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Supelec M2M IoT course 1 - introduction - Part 1/2 - 2012

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Part 1/2 of introduction to M2M and IoT in Final Year of Supelec, one of Top Engineering School in France.

Part 1/2 of introduction to M2M and IoT in Final Year of Supelec, one of Top Engineering School in France.

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  • 1. FromMachine-to-Machine (M2M) Communications to Internet of Things (IoT) Introduction to M2M/IoT Market Technology Roadmap & Standards Thierry Lestable (MS’97, Ph.D’03) Technology & Innovation Manager, Sagemcom
  • 2. Disclaimer • Besides Sagemcom SAS’, many 3rd party copyrighted material is reused within this brief tutorial under the ‘fair use’ approach, for sake of educational purpose only, and very limited edition. • As a consequence, the current slide set presentation usage is restricted, and is falling under usual copyright usage. • Thanks for your understanding! 2© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 3. What are we targeting during this course? Machine-to-Machine (M2M) communications represent technological solutions and deployments allowing Machines, Devices or Objects to communicate with each other, w/o any human interventions. The M2M market generated by usages, applications and services is promised to experience an annual growth of 49%, reaching more than 220billions euros in the coming years. This represents one of the most attractive emerging market, with applications such as Fleet Management, Smart Metering, eHealth, and many others facilitating daily life of the citizens, whilst truly transforming our usages in the coming years. Due to this massive potential both in terms of business and transforming usages, many governments, governance bodies and thus standards are currently preparing the adequate frameworks from legal, technological and services point of view. During this brand new course, we’ll thus dig into this M2M arena, in order to understand first the wide variety of usages & services potentially offered, together with the technologies available (Wireless, Wireline, IP, Security…), and how they cooperate with each other, whilst key features of M2M will be identified. Particular attention will be paid to IP. Finally, since Interoperability is the keystone of M2M, we’ll review the state-of-Art (SoA) of the whole M2M ecosystem, including worldwide standards (3GPP, ETSI M2M, IEEE 802.16, IETF…) and industry forums currently trying to push for both solutions and usages. 3© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 4. Outline of whole course Introduction to M2M market Industrial Landscape: value chain, new applications & usages, Products Trends and achievable market Keystone Technologies & M2M Architecture M2M Architecture(s): Vertical Markets & generic approach, economy of scale & Interoperability Wireless M2M: Cellular (2G, 3G, LTE, WiMAX), Shortrange (WiFi, ZigBee, BT, RFID, Z-wave, etc…) Wireline M2M (PLC,…) IP M2M: IP-to-the-sensor (constrained IP stacks), autoconfiguration algorithms, M2M networks connected to Internet Key functionalities Security, privacy, trust Device management: protocols, Firmware Over The Air (FOTA), remote diagnostic, self-discovery, scalability Ubiquitous connectivity, interoperability Energy efficiency Overview of microcontrollers and embedded OS. Context awareness and monitoring Identification, naming and addressing: fundamental concepts of IP routing and addressing Technology Roadmap and Standards IETF (ROLL, 6LowPAN) ETSI: TC M2M, ITS 3GPP: Machine Type Communications (MTC) with LTE Rel.10 & Beyond Smart Grids: NIST architecture, IEEE P2030, Gridman, DLMS, CEN-CENELEC IEEE P1901 DSL Forum Conclusions: Research priorities & recommendations Digital Agenda for Europe Governance recommendations: Mandates from European Commission Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) for the Future Internet Digital Economy support in France (e.g. Grand Emprunt) 4© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 5. Outline of course#1 Introduction to M2M market Industrial Landscape: value chain, new applications & usages, Products Trends and achievable market Technology Roadmap and Standards IETF (ROLL, 6LowPAN) ECOSYSTEM ETSI: TC M2M, ITS 3GPP: Machine Type Communications (MTC) with LTE Rel.10 & Beyond Smart Grids: NIST architecture, IEEE P2030, Gridman, DLMS, CEN-CENELEC IEEE P1901 DSL Forum Conclusions: Research priorities & recommendations Digital Agenda for Europe Governance recommendations: Mandates from European Commission Strategy & Perspectives Public-Private Partnerships (PPP) for the Future Internet Digital Economy support in France (e.g. Grand Emprunt) 5© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 6. Market opportunitiesFrom Vertical ‘niche’ markets to Outstanding opportunities…
  • 7. Mobile Broadband (MBB) Experience Connected Life: Home, on-the-move, Work Traffic Generated = 24 x = 515 x = 122 x Source: CISCO VNI Mobile 2011 7© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 8. Smart City What we are looking for….ultimately… Whilst avoiding ‘Big Brother’ & maintaining ‘Privacy’… 8© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 9. Yesterday: People Connecting to People Presented by Interdigital: Globecom’11 – IWM2M, Houston 9© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 10. Today: People Connecting to Things Presented by Interdigital: Globecom’11 – IWM2M, Houston 10© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 11. Tomorrow: Network of Networks, Internet of Things (IoT) Presented by Interdigital: Globecom’11 – IWM2M, Houston 11© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 12. Non-exhaustive list of M2M applications & services Car Telematic Fleet Management Parking & Traffic Management in urban areas Positioning Systems Smart Metering POS-Terminal Security Remote Monitoring of Green Energy power plants Remote Management of Assets & Products Environmental monitoring & ICT support to a sustainable economic growth eHealth • Etc… 12© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 13. Traffic Growth Opportunitites Global M2M Eco-system revenues 1,200,000 45 1,000,000 Industrial 40 Transport Automobile 35 800,000 Entertainment 30 Billion $ 25 Services 600,000 Mobile 20 400,000 15 Software 10 200,000 5 Hardware Computers 0 0 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Strategy Analytics – March 2006 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 Growth of Internet « Connections »: • 2005-2008: Fixed-Mobile Convergence (FMC) • 2008-2012: M2M Communications 13© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 14. Market Evolution Cellular M2M Communications Short Range M2M Communications (GSM/GPRS/EDGE & (WiFi, Zigbee, Bluetooth, RFID) WCDMA/HSPA) ZigBee Chipset Shipment Forecast by Application SIM Cards for M2M (Europe) Segment 70 140 60 120 Other 50 Home automation Millions dunités POS term inals 100 Millions units Home networking 40 Security alarm s 80 Industrial automation 30 Energy meters Comm ercial vehicles 60 Utilities 20 Private vehicles Building automation 40 10 Toys 20 0 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 0 Berg insights – The European Wireless M2M market - 2008 West - WIRELESS SENSOR AND M2M MARKETS - 2005 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Combination of both are necessary for economically viable solutions, within a Market worth 40Bn$ 14© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 15. Main trends and drivers The dramatic growth of mobile data trafficSource:IDATE UK mobile data traffic growth AT&T traffic evolution Source: Ofcom Source: AT&T Mobile data traffic evolution (TB per million inhabitants per month) in some European countries Daily traffic consumption in Europe Source: Sandvine Source: ECC PT1 15 © Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 16. Mobile traffic forecasts 2010-2020: Worlwide Total mobile traffic •As a conclusion, total worldwide mobile traffic will reach more than 127 EB in 2020, representing an 33 times increase compared with 2010 figure. Total mobile traffic (EB per year) 140.00 120.00 100.00 Yearly traffic in EB Europe 80.00 Americas Asia 60.00 Rest of the world W orld 40.00 20.00 - 2010 2015 2020 Source: IDATE 16© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 17. Wireless M2M: 4 pillars 17© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 18. M2M Deployment Challenges Source: Yankee group, 2008 Need for OPEN Standards, Open API & SDK, industry groups, Incentive Regulation and Governance 18© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 19. A Bright Future for M2M & IoT 19© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 20. Connected Devices: Services 20© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 21. LTE Ecosystem is maturing fast!Smart Phones M-Tablets DSL-Routers + USB Dongles + Netbooks, etc… 21© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 22. M2M Cellular: Vertical Market Growth 22© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 23. New M2M Value Chain: Stakeholders opportunities & roles 23© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 24. M2M ecosystem 24© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 25. M2M: Paving the way towards IoT 25© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 26. M2M Market: Maturity assessment Source: ORANGE 26© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 27. Carriers co-operations with M2M players 27© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 28. Miniaturization towards the IoT Number of Devices Cost & Size 28© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 29. Smaller Cost, Size & Consumption 29© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 30. Sagemcom Modules Automotive Security & Alarm Remote monitoring POS Terminals Smart Metering 30© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 31. Sagemcom products Printing Terminals Broadband & Residential Terminals Professional Terminals and Systems Residential Terminals Consumer Fax Broadband Terminals Imaging Connected screens Digital TV Set-Top Box Energy & Telecom Systems & Networks M2M Communications Partnerships Energy management 31© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 32. Internet of Things (IoT)
  • 33. Smart World: IPSO vision 33© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 34. IoT & Future Internet Active & Sensitive Ambient Intelligence Systems 34© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 35. IoT, Technology Roadmap 35© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 36. Connected objects: Segmentation map 36© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 37. Internet of Things Enablers Barriers Energy Lack of Governance Intelligence Privacy & Security Communication Integration Interoperability Standards Manufacturing Applications Ubiquitous intelligent devices Things on the move Ambient and Assisted Living Retail (AAL) Bar code replacement by –eHealth RFID Tag Logistic –Intelligent Home Pharmaceutical –Transportation Food Society, –People, Security & Privacy 37© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 38. IoT: Food Traceability 38© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 39. IoT: Drug Traceability 39© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 40. IoT Key Enablers 40© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 41. RFID Communication platform 41© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 42. RFID: Basics 42© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 43. 3 RFID Tags categories (1) (2) (3) BAP = Battery Assist Passive 43© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 44. RFID passive Tags: function Vs Frequency 44© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 45. IoT: Identity Interoperability Challenges 45© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 46. Id Tag examples • 2D bar codes • 1D (linear) bar code examples 46© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 47. Id Tag B2C scenario example 47© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 48. RFID NFC 48© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 49. NFC use cases 49© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 50. NFC: 3 operating modes Universal Mobile Wallet 50© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 51. IoT, European Commission 51© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 52. IoT, European Commission • Need for Governance Actions – Privacy & protection of personnal Data – Trust, Acceptance & Security – Standardization Internet of Things Internet of Things for People 52© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 53. Privacy Protection: 4 facets 53© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 54. IoT: Privacy act (US) Notice Privacy Labeling Deactivation 54© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 55. Standardization efforts & ArchitectureTowards Global International M2M Partnership Project?… (M2MPP)
  • 56. Standard « strategy »… 56© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 57. ..Make it (really!) useful… 57© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 58. High Level (simplified) M2M Architecture Capillary Network Operator platform M2M Gateway Client Application 58© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 59. Network of Networks, Internet of Things (IoT) Presented by Interdigital: Globecom’11 – IWM2M, Houston 59© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 60. IoT & Cloud Computing 60© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 61. M2M Ecosystem’s Jungle 61© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 62. 3GPP Structure 62© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 63. 3GPP Liaisons 63© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 64. ETSI TC M2M links with other ETSI TCs ETSI RRS ETSI ATTM ETSI DECT ETSI SCP Capillary Access Networks Service Platform ETSI ERM ETSI TISPAN wireless Wide Area Network M2M Gateway IP Network wireline Application ETSI ITS ETSI e-Health ETSI PLT 64© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 65. ETSI M2M Links with ecosystem EPCGlobal ISO/IEC JTC1 GS1 UWSN ESMIG Metering IUT-T Utilities HGI NGN CEN CENELEC Home Gateway Metering Smart Metering Smart Metering Capillary Initiative Access networks OASIS Service Platform W3C WOSA wireless Wide Area Network IETF 6LowPAN M2M Gateway KNX IPSO Phy-Mac Over IPV6 IPV6 IP Network Hardware and W-Mbus Protocols IETF ROLL Routing over Low Power Lossy Networks wireline IEEE ZCL 802.xx.x Application ZigBee Alliance. ZB Application Profiles OMA GSMA 3GPP SCAG,… SA1, SA3, ,… 65© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 66. ETSI TC M2M Use Cases TR 102 692 TR 102 732 TR 102 857 TR 102 898 TR 102 897 Smart eHealth Connected Automotive City Metering consumer automation PUBLISHED TS 102 689 Stage 1 M2M Service Requirements PUBLISHED TR 1xx xxx TR 102 725 Interworking M2M with M2M Area TS 102 690 Definitions Networks Stage 2 M2M Functional Architecture TR 102 935 TR 101 531 TR 102 167 Smart Grid TS 102 921 Re-use of 3GPP Threat analysis and Stage 3 nodes by M2MSC counter measures impacts on M2M Communications; mIa, dIa and mId interfaces layer to M2M service M2M layer 66© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 67. GSC M2M Standardization Task Force Source: Numerex 67© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 68. Telecommunications Technology Association – TTA (Korea) 68© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 69. Association of Radio Industries & Business - ARIB 69© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 70. Telecom Industry Association – TIA (USA) 70© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 71. China Communications Standards Association - CCSA 71© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 72. Global ICT Standardization Forum for India - GISFI 72© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 73. GSMA - Smart Card Application Group (SCAG) - Embedded SIM Task Force - Updated remotely with operators credentials (even after sale) - Secure re-provisioning of alternative operators Liaison with ETSI Smart Card Platform (SCP) Then to 3GPP CT6 73© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 74. M2M Standards Landscape WAN Capillary 74© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 75. Taxonomy M2M Standard activities 75© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 76. Goals for a Global Initiative for M2M Standardization (M2M Partnership Project) Develop one globally agreed M2M Service Layer specification Consolidate current M2M Service Layer standards activities into the Global Initiative Identify a common Service Layer architecture and identify gaps where existing standards do not fulfill the requirements and provide or initiate the creation of specifications to fill these gaps Develop and maintain Technical Specifications and Technical Reports in support of the M2M common Service Layer architecture framework Collaborate with wireless and wireline SDOs and fora responsible for developing standards for Core and Access Networks Collaborate with SDOs and fora in charge of developing the vertical markets (i.e., domain-specific) aspects of M2M applications Develop specifications that will help drive the industry towards a goal of lower operating expenses, lower capital expenses, faster time-to-market, and mass- market economies of scale Source: Final Draft updated during Plenary Telecon #1 to discuss Ad Hoc Group input - Updated 19 October, 2011 76 76© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 77. Open Issues • E2E Architecture • Governance, naming, identity, interfaces • Service openness, interoperability • Spectrum (Wireless) • Standards 77© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 78. Capillary Network &Wireless Sensors Network (WSN) Key Technologies From proprietary solutions towards IP smart objects…
  • 79. Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) evolution Price Scalability Cabling Proprietary ZigBee 6lowpan radio + network Internet Z-Wave, prop. ZigBee and 6lowpan Any vendor ISM etc. WHART ISA100 Cables Vendor Complex Open development lock-in middleware and portability 1980s 2000 2006 2008 -> Increased Productivity 79© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 80. Konnex (KNX) • Worldwide Home & building Automation European Installation Bus (EIB) is an European Std (ISO), created in 1987. It is thus Open Std. • International Std: ISO/IEC 14543-3 • European Std: • CENELEC EN50090 • CEN EN 13321-1 / 13321-2 • Chinese Std: GB/Z 20965 • US Std: ANSI/ASHRAE 135 80© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 81. KNX: The EIB Bus • EIB Bus system principle Medium Transmission: -Twisted Pair (TP) -Powerline (PL) -RF 81© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 82. ISA 100: Industrial AutomationISA100.11a Wireless is based on ISA: International Society for AutomationIEEE 802.15.4 (WPAN) & IETF 6LoWPAN 802.15.4-2006 2.4 GHz used as in standard Except: carrier sensing is optional 802.15.4-2006 MAC sub-layer used as in the standard ISA100.11a adds MAC features on-top of this Channel hopping Slotted hopping and slow hopping Time coordination No MAC retransmissions No 802.15.4 beacon mode features used 82© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 83. WirelessHART 83© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 84. WirelessHART Source: Ron Helson, GSC MSTF - 2011 84© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 85. WirelessHART Source: Ron Helson, GSC MSTF - 2011 85© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 86. Bluetooth (Master in one piconet can bePiconet (up to 7 active Devices) bridge a slave in another) 2.4 GHz ISM band 79 x 1MHz channels BT version Throughput (Mbps) v1.2 1 v2.0+EDR 3 v3.0 + HS 24 Star Topology scatternet Max Range Max Power1998 - BT technology is officially introduced and the Bluetooth SIG is formed. Class (m) dBm mWBluetooth technologys intended basic purpose is to be a wire replacement 1 100 20 1001999 - Bluetooth 1.0 Specification is introduced. 2 10 4 2,5 3 1 0 12003 - announcement of Version 2.1.2004 - v 2.0 + EDR (Enhanced Data Rate) is introduced.2005 - v 2.0 + EDR begin to hit the market in late 2005.2007 - v 2.1 + EDR is adopted by the Bluetooth SIG.2009 - v 3.0 + HS (High Speed) is adopted by the Bluetooth SIG. Wi-Fi as alternate PHY/MAC2010 – v4.0: WiBree (Ultra Low Power) integrated into Bluetooth, as Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) Up to 7 controllers 86 © Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 87. Zigbee IEEE 802.15.4 features Data rates of 250 kbps, 40 kbps, and 20 kbps. Two addressing modes; 16-bit short and 64-bit IEEE addressing. Support for critical latency devices, such as joysticks. CSMA-CA channel access. Automatic network establishment by the coordinator. Fully handshaked protocol for transfer reliability. Power management to ensure low power consumption. 16 channels in the 2.4GHz ISM band, 10 channels in the 915MHz I and one channel in the 868MHz band. 87© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 88. IP for Smart Object (IPSO) Alliance • Support Activities • Activities – IETF 6LoWPAN – Interoperability Tests – IETF ROLL (IOT) – ISA100 – Architecture Design – IEEE – Technology Proof of Concepts (PoC) – White Papers – Tutorials/Dissemination 88© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 89. IETF 6LoWPAN IPv6 over Low-power WPAN • IETF RFC 4919, 4944 • 16/64 bit IEEE 802.15.4 • 6LoWPAN is an ADAPTATION addressing Header Format! • Efficient header compression – IPv6 base and extension headers, UDP header • Network autoconfiguration using neighbor discovery • Unicast, multicast and broadcast support – Multicast is compressed and mapped to broadcast • Fragmentation – 1280 byte IPv6 MTU -> 127 byte 802.15.4 frames • Support for IP routing (e.g. IETF RPL) • Support for use of link-layer mesh (e.g. 802.15.5) IPv6-LoWPAN Router Stack 89© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 90. IETF ROLL Routing Over Low-power and Lossy networks • Standardizing a routing algorithm for embedded apps • Application specific requirements – Home automation – Commercial building automation – Industrial automation – Urban environments • Analyzed all existing protocols • Solution must work over IPv6 and 6LoWPAN • Routing Protocol in-progress called RPL “Ripple” – Proactive distance-vector approach – See draft-ietf-roll-rpl for detailed information 90© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 91. Contiki – uIPv6 stack • Open source • uIPv6 Design • Small footprint – Code size ~ 11.5Kb – RAM usage ~ 1.8Kb – Fit on most constraint Sensors platforms • Certified – IPv6 Phase 1 • IPv6 Specs (RFC2460) – interoperable with stacks from all other • IPv6 Addressing (RFC4291) certified vendors • Neighbor Discovery (RFC 4861) • Stateless Address Config (RFC4862) • ICMPv6 (RFC4443) 91© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 92. Berkeley initiative http://www-bsac.eecs.berkeley.edu/ • http://openwsn.berkel • http://wsn.eecs.berkel ey.edu/ ey.edu/connectivity/ Open source implementations + Connectivity data repositary & IETF ROLL/RPL test 92© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 93. WAN – Cellular Systems 3GPP LTE & WiMAX
  • 94. Wireless Broadband Systems mapping 94© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 95. LTE Parallel evolution path to 3G DL: 21Mbps (64QAM) DL: 28Mbps [2x2 MIMO & 16QAM] DC-HSPA + 64QAM 2x2 MIMO & 64QAM 95© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 96. Main benefits from LTE 96© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 97. Main benefits from LTE • Full Packet Switched (PS) no MSC • CSFB, SRVCC • no RNC • Hotspot Offload • Self-Organizing Networks (SON) • DL: 150Mbps / UL: 50Mbps (2x2 MIMO) • Mobility up to 350Km/h • BW up to 20MHz • Latency < 5ms • Default Bearer & QoS • QoS & IMS | ICIC • BW: 1.4, 3, 5, 10, 15, 20MHz • GSMA (VoLTE), LSTI, NGMN, GCF, Femto Forum • new Bands: 2.6GHz, 700/800 MHz (Digital Dividend) 97© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 98. LTE Rel.8/9: Bandwidth & Duplexing modes And HALF-DUPLEX!!! 98© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 99. Investing in LTE: 237 Operators in 85 Countries 26 Commercial LTE NW launched 161 LTE User Devices (July 2011) 174 Commercial LTE Commitments in 64 countries 63 additional pre-commitment trials 93 LTE Networks are anticipated to be in Commercial service by end of 2012! 99© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 100. Worldwide Mobile Broadband Spectrum FDD: 2x70MHz FDD: 2x35MHz TDD: 50MHz FDD Hong-Kong 7 3 China Mobile 2600 1800AWS TeliaSonera Genius Brand Vodafone CSL Ltd O2 … Major TD-LTE Market … (incl. India) VerizonmetroPCS AT&T 21 1500 NTT DoCoMo Refarming and Extensions are still to come… Digital Dividend Fragmentation & Harmonization of Spectrum is a critical problem! 100© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 101. LTE Roll-out Worldwide Vs Spectrum Band fragmentation Source:Huawei 101© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 102. TD-LTE is gaining momentum Strong Ecosystem growing fast… TD-LTE is becoming a Technology of Highest interest for Operators & Vendors 102© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 103. Global UMTS Subscriber Growth Forecast HSPA+ will still play an active role In near future, both as migration and complementary to LTE. 3G will keep playing a Key role In Future! Multi-Radio chips (2G/3G/LTE) 103© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 104. VoLTE (GSMA IR.92) Timeline Early Adopters General Market craft revolution 2011: TRIALS 2011: CSFB 2012: COMMERCIAL 2012: TRIALS SRVCC 2013: COMMERCIAL « The need for 4G picocells and femtocells to enhance coverage and boost capacity if one of the important principles for Verizon’s LTE Network. » Tony Melone – Verizon Wireless CTO – Sept. 2009 104© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 105. 3GPP LTE System architecture IMS: IP Multimedia Subsystem PCRF: Policy, Charging Resource Function UE: User Equipment MME: Mobility Management Entity S-GW: Serving Gateway P-GW: Packet Gateway HSS: Home Subcriber Server EPC: Evolved Packet Core EPS: Evolved Packet System = EPC + E-UTRAN E-UTRAN: Evolved UTRAN PMIP: Proxy Mobile IP DHCP LTE – Rel.8 105© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 106. LTE Femtocells
  • 107. Femtocell Ecosystem: 62 Operators Femto Forum – 62 Operators members 107© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 108. Femtocell Ecosystem: 74 Technology providers End to End Solutions Components & Software Femto Access Points Femto Core Network Others The Ecosystem is now mature enough, and has experienced its 2nd IOT Plugfest. 108© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 109. Femtocell Market status 19 Commercial Deployments in 13 countries, 15 Roll-out commitments in 2011 109© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 110. LTE Femto: HeNB S1 S1 S1 S1 X2 X2 3GPP Rel.10 110© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 111. LTE Femtocell: Home eNode B (HeNB) 3 Options! 111© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 112. LTE Femtocell: Home eNode B (HeNB) 3 Options! [1] [2] [3] 112© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 113. HeNB OAM process (Mgt System) 113© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 114. Residential Macro Data Offload Offload via WiFi and/or Femtocell On average, more than 70% of traffic can still be Offloaded ! 114© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 115. Key Findings Global Femtocell Survey 6,100 consumers in 6 countries 115© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 116. LTE Self-Organizing Networks (SON)
  • 117. LTE Self-Organizing Network (SON) features S1/X2 configuration 117© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 118. SON progress status w.r.t 3GPP Releases 8, 9, and 10 SON Concepts & Requirements 3GPP Rel.8 Self-Establishment of eNBs SON Automatic Neighbour Relation (ANR) list Mgt Study on SON related OAM interfaces for HNB Study on Self-Healing of SON SON – OAM Aspects 3GPP Rel.9 - SON Self-Optimization Mgt - Automatic Radio Network Configuration Data preparation SON SON – OAM Aspects 3GPP Rel.10 - SON Self-Optimization Mgt Continuation - SON Self-Healing Mgt - OAM aspects of Energy saving in Radio Networks LTE SON Enhancements 118© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 119. Support for Self-Configuration & Self-Optimization • Self-Configuration Process – Basic Set-up – Automatic Registration of nodes in the system – Initial Radio Configuration • Self-Optimization Process – Ue & eNB measurements and performance measurements are used to auto-tune the network 119© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 120. LTE-Advanced
  • 121. LTE-Advanced (Rel.10) and Beyond (Rel.11) Rel.11 121© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 122. LTE-Advanced: System Performance Requirements Support of Wider Bandwidth Carrier Aggregation up to 100MHz MIMO Techniques extension DL: up to 8 layers UL: up to 4 layers Coordinated Multiple Point (CoMP) (Rel.11) Relaying Un Uu L1 & L3 relaying 122© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 123. LTE-AdvancedArchitecture & Services Enhancements • LIPA • SIPTO • IFOM • Relaying • MTC (M2M)
  • 124. LTE-Advanced: Local IP Access (LIPA) 124© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 125. LIPA: initial solutions in competition 125© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 126. LIPA solution for HeNB using Local PDN Connection LIPA MME PCRF Rx S10 S11 S1-MME L- GW Gx L-S5 Other IMS HeNB S1-U SGW S5 PDN GW SGi Internet Etc. E- UTRA- Local IP acc ess network elements Uu E-UTRAN network elements EPC network elements Packet data network (e.g. Internet, E-UTRA UE Intranet, intra-operator IMS provisioning) 126© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 127. LIPA solution for HeNB using Local PDN Connection 127© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 128. 3GPP Current conclusions on LIPA 128© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 129. 3GPP Current conclusions on LIPA 129© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 130. LTE-Advanced: Selected IP Traffic Offload (SIPTO) SIPTO Traffic CN L-PGW MME RAN S5 S11 S1-U S5 eNB S-GW P-GW UE CN Traffic 130© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 131. LTE-Advanced: IP Flow Mobility and Seamless Offload (IFOM) • IP Flow Mobility and Seamless Offload (IFOM) is used to carry (simultaneously) some of UE’s traffic over WIFI to offload Femto Access! IETF RFC-5555, DSMIPv6 131© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 132. LTE-Advanced: Relaying and its potential gain Un Uu 132© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 133. LTE-Advanced: Relay support MME / S-GW MME / S-GW S1 S1 S1 X2 1 E-UTRAN eNB S1 DeNB X2 Un RN 133© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 134. Machine-Type Communications (MTC) in 3GPP 134© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 135. MTC Scenarios • MTC Device MTC server • MTC Device <--> MTC Device (No Server in between!) MTC MTC API Operator domain Server User MTC Device MTC MTC MTC Operator domain A Operator domain B Device Device Device MTC MTC MTC Device Device Device MTC MTC Device MTC Device Device MTC MTC Device Device Operator domain MTC Server/ MTCMTC UserDevice MTC Device Still Not Considered in Rel.10!! MTC Device MTC Device 135© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 136. 3GPP MTC (High Level) Architecture MTCsms MTC 3GPP Server PLMN - MTCu 3GPP bearer services / MTC MTC Server Device SMS / IMS IWK Function MTC Server MTCi MTCu: It provides MTC Devices access to 3GPP network for the transport of user plane and control plane traffic. MTCu interface could be based on Uu, Um, Ww and LTE-Uu interface. MTCi: It is the reference point that MTC Server uses to connect the 3GPP network and thus communicates with MTC Device via 3GPP bearer services/IMS. MTCi could be based on Gi, Sgi, and Wi interface. MTCsms: It is the reference point MTC Server uses to connect the 3GPP network and thus communicates with MTC Device via 3GPP SMS. 136© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 137. 3GPP MTC: Service Requirements • Common Service REQ • Specific Service REQ (Features) – Device Triggering – Low Mobility – Addressing – Time Controlled – Time Tolerant Private Address Space Public Address Space – PS only MTC MTC – Small data Trx MNO Device Server – Mobile originated only – Infrequent mobile Terminated – Monitoring – Identifiers – Priority alarm – Charging – Secure Connection – Security – Location Specific Trigger – Remote Device Management – NW provided destination for UL data – Infrequent Trx – Group based features 137© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 138. 3GPP MTC: Service REQMTC Common Service REQ DetailsDevice Triggering MTC Device shall be able to receive trigger indications from the network and shall establish communication with the MTC Server when receiving the trigger indication. Possible options may include: -Receiving trigger indication when the MTC Device is offline. -Receiving trigger indication when the MTC Device is online, but has no data connection established. -Receiving trigger indication when the MTC Device is online and has a data connection establishedAddressing MTC Server in a public address space can successfully send a mobile terminated message to the MTC Device inside a private IP address spaceIdentifiers uniquely identify the ME, the MTC subscriber. Manage numbers & identifiers. Unique Group Id.Charging Charging per MTC Device or MTC Group.Security MTC optimizations shall not degrade security compared to non-MTC communicationsRemote MTC Device The management of MTC Devices should be provided by existing mechanisms (e.g. OMA DM, TR-069)Management 138© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 139. 3GPP MTC: Features MTC Feature DetailsLow Mobility MNO change 1) Frequency of Mobility Mgt procedures, or per device, 2) Location updates performed by MTC deviceTime Controlled MTC Applications that can tolerate to send or receive data only during defined time intervals and avoid unnecessary signalling outside these defined time intervals. Different charging can apply.Time Tolerant MTC Devices that can delay their data transfer. The purpose of this functionality is to allow the network operator to prevent MTC Devices that are Time Tolerant from accessing the network (e.g. in case of radio access network overload)Packet Switched (PS) only network operator shall be able to provide PS only subscriptions with or without assigning an MSISDNSmall Data Trx The system shall support transmissions of small amounts of data with minimal network impact (e.g. signalling overhead, network resources, delay for reallocation)Mobile originated only Reduce Frequency of Mobility Management Procedures (Signalling)Infrequent Mobile Terminated MTC Device: mainly mobile originated communications Reduce Mobility Management SignallingMTC Monitoring Detect unexpected behaviour, changes, and loss of connectivity (configurable by user) Warning to MTC server (other actions configurable by user)Priority Alarm Theft, vandalism, tampering Precedence over aby other MTC feature (MAX priority!)Secure Connection Secure connection between MTC Device and MTC server even during Roaming.Location Specific Trigger initiate a trigger to the MTC Devices based on area information provided to the network operatorNetwork Provided Destination MTC Applications that require all data from an MTC Device to be directed to a network provided destination IPfor Uplink Data address.Infrequent Transmission The network shall establish resource only when transmission occursGroup Based (GB) MTC 1 MTC device associated to 1 single MTC group. Combined QoS policy (GB policing): A maximum bit rate forfeatures the data that is sent/received by a MTC Group shall be enforced GB addressing: mechanism to send a broadcast message to a MTC Group, e.g. to wake up the MTC Devices that are members of that MTC Group 139© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 140. M2M European R&D Innovation: FP7 EXALTED • EXpAnding LTE for Devices 140© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 141. NGMN – LTE Backhaul Source: Ericsson Traffic Volume: X2 ~ [ 4 - 10%] S1 IPSec +14% GTP/MIP overhead ~10% LTE Small Cells Deployment will change Rules for Backhaul Provisioning Need for more Research Architecture / PHY / Synchronization (e.g. PTP (1588), SyncE, Hybrid…) 141© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 142. TVWS for Backhaul 142© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 143. LTE in TVWS 143© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 144. LTE Royalty Level: Need for Patent Pool facilitation? LTE/SAE Declarations to ETSI by PO 4076 declarations (March 2011) 14.8% Critical constraint for Femtocells is COST EFFICIENCY!! © 2011 Sisvel (www.sisvel.com) 144© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 145. LTE & 4G patents $12.5 billion 6000+ patents 24000+ patents $4.5 billion WHO’s NEXT?… $2.6 billion $340 Million $770 Million Risk to ‘Kill’ the Business… Especially in Vertical Markets! 145© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 146. Verizon LTE Innovation Center LTE Connected Car Office in the Box Connected Home (incl. eHealth) Bicycle LiveEdge.TV 146© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 147. WiFi – CellularConvergence
  • 148. Fixed/Mobile Convergence Source: BT Wholesale It’s Mandatory to propose integrated Architectures Taking advantage of Wireless/Wired systems (e.g. 3G, LTE, WiFi, WiGig, DAS, RoF, PLC…) 148© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 149. WBA – Roadmap Small intelligent Cross-Cell (SiXC)™ 149© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 150. Hotspot 2.0 (HS2.0) - NGH Enhancing WiFi to be more ‘Cellular’ Built directly Built directly into device into device Multitude of 3rd Party Connection Managers: Source: Cisco 150© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 151. WiMAX –M2M & Smart Grids IEEE 802.16p, 802.16n
  • 152. WiMAX community turns to M2M • IEEE 802.16p • IEEE 802.16n – Machine-to-Machine (M2M) (GRIDMAN) – Approved: Sept. 2010 – Smart Grids – Expiration: Dec. 2014 – Emergency, Public Safety!! • Misleading title, stands for: – Greater Reliability In • URL: Disrupted Metroplotian http://ieee802.org/16/m2 Area NW m/index.html – Approved: June 2010 – Expiration: Dec. 2014 • URL: http://wirelessman.org/gri dman/index.html 152© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 153. WiMAX based M2M Architecture MNO (Mobile Network Operator) Access Service Connectivity Network Service Network IEEE 802.16 R1 Non M2M M2M device M2M Service Server Consumer R1 IEEE 802.16 IEEE 802.16 BS M2M device Non IEEE R1 IEEE 802.16 802.16 M2M device M2M device Classical WiMAX NW 153© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 154. WiMAX M2M: Requirements & Features • Extremely Low Power Consumption • High Reliability • Enhanced Access Priority – Alarms, Emergency calls etc…(Health, Public safety, Surveillance…) • Extremely Large Numbers of Devices • Addressing • Group Control • Security • Small burst transmission • Low/no mobility • Time Controlled Operation (pre-defined scheduling) • Time Tolerant operations • One-Way Data traffic • Extremely Low Latency (e.g. Emergency..) • Extremely Long Range Access • Infrequent traffic Looks quite similar to 3GPP MTC… 154© Thierry Lestable, 2012
  • 155. WiMAX M2M: Potential impacts M2M Requirements & Potential Directions with impacts on Standard Features Low Power Consumption Idle/Sleep modes, Power savings in active mode. Link Adaptation, UL Power Ctrl, Ctrl Signalling, Device Cooperation. High Reliability Link Adaptation protocol with very robust MCS. Enhanced Interference Mitigation procedures. Device Collaboration with redundant and/or alternate paths (e.g. diversity) Enhanced Access priority BW request protocol, NW entry/re-entry, ARQ/HARQ, frame structure Transmission attemps Large Link Adaptation, ARQ/HARQ, frame structure, Ctrl signalling, NW entry/re-entry Numbers of Devices Group Control Group ID location, Ctrl signalling, paging, Sleep mode initiation, multi-cast operation, BW request/allocation, connection Mgt protocols Small burst transmission New QoS profiles, burst Mgt, SMS transmission mechanism, BW request/allocation protocols, Channel Coding, frame structure. Low-overhead Ctrl signaling for Small Data. Smaller resource unit! Low/no mobility Mobility Mgt protocol. Signaling w.r.t Handover preparation & execution migt be turned off. Idle mode. Measurements/feedback protocls, pilot structure. Extremely Long Range access Low & roust modulation schemes, higher power transmission Infrequent traffic Simplifications to Sleep/idle mode protocol Keeping in Mind BACKWARD compatibility 155© Thierry Lestable, 2012