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Revisiting LEA in Adult ESL Literacy
 

Revisiting LEA in Adult ESL Literacy

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A slideshow presented at the annual conference of New York State Teachers of English as a Second Language, New York, 2005

A slideshow presented at the annual conference of New York State Teachers of English as a Second Language, New York, 2005

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  • Sort autobiographical intro: graduated from SFSU at age 41,
  • What comes to your mind first-Francisco’s orthography, his syntax, the structure of the composition? Something else?
  • Pay attention to the spelling of “Spanish.” What does this indicate about Francisco’s existing literacy skills?
  • Ue “visualization script.”
  • Start in Spanish: Imaginense si yo estuviera hablando en espanol. How many of you understood me? How did those of you who did not understand me feel? Don’t worry. We’ll do the rest in English.
  • Start in Spanish: Imaginense si yo estuviera hablando en espanol. How many of you understood me? How did those of you who did not understand me feel? Don’t worry. We’ll do the rest in English.
  • OK, does this help? Why?
  • OK, does this help? Why?

Revisiting LEA in Adult ESL Literacy Revisiting LEA in Adult ESL Literacy Presentation Transcript

  • Revisiting LEA in Adult ESL Literacy
    • A presentation at the NYSTESOL Annual Conference
    • New York University
    • November 11, 2005
    • Presented by , Ph.D., M.F.A.
    • TESOL Program, Hunter College, City University of New York
    • Email: timwalsh65@yahoo.com
  • Introduction: Beginning Adult ESL Literacy Learners
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • From The Learner’s Point of View
        • 
        • ’
        • 
        • 
    • 
    • 
    1
        • 
        • ’
        • 
        • 
    • 
    • 
        • 
        • ’
        • 
        • 
    • 
    • 
    2
        • A: oan.
        • ’ ?
        • B: im.
        • A: ,im.
    • B: ,oan.
    3
        • 
        • ’
        • 
        • 
    • 
    • 
  • What’s a teacher to do?
  • THE LANGUAGE EXPERIENCE APPROACH TO READING
    • STEPS IN GROUP LEA
        • 1. Teacher and class discuss the stimulus (a drawing, photo, realia, remembered experience, etc.)
        • 2. Teacher elicits a sentence from the group.
        • 3. Student contributes a sentence; teacher writes contributor's sentence, word by word, as he or she writes.
        • 4. Teacher reads sentence, word by word, as class reads chorally.
        • 5. Contributor reads his or her sentence.
        • 6. Teacher calls upon another student to read the sentence; this student reads.
        • 7. Teacher continues to call upon each student. Students unwilling to read may "pass".
        • 8. Class repeats steps 2-7.
        • 9. When either all of the students in the group, or a sufficient number of students (as defined by the teacher, taking into consideration class time and student attention) have contributed, teacher and class read whole story chorally.
        • 10. Teacher asks for volunteers to read story.
  • LEA Extension One Cloze
  • LEA Extension Two Scrambled Sentences
  • Underlying Theory
  • Schema Theory in a Clamshell
  • SCHEMA (plural: schemata) An abstract structure representing concepts stored in memory
  • Main Types of SCHEMATA in the Reading Process
    • Content Schemata : background knowledge of the content area of a text
    • Formal Schemata : background knowledge of the discourse and organizational structure of different types of text (Eg., lists, cause-effect, problem and solution, comparison and contrast, description, etc.)
  • Multiliteracy Theory in a Nutshell
  • Derives from researchers’ (Gee, Cope, Kalantzis, Street) efforts to move away a “Great Divide” explanation of orality and literacy A view of literacy that focuses on social practices and literacy events There is not just one kind of literacy.
  • Multiliteracy practitioners identify four steps in mulitiliteracy pedagogy: 1 . situated practice 2. overt instruction 3. critical framing 4. transformation of practice
  • Theory-Based “Práctica”
  •  
  • En nuestros países nuestros padres trabajan sembrando en la tierra o en la ciudad. Cultivando la siembra para alimentar a la familia. La llegada a Nueva York fue dura. Encontramos un clima nuevo. Encontramos problemas con el inglés y el trabajo. Estamos superando para seguir adelante. Todos luchamos por la familia escribiendo y aprendiendo en la clase. In our countries, our parents worked on the land or in the city. Taking care of the planting to feed their families. Arriving in New York was hard. We encountered a new climate.We encountered problems with English and work. We’re getting ahead. We’re all struggling for our families, writing and learning in class.
  • 