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Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
Introduction to corrosion
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Introduction to corrosion

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An introductory presentation giving the definition, impact, and cost of corrosion.

An introductory presentation giving the definition, impact, and cost of corrosion.

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  • 1. INTRODUCTION TO CORROSION PROF T. K. G. NAMBOODHIRI CORROSION CONSULTANT [(Retd) Professor, Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Institute of Technology, BANARAS HINDU UNIVERSITY]
  • 2. DEFINITION <ul><li>Destruction or deterioration of materials due to their reaction with environment. Materials may be metals & alloys or non-metals like ceramics, plastics, rubber. Environments may be gaseous, liquid, or solid. </li></ul><ul><li>For metals, corrosion may be thought of as ‘Extractive metallurgy in reverse’. </li></ul>
  • 3. CORROSION- EXTRACTIVE METALLURGY IN REVERSE
  • 4.  
  • 5. Some areas affected by corrosion
  • 6. Areas affected by corrosion <ul><li>• Infrastructure, including building structures (onshore and offshore), </li></ul><ul><li>transportation (roads, bridges, and tunnels), water distribution mains, </li></ul><ul><li>energy distribution (electricity, gas, and oil), and communication systems </li></ul><ul><li>and devices. </li></ul><ul><li>• Transport methods, including railways, automotive (materials technology, </li></ul><ul><li>coating technology, clean exhaust technology by catalysts or </li></ul><ul><li>filters), aerospace, and ships (diesel engines). </li></ul><ul><li>• Energy production and storage, including fossil fuels, nuclear fuels, </li></ul><ul><li>biomass fuels, alternative energy sources, and hydrogen technology. </li></ul><ul><li>• Raw materials, including mining, metallurgy, recycling, and oil & gas for </li></ul><ul><li>non-energy use. </li></ul><ul><li>• Production technologies in refineries, petrochemistry, chemistry, pulp & </li></ul><ul><li>paper, and electronics. </li></ul><ul><li>• Food, including agriculture, food production technologies, and water </li></ul><ul><li>cleanliness and availability. </li></ul><ul><li>• Health, including implant materials and technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>• Safety and social integrity. </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge dissemination and technology transfer </li></ul>
  • 7. General Corrosion Examples
  • 8. Collapse of Berlin Congress Hall in 1980
  • 9.  
  • 10. IMPACT OF CORROSION
  • 11. IMPACT ON SAFETY
  • 12. COST OF CORROSION <ul><li>Annual loss due to corrosion is estimated to be 3 to 5 % of GNP, about Rs.700000 crores </li></ul><ul><li>Direct & Indirect losses </li></ul><ul><li>Direct loss: Material cost, maintenance cost, over-design, use of costly material </li></ul><ul><li>Indirect losses: Plant shutdown & loss of production, contamination of products, loss of valuable products due to leakage etc, liability in accidents </li></ul>
  • 13. DIRECT COSTS <ul><li>Material loss </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of replacement/repair </li></ul><ul><li>Cost of maintenance </li></ul><ul><li>Inability to use otherwise desirable materials </li></ul><ul><li>Over-design to allow for corrosion. </li></ul>
  • 14. INDIRECT COSTS <ul><li>Loss of appearance-Automobiles, buildings </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of production due to plant shut down </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of valuable product-Leakage, contamination </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of valuable minerals-Depletion of natural resources </li></ul><ul><li>Loss of safety & reliability. </li></ul><ul><li>Product liability. </li></ul>
  • 15. COST OF CORROSION (U. S. A) <ul><li>The diagram shows the extrapolated total cost of corrosion in the USA. </li></ul><ul><li>Total cost: $ 276 Billion (3.1 % of GDP) </li></ul><ul><li>Year: 1998 </li></ul>
  • 16. WHY STUDY CORROSION? <ul><li>Every one using materials of any sort must have a basic understanding of corrosion in order to protect them from corrosion. </li></ul><ul><li>Engineers, who design, construct, and use large amounts of structural materials, must especially be aware of this natural process so that they can take preventive action. </li></ul><ul><li>Saving the huge annual loss due to corrosion as well as ensuring the safety and reliability of the materials/structures/machines under their charge requires understanding of corrosion. </li></ul>

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