Tim Findlay 15038986
“Simply put, Vimeo is the home for videos you create.We offer the best tools and the highest quality video in the Universe...
Ever accepted a platforms  terms of servicewithout reading them?                     Image uploaded to Flickr by Colin_K
You may wanttoreconsiderthis andtake sometimeto  read the fine printImage uploaded to Flickr by Jessica.Diamond
What are terms ofservice?
Rules which one mustagree to abide in orderto use the service(Vimeo, 2011).
“By registering as a                       member you acceptTim Findlay            these terms of                       se...
So what are they?      Image provided from http://peterandthegoose.adversaria.co.uk/wp-content/confused.jpg
Requirement
You must be at least 13   years of age to use the Vimeo Service
License   the service
By uploading your video’syou still own yourContent!                     Image uploaded to flickr by s.o.f.t
By submitting your video, yougrantVimeoa limited, world wide ,non-exclusive,royalty free-license and right to copy,transmi...
Vimeo has the right to distributeanduse your media free        of charge!With the power to make derivatives of your workfo...
License   Other users
You further grant all users of the Vimeo Servicepermission to viewyour videos for personaland non-commercial purposes     ...
The right to copy your work,            and make derivate works            from the content          (Vimeo, 2011).       ...
Each user is responsible for ensuringthat the images uploaded to theVimeo site do not       infringe anythird party copyri...
Vimeo has no obligation to screenor monitor any content availableon the Vimeo service and doesnot guarantee that any conte...
So basically Vimeo states that itis illegal to upload media whichis in breach of copyright…..                             ...
They donot monitor content and holdno responsibility for media that isuploaded onto the site. Even thoughthey provide the ...
Privacy Image uploaded to Flickr by @boetter
{   “In general we may collect information that can    identify you, such as your name and email address”    (Vimeo, 2011)...
{   Vimeo may also request information about your    interests and activities, your gender age and other    demographic in...
This includes your IP address, browser type, language                                      and content of any undeleted co...
disclaimers
•Vimeo provides the Vimeo service on an “as is”basis. You therefore use the Vimeo Serviceat your own risk         (Vimeo, ...
•Vimeo provides the Vimeo service on an “as is”basis. You therefore use the Vimeo Serviceat your own risk           (Vimeo...
Uploaded to Flickr by striatic
References•   Adactio. (2008). Clone Troopers. Retrieved 23rd October 2011    from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/2...
References•   S.o.f.t. (2007). Shiny Happy People. Retrieved 14th October 2011    from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/soft/...
Online policy primer| Vimeo
Online policy primer| Vimeo
Online policy primer| Vimeo
Online policy primer| Vimeo
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Online policy primer| Vimeo

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Online Policy Primer for NET303. Vimeo is the chosen platform for analysis of the terms of service.

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  • Hi Brent,

    Thanks for your comments on my presentation. Most of these TOS seem to hold the same structural layout, implementing changes and adaption’s to suit their specific services. Rights to content make up a large majority within these online platforms TOS. Sites ability to use your content in anyway the please without permission or even accreditation would have to be one of the most significant factor facing users. I noticed this similarity in your presentation on Twitter, the same structure applies for even posting Tweets, “you give Twitter a worldwide royalty free license to your content” (Flemming, 2011). Terms and conditions around the reproduction of your content are also of concern, I know with the case study of Vimeo you allow your individual work to be reproduced and manipulated without permission, notice or financial benefits (Vimeo, 2011).

    Again privacy is another major factor within a platforms TOS. It was interesting that your mentioned the Barbaro & Zeller reading as I feel this is a great example of your case study on Twitter. This reading really opened up my eyes to the fact of leaving a digital trail on the Internet, in regards to not only the content that we are intentionally uploading to these platforms but as you mentioned even the information that we are searching for. This article was quite confronting around the amount of unintentional information people are releasing to these services. The example of user 4417749 was a clear indication on how information that is posted on the Internet can in fact reveal a persons true identity (Barbaro & Zeller, 2006). The fact that user 4417749 was then traced back to a Thelma Arnold, a 62-year-old widow, and piece-by-piece a picture was painted around her life due to the information she was submitting to these search engines.

    Given the fact that Twitters sole purpose is to post tweets including personal thoughts begs the question on how much information people are revealing daily to complete strangers. One positive implementation from reading your presentation was the fact that Twitter re-enforces the fact of taking care when posting messages, that “you should consider the fact that your tweets may be viewed by people all over the world instantly” (Twitter, 2011).

    I really enjoyed your presentation, the fact that you used minimal text on each page really helped to simplify and understand the content presented. Your use of subheadings to draw a clear distinction of your main points of analysis was also a nice touch.


    Regards

    Tim.

    References

    Barbaro, M., & Zeller, T. (2006, August 9th). A Face Is Exposed for AOL Searcher No. 4417749. New York Times.
    Available: http://w2.eff.org/Privacy/AOL/exhibit_d.pdf

    Flemming, B. (2011). Twitter terms of service explained. Retrieved, November 5, 2011, from http://www.slideshare.net/brentf99/twitter-terms-of-service-explained

    Twitter. (2011). Twitter Privacy Policy. Retrieved, October 22, 2011 from, http://twitter.com/privacy

    Vimeo. (2011). Terms of Service. Retrieved 15th October 2011 from, http://vimeo.com/terms#privacy
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  • I really enjoyed your presentation. It was put together very well, great graphics and well constructed! I regularly watch Vimeo content however I have no Vimeo account and have not uploaded content, so I found it very interesting to read your take on the Vimeo Terms of Service.

    Similar to blogging or tweeting, uploading video to a public space comes with risk; choosing a pseudonym as a username on Vimeo might be wise to help protect your identity and lessen the risk of published content being linked back to you (Online Privacy, 2008).

    Having chosen Twitter for my own presentation, in reading your presentation I have found that Vimeo’s terms regarding content ownership and use are very similar to those of Twitter. I have also noticed in other policy primers (google plus, slideshare etc) that this seems to be common across social networking or content sharing sites’ terms of use (regardless of how fair or unfair this might seem!)

    I was previously unaware that, like Twitter, users are responsible for ensuring content does not infringe copyright and that content is not screened or monitored by Vimeo. As Bowrey and Rimmer write, the internet has allowed for innovative methods of copyright infringement and in combination with O’Sullivans’s assertion that “copyright increasingly protects the [content] owners” it is critical that users are aware of the consequences of using and distributing content online (Bowrey, K. & Rimmer, M. 2002. & O’Sullivan, M. 2008). It is also important that users understand that although the platform they are using might allow for the uploading of infringing material all responsibility for its use will be passed down to the individual user.

    Thanks for your thought provoking presentation!

    References:

    Privacy and the Internet: Travelling in Cyberspace Safely (2008). Retrieved from http://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs18-cyb.htm

    O’Sullivan, M. (2008) Creative Commons and Contemporary Copyright: A fitting Shoe or “a load of old cobblers”?, First Monday, 13(1). Retrieved from http://firstmonday.org

    Bowrey, K. & Rimmer, M. (2002), Rip, Mix, Burn: The Politics of Peer to Peer and Copyright Law, First Monday, 7(8). Retrieved from http://firstmonday.org
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  • Hey Chris,

    thanks for submitting your comment. There are quite a few similarities between our presentations. One element that seems to stand out is the fact of how uploaded content can be used by not only the platform you are submitting the content too, but also how other users can use your work. Without reading these TOS there could be fundamental consequences in gaining accreditation and also financial rights to your work at a later stage.

    I found it interesting in your presentation you state 'Slideshare can change their terms of service whenever they want, without telling you' (Kujat, 2011). Most of these platforms TOS agreements are quite extensive to read and understand first time around, let alone keeping track with incoming changes to the contract. This in itself seems quite risky, as Slideshare can take complete control of your content and change elements around rights to your own work without the author knowing.

    Privacy was also a topic both our presentations addressed, the “information you provide may be collected and stored, including personal information that is contained in any video, comment and post” (Findlay, 2011). This information is then sold to third party advertisers who can choose to use this information in anyway they please (Goettke & Christiana, 2007). You also mentioned in your presentation the factor of cookies, which automatically take information off your browser, without the users consent. I have noticed with multiple platforms that cookies must be enabled to use the service provided. Facebook has a similar system in which you are prompted with a message letting you know that cookies are disabled in the browser and the platform must have this enabled to be able to continue.

    One overwhelming factor within these TOS is that fact that once content is uploaded, the service provider can use your work in anyway they please contradictory of the fact that you can use there tools to uploaded the content, however they in no way take responsibility for the content that is uploaded. We all use these services at our own risk in which content can be used, duplicated and reinvented without consent of the user (Vimeo, 2011). Once a problem arises the user takes full responsibility for the property that is uploaded, not the platform.


    Findlay, T. (2011) Online policy primer| Vimeo. Retrieved from:
    http://www.slideshare.net/tim_findlay/online-policy-primer-vimeo

    Goettke, R., & Christiana, J. (2007). Privacy and Online Social Networking Websites. Computer Science 199r: Special Topics in Computer Science Computation and Society: Privacy and Technology.
    Available: http://www.eecs.harvard.edu/cs199r/fp/RichJoe.pdf

    Kujat, C. (2011) Net303 Online Policy Primer of SlideShare.net. Retrieved from:
    http://www.slideshare.net/CurtinStud/net303-online-policy-primer-of-slidesharenet
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  • Hi Tim,

    This is a high quality graphic presentation. There is also an interesting use of text and colour to draw attention to the points being made. Of particular note is a nice use of a movie censorship banner.

    The license users grant to vimeo, a limited, world-wide, non-exclusive, royalty free right to copy, display and transmit your media, is almost identical to other platforms I have seen examined. In effect, vimeo will do what they like with your content. Users also grant a license to all other vimeo users to view, copy, and make derivative works from your content.

    Users have the sole responsibility of ensuring they do not breech copyright, vimeo is not responsible for this. Again, this is similar to other platforms.

    Privacy is a focus in this presentation and I have noticed this emerging as a strong theme in other studies of terms of service including my own examination of Twitter. In “A Face Is Exposed for AOL Searcher”, it is observed that it is not just the information that we reveal to the platforms we sign-up for, but even the way that we search on the Web draws together these pieces to assemble a virtual image of who, and where we are (Barbaro, & Zeller. 2006).

    In “Fact Sheet 18:Online Privacy:Using the Internet Safely” numerous reasons are given for being cautious when signing up for services, and a picture is painted of how our data is gathered from various points on the Internet until it can be cross referenced in a methodology that approximates a virtual triangulation of our position and activity on the (Web Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. 2006). In turn, this can provide a deeper understanding of who we are. Your presentation stylishly brought together many of these important considerations.

    Cheers,
    Brent


    References

    Barbaro, M., & Zeller, T. (2006). A Face Is Exposed for AOL Searcher No. 4417749. Retrieved September 27, 2011, from http://w2.eff.org/Privacy/AOL/exhibit_d.pdf

    Privacy Rights Clearinghouse. (2006). Fact Sheet 18:Online Privacy: Using the Internet Safely. Retrieved September 27, 2011, from https://www.privacyrights.org/fs/fs18-cyb.htm#PART_ONE
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  • Hello Tim,

    I must admit Vimeo has been unknown to me until I watched your presentation on SlideShare. While Vimeo was unknown to me, some of the points you raised were quite similar to the once of my Online Policy Primer about SlideShare’s Terms of Service.

    You state “By submitting your video, you grant Vimeo a limited, world wide, non-exclusive royality free-license and right to copy transmit and display your media! “ ( Findlay, 2011)
    This excerpt reminds me on the rights user grant by uploading their presentations to Slideshare.net.
    (Kujat, 2011)

    Also, your Policy Primer states that Vimeo can be just used for non-commercial and personal purposes. (Findlay, 2011) It is similar to SlideShare.net’s TOS which do not allow and commercial use either. (Kujat,2011) Both services still give themselves the right to use the user-generated content published on their platform to gain money without letting the user know and without giving the user any money in exchange. (Findlay,2011 ; Kujat,2011)

    Further, it is quite interesting that Vimeo is not responsible for the content uploaded, even if the content breaks the copyright laws, as they do not scan the content uploaded. (Findlay,2011)

    Still, Vimeo collects and stores information which even can identify the user. (Findlay,2011) This fact of transparency would scare me as a user of Vimeo as the user does not know who will have access to these personal information but I assume that this fact of transparency is very common for Web 2.0 services.

    The way you present your Policy Primer is quite “eye-catching” as you use relevant images to get attention. Your bits of informations are concise and easy to consume and understand.

    Cheers,
    Chris



    References

    Findlay, T. (2011) Online policy primer| Vimeo. Retrieved from:
    http://www.slideshare.net/tim_findlay/online-policy-primer-vimeo


    Kujat, C. (2011) Net303 Online Policy Primer of SlideShare.net. Retrieved from:
    http://www.slideshare.net/CurtinStud/net303-online-policy-primer-of-slidesharenet 
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Online policy primer| Vimeo

  1. 1. Tim Findlay 15038986
  2. 2. “Simply put, Vimeo is the home for videos you create.We offer the best tools and the highest quality video in the Universe”(Vimeo, 2011). Image provided by Vimeohttp://vimeo.com/log_in
  3. 3. Ever accepted a platforms terms of servicewithout reading them? Image uploaded to Flickr by Colin_K
  4. 4. You may wanttoreconsiderthis andtake sometimeto read the fine printImage uploaded to Flickr by Jessica.Diamond
  5. 5. What are terms ofservice?
  6. 6. Rules which one mustagree to abide in orderto use the service(Vimeo, 2011).
  7. 7. “By registering as a member you acceptTim Findlay these terms of service” (Vimeo, 2011).tim101st@hotmail.com ***********
  8. 8. So what are they? Image provided from http://peterandthegoose.adversaria.co.uk/wp-content/confused.jpg
  9. 9. Requirement
  10. 10. You must be at least 13 years of age to use the Vimeo Service
  11. 11. License the service
  12. 12. By uploading your video’syou still own yourContent! Image uploaded to flickr by s.o.f.t
  13. 13. By submitting your video, yougrantVimeoa limited, world wide ,non-exclusive,royalty free-license and right to copy,transmit and display your media!
  14. 14. Vimeo has the right to distributeanduse your media free of charge!With the power to make derivatives of your workfor the purpose of displaying your videosto third party websites! (Vimeo, 2011). Image uploaded to Flickr by Kalexanderson
  15. 15. License Other users
  16. 16. You further grant all users of the Vimeo Servicepermission to viewyour videos for personaland non-commercial purposes (Vimeo, 2011).
  17. 17. The right to copy your work, and make derivate works from the content (Vimeo, 2011). Image uploaded to Flickr by richwall100Image uploaded to Flickr by adacito
  18. 18. Each user is responsible for ensuringthat the images uploaded to theVimeo site do not infringe anythird party copyright (Vimeo, 2011).
  19. 19. Vimeo has no obligation to screenor monitor any content availableon the Vimeo service and doesnot guarantee that any contentavailable on the Vimeo Servicecomplies with this agreement(Vimeo, 2011).
  20. 20. So basically Vimeo states that itis illegal to upload media whichis in breach of copyright….. Image uploaded to Flickr by Johntrainor
  21. 21. They donot monitor content and holdno responsibility for media that isuploaded onto the site. Even thoughthey provide the platform and toolsto distribute the video content? Image uploaded to Flickr by guudmorning
  22. 22. Privacy Image uploaded to Flickr by @boetter
  23. 23. { “In general we may collect information that can identify you, such as your name and email address” (Vimeo, 2011). }
  24. 24. { Vimeo may also request information about your interests and activities, your gender age and other demographic information (Vimeo, 2011). }
  25. 25. This includes your IP address, browser type, language and content of any undeleted cookies that your browser has previously accepted (Vimeo, 2011).Image uploaded to Flickr by ssoosay
  26. 26. disclaimers
  27. 27. •Vimeo provides the Vimeo service on an “as is”basis. You therefore use the Vimeo Serviceat your own risk (Vimeo, 2011).
  28. 28. •Vimeo provides the Vimeo service on an “as is”basis. You therefore use the Vimeo Serviceat your own risk (Vimeo, 2011).• “Vimeo shall not be liable for any direct, incidental,special, consequential, or exemplary damages.Including, loss of profits, good will,data orother intangible losses” (Vimeo, 2011).
  29. 29. Uploaded to Flickr by striatic
  30. 30. References• Adactio. (2008). Clone Troopers. Retrieved 23rd October 2011 from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/2856955322/in/photostream/• Boetter, Jacob. (2009). Thinking RFID. Retrieved October 15th from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/jakecaptive/3205277810/in/photostream/• Colin_k. (2008). Question mark sign. Retrieved 19th October 2011 from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/colinkinner/2200500024/in/photostream• Diamond, Jessica. (2008). Warning. Retrieved 21st October 2011 from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/sleepishly/2348416768/in/photostream• Donque, Allan. (2009). Files. Retrieved 22nd October 2011 from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/allandonque/3911593727/• Guudmorning. (2009). Confused. Retrieved October 13th from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/kristiand/3223044657/in/photostream/• Kalexanderson. (2011). Sad. Retrieved 19th October 2011 from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/kalexanderson/5421517469/• Peterandthegoose. (2005) Retrieved 16th October 2011 from http://peterandthegoose.adversaria.co.uk/
  31. 31. References• S.o.f.t. (2007). Shiny Happy People. Retrieved 14th October 2011 from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/soft/492739301/in/photostream• Ssoosay. (2009). EU Privacy Directive / Changes to UK Internet Cookie Privacy Law. Retrieved October 23rd 2011, fromhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/ssoosay/5762345557/in/photostream/• Striatic. (2007). Approve. Retrieved October 19th from http://www.flickr.com/photos/striatic/2145725302/• Trainor, John. (2007). Upload/Download. Retrieved 21st October from, http://www.flickr.com/photos/trainor/1229138273/• Vimeo. (2011). Privacy Policy. Retrieved 20th October 2011 from, http://vimeo.com/privacy• Vimeo. (2011). Terms of Service. Retrieved 15th October 2011 from, http://vimeo.com/terms#privacy• Vimeo. (2011). VIMEO’s Copyright and DMCA Policy. Retrieved 15th October 2011 from,http://vimeo.com/dmca• Vimeo. (2011). Login background. Retrieved 21st October from, http://vimeo.com/log_in

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