Wk7 projlaplantta
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  • As the title slide states – research was done to assess factors related to Native American dropout rates in public or urban secondary school. <br />
  • This presentation will begin with the introduction of the problem and explore primary issues affecting Native American student academic success in America’s public secondary institutions. <br /> A review of literature will examine existing data for trends in dropout research including exploring risk factors and conditions that increase the likelihood of Native students dropping out of high school. <br /> This paper will also propose actionable steps primary stakeholders (i.e. policy makers, public school officials, Native educators, tribal leaders, parents, and researchers) can take to improve the retention rates of American Indian students in this country’s secondary education institutions. <br /> The presentation will end with a brief summary and discussion of new paradigm’s ahead in Native American Education. <br />
  • A review of literature will examine existing data for trends in dropout research including exploring risk factors and conditions that increase the likelihood of Native students dropping out of high school. <br /> This paper will also propose actionable steps primary stakeholders (i.e. policy makers, public school officials, Native educators, tribal leaders, parents, and researchers) can take to improve the retention rates of American Indian students in this country’s secondary education institutions. <br /> The presentation will end with a brief summary and discussion of new paradigm’s ahead in Native American Education. <br />
  • This paper will also propose actionable steps primary stakeholders (i.e. policy makers, public school officials, Native educators, tribal leaders, parents, and researchers) can take to improve the retention rates of American Indian students in this country’s secondary education institutions. <br />
  • The presentation will end with a brief summary and discussion of new paradigm’s ahead in Native American Education. <br />
  • Despite the enactment of the Indian Education and Self-Determination Act of 1974, No Child Left behind (NCLB), and White House Initiatives on American Indian and Alaska Native Education , there is a dropout epidemic in America’s Indian country. <br /> Studies from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) state American Indian (Native) education are in a severe crisis; Native children are being left behind (as cited in National Indian Education Association, 2013). <br /> As other groups experienced near record levels of graduation rates, the graduation rates for Native students are declining. <br />
  • The secondary or high school dropout rate for Native Americans (i.e. American Indians, Natives) is the highest among any group in the United States (Akee &Yazzie-Mintz, 2011; National Indian Education Association, 2013). <br />
  • Fourteen states reported High School graduation rates for Native students below 60 percent (National Indian Education Association, 2013). Nationally, it is estimated that 30% of Native students annually leave secondary school and in many school districts Native dropout rates are epidemic in proportion (Lee, 2000). <br />
  • Recent studies show Native students have an abnormal dropout rate compared to white and other groups. The percent of Native students who are not attending high school and have not received a diploma or equivalent is close to double the rate of other groups combined. <br />
  • The primary purpose of this research proposal is to supply information that will allow primary stakeholders to make informed decisions on designing, and providing, quality educational programs to improve the retention rates of Native secondary students. <br /> The study will explore risk factors and conditions to answer why Native students are dropping out of public secondary institutions. <br /> In addition, it will look at possible steps primary stakeholders can take to improve retention rates of American Indian secondary students. <br />
  • A high-level synthesis of researched literature reveals consistent themes in relation to Native American dropout. The lack of Native American educators, trained non-Native teachers, and other professionals within the mainstream educational system has a high correlation to Native dropout. It appears many urban public schools lack resources to implement a curriculum which includes Native history, language, and cultural values; factors associated with dropout of Native students. <br /> It should be noted the dropout situation is not entirely the result of the education system or instructors; tribal officials, family members and the students themselves need to make adaptions when attending mainstream public schools. Alternative, non-punitive, school models have had positive results in improving Native retention along with the retention rates of other high risk ethnic groups in an urban environment. <br />
  • In relation to design models, intervention-based models that enhance Native students’ sense of belonging have been shown to increase Native retention rates (Battin-Pearson et al., 2000). <br /> Intervention or prevention plans should be implemented at pre-school age and continue through K-12. Prevention programs beginning early in a child’s life has a positive effect on high school graduation rates (Deanda, 2008). <br />   <br /> Hiring more Native faculty to act as role models and to provide support is recommended to improve retention rates. <br /> Native students had higher success rates when teachers promoted an environment of trust, motivation, and inspiration. <br /> Native students that were able to retain their culture found success in a primarily urban, white, school environment. <br /> Thus encouraging non-Native teachers and faculty on Native culture is recommended. This will need to be specific to at least regional culture. <br /> Family plays an important role in student success, no matter the ethnicity of the student. Parents need to take an active role in the student’s life to provide emotional support. In addition, Tribal officials, along with community leaders, can provide financial support when needed, if this is found to be a barrier to retention. <br />
  • Alternative school models have been found to have a higher retention rate than traditional, mainstream institutions. These are schools that place importance on intervention strategies in a non-punitive environment. Class sizes are generally small enough for individual teacher-student relationships to develop. <br /> Powers (2006) has found Native students do well academically when in a safe environment among caring instructors. In short, the biggest contributing factor to education success was personnel supportiveness and the school’s climate of trust (Powers, 2006). <br /> One model to benchmark would be Spotted Eagle Alternative High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which quality non-punitive alternative education for American Indian students in an urban environment. The school has garnered support from educators and other officials and continually has a high Native graduation rate. <br />
  • Research has shown that attempts to assimilate Native students into the dominant culture have failed. <br /> It is time for change and intervention; ignoring the cultural background of Native students will continue to promote dropout. <br /> Closing the cultural gap and inducing positive experiences among Native secondary students will increase academic success and improve dropout among Native students. <br /> And lastly, school leaders need to be change agents, cognizant of traditional and mainstream environments, and are actively working to infuse transformational paradigms. <br />

Wk7 projlaplantta Wk7 projlaplantta Presentation Transcript

  • Tim LaPlant Walden University Dr. Joseph Frantiska Jr. EDUC-6125 Native American Dropout: Assessing Factors to Improve Retention in Public, Secondary Schools
  • Overview "Let us put our minds together and see what kind of life we can make for our children." - Sitting Bull, Lakota Sioux Medicine Man and Chief
  • Overview "Let us put our minds together and see what kind of life we can make for our children." - Sitting Bull, Lakota Sioux Medicine Man and Chief
  • Overview "Let us put our minds together and see what kind of life we can make for our children." - Sitting Bull, Lakota Sioux Medicine Man and Chief
  • Overview "Let us put our minds together and see what kind of life we can make for our children." - Sitting Bull, Lakota Sioux Medicine Man and Chief
  • Context and Background American Indian graduation rates have been on a downward trend since 2008.
  • Context and Background The high school dropout rate for Native Americans is the highest among any group in the United States (Akee &Yazzie-Mintz, 2011).
  • Context and Background Fourteen states, “Alaska, Idaho, Mississippi, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, and Wyoming” reported High School graduation rates for Native students below 60 percent (National Indian Education Association, 2013).
  • Comparison of National Dropout Rates Dropout Rate All Students White Students AI/AN Students Age Group or Grade Individuals Who Count as Dropouts... Data Source Event Dropout Rate (2009-10) 3% (N=514,238) 2% (N=191,943) 7% (N=12,044) 9-12th grade Dropped out of public school in a given school year and didn't receive a diploma Stillwell & Sable, 2013 National Status Dropout Rate (CPS) (Oct 2009) 8% (N=3,030,000 ) 5% (N=1,188,000) 13% (N=34,000) 16-24 years Aren't in high school and don't have a diploma or alternative credential National Status Dropout Rate (ACS) (Oct 2009) 8% (N=3,167,400 ) 6% (N=1,261,000) 15% (N=46,800) 16-24 years Aren't in high school and don't have a diploma or alternative credential Chapman, Laird, Ifill, & KewalRamani, 2011 Aud, Hussar, Kena, Bianco, et al., 2011 Note: CCD = based on data from the Common Core of Data, CPS = based on data from the Current Population Survey, ACS = based on data from the American Community Survey National Indian Education Association. (2014). Statistics on native students. Retrieved from website: http://www.niea.org/Research/Statistics.aspx
  • Purpose • Improve Retention Rates
  • Literature Research shows providing quality education for Native children and communities remains a huge challenge as both Tribal and public school officials struggle for new ways to keep Native students in school.
  • Proposed Solutions Facilitate the implementation of evidence-based strategies through intervention-based design models that: •Promote the hiring of Native instructors. •Promote a positive school environment and pro-social behavior. •Increase student engagement by promoting culture retention strategy. •Promote academic success by encouraging non-Native teachers and faculty on applicable Native culture •Increase family and community support
  • Solutions (cont.) Benchmark existing alternative schools that have had success. Suggestion: Spotted Eagle Alternative High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, which provides quality nonpunitive alternative education for American Indian students in an urban environment.
  • Conclusion • Assimilation of Native children into the dominant culture has failed. • Close the cultural gap. • Induce positive experience. • Change mainstream paradigms.
  • Resources • • • • • • Battin-Pearson, S., Newcomb, M. D., Abbott, R. D., Hill, K. G., Catalano, R. F., & Hawkins, J. D. (2000). Predictors of early high school dropout: A test of five theories. Journal of Educational Psychology, 92(3), 568-582. doi: 1O.1037//0O22-O663.92.3.568 Dianda, M. R. National Education Association. (2008). Preventing future high school dropout: An advocacy and action guide for nea state and local affiliates. Retrieved from website: http://www.nea.org/assets/docs/HE/dropoutguide1108.pdf Guillory, R. M., & Wolverton, M. (2008). It's About Family: Native American Student Persistence in Higher Education. Journal Of Higher Education, 79(1), 58-87. Retrieved from http://ezp.waldenulibrary.org/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx? direct=true&db=a2h&AN=28396332&scope=site Jeffries, R. B., Hollowell, M., & Powell, T. (2004). Urban American Indian students in a nonpunitive alternative high school. American Secondary Education, 63-78. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/195187247?accountid=14872 Lee, J. R. (2000, March 13). School not for them, many indian youths feel an academic star is unhappy that his ho-chunk peers resent his success; the dropout rate for native american students is higher than for any other ethnic group. Wisconsin State Journal. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/390912812?accountid=14872 Maxwell , L. A. (2013, Dec 04). Education in indian country: Running in place. Education Week, Retrieved from http://www.edweek.org/ew/projects/2013/native-americaneducation/running-in-place.html
  • Resources • • • • • • • National Indian Education Association (NIEA). (2013, January 24). Leading education advocate’s statement about latest high school graduation rate data: Another sign that native education is in crisis. Retrieved from http://www.niea.org/news/?id=149 National Indian Education Association. (2014). Statistics on native students. Retrieved from website: http://www.niea.org/Research/Statistics.aspx McCarty, T. L. (2009). The impact of high‐stakes accountability policies on native american learners: evidence from research. Teaching Education , 20(1), 7–29. doi: 10.1080/10476210802681600 Powers, K. M. (2006). An exploratory study of cultural identity and culture-based educational programs for urban american indian students. Urban Education, 41(1), 20-49. doi: 10.1177/0143034312446892 Sunderman, G. L. (2005). Measuring academic proficiency under the no child left behind act: Implications for educational equity. Educational Researcher, 34(8), 3-13. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/216902412?accountid=14872 U. S. Department of Education, Office of Indian Education. (2012). State tribal education partnership (step). Retrieved from website: http://www2.ed.gov/programs/step/index.html U. S. Department of Education, Office of the Press Secretary. (2011). White house initiative on american indian and alaska native education (Executive Order 13592). Retrieved from website: http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/whiaiane/executive-order-13592-improving-americanindian-and-alaska-native-educational-opportunities-and-strengthening-tribal-colleges-anduniversities/executive-order-13592/