Halo dei webinar final

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  • Halo dei webinar final

    1. 1. The Public Radio Halo Effect January 2013 Susan Leland sleland@npr.org 202.513.2815
    2. 2. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 2The Public Radio Halo Effect Definition: Ha lo eff ect (noun) – the positive sentiment that listeners have towards companies that support the community service of NPR and public radio stations
    3. 3. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 3Research to Understand the HaloNPR Audience Insight & Research has conducted a number of studies over the past severalyears to understand the dimensions of the Halo and how they benefit sponsors. This researchhas included:Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012• Conducted in October-November 2012 in partnership with three geographically dispersed stations: WFYI Indianapolis (Oct.), WLRN Miami (Nov.), KPCC Pasadena (Nov.)• Three research elements were conducted in each market: – Dial test – Focus group – 8-10 one-on-one interviews• Participants: – 20% members of the local public radio station/80% non-member public radio listeners – 50% male/50% female – Equal age distribution: 25-34 / 35-44 / 45-54 / 55-64 – Listenership to “Morning Edition” or “All Things Considered” on their local public radio station at least three days in an average week. – Listenership to their local public radio station for at least an hour in an average week. – Respondents were required to have a college degree, but not a PhD.
    4. 4. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 4Research to Understand the HaloResearch for NPR National Sponsors• Sponsor Impact Studies – various studies for individual sponsors, ongoing• Credit Effectiveness Studies – assessments of the impact of alternative credit language, 2007-2011 – Impact and credit studies all conducted by Lightspeed Research with 300-500 NPR listeners and 300-500 Non-Listeners in each study• Sponsor Focus Groups – conducted to explore attitudes about particular sponsors and reaction to a variety of credits and digital banners – Four studies conducted between 2011-2012
    5. 5. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 5Key FindingsThe new Halo Effect research by Jacobs clarifies the elements of the Halo Effectand best practices to maintain it. These findings are also reinforced by thefindings of quantitative and qualitative studies conducted for specific sponsorsover the past several years.• The Public Radio Halo Effect remains strong.• The Halo continues to provide clear benefits to sponsors including perceptions of quality, credibility, and community connection.• Public Radio can help maintain the Halo by following best practices such as focusing on brand and community messages and limiting length and number of credits.
    6. 6. Current State of the Halo
    7. 7. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 7The Halo Effect remains strong• Listeners’ passion for public radio is solid• Public radio sponsorship continues to convey strong benefits for sponsors, including improved brand perceptions and consideration. “I want to know who considers public radio a worthy place to advertise. I believe public radio has a different audience than many other radio stations. And maybe it‟s being snobbish but I believe it‟s a little more educated and connected audience. And so I listen to hear who‟s advertising on that medium to have that connection because most of the time it does fit me.” Craig/Indianapolis Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    8. 8. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 8Sponsorship does not drive tune-out, but topics, overlylong elements, and digital migration are factors• No listeners report changing channels due to sponsorship announcements – in contrast to commercial radio behavior• Most common reasons for tune-out: • Boring topic • Off-mood story • Topic repetition horizontally and vertically • Lifestyle issues • Long music segments• Digital listening – internet streams, podcasts, apps – is common among listeners of all ages, but more prevalent among younger listeners. Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    9. 9. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 9Sponsorship does not drive tune-out, but topics, overlylong elements, and digital migration are factors “I listen in the car and at work on the computer. I don‟t have a radio in the office. It‟s easier – I can get some work done while listening.” “I have the KPCC app and that helps me when I go to work because I work in San Bernardino, and the signal gets pretty fuzzy…so I use the app to get a clear feed.” Gene/Los Angeles Stacy/Miami Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    10. 10. Benefits of the Halo for Sponsors
    11. 11. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 11Public Radio Sponsorship builds brand awarenessPercent of NPR audience aware of brand in third-party study: % Aware of % Aware of Financial Services Brand Home Improvement Brand 77% 71% 68% 22% higher than 47% 46% 34% higher than Non-Listeners’ Non-Listeners’ brand brand awareness awareness 17% Before 1 Year 3 Years Before 2 Years 4 Years Sponsorship Later Later Sponsorship Later Later Source: NPR Listener Surveys, Lightspeed Research, 2007-2011
    12. 12. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 12Association with public radio builds positive brandperceptions Listeners commonly describe sponsors/sponsorships as: • Low-key • Community-focused • A “different tone” • Smart marketers • Giving back • Supporters • Unobtrusive • Forward-leaning • Public information • Kindred spirits Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    13. 13. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 13Association with public radio builds positive brandperceptions “There‟s more people like me that think if they advertise on public radio that says something about them as a company. So I hold them in higher esteem. They are a classy organization rather than go out and mass market. They see an audience they want to go after so I hold that company just a hair different than their peers because they advertise on public radio. . . So I call that „good will‟ . . . Most are in it for the long haul.” “I feel like NPR is special, and if you‟re on there, you‟re special, too.” Craig/Indianapolis Michelle/Miami Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    14. 14. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 14Association with public radio builds positive brandperceptions“It obviously shows a communityinterest and we all need to be “They sound very authentic, real. Sometimes„community fish.‟ And I‟m sure that commercials sound fake. But with WLRN, themany of them have an altruistic belief in sound for me is very credible.”public radio.” Hugh/Indianapolis Maria/Miami [What does it say about Ally that they sponsor NPR?] I think it gives a seriousness or a responsibility to [Ally]…where you‟re involved with what‟s going on the community, and you‟re helping support it, but not just for commercialism. Ally Bank Sponsorship Focus Group Sources: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012. Ally Bank Sponsorship Focus Groups, March 2012.
    15. 15. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 15Association with NPR builds positive brand perceptionsMore than half of listeners agree their opinion of a company is more positivewhen they find out it supports NPR:Q: How much do you agree or disagree that…My opinion of a company is more positive when I find out it supports NPR (0-10 Scale, 0=Completely disagree / 10=Completely agree) Disagree (Rating 0-3) 6% Neutral (Rating 4-6) 34% Agree (Rating 7-10) 60% Source: Lightspeed Research NPR Sponsor Impact Survey, 2012 Among age 25-64
    16. 16. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 16Association with NPR builds positive brand perceptionsImpact research for sponsors consistently shows that NPR sponsorships buildpositive brand image: Overall Opinion of Automotive Sponsor Overall Opinion of Bank Sponsor % Rating 8-10 on 10-Point Scale % Rating Sponsor “Excellent” or “Good” 51% 49% +76% 38% 37% +69% 33% 29% 29% 2009 2012 Non-Listeners Listeners Recall NPR Listeners Non-Listeners Source: Lightspeed Research Sponsorship Source: Lightspeed Research NPR Sponsor Impact Survey, 2012 NPR Sponsor Impact Survey, 2009-2012 Among age 25-64 Among age 35-64 with income $50K+
    17. 17. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 17Public radio sponsorship drives brand considerationIn interviews, many listeners report that a company supporting public radio is enough tobe a tie-breaker when deciding on a product or service. “If you had a choice between two “If everything was the same I‟d companies, and you heard an underwriter, all probably check them out first. things being equal, you‟d think this one Because when I drive by I underwrites for WFYI, and this one does not. realize I hear this commercial Obviously, I listen to WFYI so I‟d be likely to all the time. I think I might go with them.” check out both of them, but I‟ll check out the one I hear all the time on [public] radio first.” Katie/Indianapolis Michelle/Miami Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    18. 18. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 18Public radio sponsorship drives brand considerationIn focus groups about specific sponsors, listeners also affirm their preference to dobusiness with sponsors: If a company …supports NPR I kinda like that. …its “It would make me think about not that I think that theyre being particularly [Progressive] in terms of altruistic. Theyre gonna throw their money wherever me…looking at them in the they think they can get their listeners. But if theyd future, because it would go like to help pay for NPR…I will take note of that and along with the other advertisers support that business for supporting NPR as I‟ve heard on NPR in that it‟s – opposed to anything else. they seem to be good companies. I mean like you Ally Bank Sponsorship wouldn‟t expect to have Focus Groups second-rate companies advertise on that station.” “If I heard a security company [as an NPR sponsor], if it was one I haven‟t heard of before, then that would be very interesting. That would get me flying to the Progressive web browser to look these people up.” Sponsorship Focus Groups ESET Focus Group – IT Professionals Sources: ESET Focus Groups, August 2011. Ally Bank Focus Groups, March 2012. Progressive Focus Groups, April 2012
    19. 19. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 19Public radio sponsorship drives brand considerationHalf of listeners assert that they generally prefer to buy products from NPRsupportersQ: How much do you agree or disagree that…When price and quality are equal, I prefer to buy products from companies that support NPR. (0-10 Scale, 0=Completely disagree / 10=Completely agree) Disagree (Rating 0-3) 5% Neutral Agree (Rating 4-6) (Rating 7-10) 43% 52% Source: Lightspeed Research NPR Sponsor Impact Survey, 2012 Among age 25-64
    20. 20. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 20Public radio sponsorship drives brand considerationWhen asked about specific sponsors, sponsorship consistently is shown todrive brand consideration and pre-purchase behavior such as visiting the brandwebsite: % Likely to seek more information about After one year of sponsorship by a service from sponsoring brand bank… 77% • 74% of listeners said they were more likely to consider doing business with the bank because of the 46% sponsorship • 52% of listeners said the sponsorship influenced them to visit the website All Listeners Those who Recall Sponsorship Source: Lightspeed Research Source: Lightspeed Research NPR Sponsor Impact Survey, 2007 NPR Sponsor Impact Survey, 2009-2012 Among age 35-64 with income $50K+
    21. 21. Best Practices to Support the Halo
    22. 22. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 22Specific credit practices are recommended to maintainthe strength of the Halo1. Focus on Brand/Community Messages, not Products2. Limit Number of Credits in a Row3. Keep Credits Short4. Use the Expected Tone – Calm, Respectful5. Use Adjacencies – but Reinforce Trust
    23. 23. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 23Focus on Brand/Community Messages, not Products Messages that best resonate with listeners focus on: • Community support “They got very detailed about the (spa) services they have and it felt more like a commercial. • Linking company values with They were telling you to come in and they‟d sell listeners/public radios values you all these services. . . It felt very • Corporate responsibility disconnected from what NPR stands for.” Messages with a strong product focus start to cross the line into "advertising" – inconsistent with expectations for public radio sponsors. Ben/Indianapolis Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative /Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    24. 24. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 24Focus on Brand/Community Messages, not Products Focus groups to assess alternative credits for Ally Bank also support the importance of brand vs. product messages: • 8 credit scripts and 8 banners evaluated • Preferred elements included: "…smart listening and smart banking go together…” “…values straightforward reporting and straightforward banking…” "Straightforward and trustworthy. Good for radio and for banks." • Listeners rejected messages with a product focus – “offering Popmoney, a way to pay other people online”, “24/7 live, knowledgeable customer service” Because …it‟s just no-nonsense [It‟s] empowering the listener to go find out banking…they‟re not trying to glam it the information, because clearly, they are an up by Jimmy Fallon and all these other online bank…Radio, I think, is the perfect people that are trying to push their spot, because you‟re just giving them…the products. It‟s just kind of like, here it site, and you go check it out for yourself. is, go online, check it out…we offer the services. Source: Ally Bank Sponsorship Focus Groups, March 2012
    25. 25. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 25Focus on Brand/Community Messages, not ProductsTests of alternative credit language demonstrate that credits which avoid product-specificmessages tend to be seen as more appropriate for public radio and have greater impact onlisteners intent to do business with a sponsor. % “Strongly Agree” or “Agree” Makes me more likely to do business Is appropriate for public radio with this company 90% 84%  65% 56%  Product Message No Product Product Message No Product Arrows indicate significant difference at 90% confidence level Source: Lightspeed Research, Credit Effectiveness Study, 2011
    26. 26. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 26Limit Number of Credits in a RowListeners are understanding of the need for sponsorship but running long sets of credits leadsto substantial drop off in listener appeal. Ideally, credits should be limited to two or three (shortcredits) in a row.The following two charts show:1. The impact of a long set of 4 credits, with a particularly large drop during the last product- focused credit, on the appeal of the break to listeners2. The relatively little impact on appeal in a brief 2 credit set. Arrows indicate significant difference at 90% confidence level Source: Lightspeed Research, Credit Effectiveness Study, 2011
    27. 27. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 27 Limit Number of Credits in a Row Traffic Music Sponsor Program / Tease Weather Traffic Program CREDITS (female) CREDIT CREDIT (male) 2 3 “Morning Edition” 4 5 6MTM8 1 Credits: 1) Spa at Torrey Pines (m) (:25) 2) Nature & Culture Int’l (f) (:12) 3) 5 Hour Energy (f) (:15) Avg. Credit Score 4) Univ. Arkansas (f) (:08) 48.6 5) Constant Contact (f) (:09) 6) Kohls Fine Flooring (m) (:18) Avg. Credit Score Fit: 60.7 48.5 Def. Change: 14% Def. Not Change: 10% Beginning of credit Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    28. 28. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 28Limit Number of Credits in a Row Program CREDITS Music Music Music Program Traffic 1 2 “Morning Edition” Avg. Credit Score Credits: 59.0 1) Indiana Transportation Museum (:15) 2) Indianapolis Public Library (:22) Fit: 78.3 Def. Change: 4% Def. Not Change: 24% Beginning of credit Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    29. 29. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 29Keep Credits ShortLonger credits (more than 10-15 seconds) lead to loss of listenerattention and perceptions that the announcements are sounding morelike "commercials." “I don‟t like long ads. I don‟t mind if it says it‟s sponsored by XYZ, but when it goes on and on it starts to sound like a commercial radio station and I don‟t like that.” Los Angeles Focus Group Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    30. 30. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 30 Keep Credits Short Call “Marketplace” CREDIT letters/ Promo Slogan / CREDIT Time Music Program “Florida 2 Roundup” 1 Promo Music 4MTM16 “Morning Edition” 3 Credits/Promos: 1) “Marketplace” (promo) (:15) 2) Palmer Trinity School (:31) Avg. Promo/Credit 3) “Florida Roundup” (promo) (:06) Score 4) Employ Florida.com (:13) 52.8 Fit: 70.5 Def. Change: 7% Def. Not Change: 15% Beginning of credit Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    31. 31. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 31Maintain Expected ToneA unique strength of public radio credits vs. commercial advertising isthe calm, respectful tone. Pushy Commercial radio Aggressive advertising Shouting Calm Public radio Subtle sponsorship States message simply Respects the listener Even keel Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    32. 32. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 32Maintain Expected Tone “From what I‟ve listened to, I think they‟re pretty“Commercial radio shouts at me. . . On straightforward. They‟re not trying to change public radio you get an even keel.” their voices and get you sucked into them, they‟re just pretty much saying what it is.” Progressive Sponsorship Focus Groups “On commercial radio, they‟re more aggressive and pushy, whatever it is they‟re trying to sell…You‟re being blasted. So, they (sponsors) can roll the Rick/Indianapolis dice and create two different types of commercials. One on commercial radio “It certainly leaves you with a feeling that where you‟re forced to listen to them they‟re altruistic, that somehow they‟re pitch a product, and on NPR that‟s gracious enough to withhold blasting you for maybe a little more subtly trying to 30 seconds but obviously they still want your suggest something to you.” attention. Progressive Sponsorship Los Angeles Focus Groups Halo Focus Group Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012. Progressive Sponsorship Focus Groups, April 2012
    33. 33. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 33Use Adjacencies – but Reinforce Trust• No indication that having a sponsor aligned with the content of a program is a problem for listeners.• Listeners describe adjacency credits as “smart marketing”• There is a high level of trust in NPR and the local stations – not one respondent felt that journalistic integrity has been compromised.• As adjacencies are used more often it is critical to be aware of potential issues and be transparent with listeners about addressing concerns. Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    34. 34. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 34Use Adjacencies – but Reinforce Trust “From listening to the content of their programming over time I feel “. . . (Ally) doesn‟t have that they report on things very undue influence. But fairly and broadly. If Ally Bank what‟s going to happen was a problem I‟d think that NPR at some point when they would just get rid of the need to do a story on problem, but I don‟t think it would auto lending or a story deter them if they are a sponsor where Ally might be from reporting accurately and implicated? You have to fairly.” keep editorial separate Hugh/Indianapolis from revenue and I trust NPR to do that.” Trevor/Miami Glenn/Miami “They‟re two completely separate things. It („Planet Money‟) is about business and money but they aren‟t interjecting their message into the content. They‟re just supporting it.” Source: Halo Investigation Qualitative/Dial Test Study, Jacobs Media, 2012
    35. 35. CONFIDENTIAL / For internal use only 35SummaryThe Public Radio Halo Effect remains strong• Passion for public radio is high and listeners continue to have positive feelings about sponsors• Sponsorship practices are not driving tune-out but digital migration is a factorThe Halo continues to provide clear benefits to sponsors:• Public radio sponsorship builds awareness• Association with NPR builds positive brand perceptions including quality, credibility, and community connection• NPR sponsorship drives brand considerationPublic Radio can help maintain the Halo by following best practices:• Focus on Brand/Community Messages, not Products• Limit Number of Credits in a Row• Keep Credits Short• Maintain Expected Tone – Calm, Respectful• Use Adjacencies – but Reinforce Trust

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