Final

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  • Final

    1. 1. CALMING TECH Calming by designing for spontaneous social behaviorTim Pusnik Jausovec | stanford university | April 2011 | timpj@stanford.edu | @timpj
    2. 2. Persona: Lemiece ZarkaBio Musts & Needs Must know and plan outFreshmen at Stanford, who lives in an her life for the next 10all-freshmen dorm is a SymSys major weeks to survive.and traditional overachiever taking 20 Therefore, needs to beunits, holding a leadership position and efficient in structuring herpart-time coding job. life - swears by iCal.Wants & StressesOften times wishes to have the ability toimmediately engage in spontaneous socialactivity. Having free time but being unableto utilize it efficiently because her friendsare unavailable, stresses her.
    3. 3. Spontaneous social activity enablers EquipmentPlace Time People Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university
    4. 4. Spontaneous social activity enablers Equipment sports gear box in dorm lounge, rent-a-“input gear” Parks, gyms,public courts/ fields Pick-up sports, open door policy, SkypeMe status Place Time People Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university
    5. 5. Spontaneous social activity techSocial bicycle/bus/pub-crawler/city-tour+ social and spontaneous- usually a one-time triggerCalmer: social interaction, physical activity Finding nearby strangers with a specific interest + focuses on enabling spontaneity +/- very specific activity Calmer: Engaging in a social physical activity Collaborative hands-on user interface + new frontier in HCI - limited uses Calmer: Novelty/cool effect, social creativity Public bicycle rental program + return the bike at any station, cheap - not necessarily social Calmer: Outdoor physical activity Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university
    6. 6. Community-focused social apps Self-explanatory heavy-weights + well-established, proven for large-scale social spontaneity (eg, Libya) +/- big, not focused communities& & et al. Calmer: Feeling of connectedness & agency, calls2actionConnect to friends via your favorite shows+ focused, perceptive market- might discourage real-life social behavior “IntoNow”Calmer: social acceptance and interaction Crowd-sourcing review site + Very accurate/personalized information - answers where not how or with whom Calmer: decreasing choice (See Barry Schwartz) Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university
    7. 7. Location-focused social apps Which friends and treasures are nearby? + stimulating reward incentive system - hard to move from info to action Calmer: Connecting with friendsFinding nearby strangers with a specificinterest+ focuses on enabling spontaneity+/- very specific activityCalmer: Engaging in a social physical activity What should I be doing? + great UI, versatile - focused on planning not spontaneity Calmer: Reducing choice Take pictures together. Party. Play date. Lunch? + Wow factor, instant social emergence - requires nearby users, “Color” who are currently not present Calmer: Aesthetics, exploration, social interaction Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university
    8. 8. Txt2Calm even a forced smile induces fountain-smile a visceral response similar to a natural one (Ekman, 1993) 14 users 21x3 breathes in 3 daysbreathing regulation has been shown toincrease cognitive performance and reduce homework-breathbody’s response to stress (Jella & Shannahoff-Khals, 1993) 3 participants (1 drop-out) 32 smiles in 3 days Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university
    9. 9. SOCIAL-CALM. WUKI “Cultivating grate-for-ness into the everyday” 7 days 23 users 78 gratefulness notesPurpose:To encourage gratefulness amongcolleagues in small-scale organizations
    10. 10. Version 2Version 1
    11. 11. Insights it’s all about 95% of all the responses were timing received within 5min of the triggerFS received more responses overall, andparticipation frequency was highest at the triggersend of trial (vs. HB lowest at the end) periodic > sporadic Each user is different, must design a product increasing which fits within their life-style, allows them to adoptability/flexibility adopt, e.g. what times is it best to trigger behavior. Users felt frustrated and incomplete if they couldn’t change the way the app interacted allowing with them. Don’t try to create apps that users to impact app change users, allow users to change apps. Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university
    12. 12. Questions and InsightsExisting solutions are mostly calming because of misuses rather than design,they suffer b/c of social stigma and user expectation, I.) it’s weird posting a twitter or FB update asking who has time to play golf II.) b/c it is not expected I’m much less likely to engage/look for such activities on existing techthey have a hard time moving users from info to action,this creates a large vacuum/opportunity when it comes to calming tech.Nonetheless challenges lie ahead:often an activity’s spontaneity is inversely proportional to it’s sociablenessthe triangle question: how to provide people, space, equipment while keeping it spontaneous/flexible?Solving will require being mindful of following insightsencouraging spontaneous social activities requires specific communities (social and geographical)it’s about providing ability not motivation (motivation is already present!) Tim Pusnik Jausovec, stanford university

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