Performance management manager training
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Performance management manager training

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  • Today is not only a training session but a sales pitch because we need your buy in as managers if this is going to work.Define work = Has a clear benefit to all.
  • Run through the processEmphasis flexibility
  • Performance Management is not the system
  • Infographics seem to be all the rage these days so here is a token one for interest.Source is from a company who are selling benefits and rewards programs, so take with a grain of salt
  • Idea is to keep it simple rely on your feedback and input to make sure this does become too complicatedSome hard work is needed in order to get anything out of it.
  • Idea is to keep it simple rely on your feedback and input to make sure this does become too complicatedSome hard work is needed in order to get anything out of it.
  • Old but remains relevant
  • This might for your unit only or in consultation with other stakeholders, like Jim with Mr HMost important part is planning, normally takes the longest too but sets a good foundationHelp them to be their bestNo surprises more an opportunity to recognise good efforts throughout the period rather than a bashing session
  • So rather than looking at what the employee has done or not done in the past performance period (looking solely at behaviour, you can look at the person’s contributions, then back track to behaviour and individual variables. Done properly they will be far less defensive since the focus is on the company and work unit goals.Focusing on contribution also makes the performance review process an important business tool as it is concentrating on real problem solving with the employee taking into consideration the environment we work in.
  • Stages of Performance ManagementProblem AwarenessBecoming aware that staff are either “not doing what they should be doing” or “doing something that they are not supposed to be doing”.Some common causes of poor staff performance are gaps inCompetenceResourceMotivation Confidence Authority Feedback DirectionRewardNEVER ASSUME YOU KNOW WHAT IS CAUSING POOR PERFORMANCE IT COULD BE YOU!Problem AssessmentAn assessment of the seriousness of the problem, here you need to establish whether the problem is worth your time and effort. Problem IdentificationIf the problem is worth your time and effort then you need to establish the causes of the problem. Performance planningIt is very important that the person who is being reviewed understands what they were supposed to do throughout the yearStart performance management from day one by creating performance goals.A performance Plan provides your staff with:A sense of directionA benchmark against which to measure their progress Confidence These performance goals clearly outline what objectives and standards the person is to achieve in a certain period. Effective goals are SMARTA. Specific Measurable Agreed Realistic Timed AlignedHow are you going to gather relevant data throughout the year?Discussions at the end of a performance period based on vague feelings is not going to end wellGather and record what you have observed; good and bad.Performance coachingPerformance coaching is the ongoing feedback and reinforcement of staff regarding their progress in terms of meeting the objectives and standards set in the planning phase. As a performance coach the manager is continually observing how employees are performing and providing them with feedback.Effective feedback is: Regular and goal directedClear, specific, timely and brief Descriptive rather than evaluative (expressing a judgment or assigning a value to it, as opposed to describing a fact)Directed toward controllable behavior rather than personality Face-to-face if possible, sincere and genuine Done in an appropriate setting Confronting Poor Performance It is important that regardless of whether the objective of this feedback is motivational or corrective, it needs to be constructive not destructive.Destructive feedback tends to focus on generalized, subjective comments that focus on personality characteristics rather than specific behaviors Tell/Inform the person… What he/she is doing wrong or not doingWhat he/she should be doing What he/she needs to change to be doing it right How long he/she has to get it right What support he/she will get from you Remember the Golden Rule for Managing Performance Zero Tolerance for Poor PerformanceCoaching steps           Performance Review and Planning MeetingThe formal performance review has four main purposesMotivationalDevelopmentalRemedial Planning for the futureReview ALL employees’ performance twice a year. With new employees at the end of three month probation period Measuring performance aims to answer the questions:What has the person contributed and achieved in the last review period?What has the person achieved in relation to previously set goals?What needs to change in order for this employee to contribute more?What is the action plan for that change to happen? Who, What, Where and When?Give the staff member two weeks’ notice to prepareReview the following prior to the meeting: The job requirements and any previous performance goals and standardsHow well has the person achieved his/her performance goals during the review period? The extent to which the person’s contribution and behaviour has enabled the performance objectives and standards to be achievedHow well have any improvement plans agreed in the last review been put into effect? What performance goals would you like to set for the person for the next review period? Has the person had any problems carrying out his/her work? Does the person need any additional support from you? Is the best use being made of the person’s skills and abilities? Is the person ready for additional responsibilities? What development and training does the person require?Are there any special tasks or projects that the person could benefit from? Conduct the meetingDiscuss each element of the previous performance planWhat went wellWhat could be improvedHow can it be improved (For input into Performance PlanningAgree on each point/area of performanceCreate a Performance Plan for the next period which will be the foundation for the next reviewBy the end of the meeting the employee shouldHave the sense that the manager is more interested in creating success than finding fault laterFeel that the manager is willing to help the employeeFeel that the manager recognizes that the employee has significant knowledge and ability to increase productivity and achieve greater success in his or her job.Have a sense they she or he and the manager are on the same wavelength and share similar goals and concerns (They are on the same side)
  • Performance coaching is the ongoing feedback and reinforcement of staff regarding their progress in terms of meeting the objectives and standards set in the planning phase. As a performance coach the manager is continually observing how employees are performing and providing them with feedback.Effective feedback is: Regular and goal directedClear, specific, timely and brief Descriptive rather than evaluative (expressing a judgment or assigning a value to it, as opposed to describing a fact)Directed toward controllable behavior rather than personality Face-to-face if possible, sincere and genuine Done in an appropriate setting Confronting Poor Performance It is important that regardless of whether the objective of this feedback is motivational or corrective, it needs to be constructive not destructive.Destructive feedback tends to focus on generalized, subjective comments that focus on personality characteristics rather than specific behaviors Tell/Inform the person… What he/she is doing wrong or not doingWhat he/she should be doing What he/she needs to change to be doing it right How long he/she has to get it right What support he/she will get from you Remember the Golden Rule for Managing Performance Zero Tolerance for Poor Performance
  • The 6 legal issues
  • Non-directive - allow the individual to talk out problems and resolve difficulties with a minimum of direction being provided by the person serving as counsellor.
  • 2 employees with same skills may produce different results because they are affected by the system/environment differentlyGenerally what annoys you in someone is a trait you have

Performance management manager training Performance management manager training Presentation Transcript

  • Performance Management • Manager Training
  • Objectives of Training1. Understand Performance Management2. Clear purpose & goal for undertaking Performance Management3. Have a feeling it is worth doing well and has a clear benefit to all4. Agreed Manager Guidelines5. Know how to use the system 2
  • What is performance Management?•The process of managing people to do the right thing;driving constant and continuous improvement ofpeople in your organisation and work unit.•Goal = Improve the performance and the abilities ofour employees to contribute to the company goals andthe goals of their work unit.Right things Right way Contribution 3
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  • Why Performance Management?• Performance Management is part of a line managers everyday job.• A System formalises that process.• It helps to: • Align employees goals & objectives to the companies goals & objectives • Make the process Equitable and Fair – Legal issue • Drive employee engagement – they feel like they are contributing • Drive a culture of values and continuous improvement • Increase the companies overall skills • Recognise stars and improve or weed out non-performers • Improve employee turnover 5
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  • Why a Performance Management system?•Mainly it addresses Legal issues:• Fair and equitable• Consistent process for all• We all sing from the same song sheet 7
  • Benefits and pitfalls of a formalised process? Formal Informal Appearance of Fair and Objective  Intimate and personal More accurate  Flexible Less personal bias  High Personal bias Can assist inexperienced managers  Harder to police More control  Lacks comprehensive reporting Systematic process  Perceived as being unfair May become to cumbersome  Record keeping more difficult 8
  • Factors effecting job attitudes Leading to Leading to Dissatisfaction Satisfaction • Company policy • Achievement • Supervision • Recognition • Relationship with boss • Work itself • Work conditions • Responsibility • Salary • Advancement • Relationship with peers • GrowthAccording to Herzberg’s theory - 1959 9
  • Four key steps1. Define Business Goals and Objectives• Identify a clear set of business goals and objectives. 2. Plan Performance • Set clear performance goals for a given period. 3. Coach Performance • Coach the person to achieve the goals within the given time period. 4. Review Performance • Formally review the performance for a given period against the performance goals. 10
  • Contribution 11
  • Stages of Performance Management Problem “not doing what they should be doing” or “doing Awareness something that they are not supposed to be doing” Problem How serious? Is it worth your time?Assessment Problem What is the root cause? It could be you.IdentificationPerformance Ensure they understand what is needed. Planning Sense of direction, benchmark and confidence.Performance Ongoing feedback, reinforcement, encouragement. CoachingPerformance No surprises meeting. Review Planning for the following period. 12
  • Coaching Steps Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage 3 Feedback Stage 4 Monitor Further Feedback Stage 5 Identify, agree, performance Monitor Congratulate or Warningdiscuss, action plan, performance Follow up, identify, clarify, supported encourage document accountability 13
  • Causes of Inflated RatingsThe belief that accurate ratings would have a damaging effect on thesubordinate’s motivation and performanceThe desire to improve an employee’s eligibility for meritThe desire to avoid airing the department’s dirty laundryThe wish to avoid creating a negative permanent record of poor performancethat might hound the employee in the futureThe need to protect good performers whose performance was sufferingbecause of personal problemsThe wish to reward employees displaying great effort even thoughcontributions are relatively lowThe need to avoid confrontation with certain hard-to-manage employeesThe desire to promote a poor or disliked employee up and out of thedepartment 14
  • Lowered RatingsTo scare better performance out of an employeeTo punish a difficult or rebellious employeeTo encourage a problem employee to quitTo create a strong record to justify a planned firingTo minimize the amount of the merit increase asubordinate receivesTo comply with an organization edict that discouragesmanagers from giving high ratings 15
  • Legal1. Documentation for legal protection • used to protect against unfair dismissal claims2. Possibility of condoning poor performance by inaction • Employee can argue that this is the behaviour expected3. Employer’s duty to the poor performer • Give an employee an opportunity to rectify poor performance4. Adequate warning before dismissal • Document and make clear the consequences of poor performance5. Effects of Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) • This can be avoided by making sure the appraisal criteria are work related, the criteria have been checked and appraising managers have been trained to do appraisals.6. Termination • Sufficient notice, fairness and grounds for the termination 16
  • Legal obligations can be met by: Transparent performance system, consistently applied Review is made against clearly specified criteria (for example a job description, performance plan and performance goals) Previous performance assessments are taken into account Systems to deal with counselling and warnings are in place Nature, reason and duration of the actions are clearly written and acknowledged. Understanding how performance could be improved & assessed Informed of the consequences of not improving performance and the procedures to be followed if this occurs 17
  • CRITERIA SHOULD BE:• objective rather than subjective• job-related or based on job analysis• based on behaviours rather than traits• within the control of the ratee• related to specific functions, not global assessments 18
  • Counselling• Vital skill as a manager• Worth your time and effort• Deal with personal problems only if they effect performance • Use a counselling service (Lifeline)• Focus on solving the problem let them take the lead 19
  • What can counselling achieve? Providing This is appropriate to work-related problems when there is a clear-cut solution. However, it is inappropriate in dealing with personal problems and advice emotional situations. Providing While this can give an employee encouragement or renew confidence, I t may fail to address the root cause of the problem. reassurance Facilitating The manager can gain insight into the employees thoughts and feelings and enhance two-way communication.communication. Releasing The manager can allow the employee to unburden by sharing worries/ emotional concerns. tension. Clarifying Sometimes merely by talking things over, a person can get a new perspective on the nature of a problem and begin to look at it more objectively. This will thinking. go a long way towards enabling the employee to work out solutions. Their goals, values or behaviour, especially if the problem is of a work-Encouraging a related nature. change in an If, however, the problem is a personal one, the manager may wish to refer individual the employee to a professional counsellor. 20
  • Counselling Guidelines• Talk early in day and week and in private• Be non-directive, non-judgemental, non-moralising and non- prying• Set a tone of working together as a team to resolve• Be patient, jumping to conclusions will not get to the source• Question and probe to help them clarify and resolve problem• Get them to recognise the consequences of not dealing with it• Assure confidentiality, encourage and engage in follow up• Close without rushing, make sure they are comfortable• Expecting an ideal outcome may be unrealistic• Consider writing it all down either during or after as a summary 21
  • Feedback • Tell them how well they are doingTell & Sell • Sell them on the idea • Flow is downward Tell & • • Tell them how well they are doing Strengths and areas of improvement needed • Listen to response to gauge attitude and feelings, then discuss Listen • Aim to increase job satisfactionProblem • • Open clear two-way communication Aim to solve for barriers to performance • Non-threatening, reduces hostility Solving • Recommended for most situations 22
  • Feed forward• Rather than feedback on what has gone wrong, give ideas for the future.• Much the same way we are focusing on what and how a person is contributing to the company, we focus on what the person can do better going forward• Let go of the past• Feedback usually means the other person is wrong• Nothing to be learnt from defending that you are right• More @ http://www.marshallgoldsmithlibrary.com 23
  • Feed Forward top ten1. We can change the future2. More productive to help people learn to be “right”3. Who likes negative feedback, giving or receiving it4. Just requires have good ides to move forward5. Not as personally taken6. Feedback reinforces self fulfilling prophecy and failure. Feedforward reinforces the possibility of change7. Corrects mistakes not dwell on them8. “Here are 2 ideas, if you only use one you are ahead, please accept them in the positive spirit they are intended”9. Feedback is seen as judgemental10. Easier to listen to as you are not composing a reply in your head. 24
  • 1. Receiving Feedback Listen carefully2. Seek feedback - See it as an opportunity to learn something3. Don’t be reactive or let defenses build, mentally note questions or disagreements4. Summarise what you think you hear to check your perception for accuracy and understanding.5. Ask questions & for examples for clarification. Paraphrase answers again6. Carefully evaluate accuracy & potential value7. observing your own behaviour & others reactions to it8. Do not overreact to feedback, modify your behaviour & evaluate the outcomes. Avoid explaining or excuses. 25
  • Keys to success Focus on the contribution by employee, Pay attention to barriers to performanceCheck your bias, establish the habit of constantly gathering information about performance. Be aware of legal issues, main focus is on improvement Become a good counsellor, give feed forward, know how to take feedback 26