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Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
Blending with social media
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Blending with social media

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Presentation from Sloan-C Blended Learning Conference and Workshop

Presentation from Sloan-C Blended Learning Conference and Workshop

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  • How do we harness the opportunity provides by student use of social media and mobile technologies to enhance their learning?  How do these tools help us as instructors develop networks to information to increase our effectiveness?  Social media tools, such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, are changing the way that people across the globe communicate, share ideas, and build networks. Just over a year ago, Google lost its position as the most visited site on the web to the social media phenomenon, Facebook (see Wall Street Journal, March 14th, 2010). The interest in social media is quickly increasing, and as with many other technologies, the educational community is looking to harness the potential of these technologies to overcome challenges in the classroom and on campus. Not only do social media have the potential to improve learning in the classroom, they will be transformational for the future of education. This session will characterize the transformational potential of social media in education.
  • My work with these initiatives has gained national attention. Last year, my survey of students' use of Twitter was quoted in The Chronicle of Higher Education's Wired Campus, and this summer, my social media work on Facebook was highlighted as well.  I have presented my research, including pedagogical uses, best practices, and faculty development tips, on several emerging technologies projects, including social media and virtual worlds at the EDUCAUSE annual conferences, several Sloan-C conferences, the New Media Consortium annual conference, the National Communication Association annual conference, and others.  My work was mentioned in various technology blogs and media outlets, such as Ed Tech Magazine, eCampus News, and EDUCAUSE Quarterly.   In addition, I am the EDUCAUSE social media constituent group leader, a reviewer for the EDUCAUSE Quarterly, and a reviewer for the EDUCAUSE annual conference. I am also a member of the EDUCAUSE evolving technology steering committee, the ELI Focus Group steering committee, the Sage Publications digital media advisory board, and the Sloan-C Blended conference steering committee.
  • ONLINE COUORSES: POOR COMMUNICATION As Metts (2003) reported that “Over half (52%) said the worst part of the online experience was poor communication. And half of those (26% of the total) said the problem was communicating with their instructors” (para 16). STUDENTS NEED GOOD COMMUNICATION According to a survey by Joosten (2009), students reported that they need good (67%) and frequent communication (90%) with their instructor and good communication with their classmates (75%). They also reported that they need to feel connected to learn (80%) (see http://tinyurl.com/yafu8qz). Connecting with students and building connections amongst students allows us to create learning communities. Community and peer networks increases students motivation to perform and provides them with resources to help do better in class.
  • D2L only pushes down e-mail, no discussion notifications for posts, no mobile notifications, etc. STUDENTS DON’T CHECK EMAIL c PEW Study – don’t check email?? As Shannon from Seton Hall Law School stated in ELI Mobile session the first week in March, they view e-mail as old technology or for old people.
  • STUDENTS USE SOCIAL MEDIA OFTEN According to Bulik (July 8 th , 2009) “Out of the 110 million Americans (or 60% of the online population) who use social networks, the average social networking user logs on to these sites quite a bit. They go to social networking sites 5 days per week and check in 4 times a day for a total of an hour per day. Nine percent of that group stay logged in all day long and are ‘constantly checking what's new’” (para 7).
  • In 2004 a study at UW system reported that the majority of students do not want their personal media convoluted with course-related media 5 years later in 2009, that has changed STUDENTS WANT SOCIAL MEDIA Preliminary research conducted (see http://tinyurl.com/yafu8qz ) indicates to us that the majority of students would like to receive communication about their course via text messaging and that the majority of students are on Facebook where they communicate most often.
  • Social Media at UWM Second Life, Virtual Worlds, Social Media, Mobile Technologies
  • What is social media? Social media is media which is used to build social networks and connections for sharing information via a mediated channel. It also is considered user-constructed media that is shared through social networks. In some cases, social media has been referred to as social networking sites (SnS) or tools or Web 2.0 technologies. More specifically, Boyd and Ellison (2007) describe "web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system" (para 4). Examples of social media may include Twitter, Facebook, Second Life, LinkedIn, YouTube, Flickr, and more. Social media tools, such as Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, and YouTube, have the potential to increase communication among faculty and students, increase engagement in the classroom, and create peer networks among students, faculty, and the community. With the advancement of the functionality of mobile technologies and the widespread ownership on college campuses, social media tools that have the potential to increase engagement and interactivity are literally at students fingertips.
  • Social Mobile –content deliveyr
  • Transcript

    • 1. Tanya Joosten, @tjoostenDirector, Interim, Learning Technology CenterLecturer, Department of CommunicationUniversity of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
    • 2.  According to a survey by Joosten (2009), students reported that they need good (67%) and frequent communication (90%) with their instructor and good communication with their classmates (75%). They also reported that they need to feel connected to learn (80%) (http://tinyurl.com/yafu8qz).
    • 3.  According to PEW Internet study, “Teens who participated in focus groups for this study said that they view email as something you use to talk to ‘old people,’ institutions, or to send complex instructions to large groups “ (http:// www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2005/Teens-and- Technology.aspx?r=1).
    • 4.  According to Bulik (July 8th, 2009) “…They go to social networking sites 5 days per week and check in 4 times a day for a total of an hour per day” (para 7). According to PEW Internet study, “…Nearly three-quarters (72%) of online 18-29 year olds use these sites– similar to the rate among teens–with 45% doing so on a typical day” (http://tinyurl.com/33hynyx).
    • 5.  New survey results also show that among adults 18 and older, Facebook has taken over as the social network of choice 73% of adult profile owners use Facebook
    • 6.  According to Joosten (2009), 71% of students want to receive text messages about their class (http://tinyurl.com/yafu8qz). According to PEW Interent, “the typical American teen sends and receives 50 or more messages per day, or 1,500 per month.”
    • 7.  web-based services that allow individuals to (1) construct a public or semi-public profile within a bounded system, (2) articulate a list of other users with whom they share a connection, and (3) view and traverse their list of connections and those made by others within the system
    • 8.  Increases interactions between instructors and students Enhances communication Builds feelings of connectedness Overcomes the challenges of students at a distance or in remote locations Facilitates providing timely student feedback
    • 9.  Helps students stay organized Increases student performance Provides a medium for instructors enhance their identity and encourage students Results in high levels of satisfaction of instructors and students
    • 10.  What is the pedagogical need? How will the selected social media help meet that need? What aspects of the learning process should be improved? What learning outcomes can be better achieved through the use of the selected social media over other technologies? What is the expected behavior of students within the selected social media?
    • 11.  Increase communication and contact Engage students through rich, current media Gather and provide feedback in the classroom Create a cooperative and collaborative learning opportunities Provide experiential learning opportunities
    • 12.  Need: Increase communication and contact How will a social media help meet that need? Students are already using it, or it is available on mobile devices Provides instant or immediate access to information Lean medium that is primarily text based Requires focused and succinct messages with a manageable amount of information
    • 13.  Update social media profiles to include an image and a bio appropriate for the social media. Connect with colleagues through conference or professional group hashtags. Identify useful or influential colleagues and review to who they are connected. Participate in your educational institution’s social media accounts.
    • 14.  Youtube.com, Twitter.com #edusocmedia Edusocmedia.wikispaces.com
    • 15.  twitter.com/tjoosten facebook.com/tjoosten juice gyoza | second life professorjoosten.blogspot.com tanyajoosten. com

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