By the end of the lesson, students should be ableto :• Understand the essential techniques of writing agood descriptive pi...
• An effective written description is one thatpresents a clear picture to your reader.• A successful description uses vivi...
• Imagery is the use of words to create images, or mentalpictures. Imagery helps you picture how something: Looks Feels...
‘Dark shapes glide through the night sky on silent wings, their sinistershadows outlined against the light of the full moo...
The villa was small and square, standing in its tiny garden with an air of pink-faceddetermination. Its shutters had been ...
It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and asheshad allowed it; but as matters stoo...
• Imagine yourself to be a kind of human video camera‘: Imagine youare going to record what was in the particular scene or...
• Avoid excessive, flat or boring description.Cool water flows through the rocky banks of the creek and into a widepond. R...
• Avoid excessive, flat or boring description.Cool water flows through the rocky banks of the creek and into a widepond. R...
• Avoid excessive, flat or boring description.Cool water flows through the rocky banks of the creek and into a widepond. R...
• Describing all your nouns with extra adjectives actually weakens thedescription.• What strengthens description a great d...
• Its important to use your description to create, develop or assist amood suited to your subject matter or theme.• Good d...
• Be specific, not vague.• Elaborate (add more details and expand your ideas)• Use vivid vocabulary• Include details that ...
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
Nazli   descriptive writing
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Nazli descriptive writing

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Nazli descriptive writing

  1. 1. By the end of the lesson, students should be ableto :• Understand the essential techniques of writing agood descriptive piece,• Know the various ways in which vocabulary canenrich a given text,• Understand how too much description becomesredundant.
  2. 2. • An effective written description is one thatpresents a clear picture to your reader.• A successful description uses vivid vocabulary,including colorful adjectives and figurativelanguage.• An interesting description attracts the readers’attention.
  3. 3. • Imagery is the use of words to create images, or mentalpictures. Imagery helps you picture how something: Looks Feels Smells Tastes Sounds• Can you imagine a car journey? What might you see, touch, smell, tasteand hear?• See: Like a fiery red fist, the Ferrari Testarossa punched its way past our ageing FordFiesta...• Touch: the open window allowed a cool spring breeze to caress my cheeks• Smell: an ancient jalopy of a school bus spluttered along in front of us spewing outnauseous black clouds of exhaust...• Taste: the bitter taste of the pre-trip travel sickness pill still clung to back of my throat.• Hear: the screeching siren of an ambulance forced us to pull in and wait till it passed...
  4. 4. ‘Dark shapes glide through the night sky on silent wings, their sinistershadows outlined against the light of the full moon. Swooping down tothe earth, they hover near houses and deserted buildings, breaking thepeace of the night with their disturbing presence. Carriers of disease,drinkers of blood, companions of witches and demons, bats – the veryword brings a shiver of fear to most people.’ - Sylvia A. Johnson, Bats.Anybody could see how cold it got. The wind already had glass edgesto it, stiffening muscles and practically cutting through the stitches ofour clothes. When it blew, the chill stabbed our teeth like icicles, andour voices jiggled every time we talked.’ – Victor Martinez, Parrot in theOven: Mi Vada.
  5. 5. The villa was small and square, standing in its tiny garden with an air of pink-faceddetermination. Its shutters had been faded by the sun to a delicate creamy-green,cracked and bubbled in places. The garden, surrounded by tall fuchsia hedges, hadthe flower beds worked in complicated geometrical patterns, marked with smoothwhite stones. The white cobbled paths, scarcely as wide as a rake’s head, woundlaboriously round beds hardly larger than a big straw hat, beds in the shape ofstars, half-moons, triangles, and circles all overgrown with a shaggy tangle of flowersrun wild. Roses dropped petals that seemed as big and smooth as saucers, flame-red, moon-white, glossy, and unwrinkled; marigolds like broods of shaggy suns stoodwatching their parent’s progress through the sky. The warm air was thick with thescent of a hundred dying flowers, and full of the gentle, soothing whisper andmurmur of insects. – Gerald Durell, My Family and Other Animals.
  6. 6. It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and asheshad allowed it; but as matters stood, it was a town of unnatural red and black like thepainted face of a savage. It was a town of machinery and tall chimneys, out of whichinterminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never gotuncoiled. It had a black canal in it, and a river that ran purple with ill-smelling dye, andvast piles of building full of windows where there was a rattling and a trembling all daylong, and where the piston of the steam-engine worked monotonously up and down,like the head of an elephant in a state of melancholy madness. It contained severallarge streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like oneanother, inhabited by people equally like one another, who all went in and out at thesame hours, with the same sound upon the same pavements, to do the same work,and to whom every day was the same as yesterday and tomorrow, and every year thecounterpart of the last and the next. – Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities.
  7. 7. • Imagine yourself to be a kind of human video camera‘: Imagine youare going to record what was in the particular scene or situation thequestion asks you to describe.• Describe - as appropriate to the scene - what you saw, heard, tasted,smelt and felt - that is, use sensory description.• Write about a past event using past tense verbs throughout!• While using the present tense, its far too easy to forget the timeframe and flip back into using past tense verbs withoutrealising. This is poor style, very confusing for the reader and worstof all... will lose m-a-n-y marks!• Use precise vocabulary; the kind of words that almost contain theirown description and which etch themselves into the mind of yourreader.
  8. 8. • Avoid excessive, flat or boring description.Cool water flows through the rocky banks of the creek and into a widepond. Reeds and cattails surrounding the bank embrace the pond like amother’s enfolding arms reaching out to caress her sleeping child. Likea beaming proud mother’s eye, the sun drenches the scene with itsloving warmth. Just beneath the sparkling surface of the water,minnows shoot from rock to rock like silver darts thrust like scattershotby some unseen hand.
  9. 9. • Avoid excessive, flat or boring description.Cool water flows through the rocky banks of the creek and into a widepond. Reeds and cattails surrounding the bank embrace the pond like amother’s enfolding arms reaching out to caress her sleeping child. Likea beaming proud mother’s eye, the sun drenches the scene with itsloving warmth. Just beneath the sparkling surface of the water,minnows shoot from rock to rock like silver darts thrust like scattershotby some unseen hand.
  10. 10. • Avoid excessive, flat or boring description.Cool water flows through the rocky banks of the creek and into a widepond. Reeds and cattails surround the bank. The sun drenches thescene with its warmth. Just beneath the sparkling surface of the water,minnows shoot from rock to rock.
  11. 11. • Describing all your nouns with extra adjectives actually weakens thedescription.• What strengthens description a great deal is to usea few but carefully chosen and vivid similes and metaphors e.g. Helooked like a man just back from a journey to Hell; Her cheekswere glowing like the ripest of ripe strawberries!• Help your reader feel as if he or she were actually there,experiencing the thing being described.
  12. 12. • Its important to use your description to create, develop or assist amood suited to your subject matter or theme.• Good descriptive writing depends on choosing exactly the right wordto communicate what is in your mind. Consider the followingsentences.• The teacher came into the classroom and sat on his chair behindthe desk.• The teacher drifted into the classroom and slumped into his chairbehind the desk.• The teacher stormed into the classroom and positioned himself onthe chair behind his desk.
  13. 13. • Be specific, not vague.• Elaborate (add more details and expand your ideas)• Use vivid vocabulary• Include details that relate to your five senses.• Wherever possible, show, dont tell!
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