Kanold tonchefflearningforwarde07summer2011f
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This is the Learning Forward summer 2011 conference presentation E07 by Kanold and Toncheff.

This is the Learning Forward summer 2011 conference presentation E07 by Kanold and Toncheff.

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  • Image Credit: 10_cardboard_rough_03 by Six Revisions http://www.flickr.com/photos/31288116@N02/3066482220/ Licensed Creative Commons Attribution on February 6, 2011 Slide by Bill Ferriter The Tempered Radical http://teacherleaders.typepad.com/the_tempered_radical
  • Welcome etc. Who knows what PRIME stands for? Martin Luther King - Upon accepting the Nobel peace Prize in 1964 at the University of Oslo. This a document of hope!! We do not have to settle for what “is”. There will be a better day. There is hope for our leadership actions to matter. This quote will be referenced in slide 6.
  • Transition slide to the discussion of the 4 principles.
  • Transition slide to the discussion of the 4 principles.
  • Transition to Mona- Turn to page 2 of the handout- at your table take a moment to examine the first three words of each paragraph that explains each Mathematical Practices… Turn to your shoulder partner and talk about what you notice? 2-3 minutes
  • {before we begin- have each table numbered 1-8} Now lets look at the verbs in each of the practices – your table is assigned a number which represents the corresponding mathematical practice that you are going to explore What are the verbs that illustrate the student actions for your assigned mathematical practices? Circle , highlight, or underline the verbs. At your table, discuss what you notice. 6-7 minutes
  • The 8 Standards for Mathematical Practice – place an emphasis on student demonstrations of learning… “ What we as teachers do, doesn’t matter nearly as much as how our students experience what we do” Daily, we know what it is we do… how do we know how the student s experience it? How do teachers purposefully plan learning experiences to develop the mathematical practices When working with teachers, what would teachers need to plan to do this successfully? 2 minutes
  • Give each team about 10 minutes to create columns for their assigned standards Take a moment to scan the expectations of this standard… Create two columns, the first column will list 2-3“student practices” that are highlighted in this “mathematical practices standard. The 2 nd column will list teacher behaviors needed to help facilitate this practice. 10-12 minutes This will transition to Standard 3: The team that completes Standard 3 will present their tables responses, and then I will transition to exploring in detail Mathematical practice: (Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others) 3-5 minutes ( Team presentation and questions)
  • 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others. Mathematically proficient students understand and use stated assumptions, definitions, and previously established results in constructing arguments. They make conjectures and build a logical progression of statements to explore the truth of their conjectures. They are able to analyze situations by breaking them into cases, and can recognize and use counterexamples. They justify their conclusions, communicate them to others, and respond to the arguments of others. They reason inductively about data, making plausible arguments that take into account the context from which the data arose. Mathematically proficient students are also able to compare the effectiveness of two plausible arguments, distinguish correct logic or reasoning from that which is flawed, and—if there is a flaw in an argument—explain what it is. Elementary students can construct arguments using concrete referents such as objects, drawings, diagrams, and actions. Such arguments can make sense and be correct, even though they are not generalized or made formal until later grades. Later, students learn to determine domains to which an argument applies. Students at all grades can listen or read the arguments of others, decide whether they make sense, and ask useful questions to clarify or improve the arguments.
  • Turn to page 15 , we are going to put on student hats and participate in a learning experience that will address two CCSS Algebra Unit 1: Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems. Working with quantities and the relationships between them provides grounding for work with expressions, equations, and functions.   N.Q.1: Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; N.Q.3: Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. 7 minutes to create mathematical argument on paper Then have one person from each team rotate to the next team to articulate their teams mathematical argument (3 minutes for presentation)
  • Turn to page 15 , we are going to put on student hats and participate in a learning experience that will address two CCSS Algebra Unit 1: Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems. Working with quantities and the relationships between them provides grounding for work with expressions, equations, and functions.   N.Q.1: Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; N.Q.3: Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. 7 minutes to create mathematical argument on paper Then have one person from each team rotate to the next team to articulate their teams mathematical argument (3 minutes for presentation)
  • Turn to page 15 , we are going to put on student hats and participate in a learning experience that will address two CCSS Algebra Unit 1: Reason quantitatively and use units to solve problems. Working with quantities and the relationships between them provides grounding for work with expressions, equations, and functions.   N.Q.1: Use units as a way to understand problems and to guide the solution of multi-step problems; choose and interpret units consistently in formulas; N.Q.3: Choose a level of accuracy appropriate to limitations on measurement when reporting quantities. 7 minutes to create mathematical argument on paper Then have one person from each team rotate to the next team to articulate their teams mathematical argument (3 minutes for presentation)
  • At your tables, take 2 minute to reflect on this particular task and how it developed, “ Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others”
  • As leaders, how do we support the development and planning of creating learning experiences – turn to page 16. Thinking about the mathematical task we just completed- put on your Observer hat and evaluate the short lesson using the rubric for student look-fors (They can also go back to their original list of student actions to see if they line up?) (8 minutes) Transition to Tim: Erasing Inequities

Kanold tonchefflearningforwarde07summer2011f Kanold tonchefflearningforwarde07summer2011f Presentation Transcript

  • Closing the Learning Gap in Mathematics: The Common Core States Standards The teaching of mathematics can be controversial. Today’s classrooms look quite different from classrooms of twenty years ago…A substantial body of research on teaching and learning is now available and can guide our teaching… Navigating mathematical understanding through research July 19 th , 2011 Dr. Timothy D. Kanold tkanold.blogspot.com Ms. Mona Toncheff [email_address]
  • Sustainable change starts with thinking at the edges of the box. It’s about evolution, Not revolution. http://www.flickr.com/photos/31288116@N02/3066482220/sizes/o/
  • Poll: Primary Causes of the Learning Gap in Mathematics View slide
  • Closing the Learning Gap in Mathematics: The Common Core States Standards For those following us on-line or virtually, You can go to http://www.slideshare.net/tkanold/kanold-toncheffleanringforwarde07summer2011 For the Powerpoint presentation Kanold/Toncheff E07 View slide
  • Two Primary Causes of the Learning Gap in Mathematics
    • A Primary Content and Teaching emphasis on Procedural Fluency –
    • The absence of teaching
    • and learning for
    • Understanding…
  • NCTM (C&E, 1989), (TPS, 1991), (PSSM, 2000) and (Focal Points, 2008)
  • National Research Council ( Adding It Up , 2001)
  • The Common Core States Standards for Mathematics These Standards are not intended to be new names for old ways of doing business. They are a call to take the next step. It is time for states to work together to build on lessons learned from two decades of standards based reforms. It is time to recognize that standards are not just promises to our children, but promises we intend to keep. — CCSS (2010, p.5) We know what to do… why don’t we do it?
  • Two Primary Causes of the Learning Gap in Mathematics
    • 2) Isolated faculty and administrative decision-making –
    • The absence of the development and implementation of a comprehensive, equitable, sustainable
    • and coherent instruction
    • and assessment
    • system in mathematics…
  • The PRIME and CCSS Teacher and Leader…
    • “ It is the PRIME teacher and leader who will close the ‘knowing-doing ’ gap between our knowledge about how to enhance student achievement and
    • the commitment to
    • actions we must take as a
    • result of that
    • knowledge.”
    • PRIME, p. 56
  • The Expectations-Acceptance Gap of the Leader…
    • One way to re-frame the Knowing-Doing Gap question – which is about someone else – is to think of it as the leaders’
    • “ Aspirations-Tolerance Gap”
    • Is it possible that school leaders
    • and teachers contribute to the
    • “ Knowing – Doing” Behavior
    • Gap of faculty and staff?
  • Two Primary Causes of the Learning Gap in Mathematics
    • A Primary Content and Teaching emphasis on Procedural Fluency –
    • The absence of teaching and learning for Understanding…
  • The CCSS Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice The Standards for Mathematical Practice describe varieties of expertise that mathematics educators at all levels should seek to develop in their students… These practices rest on important “processes and proficiencies” for mathematics education.
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice (p.2) Take a moment to examine the first three words of each of the 8 mathematical practices… what do you notice?
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice What are the verbs used to illustrate student actions?
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice Beanie Baby Bungee Metro Tech HS Phoenix, AZ 2010
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice Student Actions Teacher behaviors needed to help facilitate this practice
  • SMP # 3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of others Wordle
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice (p14)
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice (p14)
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice (p14)
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice Reflection: How did the mathematical task develop Mathematical Practice 3?
  • The Standards for [Student] Mathematical Practice (p.15)
  • PARCC States http://www.parcconline.org/ Governing Board States Participating States
  • SMART States http://www.k12.wa.usSMARTER/map.aspx Governing Board States Participating States
  • Overlapping States
      • Alabama
      • Colorado
      • Delaware
      • Kentucky
      • New Jersey
      • North Dakota
      • Ohio
      • Oklahoma
      • Pennsylvania
      • South Carolina
    • States in both consortia have until 2014 to decide which consortia they must commit to…and therefore which assessment…
    • A mix of item types – short answer, longer open response and performance-based – in addition to richer multiple choice items that:
      • Reflect the knowledge and skills found in the ELA and Mathematics Common Core State Standards and
      • Will help student develop an understanding of the subject matter, rather than just narrowing their instruction in order to “teach to the test”
    Assessment Improvements
  • Transitions to the CCSS and closing the Gap…
    • Where to start?
      • Mathematical Practices (lesson design )
      • Learning trajectories and progressions
      • Focus on conceptual understanding
      • Designing and improving local assessment processes
  • Your TPOV About PD and Assessment
    • Noel Tichy – Your Teachable Point of View or TPOV
    • “ A cohesive set of ideas and concepts that a person is able to clearly articulate to others.”
  • Your TPOV for Effective Assessment
    • Describe 2-3 vital teacher or administrator behaviors…
    • non-negotiable…
    • Your Vision for effective Assessment Practices
  • Becoming a Mathematics Inequity Eraser!
    • Access Inequity – tracking or levels…
    • Task Selection Inequity – rigor of daily tasks
    • Formative Assessment Inequity – depth and quality of teacher descriptive feedback
    • Summative Assessment Inequity – lack of a “Basis for exam design and scoring
    • Grading inequity – fidelity to accuracy
    • RTI Inequity – Variance, timeliness and intentionality
  • Turning Effective Mathematics Assessment Into Action!
    • Your “non-negotiable” vital teacher/administrator Assessment behavior list –
    • 1) Is there research that supports your opinion?
    • 2) How will you close the gap between the reality and the vision of action by all adults?
  • Reconciling Your Experience with the Research and Evidence
    • How can your PLC team distinguish your experiences from actual evidence?
    • 5 Levels of certainty in
    • your current PLC mathematics
    • practices…
  • Reconciling Your Experience with the Research and Evidence
    • 5 Levels of certainty in your practices…
    • 1. Opinion — This is what I believe and I believe it sincerely.
    • 2. Experience — This is
    • what I have seen based
    • on my personal observation 
  • Reconciling Your Experience with the Research and Evidence
    • 5 Levels of certainty in your practices…
    • 3. Local Evidence — This is what I have seen based on the experiences of my friends and colleagues.
    • 4. Preponderance of evidence — This is what we know as a profession, in many different contexts and across all locations (Research and data).
  • Reconciling Your Experience with the Research and Evidence
    • 5. Mathematical Certainty —This what I have seen with 100% certainty. There is no need for a debate.
    • Your Non-negotiable adult behaviors must have a high degree of certainty that they are a right thing…
  • PLC’s: A Vision for Coherence and Focus…
    • The Fifth discipline – Peter Senge emphasis on adult teams (social learning) - 1990 & 2008
    • Seeking Sustainability &
    • Coherence…
  • The PD TPOV: PLC’s as THE Path
  • The TPOV of PLC’s as THE PD Path
    • PD cannot be an event…
    • … the largest effects offer 30 – 100 hours spread out over 6 – 12 months
    • Darling Hammond (2009, p. 79).
    • 8x2 +10x6 = 76
  • Two PLC PD Questions…
    • 1. PD connected to results?
    •   2. PD part of a PLC process?
    • .57 Vs .73
  • PLC’s and PD
    • Process Agreements:
    • 1. Teacher collaboration - the only sustainable form of PD
  • PLC’s and PD
    • Process Agreements:
    • 2. Provision of Adequate time and focused high leverage activities for PLC PD
    • (p.11)
  • PLC’s and PD
  • PLC’s and PD
    • Three Process Agreements:
    • 3. Equity and Access to the PLC PD
  • PLC’s and PD
    • The world’s highest performing school systems “decrease the pedagogical variability between teachers and increase the quality of instruction…
    • The 2010
    • McKinsey report:
  • PLC’s and PD
    • Content Agreements:
    • Agreement on “What” to Learn and how to implement the “What”.
  • PLC’s and PD
    • Content Agreements:
    • 2) Agreement on “How to” collaboratively and effectively assess the “ What”.
  • PLC’s and PD
    • Content Agreements:
    • Agreement on the intentional and “R”equired RtI adult response
    • RtI Vs. RRtI?
  • Remember: Change requires FUN!
  • Closing the Learning Gap in Mathematics: The Common Core States Standards Navigating mathematical understanding through research… Questions for us? Dr. Timothy D. Kanold tkanold.blogspot.com Ms. Mona Toncheff [email_address]
  • tkanold.blogspot.com
  • Closing the Learning Gap in Mathematics: The Common Core States Standards The teaching of mathematics can be controversial. Today’s classrooms look quite different from classrooms of twenty years ago…A substantial body of research on teaching and learning is now available and can guide our teaching… Navigating mathematical understanding through research July 19 th , 2011 Dr. Timothy D. Kanold tkanold.blogspot.com Ms. Mona Toncheff [email_address]