MVUSD Aug 2011 Day 1

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August 2011 SmartBoard Training

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  • We’ve talked about the objectives for the four days, but there are outcomes for each of the days as well. These outcomes build on each other and will lead us to the final Academy outcome. Today is the foundation for your lesson. You can see the progression of outcomes on the agenda.
  • Respect – our respect for your time and professionalism by giving you significant amount of work time. Your respect for presenters by limiting side conversations and putting your cell phones on stun. Our respect for each other as professionals by valuing each others’ opinions and contributions/experiences as educators. Finally respect for students as we look at achievement data and formulate plans to help all students be successfulParticipation – everyone has contributions, and the group is made less when any individual does not participate. Results – there are tangible outcomes each day of this academy. Our goal is to have every person walk away with a completed product they can implement at the beginning of next year. Hand over to Jenny and Gregg
  • 1 minute as group to look at the topics1 minute as individual to list personal responses to topic (not on cube)4 minutes – talk about group aggregates responses and write on cubes2 minutes to construct the cubeJenny and Gregg
  • There are many resources for evidence of high-quality practice: as we decide which strategies to try with which groups of students we should start with the fact that there is some evidence that those strategies will work15 minutes reading – feel free to take notes on TM p 8
  • Use clickers to capture group data, then have small group discussion.
  • Ocean View video clip: While watching the video, feel free to take notes on page 18 of DMR book about the way collaboration work and team members attitudes.
  • Individual reflection followed by table discussionTake a break after this writing
  • These are the broad inquiry questions that we used in developing the format for the four-day training.
  • Disaggregation:To separate something into its component parts, or break apartIf we don’t do anything with the data, it’s pointless. We want to avoid the data rich, information poor syndrome.
  • Use clickers to check for understanding
  • https://online.dataworks-ed.com/
  • DataWORKS Educational Research (2006) Curriculum calibration per CA Standards – percentage of assignments on grade level.
  • https://online.dataworks-ed.com/
  • So, do we teach at grade level, or do we teach to meet student instructional level? We need to do BOTH!
  • Student population is not demographics, it is your specific students and their needs
  • Application: TM p. 38 – 43Feel free to use the templates on pages 38-43 (2 templates, reproduced 3 times each) to record your strengths, obstacles, inferences, then prioritizeWe will be listening for conversations about weighted standards, inferences. We should ask them what they have prioritized, and why, including why one over another.
  • Double circle facing each other. Outer circle will shift. Some tables will be inner circle, some tables will be outer circle. Switch 3 timesJenny
  • TM pg 49, or use CTAP template, or write your own goalJenny
  • Right after lunch
  • Reminder about final products prior to SMART training
  • MVUSD Aug 2011 Day 1

    1. 1. Moreno Valley USDCurriculum Development Academy<br />August 1-4, 2011<br />We will begin promptly at 8:30.<br />Please help yourself to coffee and snacks!<br />
    2. 2. At the end of the Academy, you will have developed at least one standards-aligned SMART Notebook lesson which includes direct instruction, cognitively demanding interactive activities, and meaningful responder-based quizzes and polls, all specifically tailored to the identified needs of your incoming students. <br />Outcome<br />
    3. 3. Work collaboratively to create lessons and Notebooks in a supportive environment <br />Plan and prioritize instruction based on student achievement data <br />Objectives<br />
    4. 4. Build and practice questioning strategies to engage students using the responders <br />Expand and reinforce skills learned in the 101, 102 and advanced classes to better implement your Digital Math program<br />Objectives<br />
    5. 5. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />
    6. 6. Using Decision Making for Results process, identify student learning goal<br />Identify at least 2 resources or tools in SMART Notebook Gallery that support the goal<br />Today’s Outcome<br />
    7. 7. Respect<br />Participation<br />Results<br />Norms<br />
    8. 8. Discuss and clarify topics <br />Individual reflection on personal responses<br />Discuss and aggregate responses<br />Write responses on cube<br />Cut out and assemble cube<br />Identify one person to share out group information<br />Group Resume: Bio Cube<br />
    9. 9. Principles of Decision Making for Results<br />TM p. 3<br />
    10. 10. Becoming Data-Driven <br />How are you currently embracing a data-driven decision-making process that leads to results?<br />TM p. 5<br />
    11. 11. Where’s the Proof?<br />Marzano, Classroom Instruction that Works<br />Cotton, Classroom Questioning<br />Zemelman, Best Practices<br />NCTM Research Brief, Why is teaching with problem solving important to student learning? <br />Educause Quarterly, Clickers in the Classroom<br />http://ctap10.org/moval2011<br />Results-Driven Schools<br />
    12. 12. “The value of the data emerges only when analysis provides insights that direct decisions for students.” <br />White, Beyond the numbers<br />Take notes on p. 8 as you read and/or as team shares out research <br />Reflection<br />
    13. 13. Cause data: professional practices that create specific effects or results<br />Definitions and Examples<br />Effect data: outcomes or results<br />
    14. 14. Leadership & Learning Matrix <br />Effects/Results Data<br />Leadership/Teaching Practices<br />
    15. 15. Lucky (high results, low understanding)<br />Losing ground (low results, low understanding)<br />Learning (high results, high understanding)<br />Leading (high results, high understanding)<br />Where is your school?<br />
    16. 16. A Look at Collaboration<br />
    17. 17. What elements did you observe that made the collaboration effective?<br />How would you describe the attitudes of the participants?<br />Reflect on page 18 of DMR book<br />A Look at Collaboration<br />
    18. 18. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />
    19. 19. What are the achievement levels of our incoming students?<br />What are the achievement gaps?<br />What targeted strategies can we apply to meet these gaps?<br />What tools will we use to monitor whether we are effective?<br />Big Questions<br />
    20. 20. What do you want to know?<br />Effective strategies<br />Effective tools<br />Student learning needs<br />Student learning strengths<br />Reflect on page 20 of DMR book<br />Inquiry<br />
    21. 21. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />DMR p. 21<br />
    22. 22. Why? – To gather and organize data in order to gain insights about leadership, teaching, and learning practices <br />Considerations:<br />Measures of data<br />Disaggregation <br />Triangulation <br />Reflection<br />Step 1: Conduct a Treasure Hunt <br />
    23. 23. Disaggregation is not a problem-solving strategy. It is a problem-finding strategy.<br />Victoria Bernhardt, Data Analysis, 1998<br />Disaggregation <br />
    24. 24. Using district reports, chart the data in a way that makes sense for your grade level<br />Think about:<br />In which strands are our students having the most success?<br />What are some common needs students coming into my class are likely to have?<br />If desired, chart data on templates: pages 27-31<br />Treasure Hunt Activity<br />
    25. 25. Highlight standards in which students scored lowest<br />Cross reference with how heavily weighted those standards are in CST<br />For Example:<br />
    26. 26. I was able to capture the data I need in the templates provided<br />I filled in the templates, but I’m not sure the data tells me anything useful<br />I got some data, but was not able to organize it in the templates<br />I cannot figure out the data or how to organize it <br />Checking In<br />
    27. 27. It is not so much a lack of data, but an absence of analysis, and an even greater absence of actions driven by the data.<br />White, S. (2005). Beyond the numbers. Englewood, CO: Advanced Learning Press.<br />
    28. 28. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />DMR p. 34<br />
    29. 29. Identify causes for celebration and to identify areas of concern<br />Make inferences<br />Cognitive disconnect<br />Specific gaps<br />Cause <br />DMR p. 35<br />Analyze Data to Prioritize Needs<br />
    30. 30. Grade Level Instruction<br />
    31. 31. Grade Level Instruction<br />
    32. 32. Students perform no higher than the assignments given<br />State tests assess grade-level content<br />Students cannot learn what they are not taught<br />Students learn more when taught at a higher level than at a lower level<br />Why Grade Level Instruction?<br />
    33. 33. Curriculum Complexity<br />BOTH<br />
    34. 34. Why? - To take immediate action on most urgent needs<br />Considerations<br /> Student needs<br /> Curriculum and Power Standards<br /> Foundational knowledge<br />Prioritization <br />White, S. (2005). Beyond the numbers. Englewood, CO: Advanced Learning Press.<br />
    35. 35. Which strands and concepts are most important to target in order to ensure students will be successful with grade level content?<br />Table Conversation<br />
    36. 36. Review data from Step 1 (DMR p. 27-32, EADMS reports)<br />Consider pacing schedule, CST weights, and professional judgment<br />Prioritize urgent needs<br />Record your work on templates pages 38-43<br />Analyze to Prioritize<br />
    37. 37. Explain what area you prioritized and why<br />1 minute per person<br />Speed Round<br />
    38. 38. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />DMR p. 44<br />
    39. 39. Why? – To identify our most critical goals for student achievement based on the challenges that were identified through the inquiry process<br />Specific <br />Measurable<br />Achievable<br />Relevant<br />Timely<br /> Step 3: Establish SMART Goals<br />
    40. 40. Review prioritized needs <br />Review Treasure Hunt baseline data<br />Apply SMART goal formula<br />Use templates if desired <br />DMR p 49<br />Handout<br />Write your own<br />Establish SMART Goals<br />
    41. 41. Return by 12:45<br />
    42. 42.
    43. 43. At the end of the Academy, you will have developed at least one standards-aligned SMART Notebook lesson which includes direct instruction, cognitively demanding interactive activities, and meaningful responder-based quizzes and polls, all specifically tailored to the needs of your incoming students. <br />Academy Outcome<br />
    44. 44. SMART goal based on identified priorities<br />Identification of at least 2 Notebook tools or activities to support SMART goal<br />Final Products – Day 1<br />
    45. 45. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />
    46. 46. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />
    47. 47. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />
    48. 48. The Process for Results<br />Inquiry: Develop questions<br />
    49. 49. SMART goal based on identified priorities<br />Identification of at least 2 Notebook tools or activities to support SMART goal<br />Final Products – Day 1<br />
    50. 50. Delicious. Like my favorite dessert. <br />Good. Like a wholesome entrée. <br />Nutritious. Like my least favorite vegetable. <br />Not so good. Like eating stale bread. <br />I’d rather eat sand. <br />How did today’s material go down?<br />
    51. 51. Standards and rigor<br />Common Core: Standards of Mathematical Practice<br />Cognitive demand and task analysis<br />Work time<br />8:00 - Continental breakfast <br />8:30 - Academy begins<br />Day 2 Preview<br />

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