Iced Eggs And Issues Presentations
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Presentation from ICED Eggs and Issues "State of the Schools" address held on September 11, 2009 in Independence, Missouri

Presentation from ICED Eggs and Issues "State of the Schools" address held on September 11, 2009 in Independence, Missouri

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Iced Eggs And Issues Presentations Iced Eggs And Issues Presentations Presentation Transcript

  • Number of students: 4777 Ethnicity statistics: Pacific Asian Black Caucasian Hispanic Indian Islander 1% 6.4% 83.3% 6.3% 1% 2% Free and Reduced lunch percentage: 2003- 2004- 2005- 2006- 2007- 2008- 04 05 06 07 08 09 34.5% 38.9% 40.6% 42.8% 43.6% 46%
  • District size in square miles: 132 square miles Early Childhood Center Blue Hills Elementary Buckner Elementary Cler-Mont Elementary Elm Grove Elementary Indian Trails Elementary Fire Prairie Middle School Osage Trail Middle School Fort Osage High School Lewis and Clark Learning Center McCune School Career Technology Center Entrepreneurial Studies program at the Independence Center
  • FEDERAL – 6.66% COUNTY – 1.32% LOCAL – 41.20% STATE – 50.90%
  • CAPITAL PROJECTS – .67% MATERIALS & SUPPLIES – 7.28% PURCHASED SERVICES– 10.31% BENEFITS – 15.93% SALARIES – 60.97%
  • Starting Salary Rank Starting Salary Rank SCHOOL DISTRICT with a with a Top End Baccalaureate Master’s Salary Rank BLUE SPRINGS $34,000 $37,957 $68,026 FORT OSAGE $35,500 $40,300 $74,740 GRAIN VALLEY $34,000 $37,100 $68,025 INDEPENDENCE $34,700 $37,605 $68,196 LIBERTY $33,668 $38,291 $76,280
  • Long-Range Facilities Master Plan VISION Additional Completed Projects Baseball Field Improvement Buckner Site Improvements Asphalt Elementary Playgrounds 100 ton of Roof Top Units Elm Grove Window Replacements Building Our Future CTC Ag Building and Green House Improved Softball & Baseball fields Additional Card Access Door Controls Phase 1 Fire Prairie MS Playground Equipment Voice Over IP Phone System
  • Long-Range Facilities Master Plan VISION Year 2011 Build a new Early Childhood/PAT facility Construct additional classrooms at Fire Prairie Middle School Building Our Future Construct additional classrooms at Osage Trail Middle School Construct additional classrooms at the Career and Phase 2 Technology Center Upgrade facilities at Fort Osage High School
  • Long-Range Facilities Master Plan VISION Year 2015 Construct a new support services building Construct an auxiliary gym and weight room at Osage Trail Middle School Building Our Future Construct a new 2,000-seat field house Upgrade and expand the Fort Osage High School athletic facilities Phase 3 Construct a new district office facility
  • New Programs Offered 2009-10 •Trailblazer Collegiate Academy •Tribal Building Our Future Community
  • Challenges and Issues facing our school district Dealing with ever-increasing operating costs (insurance, fuel, utilities, etc.) during a time of economic decline; An inadequately funded state foundation formula and an inequitable distribution of those Future Building Our state funds; Retooling and redesigning the teaching and learning processes for an ever-changing culture, economy, and world; Meeting the proficiency standards prescribed for our students under the current No Child Left Behind act.
  • No Child Left Behind A State-Wide Challenge Every district in the Greater Kansas City Area failed to meet the standard. 410 of 523 districts in the state failed to meet Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) for 2008-09. Future Building Our Standards increase next year Communication Arts Increases from 59.2% to 67% Math Increases from 54.1% to 63%
  • No Child Left Behind A State-Wide Challenge Standards continue to increase until 2014 By then 100% of students are to be proficient Guarantees Failure Building Our Future Consequences Level 1 School Choice Level 2 Supplemental Educational Services Level 3 Replace Staff Relevant to Failure Level 4 Turn Operation Over to DESE
  • School District Revenue 12 %
  • School District Revenue Including salaries, benefits, and local purchases, more than 80 percent of total budget spent in Independence
  • School District Revenue • Construction $943,000 • Food Vendors $183,000 • General Supply $468,000 • Local Services $767,000 (including school resource officers) • Utilities $2,437,000
  • Fuel: Food: 3.2 million $881,000 Phone: $532,000 Summer School: Textbooks: 5.2 million 1.1 million
  • • Concern that the state could reduce the foundation formula • Prop C sales receipts continue to come in below projections • Reduction in local valuation means loss of millions
  • Effect of Local Property Valuation Decrease in 2009-2010 In the Independence School district, decreased valuation caused a drop in revenue of 2.2 million dollars, just this year.
  • • Annual Increase to Honor Salary Schedule • Annual Increase to Pay Health Insurance • Annual Increase to Pay Retirement Benefits
  • Zero-interest bonds, available now as part of the Economic Stimulus package, could save taxpayers tens of millions of dollars.
  • Bond would build new elementary schools in Eastern and Western Independence, and allow for upgrades in schools throughout the district.
  • Project would create between 1200-1500 construction jobs, and thousands of supporting jobs (architects, suppliers, manufacturers, etc.)
  • Would also allow district to pay off lease purchases, putting approximately 2 million dollars a year into operating budget.
  • Blue Springs School District
  • Expenditure Reductions  Middle school restructuring  Eliminated 36 positions  Administrative reductions  Program budget cutbacks  Energy savings program  Cooperative purchasing GKCCSD  Textbook purchase deferral Revenue Reductions  Assessments decline  State shell-game  Transportation  Parents As Teachers  Special Education
  • Bond Issue 2009  February 2009 ◦ 89.4% voter approval ◦ $86.5 million ◦ 14 projects  Classroom additions  School renovations  High school improvements  Safety and security upgrades  Transportation Center ◦ Ten projects were done by the first day of school ◦ Four projects remain and will be complete by fall of 2010 ◦ Stimulates the local economy and trades
  • District Growth Kindergarten 2009 enrollment 1,056 Historically classes get larger each year.
  • District Strengths • 93.9% Graduation rate • 82% Attend college • Over 300 courses offered at the high school level • $8 Million awarded in scholarships • 63% Take AP or Dual Credit courses • 8 Career Technical Programs • 13 AP courses offered • 20 Dual credit courses offered • 50% of students apply for A+ in our district • 69% of our college freshman return for a second year • Safety and Security infrastructure in place • 82% of staff hold advanced degrees • State recognized professional development • Comprehensive K-5 Arts Partners Program sponsored by PTA • Reading Interventionists at all Elementary Buildings • Youth Friends provides mentors for over 300 students
  • Public Education
  • Public Education Partnership  We educate every child  Over 90% of our students graduate  Over 80% attend college  Our schools are safe  Our facilities are exemplary  We offer students a comprehensive program of Academics, Arts, Activities and Athletics  Our students are awarded millions in scholarships  Our communities are involved  Our communities trust their schools  We use money responsibly  We are transparent
  • International testing comparison
  • Public/private school cost comparison Schools / Districts Tuition/expenditure per pupil Pembroke Hill (9-12) $18,335 Barstow (9-12) $16,480 St. Paul’s Episcopal Day School $10,842 Notre Dame de Sion $10,150 Rockhurst $9,950 St. Teresa’s Academy $9,900 Oxford Academy $8,600 Blue Springs School District $8,302 St. Mary’s (non-catholic) $6,650 O’Hara High School $6,500 St. Mary’s (catholic) $5,300
  • Services not provided in private schools Blue Springs R-IV provides the following as a part of the per pupil expenditure and if we take these out, our expenses decline. $8,302 Summer School $8,216 Alternative School Programs $8,044 Specialized Staff and Programs $7,838 Transportation $6,975 Special Education $5,465
  • Public/private school cost comparison Schools / Districts Tuition/expenditure per pupil Pembroke Hill (9-12) $18,335 Barstow (9-12) $16,480 St. Paul’s Episcopal Day School $10,842 Notre Dame de Sion $10,150 Rockhurst $9,950 St. Teresa’s Academy $9,900 Oxford Academy $8,600 St. Mary’s (non-catholic) $6,650 O’Hara High School $6,500 Blue Springs School District $5,465 St. Mary’s (catholic) $5,300
  • ACT testing comparison 1965 – Top 17 % of the senior class took the ACT in Blue Springs  Nationally 20% of all seniors were tested and the average ACT score 23.8  Less than 1% of those tested were minorities  Average ACT score for BSHS seniors was 22.9 2008 – 82% of all seniors took the ACT in Blue Springs  Nationally 60% of all seniors were tested and the average ACT score 21.2  40% of those tested were minorities  Average ACT score for BSHS/BSSHS seniors was 22.3  Top 17% of the senior class average ACT is 29.3  72 seniors scored a 30 or better on the ACT 50% of questions on the 1965 SAT were taught at the 5 th grade level or below in 1990
  • Public Education Statistics  There are 55,394,000 students enrolled in public schools across the nation  Drop-out rate continues to decline ◦ 1980 – 14.1% ◦ 199 6 – 9.3% ◦ 1997 – 8.7%  There are 3.7 million teachers in schools across America  Nationally the teacher/student ratio is 15.3  In 1995, 10% of students reported feeling threatened at school ◦ This has dropped to 5% in 2004  Mobile or portable classrooms are used by 33% of schools in the U.S.  Average school building is 44 years old