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Comparison of the different types of Vaginitis
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Comparison of the different types of Vaginitis

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  • 1. Comparison of the different types of Vaginitis By: el
  • 2. How to diagnose
      • Demonstrating 3 of the following 4 Amsel's criteria is considered necessary to diagnose BV most accurately.
  • 3.
      • Clue cells are vaginal epithelial cells that have bacteria adherent to their surfaces. The edges of the squamous epithelial cells, which normally have a sharply defined cell border, become studded with bacteria. The epithelial cells appear to be peppered with coccobacilli.
      • This test is performed by placing a drop of 10% KOH on the speculum after the vaginal examination or mixing vaginal fluid with a drop of KOH on a microscope slide. The KOH, by virtue of its alkaline properties, causes the release of volatile amines from the vaginal fluid. The amines are products of anaerobic bacterial metabolism
  • 4. Amsel’s Criteria
      • Demonstration of clue cells on a saline smear is the most specific criterion for diagnosing BV.
      • A pH greater than 4.5 indicates infection, and pH may be elevated in up to 90% of patients with BV. ( loss of acidity )
      • Characteristic discharge appearance is thin, gray, and homogeneous.
      • The whiff test may be positive in up to 70% of BV patients.
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. Is BV an STI?
      • It is not! It is AMA! (kidding!)
      • Although BV is not considered a sexually transmitted disease, sexual activity has been linked to development of this infection.
  • 8. Observations to support the claim:
      • (1) incidence of BV increases with an increase in the number of recent and lifetime sexual partners
      • (2) a new sexual partner can be related to BV, and
      • (3) male partners of women with BV may have urethral colonization by the same organism, but the male is asymptomatic. Evidence that does not support an exclusive sexually transmitted role of BV is its occurrence in virginal females and its colonization of the rectum in virginal boys and girls.
  • 9. References:
      • http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/254342
      • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Vaginose-G15.jpg for the image

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