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Self-playing slideshow for Living Green Expo—highlighting the benefits and opportunities of Passive House building energy standard and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit. …

Self-playing slideshow for Living Green Expo—highlighting the benefits and opportunities of Passive House building energy standard and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit.

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  • Conservation became a resource!



    Wayne Schick’s Team at The Small Homes Council @ the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign develops the Lo-Cal House in 1974-76
    Walls: Double stud R-30, Roof: R-40



    Were built, still in operation



    We’ll get back to Urbana, Illinois later in the presentation


  • We are now seeing articles like this again in newspapers! People are starting to notice that conservation is a resource to reckon with.



    The term \"superinsulation\" was coined by Wayne Schick at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In 1976 he was part of a team that developed a design called the \"Lo-Cal\" house, using computer simulations based on the climate of Madison, Wisconsin.
    In 1978 the \"Saskatchewan House\" was built in Regina, Saskatchewan by a group of several Canadian government agencies. It was the first house to publicly demonstrate the value of superinsulation and generated a lot of attention. It originally included some experimental evacuated-tube solar panels, but they were not needed and were later removed.
    In 1979 the \"Leger House\" was built by Eugene Leger, in East Pepperell, Massachusetts. It had a more conventional appearance than the \"Saskatchewan House\", and also received extensive publicity.
    Publicity from the \"Saskatchewan House\" and the \"Leger House\" influenced other builders, and many superinsulated houses were built over the next few years, but interest declined as energy prices fell. Many US builders now use more insulation than will fit in a traditional 2x4 stud wall (either using 2x6 studs or by adding rigid foam to the outside of the wall), but few would qualify as \"superinsulated\".



    There is no set definition of superinsulation, but superinsulated buildings typically include:
    ▪Very thick insulation (typically R40 walls and R60 roof)
    ▪Detailed insulation where walls meet roofs, foundations, and other walls
    ▪Airtight construction, especially around doors and windows
    ▪a heat recovery ventilator to provide fresh air
    ▪No large windows facing any particular direction (unlike passive solar, which uses large windows facing the sun and fewer/smaller windows facing other directions).
    ▪No large amounts of thermal mass
    ▪No active or passive solar heat (but may have solar water heating and/or hot water heat recycling)
    ▪No conventional heating system, just a small backup heater
    Nisson & Dutt (1985) suggest that a house might be described as \"superinsulated\" if the cost of space heating is lower than the cost of water heating.
  • First superinsulated house that showed that airtight construction is feasible. It is equipped with a ventilation system with an air-to-air heat exchanger.
    Peak heat load at -10 degrees Fahrenheit is 3000 watts (10,640 Btu per hour)
    Walls: 12” thick, R-44 Roof: R-60



    There is no set definition of superinsulation, but superinsulated buildings typically include:
    ▪Very thick insulation (typically R40 walls and R60 roof)
    ▪Detailed insulation where walls meet roofs, foundations, and other walls
    ▪Airtight construction, especially around doors and windows
    ▪a heat recovery ventilator to provide fresh air
    ▪No large windows facing any particular direction (unlike passive solar, which uses large windows facing the sun and fewer/smaller windows facing other directions).
    ▪No large amounts of thermal mass
    ▪No active or passive solar heat (but may have solar water heating and/or hot water heat recycling)
    ▪No conventional heating system, just a small backup heater
    Nisson & Dutt (1985) suggest that a house might be described as \"superinsulated\" if the cost of space heating is lower than the cost of water heating.
































  • Due to the dramatic reduction in space-conditioning energy needs, it is referred to as a passive house,
    as opposed to utilizing active measures to keep it conditioned.



    The difference being mainly in the energy amount that utilized and the fact, that passive house utilizes mostly solar and internal heat gains (passive energy sources).



  • Economy: Significant conservation and improved performance = cost savings to the owner





    90%+ savings on space-conditioning energy, 75%+ savings on source energy (pending household use pattern)> highly reduced utility cost


    Federal tax credits, local utility company incentives (as applicable)


    Potentially reduced homeowner’s insurance (due to reduced mechanical system and quality construction)


    Benefits of energy efficiency mortgage


    Cost asymptote occurs when a traditional heating system is eliminated











  • Energy: Significant conservation and highly efficient operation





    Significantly less energy consumption


    Can be “fueled” by virtually any power source (future proof), Easier to “fuel” with renewable energy sources, cheaper to outfit with appropriately sized renewable energy sources, Crisis proof


    Renewables are smaller, hence more affordable. Zero site, or source energy, carbon neutrality, deep energy retrofit








  • Environment: Significant conservation and improved performance = significantly reduced environmental impact





    Up to 75% savings on source energy = smaller CO
    2
    footprint: Carbon-neutrality truly in reach. Don’t need a football field of PV panels


    Likely in use longer and maintained longer than average building, Less likely to need retrofit, reduction in energy used for construction and materials




  • Health: Improved indoor environmental quality = improved health





    Guaranteed mechanical air-exchange 24/7—365 days a year, Tempered air (heat recovery ventilation), Controlled humidity, Slow and steady air movement (quiet and without drafts)


    Indoor surfaces are near room temperatur, virtually no radiant heat-loss potential


    Improved daylighting and solar exposure


    Studies show less potential for asthma, allergies, sickness


    Significantly reduced exposure to CO, pollutants, VOCs. Virtually no potential for mold, no radiant heat loss, healthy humidity levels, little to no noise pollution




  • Comfort: Superinsulated building envelope = high level of comfort





    Indoor surfaces are near room-temperatur, virtually no radiant heat-loss potential


    Improved indoor environmental quality


    Extremely quiet inside due to superinsulation and high-performance windows


    very high (virtually no radiant heat loss, healthy humidity, fresh air, etc.)




  • Conscience: Most efficient building energy standard available today = clear conscience




  • Durability: High quality planning and construction = extremely durable building





    Energy modeling, quality-controlled construction, field testing > predictable results


    Advanced window technology, longevity


    Reduced mechanical system, less moving parts = less maintenance


    Owner training, “understand your building”, Owner’s manual, “pass on the knowledge”


    Certified building standard




  • Value: Best building energy standard available = incredible value





    Quality building, durability


    High performance building envelope


    Fully documented and certified


    Best starting point for an uncertain energy future


    sells up to 25% quicker, yields up to 10% more



















  • R-21 to R120+ (pending location)






  • thermally broken windows, all connections designed thermal-bridge free
    2 to 4-pane windows*, high solar heat gain
    solid or thermally broken frames*
















  • field tested with a sequence of three test, pressurized and depressurized
    impecable, continuous solid air-tight layer (i.e. OSB), thorough detailing, precise execution
    max. 0.6 ACH. Air-admittance valve.






  • Heart of the mechanical system, provides most of the energy (up to 10W/m2), 90%+ efficient, balanced and duct-blasted, short duct runs, insulated ducts
    Other mechanical systems: insulated pipes, central location, air admittance valves, energy and water saving appliances, potentially renewable sources
  • Proper orientation, solar exposure, proper summer and swing season shading, high solar heat gain glazing on south side.
    Near southern orientation, built-in shading
  • people, appliances, equipment
  • people, appliances, equipment
  • people, appliances, equipment








  • How do we measure the success?
    In Germany, we look at gas-mileage for homes. Instead of MPGs, we measure in kWh/m2 a or Btu/sf year
  • How do we measure the success?
    In Germany, we look at gas-mileage for homes. Instead of MPGs, we measure in kWh/m2 a or Btu/sf year
  • ≤ 15 kWh/(m2 a)
    U.S. housing stock ~175 kWh/(m2 a) or 58,580 BTU/(sf yr) up to 90% + improvement
    determined in PHPP
    Achieved with the help of: Superinsulated Building Envelope, very good windows and doors, air-tight and thermal bridge-free construction, passive solar heat gains, internal heat gains, and an very efficient backup heating system
  • ≤ 15 kWh/(m2 a)
    U.S. housing stock ~175 kWh/(m2 a) or 58,580 BTU/(sf yr) up to 90% + improvement
    determined in PHPP
    Achieved with the help of: Superinsulated Building Envelope, very good windows and doors, air-tight and thermal bridge-free construction, passive solar heat gains, internal heat gains, and an very efficient backup heating system
  • How do we guarantee the result?



    - Contractor training
    - Extremely detailed design drawings
  • How do we guarantee the result?



    - Contractor training
    - Extremely detailed design drawings
  • ≤ 120 kWh/(m2 a)
    up to 75% + improvement
    determined in PHPP
    Achieved through conservation in both passive and active systems
  • ≤ 120 kWh/(m2 a)
    up to 75% + improvement
    determined in PHPP
    Achieved through conservation in both passive and active systems


  • How do we measure the success?



    In Germany, we look at gas-mileage for homes. Instead of MPGs, we measure in kWh/m2 a or Btu/sf year



    In U.S. we currently use a comparative model: HERS



    Problem: nobody really knows what the basis is and buildings are compared on a point basis. Nowhere does it directly relate back to energy.



    Limited use, but realtor associations are looking to use it for a “green” realty label, MN starting 2009. HERS is determined by HERS rater.









    HERS (Home Energy Rating System), controversial and not absolute- uses comparison not actual energy modeling or monitoring
    Ratings provides a relative energy use index called the HERS Index – a HERS Index of 100 represents the energy use of the “American Standard Building” and an Index of 0 (zero) indicates that the Proposed Building uses no net purchased energy (a Zero Energy Building). Zero Site energy, nor really a zero energy building though.






    What is a HERS Rating?
    A home energy rating involves an analysis of a home’s construction plans and onsite inspections. Based on the home’s plans, the Home Energy Rater uses an energy efficiency software package to perform an energy analysis of the home’s design. This analysis yields a projected, pre-construction HERS Index. Upon completion of the plan review, the rater will work with the builder to identify the energy efficiency improvements needed to ensure the house will meet ENERGY STAR performance guidelines. The rater then conducts onsite inspections, typically including a blower door test (to test the leakiness of the house) and a duct test (to test the leakiness of the ducts). Results of these tests, along with inputs derived from the plan review, are used to generate the HERS Index score for the home.
    The HERS Index
    The HERS Index is a scoring system established by the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) in which a home built to the specifications of the HERS Reference Home (based on the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code) scores a HERS Index of 100, while a net zero energy home scores a HERS Index of 0. The lower a home’s HERS Index, the more energy efficient it is in comparison to the HERS Reference Home.
    Each 1-point decrease in the HERS Index corresponds to a 1% reduction in energy consumption compared to the HERS Reference Home. Thus a home with a HERS Index of 85 is 15% more energy efficient than the HERS Reference Home and a home with a HERS Index of 80 is 20% more energy efficient.
    For more information, visit the RESNET Web site .
    Comparing the New HERS Index with the Old HERS Score
    For homes rated before July 1, 2006, the rating score is known as a “HERS Score.” The HERS Score is a system in which a home built to the specifications of the HERS Reference Home (based on the 1993 Model Energy Code) has a HERS Score of 80. Unlike the HERS Index, each 1-point increase in a HERS Score is equivalent to a 5% increase in energy efficiency. Please see the table below for a comparison of the HERS Score and the HERS Index.
  • OUTLOOK AND POTENTIAL



    Bringing it back to the issue of climate change, energy independence, affordability (utility bill).



    There is not a better starting point than Passive House - it requires the least amount of energy, it is the easiest building type to get to any of the aforementioned states.



    Goals should be set upfront with homeowner.
  • Don’t need them, optional.



    Solar hot water is great way to go.



    Climate and site play a role. PV can help offset energy: site, source, cost, CO2 neutral
  • OUTLOOK AND POTENTIAL



    Bringing it back to the issue of climate change, energy independence, affordability (utility bill).



    There is not a better starting point than Passive House - it requires the least amount of energy, it is the easiest building type to get to any of the aforementioned states.



    Goals should be set upfront with homeowner.
  • Let’s talk more about details of Passive House Design.



    A house build to current energy code in Minnesota could potentially qualify as a Passive House in California.










  • First Passive House in urban setting. First in Twin Cities. Affordable Housing. 3112 6th St. N, Eco Village, Hawthorne, North Minneapolis



    PH design lends itself well to affordable housing:
    - low and predictable operating cost
    - high survivability (doesn’t cool off)
    - empowerment through design (don’t just give people anything, give them something really good)



    Thank MinneAppleseed for their support of Passive House design. Enjoying that process much of bringing hope to a community that is lacking attention, resources, opportunity.


  • Transcript

    • 1. FAQ: What is the basic design concept for resource-efficient buildings?
    • 2. FAQ: What is the basic design concept for resource-efficient buildings? First: Minimize losses Then: Maximize gains
    • 3. FAQ: Are super-insulated buildings “green”?
    • 4. FAQ: Are super-insulated buildings “green”? Passive House building energy standard oers the lowest certified environmental impact and carbon footprint of any certified building standard in the world. With its extremely reduced energy consumption, Passive House buildings can be designed to become zero-energy, carbon-neutral, and net- positive energy. TE Studio takes “green” to the next level. We combine Passive House and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit designs with best practice management for “green” products, materials, and construction methods creating true sustainability—
    • 5. Conservation = Resource Illinois Lo-Cal House, 1974
    • 6. Info: Origins of super-insulated buildings Super-insulated buildings were first developed in the U.S. in the 1970s in response to the oil-crisis. The basic concept of “conservation first” still holds true today. In the 1980s, cheap energy prices and lack of public energy-awareness caused people to forget about conservation and super-insulated buildings. Some pioneers stuck with the concept and started refining it. Super-insulated buildings have continuously been built since the 1970s but they have not
    • 7. Back to the future 1979 newspaper articles about the Illinois Low-Cal Houses
    • 8. First super-insulated building Saskatchewan Conservation House - Saskatoon, Canada in 1977
    • 9. “Passiv haus” The Passive House Building Energy Standard A rigorous, voluntary building energy standard focusing on highest energy eficiency and quality of life at low operating cost.
    • 10. Certified Passive house™ TM The Passive House Standard is the most rigorous building energy standard in the world. Consultants, projects or building components that have obtained the right to carry the logo have committed themselves to design excellence and the Passive House energy performance criteria. TE Studio is proud to oer Certified Passive House™ consulting.
    • 11. First Passive House, the PHI and PHIUS 1990: 1st Passive House - Kranichstein, Germany Source: Passiv Haus Institut 1996: PHI - Passiv Haus Institut 2008: PHIUS - Passive House Institute U.S.
    • 12. Info: History of Passive House Researchers and architects in Europe picked up on the early work in the U.S. and pursued perfecting it. Some light-handed legislature and public energy consciousness helped with the inception of the Passive House concept in 1990. Prof. Wolgang Feist is the “father” of Passive House. He also built the first Passive House. In 1996 he founded the Passiv Haus Institut in Darmstadt, Germany.
    • 13. First Passive House in the U.S. Source: e-colab
    • 14. Info: History of Passive House in the U.S. • The first Passive House in the U.S. was built in 2003 • The first Passive House in the U.S. was certified in 2006 • In 2008, Passive House “came home” to the U.S.—the Passive House Institute U.S. (PHIUS) was founded in Urbana, IL • 15,000 units have been built worldwide to date, about a dozen of which in the U.S. • Currently there are 2 Certified Passive House™ buildings in Minnesota: The
    • 15. Biohaus Soure: Stephan Tanner
    • 16. FAQ: What is PHIUS?
    • 17. FAQ: What is PHIUS? Passive House Institute U.S., a branch of the German Passiv Haus Institut PHI, is in charge of Passive House certification in the United States. Learn more at www.passivehouse.us
    • 18. FAQ: Is Passive House the same as Passive Solar?
    • 19. FAQ: Is Passive House the same as Passive Solar? The short answer is no. Many people have heard of Passive Solar. It represents a building design concept that harnesses solar energy for heating. Passive House also makes use of passive solar heat gains. Therefore, Passive House is a certified building energy standard that makes use of the Passive Solar concept as one part of its energy strategy.
    • 20. Passive Solar Design vs. Passive House Standard
    • 21. Passive Solar Design vs. Passive House Standard PASSIVE HOUSE BUILDING ENERGY PASSIVE SOLAR DESIGN STANDARD Building design concept Certified building energy standard “Unlimited” energy use Limited energy use per square foot and year Utilization of passive solar heat gains and Utilization of passive solar heat gains internal heat gains of shading devices and glazing to Utilization of shading devices to control Utilization solar heat gains control solar heat gains Use of thermal mass for absorption and Use of super-insulation for retention of storage space conditioning energy of solar energy mass for time-release of Use of thermal Use of ventilation system for distribution and space conditioning energy (passive recovery of heating energy convection/radiation or active distribution with mechanical system)
    • 22. “Active” versus “Passive” Passive House with “passive” systems Conventional Building with and small post-heater “active” heating system Uses a max. of 4,750 British thermal Uses 5–30x more heating energy units than a Passive House per square foot and year for heating 85 - 450 max.15 kWh/m2 kWh/m2 Source: Krapmeier & Drössler 2001
    • 23. FAQ: Why is it called Passive House?
    • 24. FAQ: Why is it called Passive House? Passive House is a direct translation of the German name “Passiv Haus”. The word “passive” refers to the setup of its heating system, which mostly relies on passive solar and internal heat gains, paired with heat-recovery ventilation and a small backup heater. This concept symbolizes one of the key dierences between Passive House and conventional buildings, which typically rely on a large “active” heating
    • 25. Economy Capitalized costs in Euro Elimination of traditional heating system Ultra low-energy building Low-energy building Passive House ` Space-Conditioning Energy in kWh/(m2 a) “Gas-Mileage for Buildings” Source: Krapmeier & Drössler 2001
    • 26. FAQ: How much does a Passive House cost?
    • 27. FAQ: How much does a Passive House cost? Passive Houses have been built for the same cost, or even less than comparably sized and outfitted conventional buildings. Some sources say that a Passive House construction can cost up to 10% more than “standard construction”.    Any increased initial construction cost for energy-saving measures are eventually recouped through energy savings.
    • 28. Energy 90%+ reduction in space-conditioning energy consumption* 75%+ reduction in source-energy consumption* Source: Krapmeier & Drössler 2001 *) compared to standard code-compliant construction
    • 29. FAQ: How much energy does a Passive House save?
    • 30. FAQ: How much energy does a Passive House save? Compared to conventional buildings, Passive House reduces heating energy up to 90% or more, and source energy up to 75% or more.
    • 31. Opportunity: Energy Independence Passive House and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit significantly reduce energy consumption through conservation, enabling energy independence for owners and society as a whole.
    • 32. FAQ: What if the power or gas go out in the middle of winter?
    • 33. FAQ: What if the power or gas go out in the middle of winter? No worries. Passive House and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit oer outstanding protection against utility outages, creating highly survivable buildings. This is an important feature in severe heating climates that no other design can provide. Passive House buildings tend to retain indoor temperatures well above freezing throughout the winter months, even when unoccupied and unconditioned.
    • 34. Environment
    • 35. FAQ: What is the environmental impact of a Passive House?
    • 36. FAQ: What is the environmental impact of a Passive House? Passive House’s impressive reduction of source energy is directly linked to a dramatic reduction of pollutants and CO2 that is produced to power it. It can been compared to a 150MPG car in terms of its energy performance. Passive House is the highest certified building energy standard in the world today. This makes it the most environmentally friendly as well.
    • 37. Health
    • 38. FAQ: What are the health benefits of super-insulated buildings?
    • 39. FAQ: What are the health benefits of super-insulated buildings? Super-insulated building envelopes provide high interior surface temperatures during the heating season, eliminating radiant heat loss—the most uncomfortable way for the human body to lose heat. Controlled ventilation in air-tight super-insulated buildings ensures highest indoor environmental quality.
    • 40. Comfort
    • 41. FAQ: What makes super-insulated buildings so comfortable?
    • 42. FAQ: What makes super-insulated buildings so comfortable? All interior surfaces stay within a few degrees of the indoor air temperature, virtually eliminating radiant heat loss.
    • 43. Conscience
    • 44. FAQ: How can I do the right thing?
    • 45. FAQ: How can I do the right thing? Passive House and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit oer leading energy savings potential and quality of life. Arguably, they are the best strategies to achieve energy independence, protect the earth, create healthy indoor environments, and oer truly sustainable value to owners. The clear conscience comes standard.
    • 46. Durability
    • 47. FAQ: What about quality and durability?
    • 48. FAQ: What about quality and durability? Passive House and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit encourage quality design, planning and execution. High performance cannot be achieved with subpar designs, materials, and construction. Field testing and third party verification help ensure quality and durability. Passive heating systems use less parts and therefore require less maintenance.
    • 49. Value
    • 50. FAQ: What value does Passive House certification provide?
    • 51. FAQ: What value does Passive House certification provide? Durability & longevity through quality planning, documented construction and certified performance.
    • 52. FAQ: What are the key Passive House benefits?
    • 53. FAQ: What are the key Passive House benefits? • Up to 90% reduced energy bills • The lowest certified environmental impact • Ultimate comfort and health • Quality, durability and low maintenance • Low total cost of ownership
    • 54. Your dream house here!
    • 55. Your dream house here! TE Studio oers custom designs for your Passive House or Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit project. We’ll work with you to make your dreams come true.
    • 56. FAQ: What does a Passive House look like?
    • 57. FAQ: What does a Passive House look like? Passive House is a building energy standard, not a design style. A Passive House can look similar to any “standard construction” building, with some limitations to the building shape based on sun exposure and surface-to- volume ratio. The most noticeable dierences are: • Thicker exterior walls in severe heating or cooling climates • High-performance windows and doors
    • 58. Paradigm Shifts 1. Leapfrog versus Incremental 2. System versus Component
    • 59. 1 Paradigm Shift: . Leapfrog versus Incremental Approach Passive House is a leapfrog approach to building compared to conventional designs. It bypasses any small incremental improvements and leaps straight to the most eficient and feasible design we can make today. Deep Energy Reduction Retrofits bypass incremental improvements, which while helpful in the short term, often prevent buildings from getting the comprehensive make-over they need to become truly sustainable—both economically and environmentally speaking.
    • 60. 2. Paradigm Shift: System versus Component Approach Each part of a building or design is reviewed in respect to its impact on the whole building system. This results in all components working in concert to create a whole that is greater than the sum of its parts.
    • 61. Passive House !quot;#$!%&'()!'&*(#+,*-&' !*()!'&*(quot;+!#!.!'#&$/ Schematic )! &3$% *? )+ -- '& >)0 * )0quot;quot;'1(&$* 5 2(4,3(*!!-) , ,:#*&/#(&$* 2('$.$%5(&*,&) 2(4&#+) 2(;$#/+,% 2('&0%3*1 2(-,/+<(*-< &3.&%/,3(9$%3!9)(6(3!!*) /!%#$%0!0)'1()0quot;,*2$%)0'&#,3 40$'3$%5(,%.,'!quot;,(6(&$*2#$5+# 3,#&$')(&%3(/!%)#*0/#$!% quot;&) )$., , () +,& #(5& !'&* ; #& $% >9$% #,* ) 2$% ? $* & $%#,*%&' +,&#(5&$%) !quot;#$!%&'(,&*#+2#04, 2(quot;,!quot;', )0--,*8(quot;*,2/!!' 2(,=0$quot;-#< #+,*-&'(4*$35,27*,, 9$%#,*8(quot;*,29&*- 3,#&$') ,:+&0)# +,&#2*,/!.,*1 .,%#$'&#$!%(6 #$%1(4&/;0quot;(+,&#,*
    • 62. FAQ: What is the Building Envelope?
    • 63. FAQ: What is the Building Envelope? The slab, walls, roof, windows, and doors that enclose space inside and protect it from outside elements. The envelope directly eects building performance and energy consumption.
    • 64. Super-insulated envelope Passive House Wall Section Notice • Thicker wall and roof assembly • Continuous insulation package Compare to standard 2x4 wall thickness Source: Waltjen 2007
    • 65. Thermal Bridge-Free Details Passive House Wall Section Notice • Continuous insulation package Source: Waltjen 2007
    • 66. FAQ: What materials are used for super-efficient buildings?
    • 67. FAQ: What materials are used for super-efficient buildings? Many materials and products are the same as those in conventional construction. In order to minimize heat loss/gain, the building envelope is assembled with high R-values using great quality and care. Materials and products have to live up to highest performance and durability standards. While not mandatory for super-eficient buildings, TE Studio encourages the use of FSC-certified lumber, low or no-VOC materials, as well as reused, recycled, or
    • 68. Passive House Corner Assembly Notice • Thicker walls • More insulation • Deeper window jambs • Interior window sill • Surface-mount raceway system (optional)
    • 69. Advanced Windows & Doors Passive House Window Notice • Insulation layer • Triple-pane glazing Source: Waltjen 2007
    • 70. Passive House Window Notice • Larger frame • Insulation • Triple-pane glazing
    • 71. FAQ: Can I open the windows in a Passive House?
    • 72. FAQ: Can I open the windows in a Passive House? Of course, but you may not need to. The ventilation system in a Passive House provides constant tempered, filtered outside air year-around. In comparison, a conventional building would have to have all windows open every 3 hours for 5-10 minutes, day and night, year-around. 
    • 73. Passive House Window Notice • Thicker walls • Deeper jambs • Interior window sill
    • 74. Passive House Window Notice • Thicker walls • Deeper jambs • Exterior window sill
    • 75. Passive House Door Notice • Continuous gaskets • Multipoint lock
    • 76. Passive House Door Notice • Gasket sweep
    • 77. FAQ: Why is air-tightness important in super-efficient buildings?
    • 78. FAQ: Why is air-tightness important in super-efficient buildings? Conventional buildings can lose up to 25% heating energy through air leakage —typically through cracks and gaps in the building envelope. Therefore, air-tightness is essential to any high-performance building.
    • 79. passive house air-tightness
    • 80. passive house air-tightness n50 ≤ 0.6 ACH
    • 81. Air-tight Construction Source: e-colab Blower door test delivers performance results
    • 82. FAQ: What about air pollution and Mold in super-insulated air-tight buildings?
    • 83. FAQ: What about air pollution and Mold in super-insulated air-tight buildings? TE Studio uses best practice management to control moisture inside buildings and avoid pollutants from construction materials and products. Super-insulation raises the interior surface temperature of exterior walls and ceilings, eectively eliminating any potential for condensation and mold. Air-tight and diusion-open assemblies allow the building to breathe. Airborne pollutants inside an air-tight building are mitigated by dilution
    • 84. FAQ: How do I heat a Passive House?
    • 85. FAQ: How do I heat a Passive House? Passive House utilizes 4 sources of heating energy: 1. Heat recovery ventilation system 2. Passive solar heat gains 3. Internal heat gains 4. Backup heating system
    • 86. 1 Heat recovery ventilation . Duct with mufler Air-intake with Supply grate Ventilation machine Heat from exhaust air is transferred to incoming
    • 87. 2. Passive solar heat gains South-facing windows and doors allow sunlight in during heating months
    • 88. 3. Internal heat gains Copyright: Sony Pictures People and equipment give o heat that helps warm a Passive House
    • 89. 4. Backup heating system
    • 90. 4. Backup heating system Backup heat needed in a Passive House is
    • 91. Optional Renewables Source: Gumprecht Architekten Solar-thermal domestic hot water
    • 92. FAQ: Does a Passive House have solar panels on the roof?
    • 93. FAQ: Does a Passive House have solar panels on the roof? Solar panels are not required for Passive House standard. However, TE Studio recommends using renewable energy resources whenever feasible. Solar power can be harnessed with the help of photovoltaic panels (for electricity) and solar-thermal panels (for hot water). Wind and water power may also be available through local utility companies. Renewable energy resources are essential to achieving zero-energy, carbon-
    • 94. High-efficiency appliances Waste water heat recovery Super-insulated Source: Ecodrain Source: Sun Frost
    • 95. FAQ: Will living in a Passive House affect my lifestyle?
    • 96. FAQ: Will living in a Passive House affect my lifestyle? Yes, in many positive ways! Passive House and Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit limit energy consumption, provide healthy indoor environmental quality, and oer highest levels of comfort. TE Studio encourages energy-aware behavior and the careful use of extremely eficient appliances and lighting.
    • 97. FAQ: What is the Gas Mileage for Buildings?
    • 98. FAQ: What is the Gas Mileage for Buildings? energy per square foot and year The Gas Mileage for Buildings allows comparisons between dierent buildings and can be used to create absolute benchmarks to limit energy consumption, or energy goals for retrofits.
    • 99. FAQ: What is the heating-energy limit for Passive House?
    • 100. FAQ: What is the heating-energy limit for Passive House? ≤ 4,750 Btu/(sf a) 4,750 British Thermal Units per square foot and year is the maximum heating- energy consumption allowed in a Certified Passive House™. This is about 90% less than the heating energy consumed in a code-compliant building today. The performance of Passive Houses is calculated with the help of an energy modeling software called the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP).
    • 101. FAQ: How is the performance of Passive Houses established?
    • 102. FAQ: How is the performance of Passive Houses established? • Energy Modeling with the Passive House Planning Package (PHPP) • Performance testing • Site supervision by a Certified Passive House™ Consultant • Submission of design drawings and performance
    • 103. FAQ: What is the source-energy limit for passive house?
    • 104. FAQ: What is the source-energy limit for passive house? ≤ 11.1 kWh/(sf a) Source-energy is the amount of energy that a utility company uses to provide a building with energy on site. Depending on the energy source and the ineficiencies of the energy extraction and delivery process, the source energy can be as high as 3 times the site energy or more. Limited source energy consumption helps reduce pollution and global
    • 105. FAQ: Is a Passive House automatically a Zero-Energy Building? 
    • 106. FAQ: Is a Passive House automatically a Zero-Energy Building?  No, it still needs a minimal amount of energy to provide a comfortable, healthy indoor climate. Passive House balances economy and ecology. TE Studio recommends using renewable energy to cover the small remaining amount of energy needed and encourages construction of net-positive energy buildings.
    • 107. Closest to Zero “STANDARD CONSTRUCTION” LEED & ENERGY STAR PH TM Net-Positive Energy Building
    • 108. FAQ: What does zero-energy mean? 
    • 109. FAQ: What does zero-energy mean?  Zero-energy describes a building performance where the amount of energy produced on site from renewable sources equals the amount of energy consumed on site. A zero-energy building can be grid-tied or o-the-grid. O-the-grid tends to be expensive due to the fact that energy needs to be stored on site. It is most feasible in areas where a grid is not available.
    • 110. Net-positive energy building Source: MB Planungs GmbH Energy produced on site ≥ 3x energy consumed on site
    • 111. FAQ: What does net-positive energy mean? 
    • 112. FAQ: What does net-positive energy mean?  Net-positive energy describes a building performance where the energy produced on site from renewable sources is more than the amount of energy consumed on site. Typically, this performance level is achieved by combination of conservation and on-site energy generation from renewable sources. Passive House is an ideal starting point towards a net-positive energy goal, as
    • 113. Think globally, Build locally. Passive House building energy standard performance requirements are always the same, no matter where built. Climate zone and a building’s distinctive location impact the design significantly. Therefore, Passive Houses will look dierent depending on where they are located.
    • 114. 2&&!'&.&*-7'*&236,$(.'*&,*(<$,'/quot;<,&*1 ,7!$6quot;)'&:$#,$.-'=3$)2$.-'/=&<(*&1 (!,$(.quot;)'#()quot;*',+&*4quot;) (*'#()quot;*'!+(,(%(),quot;$6 #( quot;2$. *1 #+ 44 )quot; /#3 #3!!)7'quot;$* * - & !quot;# #$%& '# +&quot; ,'-quot; ()quot;* $. /0$. ,&* # &:,*quot;6,'quot;$* 1 *&,*(<$,'6(.2$,$(. &:$#,$.-'6(.2$,$(. $.,&*.quot;) 5'quot;2%quot;.6&2'0$.2(0# 5'$.#3<<$6$&.,'$.#3)quot;,$(. +&quot;,'-quot;$.# ''quot;.2'2((*# 5')(05!&*<(*4quot;.6& 5'!&(!)& 5'quot;$*5,$-+,.&##')quot;7&* ''0$.2(0#'quot;.2'2((*# 5'&>3$!4,? 5'6(.,$.3(3#'$.#3)quot;,$(. 5'quot;$*')&quot;9quot;-& ''!quot;69quot;-& 5'.('%&.,$)quot;,$(. &:+quot;3#, quot;$*5$.,quot;9& *&,*(<$,'6(.2$,$(. &:$#,$.-'6(.2$,$(. +&quot;,5*&6(%&*7 )quot;*-&';quot;6,$%&; 5'0quot;,&*'!*((<$.- 5'.('0quot;,&*'!*((<$.- %&.,$)quot;,$(.'8 4&6+quot;.$6quot;)'#7#,&4 ''quot;.2'4quot;.quot;-&4&., ''quot;.2'4quot;.quot;-&4&., #4quot;))'+&quot;,&* 5'<3*.quot;6&'(*'=($)&* 5'quot;22&2'$.#3)quot;,$(. 5'.('$.#3)quot;,$(.'quot;,'quot;.2 5'4$,$-quot;,$(.'(< ''=&)(0'-*quot;2& '',+&*4quot;)'=*$2-&# 5',+&*4quot;)'=*$2-&#
    • 115. FAQ: Can I retrofit my building to become super efficient?
    • 116. FAQ: Can I retrofit my building to become super efficient? Most buildings can be upgraded with a Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit. Feasibility of a Passive House-type retrofit is directly linked to the existing building and can be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. TE Studio can help develop the best strategy for your existing building.
    • 117. FAQ: What is a Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit?
    • 118. FAQ: What is a Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit? Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit as described by Aordable Comfort, Inc. is a comprehensive sustainable building improvement that oers significantly reduced environmental impact and energy vulnerability while enhancing comfort, indoor environmental quality, and durability. It oers the potential to turn buildings from liabilities into assets.
    • 119. FAQ: What is Affordable Comfort, Inc.?
    • 120. FAQ: What is Affordable Comfort, Inc.? Aordable Comfort, Inc. (ACI) is an organization dedicated to moving existing homes towards carbon neutrality. ACI coined the term “Deep Energy Reduction Retrofit”. More information at: www.aordablecomfort.org
    • 121. FAQ: Why reduce 70% of the energy in a building? Why not 30%?
    • 122. FAQ: Why reduce 70% of the energy in a building? Why not 30%? Experts agree that 70%+ energy reduction in existing buildings is needed to halt and reverse the impact of global warming. The return on investment is more favorable at higher energy reduction, with greater savings on energy bills and elimination or significant down-sizing of mechanical equipment. While the cost to add more insulation is incremental, the work to install more
    • 123. Affordable Passive House project for north Minneapolis Appleseed House Project &