Leaving WIIFM for WCIDWT:

What Can I DO With That?
Terri Cheney

“We are not about sharing
information or even about prov...
Let there be training!
Discuss with a partner

What do you already know about providing
realistic practice in ILT or elearning?
What will be evid...
Today’s session in 3 parts
Today’s session in 3 parts

1:
Today’s session in 3 parts

1:
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model

2 & 3:
Refine your answer
Two weeks from now …

While you’re at
it, identify one
specific training
you’re involved
with to practi...
Why focus on REHEARSAL in learning events?
Information …
Information …

Used to be scarce
Information …

Used to be scarce
Is now a
commodity
Information …

Used to be scarce
Is now a
commodity
Training is about behavior
Training is about behavior
If your house is
burning down, do
you want the fire
fighters to
Training is about behavior
If your house is
burning down, do
you want the fire
fighters to
a. describe the best
methods of...
Training is about behavior
If your house is
burning down, do
you want the fire
fighters to
a. describe the best
methods of...
Practice happens anyway
Practice happens anyway
Pressure for business payoff
Pressure for business payoff
IRACIS
Goddess of
Business
Objectives
Ineffective training is
expensive!
Ineffective training is
expensive!
Ineffective training is
expensive!
Ineffective training is
expensive!
Ineffective training is
expensive!
Ineffective training is
expensive!
Different starting questions

SME

Learning
professional
Different starting questions
What do they
need to KNOW?

SME

Learning
professional
Different starting questions
What do they
need to KNOW?

SME
What do they
need to DO
back on the job?

Learning
profession...
How would YOU explain it?

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kristina06/3588522428/
Create “rehearsal opportunities”
Create “rehearsal opportunities”

How?
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model

Business
Goal
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model

Behaviors
Behaviors

Behaviors
Business
Goal
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model

Behaviors
Behaviors

Behaviors
Business
Goal
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model

Activity
Activity

Activity
Activity
Behaviors

Activity
Behaviors

Behaviors
Business...
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model
i

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Activity
Activity

Activity
Activity
Behaviors

Activity
B...
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model
i

i

i
i

i

i

i

i

i

i

Activity
Activity

Activity
Activity
Behaviors

Activity
B...
Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model
i

i

i
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i

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Activity
Activity

Activity
Activity
Behaviors

Activity
B...
i

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X

i

X

X

Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model
i

i

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Activity
Activity

Activity
Activity
Behaviors

...
Should start with business goal/s

Business
Goal
Should start with business goal/s

Business
Goal
Should start with business goal/s
Let there be
training!

Business
Goal
Usually end up starting from behaviors

Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors

Behaviors
Usually end up starting from behaviors

Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors

Behaviors
Business
Go...
Behaviors

Behaviors

X

X

Behaviors

X

X

Usually end up starting from behaviors

Behaviors
Behaviors
Behaviors

Behavi...
Two “mind hacks” to identify behaviors
Two “mind hacks” to identify behaviors

Be a fly on the wall
What would a fly observe?
Two “mind hacks” to identify behaviors

Be a fly on the wall

Prove it to a judge
What would be judge-worthy evidence?
Rehearsal is …
Rehearsal is …
Vividly imagine taking the right
specific action in the right context
Mimic real life
But which definition best
matches the highlighted term?

I can respond in
the form of a
question!

Mimic real life
Rehearsal is…
Three stalwarts…
Micro-scenarios
Teach-back
Action planning
Micro-scenarios rock!
“I’ll read you this list
of ways you can get
involved in the chapter.”

This is Larry, and these
are...
When you’re stumped, use a

Teach-back
Give your action planning a

Help your learners identify triggers
in the right context
We may be able to double the
likeli...
Give your action planning a

Help your learners identify triggers
in the right context
Provide guiding questions like:
• W...
What did Terri’s Action Map look like?
For today’s participants only:

Power Half-Hour
Help creating rehearsal opportunities in training
you are currently workin...
blog.cathy-moore.com
blog.cathy-moore.com
blog.cathy-moore.com
Terri@ConnectLearningDesign.com
@TerriChy
www.linkedin.com/in/terricheney
Code: ASTD_Confr_2013
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Breakout Session Slides from ASTD-TCC Regional Conference 2013

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From the conference brochure:

Leaving WIIFM for WCIDWT: What Can I DO With That?
Learning professionals know perfectly well that realistic practice trumps “information dumps.” But the pressures of our own hectic workflows often lead us to shortchange helping learners transfer information into action back on the job. In this practice-heavy session, expand your repertoire of techniques for creating meaningful “rehearsal” opportunities in training.

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  • Four reasons Terri is feeling really good about this session:
    1. Standing-room only crowd. Some people sat on the floor the entire time!
    2. Not one person left early, even though I ran over my time by several minutes.
    3. Terrific verbal an written feedback from participants.
    4. For the rest of the day people who were not in my session -- including a few I had never met -- approached me to say they had heard my session was good.
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  • Mini-introductionsMe: only half joking when I say I’m an evangelist for an overdue trend in WLPAt your table: Take 60 seconds to make sure everyone at your table has been introducedNow that you’ve made a connection with everyone at your table,  Quote & scopeTell me about the answers you got at your tables about the opening quote
  • This session is basically about improving learning transfer from learning events (training)For our purposes today we’re going to assume that training is the right intervention, and you are tasked with creating a training event that will either happen IN A CLASSROOM OR ON A SCREEN. The design principles are the same.Scope for today = downstream of the decision to do trainingWe all prefer to be involved as far upstream as possible, help identify the beset tools for the problem at handGun-to-the-head quote (= NOT a training issue)Assumes you are tasked with creating a training event that will either happen IN A CLASSROOM OR ON A SCREEN. The design principles are the same.Tactical focus (vs. strategic)
  • Take 2 minutes with a partner to discuss what you already know …Report back
  • Today’s session:1: Why think of training in terms of rehearsal for the real world2: How to do that; practice 2 layers of Action Mapping
  • Today’s session:1: Why think of training in terms of rehearsal for the real world2: How to do that; practice 2 layers of Action Mapping
  • Today’s session:1: Why think of training in terms of rehearsal for the real world2: How to do that; practice 2 layers of Action Mapping
  • Take about a minute to refine your post-session “evidence” AND identify a specific training that you can use for practice todayTake 30 seconds to share that with your partner
  • Why focus on rehearsal in learning events?Nothing new to you here; giving you language to use with all the other people you work with who are definitively NOT learning professionalsHighlighting 5 reasons this is mission-critical for effective training
  • First reason for treating precious training time as rehearsal is the nature of information.
  • It used to be scarce. Training was one of the relatively few channels for disseminating information your people needed on the job.
  • In the age of the interwebs information is now a commodity.
  • In fact, a lot of the time it feels more like this – like you’re being overwhelmed by a tidal wave of constant information.One result of this is that almost any information is available to anyone, anytime, who is resourceful enough to look for it. All they need is a device in their pocket, and all it takes is a few clicks or a couple of social-network queries, and they can get information any time they need it. That means information dumps are not the best use of precious face/screen time with learners. Our task becomes making sure they can access the right information at the right time – whether they are accessing from their memory or a job aid or on-the-spot research.
  • Training is about behavior.
  • The classic answers on most tests look like this, don’t they?
  • I don’t think I need to say anything more about this one.
  • Practice happens whether you allow time for it in training or not. If you don’t allow for structured practice time during training, they’ll just be practicing with your paying customers, or in the form of reworks, or trial and error. Or else they’ll just ignore it and go on doing things the old way.
  • If your kid has just passed his written driver’s-permit test, but he has never actually been behind the wheel of a car, are you ready to having him drive home in traffic? Or are you going to find an empty parking lot or country road to give him a chance to get the “feel” of driving – like how hard is too hard to hit the brakes, or how the car sounds and feels when it’s ready to shift into second gear.
  • Who remembers what IRACIS stands for?It’s a whole lot easier to demonstrate the business value of what you do when your starting point was behaviors that produce specific business results. Business goals don’t happen by themselves; they happen because specific people DO specific things at specific times. When you treat training as rehearsal of these behaviors, you start with built-in metrics for demonstrating the impact of training.
  • Training involves more than just you – although that’s already kind of a lot when you consider just how many hours you will put in designing and delivering and dealing with the aftermath of the training.
  • You’re probably reporting to someone who is directing your work.
  • Once the training is designed, someone has to put it in the elearning software or to book the room and order the supplies and so forth.
  • Then there are the actual supplies you use during the learning event.
  • But the really big expense that most of us forget about when we’re calculating the expenses in training is the time of all the people who will be participating in training instead of doing their regular jobs.Let’s say you develop a three-hour training on some new system in your company. And let’s say 30 people participate in it.Let’s say that their time costs the company an average of about $50 per hour. So that’s 30 people times 50 dollars times three hours. That’s $4,500 bucks shot right there. Plus all the development costs. Will your training produce the business more than five grand in results/value for the business?But technically there’s more. The business is paying for the time of these 30 people, but they are not engaged in the work they were hired to do. Remember IRACIS. In theory everything a business does should either make it money or save it money. Let’s say that when everything is averaged together, the work these people do brings in about $60/hr in revenue. $60 per hour times 30 people times 3 hours. That’s a lot of revenue to forego. Your training had better produce a payoff.
  • As learning professionals YOU know this. But an awful lot of the people you work with are NOT learning professionals.Different starting questions for SMEs/everyone else/even (sadly) learning professionals
  • As learning professionals YOU know this. But an awful lot of the people you work with are NOT learning professionals.Different starting questions for SMEs/everyone else/even (sadly) learning professionalsThink about a skeptical stakeholder in one of your current training projects. Take about a minute to figure out how you would help this person understand the value of spending training time on realistic practice. Share that with your partner.Report back
  • Think about a skeptical stakeholder in one of your current training projects. Take about a minute to figure out how you would help this person understand the value of spending training time on realistic practice. Share that with your partner.Report back
  • So we have established that it’s a good idea to provide realistic practice – rehearsal opportunities – in learning events. . You zero in on the specific behaviors that impact the business results, and you help people become proficient at those high-pay-off behaviors much more quickly than they would without the training. Now the question becomes, “Just how do you DO that?”
  • That’s why you build your training around creating rehearsal opportunities. You zero in on the specific behaviors that impact the business results, and you help people become proficient at those high-pay-off behaviors much more quickly than they would without the training.
  • Single most useful method I have encountered: Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping model
  • Then you identify the specific behaviors that produce that business goal.
  • These should be high-impact, high-priority behaviors that you can link explicitly to a specific business outcome.
  • The next step is to create activities that let learners practice the behaviors you want from them back on the job. In the sample activities I had you do earlier, you had a chance to make the kinds of choices and do the kinds of tasks we hope you will engage in as an active member.
  • Finally, FINALLY we get around to asking what do they need to KNOW? What is the minimum amount of information necessary for them to be successful with the practice activities?
  • You ONLY worry about the information they need for successful practice, and no more than that. If something is not necessary for the activity that lets them practice the behavior you want from them back in their natural habitat, you leave. It. Out. Put it in an appendix or reference material. DON’T spend precious face/screen time on stuff that doesn’t help learners perform successfully on the job.This is harder than it looks! You’ve got great information! It’s useful. It could be really important at some point! But if they can do the job without it, leave it out.Consider this: The more meaning and context you can attach to information, the more likely it is that learners will be able to fish it out of their memory later – at the right time, in the right place. The corollary is that if you FAIL to provide meaning and context for the information you share, they’re going to forget it anyway.
  • You ONLY worry about the information they need for successful practice, and no more than that. If something is not necessary for the activity that lets them practice the behavior you want from them back in their natural habitat, you leave. It. Out. Put it in an appendix or reference material. DON’T spend precious face/screen time on stuff that doesn’t help learners perform successfully on the job.This is harder than it looks! You’ve got great information! It’s useful. It could be really important at some point! But if they can do the job without it, leave it out.Consider this: The more meaning and context you can attach to information, the more likely it is that learners will be able to fish it out of their memory later – at the right time, in the right place. The corollary is that if you FAIL to provide meaning and context for the information you share, they’re going to forget it anyway.
  • You ONLY worry about the information they need for successful practice, and no more than that. If something is not necessary for the activity that lets them practice the behavior you want from them back in their natural habitat, you leave. It. Out. Put it in an appendix or reference material. DON’T spend precious face/screen time on stuff that doesn’t help learners perform successfully on the job.This is harder than it looks! You’ve got great information! It’s useful. It could be really important at some point! But if they can do the job without it, leave it out.Consider this: The more meaning and context you can attach to information, the more likely it is that learners will be able to fish it out of their memory later – at the right time, in the right place. The corollary is that if you FAIL to provide meaning and context for the information you share, they’re going to forget it anyway.
  • In practice I find that this is still fairly rare in our field.
  • Should start with the business goals, but usually doesn’t happen that way.
  • Most training still comes into being because someone with the authority to do so said, “Let there be training!”
  • In practice usually end up starting from behaviors“Let there be training!” Then figure out which business goals it might supportBrain dump of all the observable behaviors that would ideally be different after the training
  • Then they figure out which behaviors advance a business goal – the behaviors that have the biggest impact.
  • Identify & prioritize which ones have the biggest impact on the target business goalREMOVE any lower-priority behaviors you don’t have the capacity for with your particular constraints.Starting here takes longer than starting with an information dump of what you think your learners should know. It’s harder to do. But paradoxically, once you get clear on these key behaviors, everything else accelerates. You spend far less time agonizing about what information to include and what to leave out. You have less spotlight-on-the-trainer time to develop (or content-dump time on a screen) – because it’s the learners who will be doing the work during a big chuck of the training event.And using this method of design also has the lovely side effect of minimizing scope creep. Scope creep WILL happen, of course. But it is much easier to manage and much easier to make decisions about when you have clearly spelled out the behaviors you want and why. That extra 10 pages from your SME? If you can’t show me how it will affect what they DO in the day-to-day workflow on the job, then, no, we cannot add that content.
  • Zeroing in on what you want people to DO can be kind of tricky. It’s astonishingly easy to slide back into vague terms like “understand” and “appreciate.”So I’m going to share two “mind hacks” I have found to be effective in working with SMEs (Subject Matter Experts) to help them identify observable behaviors that should come from a training event.
  • The first is to pretend you are a fly on the wall a week after your training event. You are watching two people go about their work. One of them took the training, the other did not. FROM YOUR POSITION AS A FLY ON THE WALL, how do you figure out which is which? How is what the trained person doing different from what the untrained person is doing?Remember, a fly can’t read minds. A fly can’t ask questions. The only thing a fly can do is observe behavior. The fly can only tell if someone knows how to deliver good customer service by listening to them interact with a customer on the phone. It can only tell if someone knows the new procedure by watching them carry out that procedure.Do quick brain dump of what a fly would see after your training
  • The other “mind hack” is to prove it to a skeptical judge. Imagine you have unlimited access to sophisticated surveillance equipment, and you can summon up any imaginable business data you want, whether your company tracks it now or not. The only restriction is that your people can’t know they are bing observed. It’s two weeks or a month or a quarter after your learning event, and you have to prove to a skeptical judge that your training had its intended impact. What evidence are you going to bring the skeptical judge to prove that your training made a difference in actual performance of individuals? How will you show that your training affected the way the business met its goal?If you have secretly taped conversations among the stake holders, what did they say that reveals the impact of your training? What performance metrics are different? …
  • Do quick brain dump of judge-worthy evidence for your trainingReport back
  • So now that you have figured out exactly what behaviors you want when learners return to their natural habitat. But how do you provide meaningful practice (rehearsal)?
  • In the final analysis, rehearsal is anything that helps learners vividly imagine taking the right action in the right context.
  • Key is to mimic the real context in which they will be carrying out what you are asking of them.This NEVER happens in the real world. In the real world choices are always messier and more ambiguous than this. The specific circumstances of your particular customer at any given moment are more complicated than this.In training your people need a chance to practice making THESE kinds of messier, immensely more probable kinds of choices and decisions.
  • [Write on flip chart] So what comes to mind that might serve as effective rehearsal?role playscenarioscase study discussions q&a, panel interviews reflection certain forms of note taking (mind mapping, summarizing, predicting)Subconscious doesn’t differentiate real vs imagined; key is to help people vividly imagine application in contextetc.?
  • We’re going to take a closer look at three of theseCan almost always use these in a pinch, with virtually any content
  • Micro-scenarios Write one micro-scenario for your training; share w/ partnerReport back
  • Teach-backTrain the Trainer class proj-mgmt articles LoL: History of co-ops, structure of co-ops, etc – how is that relevant to secretary, forklift guy, VP of finance, etc.?Write down one “chnk” of content from your training that could lend itself well to a teach-back
  • Action learning with triggersMost of the activity in our brains is not at conscious level. As trainers we focus on conscious level. why not help them deploy their subconscious too?
  • Help learners figure out in advance what will remind them to act in the new way.Write down 2-3 triggers your learners might useWrite down 2-3 triggers for YOU for what you learned today
  • Now that we’ve looked at how to help others “get it” about providing meaningful practice, and we DID some rehearsal ourselves around identifying target behaviors and ways to practice them,What did my action map look like for this session (behavior + activity levels)Large-group reportYou got it! You are well on your way to being able to apply what you learned today back in YOUR natural habitat.Like any skill or habit, it takes time
  • Closing with best summary I’ve seen of what a learning professional does
  • Breakout Session Slides from ASTD-TCC Regional Conference 2013

    1. 1. Leaving WIIFM for WCIDWT: What Can I DO With That? Terri Cheney “We are not about sharing information or even about providing learning events. We are about helping performance in the context of how individuals carry out their day-to-day work in the real world.” Agree? Disagree? “Yeah, but…”? Discuss at your tables.
    2. 2. Let there be training!
    3. 3. Discuss with a partner What do you already know about providing realistic practice in ILT or elearning? What will be evidence that this breakout was genuinely useful to YOU in YOUR work?
    4. 4. Today’s session in 3 parts
    5. 5. Today’s session in 3 parts 1:
    6. 6. Today’s session in 3 parts 1: Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model 2 & 3:
    7. 7. Refine your answer Two weeks from now … While you’re at it, identify one specific training you’re involved with to practice on today What will be evidence that this breakout was genuinely useful to YOU in YOUR work?
    8. 8. Why focus on REHEARSAL in learning events?
    9. 9. Information …
    10. 10. Information … Used to be scarce
    11. 11. Information … Used to be scarce Is now a commodity
    12. 12. Information … Used to be scarce Is now a commodity
    13. 13. Training is about behavior
    14. 14. Training is about behavior If your house is burning down, do you want the fire fighters to
    15. 15. Training is about behavior If your house is burning down, do you want the fire fighters to a. describe the best methods of dousing a house fire
    16. 16. Training is about behavior If your house is burning down, do you want the fire fighters to a. describe the best methods of dousing a house fire b. put out the fire
    17. 17. Practice happens anyway
    18. 18. Practice happens anyway
    19. 19. Pressure for business payoff
    20. 20. Pressure for business payoff IRACIS Goddess of Business Objectives
    21. 21. Ineffective training is expensive!
    22. 22. Ineffective training is expensive!
    23. 23. Ineffective training is expensive!
    24. 24. Ineffective training is expensive!
    25. 25. Ineffective training is expensive!
    26. 26. Ineffective training is expensive!
    27. 27. Different starting questions SME Learning professional
    28. 28. Different starting questions What do they need to KNOW? SME Learning professional
    29. 29. Different starting questions What do they need to KNOW? SME What do they need to DO back on the job? Learning professional
    30. 30. How would YOU explain it? http://www.flickr.com/photos/kristina06/3588522428/
    31. 31. Create “rehearsal opportunities”
    32. 32. Create “rehearsal opportunities” How?
    33. 33. Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model Business Goal
    34. 34. Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    35. 35. Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    36. 36. Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model Activity Activity Activity Activity Behaviors Activity Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    37. 37. Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model i i i i i i i i i i Activity Activity Activity Activity Behaviors Activity Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    38. 38. Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model i i i i i i i i i i Activity Activity Activity Activity Behaviors Activity Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    39. 39. Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model i i i i i i i i i i Activity Activity Activity Activity Behaviors Activity Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    40. 40. i i i i i X i X X Cathy Moore’s Action Mapping Model i i i i Activity Activity Activity Activity Behaviors Activity Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    41. 41. Should start with business goal/s Business Goal
    42. 42. Should start with business goal/s Business Goal
    43. 43. Should start with business goal/s Let there be training! Business Goal
    44. 44. Usually end up starting from behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors
    45. 45. Usually end up starting from behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    46. 46. Behaviors Behaviors X X Behaviors X X Usually end up starting from behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Behaviors Business Goal
    47. 47. Two “mind hacks” to identify behaviors
    48. 48. Two “mind hacks” to identify behaviors Be a fly on the wall
    49. 49. What would a fly observe?
    50. 50. Two “mind hacks” to identify behaviors Be a fly on the wall Prove it to a judge
    51. 51. What would be judge-worthy evidence?
    52. 52. Rehearsal is …
    53. 53. Rehearsal is … Vividly imagine taking the right specific action in the right context
    54. 54. Mimic real life
    55. 55. But which definition best matches the highlighted term? I can respond in the form of a question! Mimic real life
    56. 56. Rehearsal is…
    57. 57. Three stalwarts… Micro-scenarios Teach-back Action planning
    58. 58. Micro-scenarios rock! “I’ll read you this list of ways you can get involved in the chapter.” This is Larry, and these are his circumstances. Which opportunities would you recommend for him?
    59. 59. When you’re stumped, use a Teach-back
    60. 60. Give your action planning a Help your learners identify triggers in the right context We may be able to double the likelihood that our learners actually apply what they've learned simply by having our learners link situations and actions in their action planning.
    61. 61. Give your action planning a Help your learners identify triggers in the right context Provide guiding questions like: • What’s the very next situation in which you could use what you learned here? • What in that context will remind you to do so? and • Who else will be there? • What tools/documents/equipment will you be using? • What obstacle will you encounter first? • What will you do about it?
    62. 62. What did Terri’s Action Map look like?
    63. 63. For today’s participants only: Power Half-Hour Help creating rehearsal opportunities in training you are currently working on By phone or video conference (Skype, Google+) Valid until January 31, 2014 Code: ASTD_Confr_2013
    64. 64. blog.cathy-moore.com
    65. 65. blog.cathy-moore.com
    66. 66. blog.cathy-moore.com
    67. 67. Terri@ConnectLearningDesign.com @TerriChy www.linkedin.com/in/terricheney Code: ASTD_Confr_2013
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