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ISTE Gaming Presentation
 

ISTE Gaming Presentation

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These are the introductory slides for our games and learning workshop at ISTE 2010

These are the introductory slides for our games and learning workshop at ISTE 2010

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    ISTE Gaming Presentation ISTE Gaming Presentation Presentation Transcript

    • Gaming across the Curriculum
      Finding and evaluating educational games
      MARJEE CHMIEL
      National Geographic Society
      @mchmiel
      TREVOR OWENS
      Center for History and New Media
      @tjowens
    • Young People Play Games
    • 97% of teens ages 12-17 play computer, web, portable, or console games
      Lenhart, A., Kahne, J., Middaugh, E., Macgill, A., Evans, C., & Vitak, J. (2008). Teens, Video Games, and Civics, Pew Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Teens-Video-Games-and-Civics.aspx  
    • 50% of teens played games “yesterday.”
      Lenhart, A., Kahne, J., Middaugh, E., Macgill, A., Evans, C., & Vitak, J. (2008). Teens, Video Games, and Civics, Pew Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Teens-Video-Games-and-Civics.aspx  
    • 99% of boys and 94% of girls play video games
      Lenhart, A., Kahne, J., Middaugh, E., Macgill, A., Evans, C., & Vitak, J. (2008). Teens, video games, and civics, Pew Internet & American Life Project. Retrieved from http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2008/Teens-Video-Games-and-Civics.aspx  
    • What Games Bring To Teaching
    • Games act as on-going assessments
      Gee, J. P. (2003). What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  
    • Games are inherently motivating
      Gee, J. P. (2003). What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  
    • Students work at their own pace
      Gee, J. P. (2003). What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  
    • Games encourage learning through mistakes
      Gee, J. P. (2003). What Video Games Have to Teach Us About Learning and Literacy. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.  
    • Things to look for…
    • Conceptually Challenging Material
    • Multiple Entry Points
    • Personal Goal Setting
    • Parallel Challenges
    • How to use games?
    • Awareness
      links to games on your website
      include in parent newsletter
      recommend to school library
    • Optional
      assign as homework
      assign as extra credit
      recommend to special educators
      use as transition activity for students who finish assignments early
    • Large Group Activity:
      Demonstration or full-class game on interactive
      Use projector or interactive board
    • Small group-individual activity
      Laptops
      Computer labs
      One laptop per student