Thai Table manners
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Thai Table manners

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This slide is created to present 'Thai Style Table Manners' by Thai people but from foreign point of view : P....

This slide is created to present 'Thai Style Table Manners' by Thai people but from foreign point of view : P.

I did this since I was taking this course 'Personality and Social Interaction' at Assumption University, Thailand.

You can read more information from the references shown in each slide.

Thank you : )

Siam - Land of Smile
We are relaxed people LOL
Kind-hearted.

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  • Thai food has grown in popularity all over the world and many cooks and home chefs have tried their hand at Thai cuisine. While Thai recipes and cooking may take a bit of practice to perfect, setting your dinner table authentically for a Thai meal does not. With a few simple customs and traditions in mind, you can easily set your table for a simple or elegant Thai meal.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
  • 1. Cover the table with bamboo place mats and a colorful silk runner. They serve to protect the table from damage and heat as well as set the mood.\n2. Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place them around the table. This is a Thai custom, especially for special occasions and for honored guests. If you don't have orchids, use other small, compact flowers.\n3.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. Bamboo plants are considered lucky in Thailand and they are commonly seen in restaurants and homes.\n4.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are set with a fork and a large spoon for liquids, as chopsticks are only used in Thailand for Chinese-influenced recipes. However, if diners ask for chopsticks, it is impolite not to provide them.\n5.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkin closed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.\n6.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food. Though jasmine rice is most commonly served with Thai food, many hosts offer guests brown rice as well. If so, use two bowls and do not combine the rice varieties.\n
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  • Some table etiquette is the same in Thailand as in the west and some things are different. Of course, Thais are the world's most tolerant people so, even if you don't have correct table manners, they're unlikely to take offense. But why be rude if you don't need to be?\n\n
  • Elbows on the Table - In most circumstances, good table manners in Thailand still includes elbows on the table. Thais are very relaxed about it. It's acceptable. However, if you are dining with someone older (and this can be older by just a few weeks or months), because Thais treat anyone older with great respect, you should never rest your chin in your hand and elbow on the table while talking to them. It's considered disrespectful in Thailand.\nUsing a Spoon and Fork - One of the main differences you'll see in Thailand when eating is, rather than a knife and fork like we use in the west, Thais normally eat most dishes with a spoon and fork. The spoon is held in your right hand and the fork is used to scoop food onto the spoon and rearrange it so it doesn't fall off on its way to your mouth. Even in many top restaurants in Thailand, you'll be given a spoon and fork. Knives aren't used much while eating Thai food as the food is normally in bite sized pieces already, so there's no need to cut anything.\nUsing Chopsticks - Good Thai table manners include using the correct utensils for the right food. With so many Thais descended from Chinese immigrants, the use of chopsticks is also prevalent in Thai culture but they are saved for use with noodles and Chinese food. For everything else, see above.\nWait For Someone to Invite You Before Eating - For perfect table etiquette in Thailand, usually the oldest or wealthiest person at the table will invite you to eat once all the food has arrived. Don't begin to help yourself to food until invited to do so by someone either at a higher level than you or your host. Helping yourself before being invited is not polite in Thai culture.\nCommunal Eating - In most cases in Thailand, Thais will order several dishes then everyone shares, eating communal style. In this case, either wait for someone to serve you (one of the youngest people at your table usually will) or, if you help yourself, just take a small amount of rice followed by a small amount of toppings. Thais don't heap their plates full. Instead, they just take a small amount and keep going back for more. Normally you would serve yourself with the larger spoons that arrive with the food. In many restaurants though no other utensils arrive so it's perfectly acceptable to use the fork and spoon you're eating with to help yourself to more food from the communal plates.\nEat Slowly - Thai table etiquette dictates you eat slowly. Thais like to spend a lot of time over meals, hanging out with friends, talking and laughing, so don't eat your food quickly. If you do, you'll find you're sitting there with an empty plate while everyone else has barely started. Savor the food, enjoy the many tantalizing tastes and you'll enjoy the meal even more.\nDon't Talk With Food in Your Mouth - The one thing Thais find more distasteful than anything is people who eat and talk at the same time. No one wants to see the food churning around in your mouth so wait until you've swallowed before speaking. Or, if you absolutely must speak, cover your mouth with your hand while doing so. Otherwise, people will think you are low-class indeed.\nWho Pays? - In Thai culture, either the oldest member of the group or the wealthiest pays for everyone. Often, particularly if you eat with poorer Thais, then that's usually you. Take the check when it's brought to the table and start to pay. If it's absolutely not expected of you, someone will take it from you very quickly and insist you are their guest. But, if it's left in your hands then "tag, you're it". Don't get upset though. It's meant as a compliment as they think you are a higher level or richer than them and thus hold you in high respect. Plus, in Thailand, as a meal for four people is as cheap as $10, it doesn't break the bank anyway.\nRemember, Thais are very relaxed people and don't get upset about genuine mistakes or bad table manners if they're obviously western ones. Just do your best and, if you make a mistake, you'll often find your neighbor will quietly tell you how to do it the Thai way. Or, everyone at the table will laugh at you in a good -humored way - which is also great fun and makes the meal very entertaining.\n
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  • 1. Clothes\n\nThe better a restaurant, the more comfortable you feel in neat and tidy clothing. Dress in the same way as you would for a visit to a high-class or a simple Swiss restaurant. This way you are certain to be fine. \n2. Greeting\n\nThe actual greeting of Thai people is a nod where the chin touches the fingertips of the hands, which are folded and drawn to the breast. \n\n The lady adds the words: “suawaddee kaa”. \n The gentleman says: “suawaddee krab”. \n3. First the lady or the gentleman?\n\nThere is the same custom with Thai people as over here: ladies first.\n4. The prostration\n\nWhat may seem submissive to European sensibilities is an expression of hospitality for the Thais. In a high-class restaurant, the staff, when greeting a guest, frequently kneel down in front of the guest who is sitting on the floor. This gesture is also common in Thai families at home in the presence of visitors. \n5. Who starts eating first?\n\nIn Thailand it is the custom that precedence is given to the older people. Therefore, one courteously waits for everyone to be served and for the eldest to start eating. \n6. Cutlery\n\nIn Thailand you eat with a spoon. The fork is a tool with which rice or meat – bite-sized – is correctly positioned on the spoon.\n7. Chopsticks\n\nIn contrast to Chinese cuisine, Thai people mainly eat with a fork and spoon. Chopsticks are exclusively used for noodle dishes. While in China the bowl is taken to the mouth, in Thailand the same applies as for us Europeans: the spoon is taken to the mouth.\n8. Clinking glasses in Thailand\n\nThe clinking of glasses in Thailand is a modern, contemporary custom that is not common at the traditional dining table. When drinking beer among friends, the expression “chockdee”, which means “to our luck”, is used. Water is mainly drunk with Thai food. In modern restaurants, however, the European guest does not have to do without a glass of wine and can clink glasses according to the western custom. \n9. Extra servings\n\nDepending on the restaurant, one-course meals are served or meals are served on plates, from which each guest can help him/herself. When you have ordered meals on plates, the rule is: anyone who wants more helps him/herself to more or serves the person opposite – simple and straightforward.\n10. Lob und Tadel\n\nDid you enjoy your meal? Then let your host know. In contrast to western restaurants, you are not asked after a meal if you liked it – and if you are, then this is only because the staff, out of respect for the guests, make use of western manners. Thais attach great importance to discretion. If you would like to complain about something, you will find the person will listen to you even if you speak in a low voice.\n
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  • 1. Decide on the formality of your occasion. Are you having business associates over or friends? Relatives from out of state or your immediate family? The relationship that you have with the people attending your event will determine the formality. As a general guide, a silver service sit-down event should be reserved for professional or very special occasions; a buffet is far more informal and you are less able to control the seating arrangements.\n\n2. Seat people who have common interests together. This is the most helpful starting point. Consider the following: \nDo they have a need to discuss business together?\nDo they have hobbies or interests in common?\nDo they have professions in common?\nDo they have marital/single status in common? (Perhaps you're into matchmaking, although some would be irritated by your attempt if they were to figure it out)\nDo they like one another or not? Be careful of seating people you know have an animosity towards one another unless you want a dampener on the occasion.\n\n3.Pair people together. Be creative in your pairings. Sometimes it is customary to pair male/females but this can be stifling to the conversation or uncomfortable for some people. If you know someone to be shy, try to pair them with a caring extrovert. If you think two people who would normally not cross paths will end up having a good yarn, then try it. Being the host calls for exercising some people skills in your choices, as well as during the occasion.\n\n4. Seat guests of honour in order. If you have a guest of honour, for example, a boss, an elderly relative, a visiting superstar, there are etiquette rules as to their seating. A female guest of honour usually sits to the right of the host, while a male guest of honour usually sits to the left of the hostess.\n\n5.Put out placecards. Write the full name of each guest in fancy print on little cards (if you're creative, this is a fun part; if not, get someone else to do it). You really don't need placecards unless you have more than 6 guests. Below that amount is a little like telling your guests what to do. By tradition, there is no need to provide place cards for the hosts unless you think that omitting them will lead to confusion.\n\n6. Have a seating list for large dinner parties. If your dinner party is so large that it encompasses a group of tables, it is helpful to have a seating list at the entrance to the room. Or, personalise it and tell each guest where their table is. That is always much friendlier than making them line up like they're at a school cafeteria.\n\n7. Be a good host. Enjoy yourself but make sure the guests are having fun, too. Make sure that anyone with a disability is seated on a comfortable chair; offer to change it or add a cushion etc., if they appear uncomfortable. Let people know quietly where the bathrooms are located, or assist by making it clear with a discreet sign. If a guest looks put out at where you've seated them, do some discreet legwork and re-seat them as quickly as possible; make an excuse like, "Oops, I meant to put you over there." Don't do this if it makes the situation too obvious or you really can't work out a better place for them to sit.\n
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  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
  • Chaokuai - grass jelly is often served with only shaved ice and brown sugar.\nKhanom bua loi – taro root mixed with flour into balls in coconut milk.\nKhanom chan – multi-layers of pandan-flavored sticky rice flour mixed with coconut milk.\nKhanom mo kaeng - a sweet baked pudding containing coconut milk, eggs, palm sugar and flour, sprinkled with sweet fried onions.\nKhanom tan – palm flavored mini cake with shredded coconut on top.\nKhanom thuai talai' - steamed sweet coconut jelly and cream\nKhao niao mamuang - sticky rice cooked in sweetened thick coconut milk, served with slices of ripe mango.\nLot chong nam kathi – pandan flavored rice flour noodles in coconut milk, similar to the Indonesian cendol.\nRuam mit – mixed ingredients, such as chestnuts covered in flour, jackfruit, lotus root, tapioca, and lot chong, in coconut milk.\nSarim – multi-colored mung bean flour noodles in sweetened coconut milk served with crushed ice.\nSangkhaya fak thong - egg and coconut custard served with pumpkin, similar to the coconut jam of Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines.\nTako - jasmine scented coconut pudding set in cups of fragrant pandanus leaf.\n
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  • Chao kuai (Thai: เฉาก๊วย, grass cake) is a jelly which is made by boiling the aged and slightly oxidized stalks and leaves of Mesona chinensis, a type of mint, with potassium carbonate for several hours with a little starch and then cooling the liquid to a jelly-like consistency. Originally a Chinese dish, in Thailand it is normally eaten with ice and natural brown sugar. This photo was made at the Sunday Evening Walking Street market of Chiang Mai, Thailand.\n\n
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Thai Table manners Thai Table manners Presentation Transcript

  • PC3311 PERSONALITY & SOCIAL INTERACTIONThai Style Table Manners Section 404 Anuch K. 5016324 Panthip B. 5111851 Ratiporn A. 5133021 Nannapat K. 5211500 - Presentation Maker Date Presentation : 14 July,2011 13.30-16.00
  • TABLE SETTING Thai food is usually served family style.Dishes are placed in the middle of the table and are shared by everyone dining.
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE? http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are setwith a fork and a large spoon for liquids. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are setwith a fork and a large spoon for liquids. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are setwith a fork and a large spoon for liquids.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkinclosed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are setwith a fork and a large spoon for liquids.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkinclosed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string. http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • HOW TO SET THAI TABLE?Cover the table with bamboo place-mats and a colorful silk runner.Fill small glass bowls with water and float a small orchid in each. Place themaround the table.Put a bamboo plant in front of each setting in a glass vase.Do not set out chopsticks unless specially requested. Most Thai tables are setwith a fork and a large spoon for liquids.Cover your silverware by wrapping each place setting in a napkin. Tie the napkinclosed with a piece of decorative ribbon or string.Place a large bowl of rice on the table before you serve any other food http://www.ehow.co.uk/how_7794596_set-thai-table.html
  • EXAMPLES
  • EXAMPLES
  • EXAMPLES
  • EXAMPLES
  • SETTING THE TABLE http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • SETTING THE TABLEPlace a medium sized plate for each person on the table. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • SETTING THE TABLEPlace a medium sized plate for each person on the table.Large dinner plates are rarely used, as it is usual to keep filling up your plate so thatyou always have fresh warm rice and accompaniments. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • SETTING THE TABLEPlace a medium sized plate for each person on the table.Large dinner plates are rarely used, as it is usual to keep filling up your plate so thatyou always have fresh warm rice and accompaniments.On the right, place a large dessertspoon, and chopsticks if they are to be used, onthe left place a large fork. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • SETTING THE TABLEPlace a medium sized plate for each person on the table.Large dinner plates are rarely used, as it is usual to keep filling up your plate so thatyou always have fresh warm rice and accompaniments.On the right, place a large dessertspoon, and chopsticks if they are to be used, onthe left place a large fork.Cutting implements are rarely used as most Thai food is in bite-sized piecesalready. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • SETTING THE TABLEPlace a medium sized plate for each person on the table.Large dinner plates are rarely used, as it is usual to keep filling up your plate so thatyou always have fresh warm rice and accompaniments.On the right, place a large dessertspoon, and chopsticks if they are to be used, onthe left place a large fork.Cutting implements are rarely used as most Thai food is in bite-sized piecesalready.To the right front of your plate place a small soup bowl with a small soupspoon! Onthe table, tissues should be provided or Thai style napkins - a toilet roll with thecardboard tube taken out of the middle placed inside an attractive holder. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • SETTING THE TABLEPlace a medium sized plate for each person on the table.Large dinner plates are rarely used, as it is usual to keep filling up your plate so thatyou always have fresh warm rice and accompaniments.On the right, place a large dessertspoon, and chopsticks if they are to be used, onthe left place a large fork.Cutting implements are rarely used as most Thai food is in bite-sized piecesalready.To the right front of your plate place a small soup bowl with a small soupspoon! Onthe table, tissues should be provided or Thai style napkins - a toilet roll with thecardboard tube taken out of the middle placed inside an attractive holder. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • All the food dishes are placed in the middle of the table within everyonesreach. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • All the food dishes are placed in the middle of the table within everyonesreach.Sauces, which go with particular dishes, are placed directly next to that dishin an informal setting or ... http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • All the food dishes are placed in the middle of the table within everyonesreach.Sauces, which go with particular dishes, are placed directly next to that dishin an informal setting or ......if it is a formal dinner then every single diner will have an individual set ofsauces in front of his plate. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • All the food dishes are placed in the middle of the table within everyonesreach.Sauces, which go with particular dishes, are placed directly next to that dishin an informal setting or ......if it is a formal dinner then every single diner will have an individual set ofsauces in front of his plate.If you will be eating sticky rice, it will either come in a large bamboo ricebasket from which everyone is served or you can place small individual ricebaskets, with the ready cooked rice inside, in front of each plate. http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • All the food dishes are placed in the middle of the table within everyonesreach.Sauces, which go with particular dishes, are placed directly next to that dishin an informal setting or ......if it is a formal dinner then every single diner will have an individual set ofsauces in front of his plate.If you will be eating sticky rice, it will either come in a large bamboo ricebasket from which everyone is served or you can place small individual ricebaskets, with the ready cooked rice inside, in front of each plate.Set a water glass for each person and fill it with iced water. Other drinks area matter of taste preference. Some people like to drink beer or some localfruit juices, such as guava or coconut. If you are having an extended diningand socializing evening then there might be whiskey served, usually with ice http://recipes-thailand.blogspot.com/2011/01/setting-table-thai-style.html
  • THE BEST WAY TO ENJOY A THAI FOOD MEAL ISto taste every dish individually, as combining various dishes may lose their appeal.
  • HOW TO HAVE GOOD TABLE MANNERS IN THAILAND Table Etiquette in Asia is Very Important
  • GOOD TABLE MANNERS IN THAILANDElbow not on the tableNo feet on the chair or on the tableWash your hand before eatingUsing a spoon and folkSpoon and folk at 5:25 when finished. Put your folk and spoon together when youfinished eating.Using chopsticks, they are saved for use with noodles and Chinese food.Place chopsticks on the top of bowl when finished http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2748333/how_to_have_good_table_manners_in_thailand.html?cat=16
  • GOOD TABLE MANNERS IN THAILANDDo not lick your finger.Do not pick off anyone’s else plate.Wait someone to invite you before eating.Communal eating. Thais will order several dishes then everyone shares, eatingcommunal style.Take a small amount of rice followed by a small amount of toppings dont heaptheir plates full.Eat slowly.Don’t talk with food in your mouth.The oldest member or wealthiest will pay for everyone. http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2748333/how_to_have_good_table_manners_in_thailand.html?cat=16
  • THAI TABLE MANNERS With these 10 rules and features of Thai table manners, we offer you the opportunity to succeed when you are with Thai hosts. 1. Cloth: The better a restaurant, the more comfortable you feel in neat and tidy clothing. 2. Greeting 3. Lady first 4. The prostration: The staff frequently knee down in front of guest who sitting in the floor. 5. Older starts eating first, then others follow. 6. Cutlery 7. Chopsticks used for Noodles 8. Clinking glasses to congratulate in some event 9. Extra serving: anyone who wants more helps him/herself to more or serves the person opposite – simple and straightforward. 10. Lob und Tadelhttp://www.thaiselect.ch/en/?manners/
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • BASIC TABLE MANNERS IN THE FAMILYEveryone come to the table first thenstart eatingSit properlyUse common of serving spoonsUse chopsticks in a proper wayDo not leave the table before everyoneis done eatingManners in ConversationDrinking Manners
  • SEATING ARRANGEMENT Universal Rules1. Decide on the formality of 6. Have a seating list for large your occasion. dinner parties.2. Seat people who have 7. Be a good host. common interests together.3. Pair people together.4. Seat guests of honour in order.5. Put out placecards. http://www.wikihow.com/Seat-Dinner-Guests
  • The number one rule is that you are host and its the hosts duty to ensure the happiness and comfort of the guests throughout the event.This means foregoing things for yourself if necessary (like less food), keeping an eye on guests comfort levels andproviding swift attention to any problems that might arise.
  • DO’S & DON’TS Do take your time and pick at your food; Do let the senior ladies of the group do the enjoy the conversation and the laughter ordering; its tradition. and the sense of community. Do wait for the host to invite you to dig in. Do pick up the check if it comes to you; in Thai society the person who is perceived to be the richest pays. Nine times out of ten this will be Do expect a wide variety of dishes and flavors; you. On the other hand dont try to contribute if part of the trick to ordering Thai food is to get a someone else is paying the bill, it takes away balance of sweet, sour, salty and spicy. from their status and face. Do serve yourself but only what you can eat in two or three mouthfuls. Do make sure to take only small portions of each dish so theres enough to go around. Do finish everything on your plate; it lets the host know you enjoyed the meal.http://www.phuket.com/dining/howto.htm
  • DO’S & DON’TSDont leave your chopsticks in the Dont wait for all of the food to comebowl, it symbolizes death and is very out before you eat it, Thai meals arebad luck. leisurely affairs and the food just keeps on coming.Dont order one dish that you intendto eat by yourself. Thai meals are Dont use your fork to put food inalways shared. your mouth, instead use it to push your food onto your spoon.Dont feel bad about addingcondiments to flavour your food to Dont look around for your knife -your taste. you wont need one as everything is cut up for you. http://www.phuket.com/dining/howto.htm
  • TYPES OF MENU Breakfast Lunch Dinner Desserts, sweet snacks and drinks
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.For North and Northeast will eatsticky rice but for South and middlepart of Thailand eat rice.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.For North and Northeast will eatsticky rice but for South and middlepart of Thailand eat rice.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.For North and Northeast will eatsticky rice but for South and middlepart of Thailand eat rice.
  • THAI BREAKFASTGenerally, Thai people always eat riceas s main meal in the morning such asgruel.For North and Northeast will eatsticky rice but for South and middlepart of Thailand eat rice.But nowadays, Thai people have abusy life. They will eat something thateasy and quick such as pa-tong-goand nam-tao-hu.
  • THAI LUNCHFor lunch, it will be just one-dish meal, rice with some meatand vegetable or noodle that easy to eat. But it can be som-tum and fried chicken which have many dishes.
  • THAI DINNER http://new.music.yahoo.com/blogs/yradish/8157/thai-dinner-night/For Thai people who work hardwill eat a lot in their dinner.In dinner always have rice withother 2-3 dishes.Other dishes not only meat andvegetable but it also have soupsuch as in dinner will have ricewith omelets, vegetable fried, andsoup.The number of dishes is up to thenumber of people eating.
  • THAI DINNER http://new.music.yahoo.com/blogs/yradish/8157/thai-dinner-night/For Thai people who work hardwill eat a lot in their dinner.In dinner always have rice withother 2-3 dishes.Other dishes not only meat andvegetable but it also have soupsuch as in dinner will have ricewith omelets, vegetable fried, andsoup.The number of dishes is up to thenumber of people eating.
  • THAI DINNER http://new.music.yahoo.com/blogs/yradish/8157/thai-dinner-night/For Thai people who work hardwill eat a lot in their dinner.In dinner always have rice withother 2-3 dishes.Other dishes not only meat andvegetable but it also have soupsuch as in dinner will have ricewith omelets, vegetable fried, andsoup.The number of dishes is up to thenumber of people eating.
  • THAI DINNER http://new.music.yahoo.com/blogs/yradish/8157/thai-dinner-night/For Thai people who work hardwill eat a lot in their dinner.In dinner always have rice withother 2-3 dishes.Other dishes not only meat andvegetable but it also have soupsuch as in dinner will have ricewith omelets, vegetable fried, andsoup.The number of dishes is up to thenumber of people eating.
  • THAI DINNER http://new.music.yahoo.com/blogs/yradish/8157/thai-dinner-night/For Thai people who work hardwill eat a lot in their dinner.In dinner always have rice withother 2-3 dishes.Other dishes not only meat andvegetable but it also have soupsuch as in dinner will have ricewith omelets, vegetable fried, andsoup.The number of dishes is up to thenumber of people eating.
  • THAI DINNER http://new.music.yahoo.com/blogs/yradish/8157/thai-dinner-night/For Thai people who work hardwill eat a lot in their dinner.In dinner always have rice withother 2-3 dishes.Other dishes not only meat andvegetable but it also have soupsuch as in dinner will have ricewith omelets, vegetable fried, andsoup.The number of dishes is up to thenumber of people eating.
  • THAI DINNER http://new.music.yahoo.com/blogs/yradish/8157/thai-dinner-night/For Thai people who work hardwill eat a lot in their dinner.In dinner always have rice withother 2-3 dishes.Other dishes not only meat andvegetable but it also have soupsuch as in dinner will have ricewith omelets, vegetable fried, andsoup.The number of dishes is up to thenumber of people eating.
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • DESSERTS AND SWEET SNACKS Most Thai meals finish with fresh fruit but sometimes a sweet snack will be served as a dessert.Chaokuai
  • Mango with glutinous rice
  • DRINKSCha yen - Thai iced teaKrating Daeng - an energy drink and the originof Red Bull.Oliang - a sweet Thai black ice coffee.Satho - a traditional rice wine from the Isanregion.
  • DRINKSCha yen - Thai iced teaKrating Daeng - an energy drink and the originof Red Bull.Oliang - a sweet Thai black ice coffee.Satho - a traditional rice wine from the Isanregion.
  • TOP 10 BEST THAI FOOD Tom Yum Kung ต้มยํากุ้ง
  • TOP 10 BEST THAI FOOD Pad-Thai ผัดไทย
  • TOP 10 BEST THAI FOOD พะแนง
  • TOP 10 BEST THAI FOOD Fried-Rice ข้าวผัด
  • TOP 10 BEST THAI FOOD