Tirupati travels-History Of Kolar Temple
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Tirupati travels-History Of Kolar Temple

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Kolaramma temple in Kolar dates back to the early centuries of Christian era. Though the exact date has been obliterated in the dark age of history, it is a product of ganga devotion, the clan that ...

Kolaramma temple in Kolar dates back to the early centuries of Christian era. Though the exact date has been obliterated in the dark age of history, it is a product of ganga devotion, the clan that ruled this part of the country in 6th, 7th and 8th centuries. In the beginning they ruled from Kuvalala-(The present name is Kolar). They shifted their capital to Talakadu of Mysore country and then moved to the northern parts of Andhra Pradesh; when they were overrun by Cholas in 9th and 10th centuries. The early temples sprouted in these parts amply illustrate the unique Ganga style of art and architecture. - See more at:

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Tirupati travels-History Of Kolar Temple Tirupati travels-History Of Kolar Temple Document Transcript

  • History Of kolar Temple in AndhraPradesh www.tirupatidarshan.org Kolar Temple Kolaramma temple in Kolar dates back to the early centuries of Christian era. Though the exact date has been obliterated in the dark age of history, it is a product of ganga devotion, the clan that ruled this part of the country in 6th, 7th and 8th centuries. In the beginning they ruled from Kuvalala-(The present name is Kolar). They shifted their capital to Talakadu of Mysore country and then moved to the northern parts of Andhra Pradesh; when they were overrun by Cholas in 9th and 10th centuries. The early temples sprouted in these parts amply illustrate the unique Ganga style of art and architecture. Kolar dist is the city situated in the southeast part of Karnataka. The temple is in the south east end of the city. It is some 70kms, from Bangalore. Though the temple is a small one, when compared to the other temples of Vijayanagar period, is unique in many ways. The temple is on the northern banks of Kolarammana Kere, the big tank otherwise called Amanikere. The town itself is known as Kuvalala, Kolahapura, Kolar and the Goddess –
  • kolaramma-Chamundeswari killing Mahishasura – is called Pidariamman in the inscriptions found in the temple. Pidari- the word is a corrupt form of Peedahari a Sanskrit term which means remover of bad omens and balagrahas. It is a folk deity associated with saptha Matrikas.(seven mother Goddesses) also known as Akkagarulu- elder sisters of the male God. In S.I.I vol2 para 41 Venkaiah in his foot note on the subject of Pidari has this to say- Pidari is seen in sitting pose expressing her wrath with fire flowing out from all parts of her body. There is a crown on her head. She has Vibhuthi on her forehead and ornaments hanging down from the earlobes. In her four hands she has trident, skull, drum with serpent, elephant hook. Her seat is Yagnavedhi. There are eighteen generals of her army. On the whole Chamundi is depicted as representing Pidari Devi. But Chamundi will be standing on Mahishasura. It is said that she killed Mahishusura with the Shanka and Chakra (conch and discus) of Vishnu. Two of her four hands hold Shanka and Chakra. In her Vibhuthi there will be the mark of half moon. When she has six hands – bracelet, sword, Trident, hook and skull etc; will be the armaments. When so ever the departed souls by suicide or dreadful cause became evil powers, Pidari Devatha controls them. The Goddess enshirined in Kanya Kumari is also called Pidari Devi. Gopinatha rao- while explaining the meaning of the pillar inscription of kanya Kumari says that Pidari Devi is Kanya Kumari. The original lines (from 433 to 444 E.I Volume edited by H.Krishna Sastry) are – “Raja Raja Pandia Nattu Kumari Kanniya Pidariyarku Vendum Nithya nimandanangalukku Chakkaravarthi Sri Veera Rajendra Devar Kudutta ..”(…as per charities endowed by Chakravarthi Sri Vira Rajendra deva to Pidariar Kanyakumari of RajaRaja Pandya country….) we can safely conclude that Pidari Devi was very famous Goddess in the south India sub-continent and in the course of time she came to be known as Chamundi- Chamundeswary Devi.
  • Kolar Temple In the early days before the advent of Agamas when Mantrokta Aradhana was scarce, the Gods and Goddesses were generally believed to be evil spirits or wrathful and vindictive super powers and were worshipped to be graceful and to ward off evil effects in ones life. While the time passed they were associated with good natured, graceful male Gods and they too became benevolent and good natured and were called Mother Goddesses and they were many-six, seven, eight, even sixteen. But all were filtered down to seven and were invariably associated with their male counter parts. Only varahi and Chamundi have got individual existence. Mahabharata narrates the story of saptha matrikas, in its 225th Adhyaya of Vanaparva. Afterwars they came to be counted as seven in number. They are Brahmi, Maheswari, Koumari, Vaishnavi. Varahi, Indrani, Chamundi. The very names suggest the male counterparts. The vehicles used for their conveyance are also the same used by their male counter parts. Vehicles, like Hamsa for Brahmi, Nandi for Maheswari, Mayura for Koumari, Garuda for Vaishnavi, male buffalo for Varahi, elephant for Indrani, lion for chamundi, here also one can see the difference in Varahi and Chamundi. Anyway our goddess Kolaramma is having eight hands and with a trident she is seen killing Mahisha rakshasa, with her left foot firmly holding Asura to the ground. Simha Vahanam can be seen clearly in the background. She is facing south with her back to the northern wall of the Girbha Griha. Other six Matrikas are on the adhistana- near the western wall facing east. Ganapathi and Veerabhadra are also placed here. There is a Sri Chakra in the middile of the sanctum; which seems to be a new addition to the old pantheon. In order to house these idols Garbha Griha has become oblong. The unique feature is that one will not be able to see the Goddess by standing in the eastern doorway. To accommodate a full view of Chamundeswari Devi, a big mirror is installed in the south west corner of the sanctum. Another mirror is hanged to the North east pillar in the Mukha mandapa. One can see the image of Kolaramma in this mirrior also, which is a reflection twice removed from the original. To the left of this Garbha Griha there is another along structure at right angle which is another Garbha Griha housing the clay images (marter images- Sudha Vigrahas) of Saptha Matrikas. While in the first sanctuary all the idols are made of stone; here they are of marter. This room is more than twice the size of the first one, and has a horizontal wall separating the inner yard housing the deities and the outer mantapa where the devotees stand to have a glimpse of the idols. But here too one will not be able to get a full view of Saptha matrikas along with Ganapathi and Veerabhadra. Added to this oblong nature of placement of Vigrahas, the processional deity of Chamundeswari is at the entrance of this Garbhagriha facing north, which prevents a full view. In the outer section, to the left of the door, facing the north wall is the life size statue of Mooka Nachchiyar popularly known as Cheluramma. Tradition says she is nude, but a cloth is covering her body. Though she has no pooja of any sort, devotees prostrate at her feet where the image of a scorpion made of silver is at her feet. They say it is a pit of scorpions and as such the deity is
  • called Cheluramma. The two parts of this Garbha griha has got eight pillars supporting the roof, four to each side of the dividing wall in between. This Mukha Mantapa is having doors in the north and east. Devotees entering the temple by the north door depart from the east door, which leads to an outer Ranga Mandapa. Infront, to the east, there is an adhistana- a podium on the two sides of the entrance. Inside the temple entrance there is Balipita.there is a Dhwaja stamba ib the outer court yard. Kolar Temple In the10th century A.D. when the temple was a brick structure it received many charities for lamps and worship, gold ornaments and Naivedyams. Jakkiyabbe the daughter of Thribhuvanaiah erected this mantapa in c.1030 A.D. in 1033 on the orders of rajendra Chola Devar, Senapathi Arumoli maharayaru constructed the temple in stone which was brick structure earlier. The shilpi who constructed the temple at the instance of Arumolidevan was one Brahmin of Kattumanapakkam, shilpi Tiruppori ambalattadi. During the period of imperial cholas the temple had its golden age having one utsavam in every four days. There was an annual Thirukkodi Tirunnal called “Panguni Tiruvila” conducted in the month of Panguni. Dhwajarohanam being done on the day of Uttara Phalguni Nakshatra. This Dhwaja- flag was of 18 feet approximately. The artist who painted this flag was getting some honorarium also. The temple of Pidariyal used to have animal sacrifice also. There used to be twenty four dancing girls serving the Goddess. There was a Vyakarna panditha and a Jyothisthi. Young damsels were worshiped in Kanyapooja. Intoxicants were also used and all the festivals are explained in detail in the inscription found on the walls of the temple. Slowly after some time – say during 13th century, when Chola hegemony was declining, the temple was neglected and dilapidated, in AD 1280 Vettumarabanan renovated the temple adding the Mukhamantapa and reissuing orders for renewal of the charities of the old times. By this time the old practice of worship was also given up and as such there are no details on any aspect of renewal. By this time, one can assume, the Goddess was accustomed to Vaidika Agama Puja Paddhathi. This is followed even today. But it has seen more than one negligence and more than two renovations. This is evident from the inscription of Achutharayas time (Vijayanagar period) and the Mahadwaram constructed during the later Vijayanagara period.
  • Thanks For See This Documentation we are Under taking 1 Night & 2 Days Packages For Tirupati. http://www .tirupatidarshan.org Mobile:09666096077. Thank You Visit Again Jai Govinda