MCS
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How design can affect Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - good and bad

How design can affect Multiple Chemical Sensitivity - good and bad

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MCS MCS Presentation Transcript

  • An extensive overview of MCS and a path forward Presented By: Christina Birkentall, John Gaul, Yvonne Noack & Tamara Van Tuyl INDS 721: Emerging Materials Project B SCAD Winter Quarter 2010 MCS: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity
  • What is MCS? Multiple Chemical Sensitivities (MCS) encompass severe reactions and allergy-like symptoms to daily exposure to common air pollutants. It has not been meaningfully defined by the medical community. The concepts underlying MCS were developed by allergist Theron G. Randolph, in the 1940‟s. A single episode of exposure or stress may trigger a life-time of symptoms MCS often attacks a persons breathing, sometimes confused with asthma symptoms. with the lungs are often most aggravated, with the skin and other organs affected secondarily Common Symptoms include: Persistent condition, re-curing with repeated exposures Increased sensitivity to chemicals off-gassing Multi-organ manifestations including runny nose, itchy eyes, headache, scratchy throat, ear aches, scalp pain, heart palpitations, upset stomach or increased mucous, continual and persistent coughing, aching joints, drowsiness Introduction to MCS
  • Newly installed materials and new products New Construction drywall dust Stores during seasonal changes of merchandise Leather product stores Dry cleaning recommended clothing Persons wearing perfume or cologne Smoking environments Moist or damp spaces Description of MCS Proper ventilation Natural or low VOC cleaning products Organic cosmetics Natural plants to help filter the air Re-claimed wood or porcelain tile flooring Homes built on foundation piers to allow for natural air flow Homes and spaces that are not super energy sealed which reduces the natural flow of fresh air Spaces & Products to Avoid Products & Elements to Use The bad and the good View slide
  • 32 years of age She was very active- mentally, physically, and creatively Brooklyn resident- Has always worked in the downtown New York City area Results of a renovation within her company’s building, the chemical exposures lead to headaches, nausea, disorientation, the inability to sleep, and difficulty eating. 9/11 trauma She has become isolated, dependent, and fearful of what the future holds for her Case Study: Jennifer Duncan Her developing story View slide
  • Child years: Constant surroundings to lead paint and asbestos Had a mother who drank and smoked while pregnant and was around second-hand smoke for years after College years: Fine art major Painted with oil paints Worked during the day as a graphic artist at a newspaper, using chemicals in photography processing and also 3M Spray Mount Career years: Traveling Surrounded by sites and projects filled with debris, drywall dust and lots of VOC’s She coughs all the time, triggers include: smoke, perfumes (but not lavender), drywall dust, chalk dust, wood products that are still off-gassing (anything made with MDF), mold, dry-air coming from a furnace, humid air, especially if mildew is present. Case Study: Christina Birkentall Could it be MCS?
  • Case Study: John Gaul Journey- Florida to Georgia Allergies and progressive worries Ornamental pear blossoms Biopsy of ulcer Doctor Visits Realization leads to chemotherapy An altered state due to Biochemistry Hair became curly and dark for some time Could it be MCS?
  • Environmental and Health aspect Explanation of Needs Environmental Needs: Specify building materials that are free of chemicals, especially formaldehyde, benzene, and trichloroethylene Remove synthetic substances from the environment Health Needs: Food that is organic, or chemically less-contaminated Chemically less-contaminated water such as spring, distilled, and charcoal-filtered General volatile hydrocarbon blood tests
  • Build with materials and products that are free of chemicals, especially Formaldehyde, Benzene and Trichloroethylene Keep the interior free from excessive accessories, except for live plants Use solid wood furniture, antiques which have off-gassed already Use only organic natural fabrics for all soft goods, upholstery that are treated or naturally resistant to microbes and dust mites Maintain a continuously clean environment Description of MCS What can be done?
  • What makes the difference Innovative Materiality WOOD PRODUCTS: Reclaimed Wood Carlisle Wide Plank Floors No formaldehyde MDF or wood products McKillican-Purkor FSC certified MDF Solid Wood Furniture and Antiques Mike Bell, Inc.
  • What makes the difference Innovative Materiality FIBER PRODUCTS: Organic cotton and wool bedding Royal-Pedic Wool carpet Earthweave Carpet Silver fibers X-static Fiber
  • What makes the difference Innovative Materiality WHOLE HOUSE PRODUCTS: Mold resistant paperless drywall Georgia Pacific-DensArmor Whole house air purifiers Airpura Whole house vacuum system NUTONE Sauna Heavenly Heat Saunas Zero VOC paint Mythic Paint Houseplants Plantscape Inc.
  • “ Preventing MCS is difficult because each person reacts differently to high-dose exposures. One possible preventive measure may be to adequately ventilate any space that has potential for chemical exposure- either acute high-dose or chronic low-dose.” Emphasis should be placed on: Understanding the materiality that is installed in the built environment The installation process Sustainability Products and materials need to continually be developed that emit lower levels of indoor pollutants Research MCS within other countries Areas needing further attention Diligent research means progression
  • Creation of conceptual material What can be the solution?
    • Welcome to Elemental Surfaces. Natural elements and fibers together in a material to keep your spaces healthier and our environment better.
    • Our material, AGW, is made from silver and wool, both natural substances in our environment. Both have beneficial properties for promoting a healthy environment for you.
    • Silver filament:
        • Inhibits bacterial growth.
        • Reflects heat and regulates thermal qualities in the environment.
    • Wool is:
        • Resistant to dirt and bacteria, not releasing it.
        • Resistant to moisture.
        • Resistant to tears or breaks.
        • Flame resistant.
  • Creation of conceptual material Material becoming a product Imagine your walls cleaning up the air quality in the interior space around you. Attracting dirt and bacteria without releasing them. Not absorbing moisture that can create mold. Insulating the climate set for more stable temperatures. Chemicals cannot be released because there are none. AGW is supplied in a loose-weave material through which other natural fibers or objects may be woven through to create a solid-yet-porous wallcovering product. Alternative Product Options
  • Advertisement Bringing Awareness
  • Conclusion Wrapping up Scientific research and epidemiological studies have been working hard to create awareness. MCS remains a worldwide problem that is growing at an alarming rate Designers are working hard to initiate change by working collaboratively on research that is occurring within the medical community and individuals with MCS- all for a healthy built environment. Growing body of knowledge
  • Bibliography Knowledge Database 1. Buckland Diana. (2004). MCS Global Recognition Campaign: Awareness, Education, Information & Recognition Campaign. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from MCS-Global’s Website: http://www.mcs-global.org/ 2. (2010). Multiple Chemical Sensitivities: Safety and Health Topics. Department of Labor. Occupational Safety & Health Administration. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from OSHA’s Website: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/multiplechemicalsensitivities/index.html 3. Heimlich, Joe E. Multiple Chemical Sensitivities: The Invisible Environment Fact Sheet Series. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from Ohio State at: http://ohioline.osu.edu/cd-fact/pdf/0192.pdf 4. U.S. National Library of Medicine. Environmental Health and Toxicology. Retrieved 9 February from IUPAC: http://sis.nlm.nih.gov/enviro/iupacglossary/glossarym.html 5. Wong. Cathy. Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from About’s Website: http://altmedicine.about.com/library/weekly/aa080701a.htm 6. (2010). Cancer Fears. Retrieved 9 February from http://news.scotsman.com/health/Chemical-cancer-link-fears.3985040.jp g 7. Craver, Richard. (2009). Professor finds link in cancer, chemical. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from Winston-Salem Journal: http://www2.journalnow.com/content/2009/aug/02/professor-finds-link-in-cancer-chemical/business/ 8. Nussbaumer, Linda L. (2002) Multiple Chemical Sensitivity. InformeDesign: A Website for design and human behavior research . University of Minnesota, 3(4). Retrieved from www.informedesign.umn.edu/_news/apr_v03r-pr.pdf 9. (2002). Chemical Sensitivity Foundation. Retrieved 9 February from CSF’s Website: http://chemicalsensitivityfoundation.org/chemical-sensitivity-transcript.htm 10. (2002). Chemical Sensitivity Foundation. Retrieved 9 February from CSF’s Website: http://chemicalsensitivityfoundation.org/chemical-sensitivity-transcript.htm 11. Nussbaumer, L. (2004). Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS): The Controversy and Relation to Interior Design. Journal of Interior Design , 30 (2), 51-65. Retrieved February 5, 2010, from Art Full Text database. Retrieved also from http://www.idec.org/pdf/JIDarticleMCS.pdf 12. Kendall, Julia. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Retrieved February 9, 2010 from The Healthy Housing Coalition’s website: http://www.herc.org/hhc/What2Look4.html 13. Diagnosis: Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS). Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from CFIDS’s Website: http://www.cfids.org/about-cfids/multiple-chemical-sensitivities.asp
  • Bibliography Knowledge Database 14. Rea, William J. (1998). Chemical Hypersenitivity and Allergic Response. Easr, Nose, and Throat Journal . 67(1) Retrieved from: http://www.aehf.com/articles/article36.html 15. (2006). Multiple Chemical Sensitivities America. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 for MCS-America’s Website: http://www.mcs-america.org/ 16. (2009). Indoor Air Pollution: An Introduction for Health Professionals. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from EPA’s Website: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/hpguide.html#faq1 17. Nussbaumer, L. (2004). Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS): The Controversy and Relation to Interior Design. Journal of Interior Design , 30 (2), 51-65. Retrieved February 5, 2010, from Art Full Text database. Retrieved also from http://www.idec.org/pdf/JIDarticleMCS.pdf 18. (2009). Indoor Air Pollution: An Introduction for Health Professionals. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from EPA’s Website: http://www.epa.gov/iaq/formalde.html 19. (2010). Wool Carpets Can Help Purify the Air. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 at http://www.ecobydesign.com/1/carpet/index.html 20. National Association of Organic Mattress Industry. NAOMI Standards. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 at http://www.naomiorganics.com 21. Silver Fiber. X-Statis. Noble Biomaterials. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from Noble’s Website: http://www.x-staticfiber.com/index3.htm 22. Noble Materials: An Innovative Advanced Materials Company. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from Noble’s website: http://noblebiomaterials.com/category2.asp?itemid=99 23. Noble Materials: An Innovative Advanced Materials Company. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from Noble’s website: http://noblebiomaterials.com/category.asp?itemid=52 24. Noble Materials: An Innovative Advanced Materials Company. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from Noble’s website: http://noblebiomaterials.com/category.asp?itemid=334 25. Tourtet, Christiane. (2 February 2009). MULTIPLE CHEMICAL SENSITIVITY (MCS) IS A WORLDWIDE ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH CRISIS. Retrieved 9 February, 2010 from American Chronicle’s Website: http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/view/89744 26. Nussbaumer, L. (2004). Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS): The Controversy and Relation to Interior Design. Journal of Interior Design , 30 (2), 51-65. Retrieved February 5, 2010, from Art Full Text database. Retrieved also from http://www.idec.org/pdf/JIDarticleMCS.pdf 27. Chart and Images from Google.com/images