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Social Media lessons
from space for
destination Earth
Presented at the Social Media Tourism Symposium
#SoMeT14EU in Rovani...
Space is not a
destination.
It is a destiny
In the beginning,
there was a race…
photo credit: RIA Novosti
Public heroes of the 1960’s
The Mercury 7
Yuri Gagarin
photo credit: NASA
Armstrong, Aldrin, Collins
Cernan, Stafford, Young
photo credit: NASA
Public interest disappeared
even quicker than NASA’s budget!
135 missions that nobody
knew cared about…
except when
things go wrong…
photo credit: NASA History Office
STS-1, Space Shuttle Columbia, 12 April 1981Flight #1
STS-51L, Space Shuttle Challenger, 28 January 1986
photo credit: NASA
Flight #25
STS-107, Space Shuttle Columbia, 1 February 2003
photo credit: NASA
Flight #113
photo credit: Javier Pedreira
STS-135, Space Shuttle Atlantis, 8 July 2011Flight #135
The end of the space program?
image credit: XCORphoto credit: SpaceX
image credit: MarsOne
No! Space has never been cooler than today!
ISS passing over the International Space University, France, July 2013
#spacetweeps
to the rescue…
The first tweet from space!
photo credit: bunnicula
2009: The first #NASATweetup
Feeding the space
ambassadors
2011 #STS135 #NASATweetup
6,000 registrations
for 150 spots
100+ #NASASocial events
over 3,000 participants
photocredit:NASA/AubreyGemignani
photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingals
Brand ambassadors for life, 100 at a time…
6.4 million
followers
3.6 million
page followers
300 million+
views
32 channels
900,000 subscribers
187 million views
800,...
Going Global: 2011 ESA/DLR #spacetweetup
Local flavours: #CNEStweetup
Bringing space to you
When the community
takes over…
15 days
15,229 posts
42.3 million impressions
#ThingsNASAMightTweet
Co-creation
Crowdsourcing
@SpaceApps
Storytelling
“Space Oddity”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaOC9danxNo
#WakeUpRosetta: How to turn
technology into public excitement
Giving technology a face
Engaging the public
photo credit: ESA
From boring engineering stuff…
…to a personality
…and human emotion!
Lessons from space
for destination Earth
summary
#1 – Take social media seriously
#2 – Create a sense of pride
#3 – Feed the ambassadors
#4 – Tell stories
#5 – Make it personal
ThankYou!
@TimmermansR
@TravelsInOrbit
@WorldSpaceWeek
Social Media Lessons from Space for Destination Earth
Social Media Lessons from Space for Destination Earth
Social Media Lessons from Space for Destination Earth
Social Media Lessons from Space for Destination Earth
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Social Media Lessons from Space for Destination Earth

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What lessons can social media and community managers on Earth learn from the lessons of social media in space? Did you know that NASA is the largest non-IT company on Twitter? See what space organizations are doing RIGHT to engage their community of ambassadors to support space exploration.

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Transcript of "Social Media Lessons from Space for Destination Earth"

  1. 1. Social Media lessons from space for destination Earth Presented at the Social Media Tourism Symposium #SoMeT14EU in Rovaniemi, Finland, April 2014 Remco Timmermans - @timmermansr
  2. 2. Space is not a destination. It is a destiny
  3. 3. In the beginning, there was a race…
  4. 4. photo credit: RIA Novosti Public heroes of the 1960’s The Mercury 7 Yuri Gagarin
  5. 5. photo credit: NASA Armstrong, Aldrin, Collins
  6. 6. Cernan, Stafford, Young photo credit: NASA
  7. 7. Public interest disappeared even quicker than NASA’s budget!
  8. 8. 135 missions that nobody knew cared about… except when things go wrong…
  9. 9. photo credit: NASA History Office STS-1, Space Shuttle Columbia, 12 April 1981Flight #1
  10. 10. STS-51L, Space Shuttle Challenger, 28 January 1986 photo credit: NASA Flight #25
  11. 11. STS-107, Space Shuttle Columbia, 1 February 2003 photo credit: NASA Flight #113
  12. 12. photo credit: Javier Pedreira STS-135, Space Shuttle Atlantis, 8 July 2011Flight #135 The end of the space program?
  13. 13. image credit: XCORphoto credit: SpaceX image credit: MarsOne No! Space has never been cooler than today!
  14. 14. ISS passing over the International Space University, France, July 2013
  15. 15. #spacetweeps to the rescue…
  16. 16. The first tweet from space!
  17. 17. photo credit: bunnicula 2009: The first #NASATweetup
  18. 18. Feeding the space ambassadors
  19. 19. 2011 #STS135 #NASATweetup 6,000 registrations for 150 spots
  20. 20. 100+ #NASASocial events over 3,000 participants photocredit:NASA/AubreyGemignani
  21. 21. photo credit: NASA/Bill Ingals Brand ambassadors for life, 100 at a time…
  22. 22. 6.4 million followers 3.6 million page followers 300 million+ views 32 channels 900,000 subscribers 187 million views 800,000 followers 6,800 photos 18 TV channels, always live! 600,000 followers 19,000 followers
  23. 23. Going Global: 2011 ESA/DLR #spacetweetup
  24. 24. Local flavours: #CNEStweetup
  25. 25. Bringing space to you
  26. 26. When the community takes over…
  27. 27. 15 days 15,229 posts 42.3 million impressions #ThingsNASAMightTweet
  28. 28. Co-creation Crowdsourcing @SpaceApps
  29. 29. Storytelling
  30. 30. “Space Oddity” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KaOC9danxNo
  31. 31. #WakeUpRosetta: How to turn technology into public excitement
  32. 32. Giving technology a face
  33. 33. Engaging the public
  34. 34. photo credit: ESA From boring engineering stuff… …to a personality …and human emotion!
  35. 35. Lessons from space for destination Earth summary
  36. 36. #1 – Take social media seriously
  37. 37. #2 – Create a sense of pride
  38. 38. #3 – Feed the ambassadors
  39. 39. #4 – Tell stories
  40. 40. #5 – Make it personal
  41. 41. ThankYou! @TimmermansR @TravelsInOrbit @WorldSpaceWeek
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