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Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011
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Digitizatin basics for hrvh march 29 2011

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  • Digital imaging (scanning) & File ManagementDigital Image: An electronic photograph scanned from an original document... a representation of whatever is being scanned, whether it be manuscripts, text, photographs, maps, drawings, blueprints, halftones, musical scores, 3-D objects, etc.Workflow in a nutshell:Capture image from the scanner or camera (follow the Standards)Save as TIFF fileBackup your images to CD or external hard drivePrepare the image: resize, straightenCreate the derivative image: JPEGSave in your file structure & backupUpload to CONTENTdmContributors store the TIFF file locally and create a derivative JPEG for CONTENTdm.SENYLRC stores the metadata and JPEG images on CONTENTdm server.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Digitization Basics for Hudson River Valley Heritage (HRVH)March 29, 2011<br />1<br />Part 1: Management Essentials<br />Part 2: Copyright<br />World War II collection of boxes for the Red Cross at a Milton School. Marlboro Free Library<br />
    • 2. Workshop Outcomes<br />2<br />You have the tools to begin planning <br />your project.<br />After to day, you will understand the <br />process involved in creating a digital <br />project in HRVH.<br />
    • 3. Agenda: how we will reach these outcomes<br />3<br />We will cover the following areas of digital planning in today’s class<br /><ul><li>Part 1
    • 4. Project Management /Planning
    • 5. The Digital Conversion Process (scanning and metadata)
    • 6. Access
    • 7. Evaluation/Marketing &amp; Promotions
    • 8. Challenges and Impact of Digitization
    • 9. Part 2
    • 10. Copyright and Use Issues</li></li></ul><li>HRVH Service<br />4<br /><ul><li>Organizations (libraries, historical societies, museums, archives, etc.) that participate agree to
    • 11. contribute images for digital collection(s)
    • 12. and provide specific information or metadata about each item in the collection.
    • 13. SENYLRC provides:
    • 14. the website
    • 15. computer server
    • 16. CONTENTdm
    • 17. administrative, technical and training support.</li></li></ul><li>Introductions<br />5<br />Please tell everyone your name, what<br />organization you represent and why <br />you are here.<br />If you have identified a collection to<br />digitize, briefly tell us about it.<br />But it’s okay if you don’t have a <br />collection identified yet….<br />
    • 18. Project Management<br />6<br />Edwin Duryea trade card - Fortune Teller. Chester Historical Society<br />
    • 19. Project Planning<br />7<br />History of the Baby Elephant with the Great London Circus. Somers Historical Society<br />
    • 20. Project Planning <br />8<br /><ul><li>Determine Project Purpose and Scope
    • 21. Preservation? Access? Visibility?
    • 22. Audience/User Needs: Who is your audience and what do they need?
    • 23. Students
    • 24. Researchers
    • 25. Genealogists
    • 26. General public</li></li></ul><li>Project Planning: Mission/Goals/Objectives<br />9<br /><ul><li>Mission
    • 27. A purpose, reason for being; also, an inner calling to pursue an activity or perform a service.</li></ul>Example of a mission:<br />The mission of the Southeastern NY Library Resources Council is to support its members in the Mid-Hudson Valley in order to enrich their services and enhance access to information for their users.<br />
    • 28. Project Planning:Mission and Goals for HRVH <br />10<br />The mission of HRVH is to provide universal access to a collaborative digital record of Hudson River Valley history and creativity. <br />
    • 29. Project Planning: Mission/Goals/Objectives Continued…<br />11<br /><ul><li>Goals &amp; Objectives
    • 30. Goals: statements that define what you are trying to accomplish.
    • 31. Objectives: measurable actions that support the completion of your goals.
    • 32. Need to be aware that a digital project can take much more time than you think (project creep).
    • 33. The Mission, Goals and Objectives will help to define the scope of your project.</li></li></ul><li>Project Planning:Goals for HRVH<br />12<br />In order to achieve our mission, we have set the following goals:<br />identify organizational partners in the Hudson River Valley; <br />identify and include unique collections that reflect the historical significance of the Hudson River Valley; <br />train contributors to develop the skills to select and contribute to HRVH; <br />provide standards that create consistency in descriptions and allow for searching across collections; <br />promote HRVH as a valuable resource for students, educators and the general public. <br />
    • 34. Project Planning: Why we need missions, goals and objectives:<br />13<br /><ul><li>Keep your project organized and focused.
    • 35. Missions, Goals and Objectives need to be shared with your users so they know why they should look at your collection. This is done by putting statements on your website about your projects:
    • 36. Welcome to the Hudson River Valley Heritage website. Our goal is to provide online access to historical materials from New York State&apos;s Hudson River Valley.
    • 37. The Bentley Snow Crystal Collectionof the Buffalo Museum of Science is a digital library providing a high-quality collection of stunning, un-retouched images of Wilson A. Bentley’s original glass slide photographs of snow crystals, and includes dynamic resources to further an appreciation and understanding of Bentley and his work.
    • 38. Marlboro Free Library Images in the Marlboro Free Library collection can be viewed as a community scrapbook of people, places, and events in the Town of Marlborough, a small community on the western shore of the Hudson River. Most of these images capture the economic, recreational and civic pursuits of 19th Century New Yorkers in a farming community where the Hudson River was the major &quot;highway.&quot;</li></li></ul><li>Project Planning: Costs<br />14<br />Estimate the time and cost to create digital projects<br /><ul><li>What do you plan to digitize (books, manuscripts, photographs, post cards (both sides)? Costs can vary widely depending upon what you digitize.
    • 39. Create your Metadata.
    • 40. Outsource, purchase equipment, borrow SENYLRC equipment. </li></li></ul><li>Project Planning: Costs<br />15<br />Direct costs:<br /><ul><li>People to do the work: Project management, scanning, metadata, etc…
    • 41. Where will the work be done? Equipment, supplies, storage.
    • 42. Outsource: cost to outsource; transportation of materials.
    • 43. Indirect costs:
    • 44. Lights, heat, etc.</li></ul>A chart to help determine costs: <br />North Carolina ECHO, “Guide for Digitization: Chapter 1: Project Planning,” available at http://www.ncecho.org/dig/digguidelines.shtml. <br />
    • 45. Project Planning: Time<br />16<br />Time: Try to estimate your timeframe. <br /><ul><li>“Rule of Thumb” for digital projects: Projects take more time (and money) than expected.
    • 46. Remember that different materials will take different amounts of time to digitize (handling).
    • 47. Start with a sample project of about 5 to 10 images to help estimate the amount of time that it will take to digitize these images, then plan to digitize more items, based on your project’s goals and objectives.</li></li></ul><li>Project Planning:Selection (What to digitize)<br />17<br /><ul><li>Physical Characteristics of your collection:</li></ul> photographs, maps, letters, postcards, manuscripts, scrapbooks, programs from events, memorabilia and ephemera, audio and video clips, and many other materials…..<br /><ul><li>They are all potential materials to contribute to your online collections.
    • 48. How do you select the best materials to digitize?</li></li></ul><li>Project Planning: Selection (What to digitize)<br />18<br /><ul><li>Digitization can serve many functions and is applied to cultural and historic resources in a myriad of ways.
    • 49. Highlight little-used portions of a collection, bringing them to the attention of a larger audience.
    • 50. Provide enhanced access to fragile or otherwise restricted collections.
    • 51. Unite disparate resources that share a common subject or theme. </li></li></ul><li>Project Planning: Selection (What to digitize)<br />19<br />When selecting items or collections for digitization, think about the following:<br />Subject Content: <br />How will the digitization of portions of the collection best support your mission? <br />What resources in the collection best document the themes that are important to the organization? <br />Do you know enough about the material to create metadata that will be useful?<br />Condition: <br />What is the condition of the materials to be digitized? Will digitizing them help to further their continued preservation, or are they too fragile to even be digitized? Is size a consideration?<br />
    • 52. Project Planning: Selection (What to digitize)<br />20<br />Intended Audience: Who is the intended audience for the project? Is there enough of a demand for the materials?<br />Impact on your institution: Is the scope of the project within your budget for time and staff? Is the collection adequately inventoried or cataloged, or will such work need to be completed before digitization can begin? <br />Intellectual property rights: Do you hold the copyright on the materials or are they in the public domain?<br />Preservation: Are they worth preserving in digital form? Should this be done now?<br />
    • 53. Project Planning: Selection (What to digitize)<br />21<br />Value: in comparison to other materials held by your organization. Unique – is this material already on the web or is it new? Does digitizing this material bring it to a broader audience?<br />Do these materials reflect the historical significance of the Hudson River Valley (or your community)?<br />Diane Vogt-O’Connor “Handbook for Digital Projects: A Management Tool for Preservation and Access: Chapter IV Selection of Materials for Scanning by Form C, Checklist for Evaluation,” 2005, available at: http://www.nedcc.org/resources/digitalhandbook/dman.pdf<br />
    • 54. Project Planning: Selection (What to digitize)<br />22<br />Lower Turkey Fork <br />North Carolina ECHO, “Guide for Digitization: Chapter 2: Selection,” 2007, available at http://www.ncecho.org/dig/guide_2selection.shtml. <br />Konrad Cramer photograph of Hervey White, Woodstock Public Library District <br />
    • 55. Project Planning: HRVH Themes or “Most Wanted” List<br />23<br /><ul><li>Hudson River
    • 56. Mountains (Catskills, Shawangunk Ridge, Palisades, Taconic, Ramapo, Hudson Highlands)
    • 57. Great Estates
    • 58. Environmental history
    • 59. Immigration
    • 60. Colonial era (Early settlers: Huguenots, Palatines, Patentees)
    • 61. Native Americans
    • 62. Displaced communities
    • 63. African Americans
    • 64. Women
    • 65. Famous People
    • 66. Working people
    • 67. Industrialization (brick, cement, ice, tanning, mills, 20th C -IBM)
    • 68. Canals
    • 69. Hudson Valley Artists and Writers
    • 70. Crimes and Criminals
    • 71. Quadricentennial (especially 1909 event)
    • 72. Revolutionary War
    • 73. Civil War </li></li></ul><li>24<br />Project Planning: Costs<br />
    • 74. Project Planning: Costs<br />25<br />
    • 75. Project Planning: Time<br />26<br />
    • 76. Project Planning: Time<br />27<br />
    • 77. 28<br />
    • 78. 29<br />
    • 79. 30<br />Exercise<br />Discuss ideas you have for items to digitize. <br /><ul><li>Consider your mission, goals &amp; objectives
    • 80. Consider the 8 factors for selection:</li></ul>Subject content <br />Condition <br />Intended audience<br />Impact on your institution<br />Intellectual property rights<br />Preservation <br />Value<br />HRVH Themes or “Most Wanted”<br />What will you select to digitize and why?<br />
    • 81. Digital Conversion Process<br />31<br />Car covered with flowers, Dutchess County Historical Society <br />
    • 82. Standards and Guidelines<br />32<br /><ul><li>Documentation to address the following:
    • 83. selection
    • 84. copyright
    • 85. scanning
    • 86. metadata
    • 87. Solicit input from various partners (contributors and committee members).</li></ul>Margaret S. Teller Recipe Book, 1823-1834. Rhinebeck Town Historian.<br />
    • 88. Internet &amp; Equipment<br />33<br /><ul><li>Need broadband access
    • 89. Computer
    • 90. Scanner (48 bit color)
    • 91. large bed needed if dealing with larger items
    • 92. Imaging Software (like Photoshop)</li></ul>Office workers at New Paltz Normal ,<br />SUNY New Paltz<br />
    • 93. SENYLRC Equipment &amp; Digital Lab<br />34<br /><ul><li>Digital lab with a computer and scanner.
    • 94. Four Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL with a TMA 1600.
    • 95. Two laptops and three scanners that are loaned out to libraries.</li></ul>Fresh Roasted Coffee--Howard &amp; Co., Newburgh, N.Y., Newburgh Free Library.<br />
    • 96. Digital Conversion Process (Imaging &amp; Metadata)<br />35<br />What was the most helpful aspect <br />of the imaging class?<br />How will you go about imaging for<br /> your project?<br />Gold evening gown with blue chiffon full back, Orange County Community College<br />
    • 97. 36<br />22.4%<br />100%<br />
    • 98. Digital Conversion Process (Imaging &amp; Metadata)<br />37<br />Do it yourself or outsource?<br />Do it yourself:<br />Benefits: <br /><ul><li>hands-on
    • 99. flexible
    • 100. more control over the direction of the process.</li></ul>Down Side:<br /><ul><li>capital expenditures
    • 101. longer workflow process
    • 102. limited equipment and staff (you can only do so much with a flat bed scanner)</li></li></ul><li>Digital Conversion Process (Imaging &amp; Metadata)<br />38<br />Outsource:<br />Benefits: <br /><ul><li>cheaper for small projects
    • 103. fast turn around time
    • 104. high quality
    • 105. no investment in equipment
    • 106. don’t need as much technical know-how – turn over the work to experts in digital imaging
    • 107. deliverables on CD or DVD in formats that you need for HRVH and for preservation</li></ul>Down Side: <br /><ul><li>less control
    • 108. requires decisions to be made up front
    • 109. requires preparation of the collection, transfer of collection and insurance</li></li></ul><li>Digital Conversion Process (Imaging &amp; Metadata)<br />39<br />What was the most helpful aspect of the metadata class?<br />How will you go about creating the metadata for your project?<br />
    • 110. 40<br />
    • 111. 41<br />
    • 112. Project Planning: Quality Control<br />42<br />What is Quality Control?<br /><ul><li>When digitizing many images, mistakes can happen, especially when there are several people involved and these are newly developed skills for you. The work needs to be checked at every level, ideally by someone other than the person doing the work.
    • 113. Your images are going up on the web for the world to see.
    • 114. Images are being searched along with other organization’s materials in a collaborative project. We need to make sure the metadata information matches for all of your records and for other organizations records so they can be cross searched (one of the primary benefits to a consortia project).</li></li></ul><li>Project Planning: Quality Control<br />43<br />Important at every stage to determine what is acceptable:<br /><ul><li>Selection – quality of original? Copyright?
    • 115. Digitization – scanning – images straight, to dark too light? File names in order? Rotation correct?
    • 116. Metadata – collections identified correctly. Included correct descriptive information? Provide all we have? Do extra research on items? Typos?</li></li></ul><li>Project Planning: Quality Control<br />An initial assortment of objects (10 to 30) will be reviewed by SENYLRC staff before you begin to publish collections on the web.<br />44<br />Souvenir program and guide Hudson-Fulton Celebration September 25 - October 9, 1909 Local History Collection Marlboro Free Library <br />
    • 117. 45<br />
    • 118. Preservation<br />46<br />Young housewives, Donna Matthews Collection, Bard College Archives, Stevenson Library, Bard College <br />
    • 119. Project Planning: Preservation<br />47<br />Issues to consider:<br /><ul><li>Is this an access project only?
    • 120. Benefits: Save time and storage of the images.
    • 121. Down side: items may have to be scanned again in the future.
    • 122. If you decide to scan for preservation, then you need to scan to get the best possible digital image quality possible and at a quality that represents the original as closely as possible.
    • 123. Benefits to scanning for preservation: only have to scan once.
    • 124. Down side: This takes more time and money and technical planning for storage. </li></li></ul><li>Access to Digital Content<br />48<br />4th of July Parade, Tuxedo Park. Bicentennial Commission, Tuxedo Park Library<br />
    • 125. Access to online materials (CONTENTdm)<br />49<br /><ul><li>SENYLRC maintains the computer server that hosts the HRVH collections.
    • 126. SENYLRC provides your organization with a introductory webpage, where you give us the text to display. You will have a link to this page that you can put on your organization&apos;s website.</li></li></ul><li>Evaluation Marketing/Promotions<br />50<br />Farmerettes, Marlboro Free Library <br />
    • 127. Evaluation: Measure your success<br />51<br /><ul><li>Evaluate progress toward your project’s goals and objectives. Did you accomplish what you planned or did you make some revisions along the way?
    • 128. Usage statistics: SENYLRC will provide usage statistics for HRVH and for your collection(s). You can use these statistics to evaluate usage of your collections.
    • 129. By evaluating HRVH and our projects, we can learn from our mistakes and find out more about our user’s needs.</li></li></ul><li>Marketing/Promotions<br />52<br /><ul><li>Marketing/Promotions – Need to influence the “public” opinion about the benefits of our digital projects. Extremely important to focus on the benefits to the user for using our site.
    • 130. SENYLRC resources
    • 131. Marketing/Promotional MaterialsMarketing and promoting your digital collections is very important. You will find tools and resources here to help you do this, including HRVH logos, press release templates, and the HRVH communication plan.
    • 132. What can you do?
    • 133. Promote your digital project locally
    • 134. Promote to current users and potential users</li></li></ul><li>Marketing/Promotions<br />53<br /><ul><li>How do we keep people visiting our websites to view the collections?
    • 135. Promotional materials
    • 136. Press releases
    • 137. Brochures
    • 138. Allow users to post comments about images and metadata
    • 139. Links on the web
    • 140. Exhibits</li></ul>New Paltz Normal women&apos;s <br />basketball team, 1905.<br />SUNY New Paltz<br />
    • 141. Marketing/Promotions<br />54<br />New ideas to increase usage:<br /><ul><li>Tagline on WAMC – Northeast Public Radio
    • 142. Harvesting by New York Heritage and worldcat.org
    • 143. Utilize free “web 2.0” sites:
    • 144. Wikipedia
    • 145. Facebook
    • 146. Future? Flickr</li></li></ul><li>55<br />
    • 147. Challenges and Impact of a Regional Digitization Service<br />56<br />World War II collection of boxes for the Red Cross at a Milton School. Marlboro Free Library<br />
    • 148. Challenges for SENYLRC<br />57<br /><ul><li>Quality control in metadata records
    • 149. Funding for HRVH; particularly for grants to contributors.
    • 150. Recruiting new organizations to contribute collections. Growth of HRVH.
    • 151. Changing technologies and best practices.
    • 152. Marketing and promotions – we can do more.</li></li></ul><li>Challenges for Contributors<br />58<br /><ul><li>Preserving your image files (TIFF, JPEG2000).
    • 153. Metadata creation – takes more time than you realize.
    • 154. Managing platform(s). (e.g. CONTENTdm and PastPerfect or only one?)
    • 155. Funding to continue digitizing.
    • 156. Marketing – we can do more.</li></li></ul><li>Impact of Digitization on Contributors<br />59<br /><ul><li>Increased research requests (from comments and directly).
    • 157. Requests for digital images (need a policy for reproductions if they don’t already have one).
    • 158. Donations of material for their collections. (This can also be a challenge if they donate the digital rights, but not the original.)</li></li></ul><li>SENYLRC Staff involved in HRVH<br />60<br />The HRVH project team at SENYLRC. Anyone of us can try to help you with your projects or we will direct you to the best person to assist you with a particular issue:<br />Tessa Killian: killian@senylrc.org<br />Project planning, training, copyright, evaluation and marketing.<br />Jennifer Palmentiero: jennifer@senylrc.org<br />Project planning, scanning, metadata, CONTENTdm, equipment, webpages, access issues.<br />Zack Spalding: spalding@senylrc.org<br />Technical issues, servers, equipment, CONTENTdm (server side), webpages, usage statistics. <br />
    • 159. More about what we can provide<br />61<br />Once you become a SENYLRC member, you and your organization will receive the following as part of the HRVH service<br /><ul><li>Four days of workshops at SENYLRC;
    • 160. On-site training at your organization (initially up to 28 hours);
    • 161. Best practices for digital imaging and metadata to ensure quality and consistency of collections;
    • 162. A hosting platform to make digital content available on the Internet;
    • 163. Access to CONTENTdm software;
    • 164. Enrollment in the HRVH Users Group and Listserv;
    • 165. Access to a digital lab at SENYLRC if needed;
    • 166. Equipment: computer and scanner for loan.</li></li></ul><li>What is expected of your organization as an HRVH participant<br />62<br /><ul><li>Contribution to HRHV can only occur after attending this series of workshops.
    • 167. Participating organizations are expected to contribute digital objects to HRVH.
    • 168. An initial assortment of objects (10—30) will be reviewed by SENYLRC staff before you begin to publish collections to the web site.
    • 169. Adherence to HRVH standards and guidelines is expected.</li></li></ul><li>Communications <br />63<br /><ul><li>Digital Advisory Committee: Reviews activities and provides future direction for the Hudson River Valley Heritage Service.
    • 170. Website: www.hrvh.org. See About for information about the service.
    • 171. Listserv: hrvhgroup@senylrc.org. Share relevant information about HRVH via email. We will add the email addresses.
    • 172. User’s Group meeting: Gather as many participants together to discuss issues related to digital projects in HRVH. </li></li></ul><li>64<br />Part 2: Copyright Issues Related to HRVH<br />Group of happy kids, Chester Historical Society<br />
    • 173. Why do we have to concern ourselves with copyright?<br />65<br />Three key issues that need to be considered:<br />What can be digitized by your organization.<br />Once your content is online, how do you want your digital assets used and credited.<br />Reproductions of your images.<br />
    • 174. What Is Copyright<br />66<br />Copyright is a form of protection provided by the laws of the United States (title 17, U. S. Code) <br />to the authors of “original works of authorship,” <br />including literary, dramatic, musical, artistic, and certain other intellectual works. <br />This protection is available to both published and unpublished works. <br />“Copyright Office Basics,” available at: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ1.pdf<br />
    • 175. Brief Review of Copyright <br />67<br /><ul><li>Purpose: to benefit the public by advancing the progress of science and the useful arts.
    • 176. Copyright is a limited, statutory monopoly.
    • 177. Copyright includes exclusive rights for copyright holders and exemptions for users (fair use, making copies, class room use, etc.).
    • 178. Public domain: materials not or no longer protected by copyright.</li></ul>Carrie Russell, “Complete Copyright: an Everyday Guide for Librarians,” 2004.<br />
    • 179. Exclusive Rights of the Copyright Owner<br />68<br /><ul><li>To reproduce the work in copies or phonorecords;
    • 180. To prepare derivative works based upon the work;
    • 181. To distribute copies or phonorecords of the work to the public by sale or other transfer of ownership, or by rental, lease, or lending;
    • 182. To performthe work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and motion pictures and other audiovisual works;
    • 183. To display the work publicly, in the case of literary, musical, dramatic, and choreographic works, pantomimes, and pictorial, graphic, or sculptural works, including the individual images of a motion picture or other audiovisual work; and
    • 184. In the case of sound recordings, to perform the work publicly by means of a digital audio transmission.</li></ul>“Copyright Office Basics,” available at: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ1.pdf<br />
    • 185. What Works Are Protected?<br />69<br />Copyright protects “original works of authorship” that are fixed in a tangible form of expression. Copyrightable works include the following categories: <br /><ul><li>literary works;
    • 186. musical works, including any accompanying words
    • 187. dramatic works, including any accompanying music
    • 188. pantomimes and choreographic works
    • 189. pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works
    • 190. motion pictures and other audiovisual works
    • 191. sound recordings
    • 192. architectural works </li></ul>“Copyright Office Basics,” available at: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ1.pdf<br />
    • 193. Copyright Exemptions (Limits on Copyright)<br />70<br />Exercise a right of copyright without the prior permission of the copyright holder and without paying a fee or signing a license:<br /><ul><li>First Sale (transfer of lawfully acquired copy).
    • 194. Fair use.
    • 195. Photocopying by libraries and archives.
    • 196. Teaching exemptions (public performance and display).
    • 197. Computer programs.
    • 198. And many more.</li></ul>Carrie Russell, “Complete Copyright: an Everyday Guide for Librarians,” 2004.<br />
    • 199. Issue 1What can be digitized by your organization without infringing on anyone’s rights? Copyright and ownership considerationswhen digitizing<br />71<br />Margaret S. Teller Recipe Book, 1823-1834. Rhinebeck Town Historian.<br />
    • 200. Where do we start?<br />72<br />Each item in the collection should be reviewed to determine if you have the right to distribute it.<br /><ul><li>Start with works not protected by copyright (e.g. public domain)</li></ul> OR<br /><ul><li>You hold the copyright</li></ul>Jean Helig, “Legal Issues to Consider When Digitizing Collections,” 1999, available at: http://www.bcr.org/cdp/digitaltb/laws/legal-issues.html. <br />
    • 201. Does your organization own the copyright to the materials you want to digitize?<br />73<br /><ul><li>If you own the copyright, then you have the exclusive rights of the copyright owner.
    • 202. Make sure you have a “Deed of Gift” that outlines the transfer of ownership.
    • 203. Possible problems: the donor was not the owner of the copyright and didn’t have the right to transfer the copyright!
    • 204. Helpful document: Society of American Archivists</li></ul>“A Guide to Deeds of Gifts,” available at: http://www.archivists.org/publications/deed_of_gift.asp<br />Physical Ownership = Copyright<br />
    • 205. 74<br />Physical Ownership = Copyright<br />
    • 206. 75<br />You don’t own the copyright, where do you start?<br />Determine if the work is in the public domain <br />This is the best place to start<br />Mary Minow, “Library Digitization Projects and Copyright,” 2002, available at: http://www.llrx.com/features/digitization.htm. <br />
    • 207. Public Domain<br />76<br />Pearl River, NY, High School site, Orangetown Historical Museum &amp; Archives<br />
    • 208. Public Domain <br />77<br /> ”Definition:  A public domain work is a creative work that is not protected by copyright and which may be freely used by everyone.  The reasons that the work is not protected include:<br />the term of copyright for the work has expired;<br />the author failed to satisfy statutory formalities to perfect the copyright or <br />the work is a work of the U.S. Government.”<br />Lolly Gasaway “When U.S. Works Pass Into The Public Domain” 2003, available at: http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm. <br />
    • 209. Public Domain <br />78<br /><ul><li>Have to determine the item is in the public domain. If so, then eligible for digitization.
    • 210. How do we do this? We will go over the basics and tools to use.
    • 211. Issues to consider include:
    • 212. Length of copyright protections for published works
    • 213. Unpublished works
    • 214. There are many charts and resources available for us to use to make these determinations.</li></li></ul><li>Public Domain <br />79<br />Three charts that help us determine when works expire into the public domain:<br />Lolly Gasaway, “When U.S. Works Pass Into The Public Domain,” 2003, available at: http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm. <br />Mary Minow, “Library Digitization Projects and Copyright,” 2002, available at: http://www.librarylaw.com/DigitizationTable.htm.<br />Peter Hirtle, “Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States,” 2010, available at: http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/training/Hirtle_Public_Domain.htm. <br />
    • 215. Public Domain <br />80<br /><ul><li>Length of copyright protections for published works</li></ul>(These are examples only, use the charts for more term lengths and footnotes.)<br /><ul><li>Published before 1923, all published works are in the public domain.
    • 216. Published between 1923 and 1963 with © notice and copyright was not renewed are in the public domain.
    • 217. Published between 1923 and 1977 without a copyright notice are in the public domain.</li></li></ul><li>Public Domain <br />81<br /><ul><li>Works Originally Created on or after January 1, 1978</li></ul>A work that was created (fixed in tangible form for the first time) on or after January 1, 1978, is automatically protected from the moment of its creation and is given a term enduring for the author’s life plus an additional 70 years after the author’s death.<br /><ul><li>In the case of “a joint work” the term lasts for 70 years after the last surviving author’s death.
    • 218. For works made for hire, and for anonymous and pseudonymous works (unless the author’s identity is revealed in Copyright Office records), the duration of copyright will be 95 years from publication or 120 years from creation, whichever is shorter.
    • 219. After 1989, protected, but no © or registration necessary.</li></ul>“Copyright Office Basics,” available at: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ1.pdf<br />
    • 220. Public Domain <br />82<br />Unpublished Works<br />Unpublished, Unregistered Works · Before 1978, if a work had been neither “published” in the legal sense nor registered in the Copyright Office, it was subject to perpetual protection under the common law. On January 1, 1978, all works of this kind, subject to protection by copyright, were automatically brought under the federal copyright statute. The duration of copyright for these works can vary, but none of them expired before December 31, 2002. <br />“Circular 22:How to Investigate the Copyright Status of a Work,” available at: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ22.pdf. <br />
    • 221. Public Domain <br />83<br />Length of copyright protections for unpublished works<br />(These are examples only, use the charts for more term lengths and footnotes.)<br /><ul><li>The term is life of the author plus 70 years (works from authors who died before 1940 are in the public domain).
    • 222. For unpublished works when the death date of the author is not known, the copyright term is 120 years from the date of creation (works created before 1891 are in the public domain).
    • 223. For anonymous works and “works made for hire,” the term is 120 years from date of creation (works created before 1891 are in the public domain).</li></ul>Peter Hirtle, “Copyright Term and the Public Domain in the United States,” 2011, available at: http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/training/Hirtle_Public_Domain.htm. <br />
    • 224. Public Domain <br />84<br />What is an Orphan work?<br />“During 2005, the Copyright Office studied issues raised by “orphan works”— copyrighted works whose owners may be impossible to identify and locate. Concerns had been raised that the uncertainty surrounding ownership of such works might needlessly discourage subsequent creators and users from incorporating such works in new creative efforts, or from making such works available to the public.”<br />“Orphan Works,” available at: http://www.copyright.gov/orphan/ . <br />
    • 225. Copyright Expired?<br />85<br />Office workers at New Paltz Normal ,<br />SUNY New Paltz<br />
    • 226. Copyright expired?<br />86<br />Maybe the copyright expired and the work is in the public domain?<br /><ul><li>There are several ways to investigate whether a work is under copyright protection and, if so, the facts of the copyright. These are the main ones:
    • 227. Examine a copy of the work for such elements as a copyright notice, place and date of publication, author and publisher. If the work is a sound recording, examine the disk, tape cartridge, or cassette in which the recorded sound is fixed, or the album cover, sleeve, or container in which the recording is sold;
    • 228. Make a search of the Copyright Office catalogs and other records; or
    • 229. Have the Copyright Office make a search for you.
    • 230. Copyright investigations often involve more than one of these methods. …</li></ul>“Circular 22:How to Investigate the Copyright Status of a Work,” available at: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ22.pdf. <br />
    • 231. 87<br />Copyright expired?<br />Researching copyright status:<br /><ul><li>Stanford&apos;s Copyright Renewal Database “This database makes searchable the copyright renewal records received by the US Copyright Office between 1950 and 1992 for books published in the US between 1923 and 1963. Note that the database includes ONLY US Class A (book) renewals.”http://collections.stanford.edu/copyrightrenewals/bin/page?forward=home
    • 232. U.S. Copyright Office “Search copyright information Works registered and documents recorded by the U.S. Copyright Office since January 1, 1978.”</li></ul>http://www.copyright.gov/records/<br />
    • 233. Copyright Status?<br />88<br />Title: Woodstock Bulletin : Maverick Festival Issue September 1, 1929<br />Date.Original: 1929-09-01 <br />Contributors: Clough, F. G. (editor) <br />Description: Selected writings and the official Maverick Festival program of events, taken from the Maverick Festival Issue of the September 1, 1929 Woodstock Bulletin (36 pages). Print of Maverick founder, Hervey White, on the cover. The Woodstock Bulletin was published on the 1st and 15th of the month, this issue was released prior to date on publication to provide Maverick Festival program.<br />http://www.hrvh.org/u?/wp,47<br />
    • 234. Library Exemption (Section 108)<br />89<br />Fencing class at Bennett College, Millbrook Free Library and Town of Washington/Village of Millbrook Historical Society <br />
    • 235. Library Exemption<br />90<br />This exemption is for the last twenty years of copyright and for “a library or archives, including a nonprofit educational institution that functions as such.”<br /><ul><li>Must be open to the public and allow outside researchers.
    • 236. No commercial advantage.
    • 237. Not subject to normal commercial exploitation.
    • 238. For published works only.
    • 239. Copying must include a notice of copyright.</li></li></ul><li>Fair Use<br />91<br />Fite at Bat, Bard College Archives, Stevenson Library, Bard College <br />
    • 240. Four Factors of Fair Use (section 107)<br />92<br />Purpose and character of the use (non-profit education versus commercial use).<br />Nature of the material being used (factual or fictional in nature, degree of creativity, published or unpublished).<br />Amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the whole.<br />Effect of the use on the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.<br />Carrie Russell, “Complete Copyright: an Everyday Guide for Librarians,” 2004.<br />
    • 241. “Fair Use” Guidelines <br />93<br /><ul><li>Are not part of the copyright law.
    • 242. Do not protect you from liability.
    • 243. Are used as maximum limits when they were always meant to be used as minimums.</li></ul>Carrie Russell, “Complete Copyright: an Everyday Guide for Librarians,” 2004.<br />
    • 244. Fair Use Tools<br />94<br />Tools for evaluating Fair Use take the four factors and outlines the pros and cons for each factor. <br />This checklist is to help determine if a use is “fair” as well as a way to record your decision making. The from was developed by Kenneth D. Crews, Columbia University, Copyright Advisory Office “Checklist for Fair Use”, available at: http://copyright.columbia.edu/fair-use-checklist .<br />Fair Use Evaluator, an online tool developed by the Copyright Advisory Network that is sponsored by the American Library Association Office for Information Technology Policy. http://librarycopyright.net/fairuse/ . <br />
    • 245. More Copyright Tools <br />95<br />Charts and Tools from Copyright &amp; Fair Use, Stanford University Libraries<br />http://fairuse.stanford.edu/charts_tools<br />
    • 246. Permission<br />96<br />Float - Title Car: United States and Modern Period From the collection of Vivian Yess Wadlin <br />
    • 247. Permission<br />97<br />Places to research permissions:<br /><ul><li>“Copyright Crash Course”: http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/cprtindx.htm.
    • 248. “Civil Rights in Mississippi Digital Archives: Intellectual Property &amp; Privacy”: http://lib.usm.edu/legacy/spcol/crda/ipp/index.html
    • 249. The Copyright Clearance Center http://www.copyright.com/
    • 250. Getting Permission http://www.utsystem.edu/OGC/IntellectualProperty/PERMISSN.HTM</li></li></ul><li>Permission<br />98<br />When asking permission:<br /><ul><li>Describe what you are doing with the copyrighted material.
    • 251. Make sure you ask for the rights to publish online in HRVH.
    • 252. Ask the copyright holder how they want to be credited.</li></ul>For example:<br />Eleanor Roosevelt with others: http://www.hrvh.org/u?/bard,194<br />
    • 253. What process should you follow to determine copyright status?<br />99<br /><ul><li>Come up with a strategy that meets the needs of your organization or your mission, goals and objectives for digitizing and integrate this strategy into your selection process.
    • 254. Document your efforts in determining copyright status in order to show your:</li></ul>“Good faith effort”<br />“Best effort”<br />“Due diligence”<br /> before you digitize.<br />
    • 255. 100<br />Copyright Status?<br />
    • 256. 101<br />Copyright Status?<br />
    • 257. 102<br />Copyright Status?<br />
    • 258. Copyright Exercise <br />103<br />Think about the collections you are considering for digitization.<br /><ul><li>Do you own the copyright?
    • 259. Can you determine the copyright status of these materials?
    • 260. Are the materials in the public domain?
    • 261. Can you digitize and add them to HRVH w/o being in violation of U.S. copyright laws? Any risk involved?</li></li></ul><li>Issue 2How do you want your digital assets used and credited? Protecting your digital assets<br />104<br />Summer entertainment at the Millbrook House, 81 Prospect Street , Haviland-Heidgerd Historical Collection, Elting Memorial Library <br />
    • 262. Protecting your digital assets<br />105<br />HRVH Copyright statement<br />Items may be protected by the U.S. Copyright Law (Title 17, U.S.C.). Usage of some items may also be subject to additional restrictions imposed by the copyright owner and/or the holding institution. Transmission or reproduction of a protected item requires the permission of the copyright owner and/or the holding institution. The holding institution is identified as part of the item description. <br />It is the responsibility of the user to obtain permission to use the content on this site and requests should be addressed to the specific holding institutions.<br />http://www.hrvh.org/about/copyright.htm<br />
    • 263. Protecting your digital assets<br />106<br />Conditions of Use<br /><ul><li>Items may be used for purposes of research, scholarship and private study. Please check the information accompanying the digital items for the “Holding Institution,” “Rights,” and “Contact Information” to determine who to contact for permissions;
    • 264. Items may not be used for any commercial purpose without prior written permission from the copyright owner and/or the holding institution;
    • 265. Items may not be re-published in print or electronic form without prior written permission from the copyright owner and/or holding institution;
    • 266. Items may not be mounted on an additional server for public use, or for use by a set of subscribers without prior written permission from the copyright owner and/or holding institution. </li></ul>http://www.hrvh.org/about/copyright.htm<br />
    • 267. Four Factors of Fair Use (section 107)<br />107<br />Purpose and character of the use (non-profit education versus commercial use).<br />Nature of the material being used (factual or fictional in nature, degree of creativity, published or unpublished).<br />Amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the whole.<br />Effect of the use on the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.<br />Carrie Russell, “Complete Copyright: an Everyday Guide for Librarians,” 2004.<br />
    • 268. Protecting your digital assets<br />108<br />What you need to do:<br /><ul><li>Create a rights statement for your metadata records.
    • 269. Keep it general, especially if your collection contains public domain content.
    • 270. Or create multiple rights statements for different materials.</li></li></ul><li>Protecting your digital assets<br />109<br />Consider when creating a rights statement….<br />If your organization holds the copyright then you have the exclusive rights of the copyright holder.<br /> Physical Ownership = Copyright<br />For example: <br />Nyack Library: © Sally Savage. Not to be reproduced without written permission. http://www.sallysavage.com/<br />
    • 271. Protecting your digital assets<br />110<br />Consider when creating a rights statement….<br />If you are not the copyright owner or if the items are in the public domain, then you do not have the rights of copyright.<br />Physical Ownership = Copyright<br />For example:<br />FDR Library and Museum: Items selected from the Roosevelt Library collections for posting on the HRVH website are in the public domain. Please credit the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum.<br />
    • 272. Protecting your digital assets<br />111<br />Examples of rights statements from HRVH members:<br /><ul><li>Historic Huguenot Street: This digital image may be used for educational or scholarly purposes without restriction. Commercial uses of the item may be subject to fees and restrictions. Please contact the holding institution for information.
    • 273. Woodstock Public Library: This digital image may be used for educational uses, as long as it is not altered in any way. Prior written permission is required for any other use of the images from the Woodstock Public Library District collection. http://woodstock.org</li></li></ul><li>112<br />More examples of rights statements from HRVH members:<br /><ul><li>Vassar College: Prior written permission required to use any photograph from the Vassar College Libraries collections, http://specialcollections.vassar.edu
    • 274. Senate House: Items selected from the archives at Senate House State Historic Site for posting on the HRVH website are in the public domain and may be used for educational or scholarly purposes without restriction. Please use the following credit: Senate House State Historic Site, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Contact Senate House for information on obtaining higher resolution digital images.
    • 275. Nyack Library: This digital image may be used for educational or scholarly purposes. Prior written permission is required for any other use of the image and commercial use of the item may be subject to fees and restrictions. For more information contact the Nyack Library: http://nyacklibrary.org/localhistory/photopolicy</li></li></ul><li>Issue 3What should we do when people ask for copies of our stuff?Tips for handling requests for reproductions of your images<br />113<br />Oak Tree, Egbert Benson Historical Society of Red Hook <br />
    • 276. Policy for Reproductions<br />114<br />Physical Ownership = Copyright<br />Fees = Copyright<br />
    • 277. Policy for Reproductions<br />115<br /><ul><li>Fees = resources expended to recoup time to produce the digital image.
    • 278. “pull fee” is a standard fee for pulling the item and to create a reproduction (FDR).
    • 279. Burden of copyright is on the user; library providing a copy.
    • 280. Remind them to credit the library as the source. </li></li></ul><li>Policy for Reproductions<br />116<br />Create a policy for reproductions that includes a fee schedule.<br />Consider when creating a policy statement and reproductions policy <br /><ul><li>Charge for reproduction services
    • 281. For .tiff files
    • 282. For photocopies
    • 283. For photographs
    • 284. Charge a different amount depending on how the researcher intends to use the materials, for publication or personal use.
    • 285. Permission contract.</li></li></ul><li>Policy for Reproductions<br />117<br />Examples:<br /><ul><li>Example from FDR and the Nyack Library in your packet.
    • 286. University of Washington Libraries, “Order Photographs &amp; Scans,” available at: http://www.lib.washington.edu/specialcoll/service/reproduction.html
    • 287. Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, Alaska &amp; Polar Regions Collections, “Ordering &amp; Using our Photographs,” available at: http://library.uaf.edu/order-photos.</li></li></ul><li>What happens after this workshop?<br />118<br /><ul><li>Jennifer and/or Zack will load software onto the computer you will use for CONTENTdm or you can borrow one of our laptops.
    • 288. Once you have your own workflow or process underway (outsource, scanning, etc..), Jennifer will work with you to set-up CONTENTdm.
    • 289. Jennifer is available to consult with you at SENYLRC or your organization. (for up to four days)
    • 290. When you are ready to load your first collection, you need to provide the text that will go on the webpage for your organization.
    • 291. Please call or email us anytime!</li></li></ul><li>www.NewYorkHeritage.org <br />119<br />
    • 292. 120<br />Contact Information<br />Tessa Killian<br />SENYLRC<br />845-883-9065<br />killian@senylrc.org<br />Questions?<br />
    • 293. 121<br />Please complete the evaluation before you leave.<br />Thank you!<br />Day after the dance, spring. <br />SUNY New Paltz<br />

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