5 Steps

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5 Steps

  1. 1. Sweat Equity Enterprises 5 Step Process
  2. 2. (SEE ) Curriculum & Guide Table of Contents Introduction ................................................................................................................................. i Step 1 ...........................................................................................................................................1 Activity 1 Brief ............................................................................................................5 Activity 2 Brief ..........................................................................................................11 Activity 3 Brief ..........................................................................................................17 Activity 4 Brief ..........................................................................................................20 Step 2 ...........................................................................................................................................26 Activity 1 Brief ........................................................................................................31 Activity 2 Brief ........................................................................................................38 Activity 3 Brief ........................................................................................................44 Step 3 ...........................................................................................................................................60 Activity 1 Brief ........................................................................................................65 Activity 2 Brief ........................................................................................................70 Activity 3 Brief ........................................................................................................78 Step 4 ...........................................................................................................................................94 Activity 1 Brief ........................................................................................................99 Activity 2 Brief ......................................................................................................105 Activity 3 Brief ......................................................................................................111 Activity 4 Brief ......................................................................................................115 Step 5 ..........................................................................................................................................128 Activity 1 Brief ......................................................................................................133
  3. 3. Introduction to SEE Sweat Equity Enterprises What is SEE? In 2004, Sweat Equity Enterprises (SEE) was founded by Marc Ecko to help youth discover their creative and career potenial. SEE builds ground breaking collaborations between youth and industry. SEE is a youth development program where teens participate in hands-on design projects. Youths gain intensive design, technology and professional training as they develop original graphic, product, or apparel designs in collaboration with a company partner. Through the program companies gain a youth perspective that can help shape their brand, products, and marketing while young designers gain a variety of 21st century skills that are transferable not just to school and career but to every aspect of their lives. Past projects have included bags for Marc Ecko Enterprises, graphics for New York Cares and Abada Capoeira, shoes for Sketchers, watches for Callanen/Timex, package design for Dr. Miracles Hair Care Products, skateboards for Zoo York, outerwear for Marc Ecko Enterprises, cars for Nissan and branding for Best Buy and RadioShack. Introduction iii
  4. 4. What is SEE’s learning process? Over the course of approximately three to four months, young designers produce original concepts for corporate clients following our methodology below: 5 Step Design Process 1 KICK OFF IDENTIFY DESIGN CHALLENGE INFORMATION GATHERING 2 RESEARCH INSPIRATION CRITIQUE BRAINSTORM 3 CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT CONCEPT REFINEMENT CRITIQUE FINAL CONCEPTS 4 FINAL CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT REVIEW FINALIZE CRITIQUE/FOCUS GROUP FINAL 5 PRESENTATION CLIENT PRESENTATION Introduction iv
  5. 5. What are the skills SEE’s students gain? SEE does not intend to make all participants into designers – but rather build on the proven capacity of design education to give them valuable transferable skills that can be used in every area of their lives. In SEE’s 5 Step Design Process students learn, apply, and understand the following skills: Professional: public speaking, project management, time management, Photoshop & Illustrator, information management, market research, and insight into brands & consumer products. Socio-emotional: problem-solving, communication, constructive self and peer criticism, collaboration, and resiliency. Academic: critical thinking, research, business, literacy, and math Constant Reinforcements Constant Reinforcements and facilitate better learning during the 5 Step Design Process. The purpose of the Constant Reinforcements is to build-in skills and understandings our young designers will use and need during Step 5 Final Presentation and in life. By applying these Constant Reinforcements in each step of the design process SEE’s young designers will be consistently: Reading Readings reinforce design understandings and design terminology. Writing Writing reinforces reflection and understanding of readings, research, and design concepts. Discussion Discussions allow SEE’s young designers to develop their oral skills and enhance their understanding of the Design Process. These discussions also prepare our young designers for presentations and design critiques. Visual Visualizing allows SEE’s young designers to use their understandings about design and manifest them in a visual medium. Mediums for visualization include but are not limited to: sketching, Introduction v
  6. 6. vector-based software, image-editing software, images, videos, models/prototypes, mood boards, logos, and presentations. Presentation Client presentations and design critiques end every step in the design process. They reinforce oral and visual skills and encourage professionalism. Design Programs Reinforcing design programs during each step within the design process allows SEE’s young designers to become familiar with various tools and techniques. This familiarity with design programs will enable our young designers to be more prepared during the final steps in the design process when the workload heightens. File Preparation File preparation reinforces organization and documentation during the design process. In additon the process of documentation allows students to reference prior learnings. In this Curriculum & Guide you will find Constant Reinforcement boxes on the Activity Brief pages. The Constant Reinforcement boxes include stars on top of each reinforcement to denote its use in the activity. This is a tool to ensure that our young designers are learning the skills they need to complete their projects and prepare them for their lives after SEE. Introduction vi
  7. 7. Step 1 Design Challenge 9 hours 30 minutes Step 1
  8. 8. Design Challenge Overview Goal: The goal of Step 1 is for SEE’s young designers to fully understand their design challenge. Through research and an initial client presentation young designers begin to explore the client (the company, its products, market, competitors etc.) and develop a better understand- ing of the project demands and constraints. Throughout this phase young designers practice researching, writing, asking questions, giving and receiving feedback, professional etiquette, presentation skills, and working with design software. Understandings: • Students will understand the importance of preparing for meetings including how to research a client. • Students will understand that the first meeting with the client is their opportunity as designers to extract as much information as they can from the client. • Students will understand that professional behavior and preparation are an important part of making a good professional impression on a client. • Students will understand that note-taking, during research and presentations, is an essential part of organization and documentation in the design process. • Students will understand that clients have constraints based on, but not limited to: time, budget, target consumers, target market, etc. • Students will understand that client constraints impact decision making throughout the design process. 2 Step 1
  9. 9. Able to Do/Apply: • Conduct research and present their findings to a group. • Extract and document important information from conducting client research and the client presentation. • Analyze their client research, identify gaps, and prepare clarifying questions for the client. • Discuss project details and identify constraints. • Practice giving and receiving feedback to their peers. • Identify key terms for Step 1 (below). Key Terms Brand Market Research Trend Forecast Client Mission Statement Revenue Competitors Product Survey Constraints Professional (ism) Target Market/Audience Consumer Professional Etiquette Time Lines Step 1 3
  10. 10. Design Challenge Activities Activity 1 – Preparing for the Client: Research and Meeting Prep Approximately 5 Hours Activity 2 – Presenting Yourself to the Client: Professional Behaviors Approximately 1 Hour 30 Minutes Activity 3 – Client Presentation Approximately 1 Hour Activity 4 – Client Presentation Debrief & Understanding Client Constraints Approximately 2 Hours Step 1
  11. 11. Activity 1 Brief Preparing for the Client: Research and Meeting Prep Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will understand the importance 1. Discussion: Design Challenge of preparing for the meetings including 2. Developing Research Questions conducting research on a client and their 3. Conducting Research market. 4. Preparing Short Presentations • Students will understand that the initial 5. Reporting Back Key Findings client meeting is their opportunity as 6. Discussion: Activity Debrief and Client designers to extract as much information Questions as they can from the client. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs Step 1 5
  12. 12. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard/poster board • Computer • Markers/chalk • Computer printer • Internet access • Pen or pencil • Sketchbook/journal Prerequisite: Some prior knowledge of word processing, internet navigation. SEE’s Design and Business Foundations. 6 Step 1
  13. 13. 1. Discussion: Design Challenge Notes: Approximately 30 minutes Transition into Step 1, Design Challenge, by reviewing the SEE 5 Step Methodology and walking through the goals and objectives of Step 1. Then, briefly introduce the design challenge and the client including: • Purpose of the client presentation • Date and time of presentation - example: 03/07/09 at 11:00 a.m. • Location of presentation - example: classroom conference area Tip Visually displaying the • Attendees (include names and position) presentation details on a - example: Thomas Brown, Senior Vice blackboard or poster sets a President of Merchandising target goal for the students. • Time frame (1 hour minimum) - example: 11 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. This is a good time to initiate a class discussion about how to prepare for the upcoming client meeting/presentation. Discussion points might include: Now that we have been introduced to the project and completed both design and business foundations, what do we need to do to prepare for our first client meeting? What should we know going into the client meeting? How can we get information about a client? Close the discussion by explaining that the students will start preparing for the client presentation by conducting research. 2. Developing Research Questions Approximately 30 minutes Assign students into research teams of two. Each pair will write a total of 20 research questions on the topics below (approximately 5 questions per topic): • Client’s identity, logo, personality, products and brand • Client’s market, competitors, market/ Tip industry trends Sending an e-mail to the client • Client’s target market/demographic (i.e. with questions will also help the typical consumer, who buys it?) the client prepare for their • Client’s costs, revenues, profits presentation. Below are some sample questions to provide to students. • What is the company’s brand and logo? What does it represent? • What words are used to describe the brand? • What makes their brand different from other brands? Step 1 Activity 1 7
  14. 14. Notes: • Who is the company’s target market? Why? • Does the company set or follow consumer trends? • Are they innovative? If so, how (materials, color choices, design, their message)? • In what areas are their products sold? Why these areas? • What stores sell the most products? Where? • What is the average price of their primary products? Why? • Where do they manufacture their products? • Who are the company’s competitors? • Where do the competing brands sell their products? • What are the competing brands best sellers? • What is the average price points for competitor’s products? Why? 3. Conducting Research Approximately 2 hours Student teams should conduct research using the internet (looking at the client’s website, articles, ads etc.) trying to find as many answers as possible to their 20 questions. Students will likely have unanswered questions, which is okay. This will lead them to understand that the client meeting is an opportunity to fill in these research gaps. Students will give a short presentation to the class of their research. Note: The facilitator should walk around the room and provide guidance to students as needed. Students should print out relevant information and articles, take notes in their journal, and print out any visual aids (budgets, pictures of products, logos, etc.) that would be helpful in their presentation. 4. Preparing Short Presentations Approximately 1 hour Students will create a presentation (approximately five minutes in length) to share five key findings that they have learned from researching. Presentations should include student drawings, pictures, charts, and other visuals or print-outs that they collected during their research phase. This exercise is a practice in presentation skills, therefore the content for the actual presentation can be open- ended. Students could report key findings from their research or other interesting facts that they learned about the client’s business. Some options might include creating a poster with information, making a collage, or creating a slide presentation. Ask students to 8 Step 1 Activity 1
  15. 15. take a couple of minutes to rehearse for their presentation. Notes: 5. Reporting Back Key Findings Approximately 30 minutes The students will come together in a round-table to present their key findings to the group. Each pair should be allocated about five minutes. Groups that are not presenting should take notes on information being presented by other groups and ask clarifying questions. 6. Discussion: Activity Debrief and Client Questions Approximately 30 minutes After the presentations are complete transition the class into a conversation on how the initial client meeting is an opportunity for designers to extract as much information as they can from their client. Open the discussion by asking: What questions were you not able to get answers to? Point out that although students found a great deal of information on the internet, they still have many unanswered questions. Students will have the opportunity to fill in these gaps in their research by asking the client these questions during their meeting. Together as a group, the class will compile a list of unanswered questions (since there will probably be duplicates). Help facilitate which questions should be included on the list for the client meeting discussing why they need to know the information. Consider assigning specific questions to students (or teams) to ask during the client meeting to ensure the information is collected and to give students practice interacting with the client in a business meeting. Note: The facilitator will send in these questions to the client prior to the client presentation. Finally, summarize all they have accomplished in Activity 1 and congratulate the students on a job well done. Step 1 Activity 1 9
  16. 16. Resources Marc Ecko Enterprises Marc Ecko Blog www.marceckoenterprises.com www.beingmarcecko.com Ecko Brazil www.ecko.com.br Ecko Unlimited - Brazil www.ecko.com.br/sobre-comm.php 10 Step 1 Activity 1
  17. 17. Activity 2 Brief Presenting Yourself to the Client: Professional Behaviors Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will understand that This activity should be conducted before professional behavior (attitudes, the client presentation. communication, dress, timeliness, etc.) and preparation (work space cleanliness, 1. Role Playing: Behavioral Scenarios equipment and materials) are an 2. Group Discussion on Role Playing important part of creating a good Scenarios professional impression when meeting 3. Debrief: Professional Etiquette with a client. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs Step 1 11
  18. 18. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Props for role playing scenarios • Markers • Poster board • Pen or pencil • Sketchbook/journal Prerequisite: N/A 12 Step 1
  19. 19. 1. Role Playing: Behavioral Scenarios Notes: Approximately 30 minutes Note: In this activity, the facilitator will introduce students to the concept of professional behavior through role-playing. The facilitator may want to line up a volunteer or intern ahead of time to help conduct the role-playing exercise. Students can be included in these role-playing activities. During the role playing exercise the students should write down their observations of the characters, room, etc. Observations are not opinions but rather what the students see. Act out examples of both nonprofessional and professional etiquette for example, posture, attitude, communication, dress, timeliness, room cleanliness and technology readiness. Possible scenarios might include: Posture • Slouching - unprofessional Sitting up- professional • Leaning head on hand or on the table - unprofessional Keeping head up and paying attention to speaker(s) - professional Attitudes • Frowning, sighing, grunting, sneering - unprofessional Smiling, making eye-contact, being friendly, acting positive - professional Gestures • Not greeting a client/and or introducing oneself – unprofessional • Shaking a client’s hand - professional • Waving arms around to answer or ask a question - unprofessional • Hand raised up high for everyone to see - professional • Whispering with peers, kicking peers under the table - unprofessional • Active listening, ignoring distractions from peers - professional Communication • Wandering eyes - unprofessional • Eye contact, active listening - professional • Interrupting the client, other peers, and/or the facilitator - unprofessional • Waiting until the speaker is finished - professional • Mumbling, talking to the ground – unprofessional • Speaking clearly and loudly to the group - professional Step 1 Activity 2 13
  20. 20. Notes: Dress • Dressing sloppy, wearing untucked shirts or revealing clothes – unprofessional • Neat, clean attire - professional Timeliness • Arriving late- unprofessional • Arriving early- professional • Starting meetings late and without a plan – unprofessional • Following an organized meeting agenda & starting and concluding on time – professional Meeting Room/Workspace Preparation • Leaving chairs in an unorganized manner all over the room - unprofessional • Planning the seating arrangements prior to arrival - professional • Cluttered, unorganized tables and/or workspaces - unprofessional • Clean, organized tables - professional 2. Group Discussion on Role Playing Scenarios Approximately 30 minutes Together as a group, create a list of professional behaviors on a poster to be used for reinforcement before each client meeting and professional presentation. A student or facilitator can record the behaviors as the class calls them out and discusses them. Discuss the understandings students have gained. Leading questions could include: • Think about a time when acting professionally was important. • Can you recall your behavior? • Did your behavior affect the outcome of the situation? Assignment: Have students read the meeting preparation articles in the resource section. Students should think about where and how they can practice using these tips by taking notes in their sketchbooks. Sample answers are: we can practice active listening in our discussion groups or in school; or we can have better eye contact with adults. • What could you have done to act in a more professional manner? 14 Step 1 Activity 2
  21. 21. • Why is being aware of your behavior important? Notes: 3. Debrief: Professional Etiquette Approximately 20 minutes Together in a group, students share their notes and findings to the entire group in a round robin setting. This activity takes place at the start of the next class since students have homework. Step 1 Activity 2 15
  22. 22. Resources “Etiquette for Meeting People in Business,” Lydia Ramsey http://www.hodu.com/meeting-etiquette.shtml “How to Prepare for Running an Effective Business Meeting,” Jo Schlegel, Editor- in-Chief, Salary.com http://www.salary.com/personal/layoutscripts/psnl_articles.asp?tab=psn&cat=cat0 11&ser=ser034&part=par383 16 Activity 2
  23. 23. Activity 3 Brief Client Presentation Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will be presented with their 1. Client Presentation design challenge directly from the client. 2. Client Question and Answer • Students will ask questions unanswered from their initial client & market research. • Students will understand project constraints. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs Step 1 17
  24. 24. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard or poster paper • Pen or pencil • Sketchbook/journal Prerequisite: N/A 18 Step 1
  25. 25. 1. Client Presentation Notes: Approximately 30 minutes The goal of this activity is to introduce the design Tip Students should be challenge to the students. The client will prepare a reminded to take notes 30-minute presentation and leave an additional 30 throughout the client minutes for question and answers from the students. presentation and during the question and answer session. The client presentation should include: • Design Challenge goals and time line. • Company information like company culture, target market, sales, competitors, trends, key products (related to the project) etc. • Client project constraints (time, budget, patterns, cost). These constraints must be defined by the client. The client should also be prepared to address all or some of the sample questions sent in preparation for the meeting: • What is the company’s brand and logo? What does it represent? • What words are used to describe the brand? • What makes their brand different from other brands? • Who is the company’s target market? Why? • Does the company set or follow consumer trends? • Are they innovative? If so, how (materials, color choices, design, their message)? • In what areas are their products sold? Why these areas? • What stores sell the most products? Where? • What is the average price of their primary products? Why? • Where do they manufacture their products? • Who are the company’s competitors? • Where do the competing brands sell their products? • What are the competing brands best sellers? • What are the competing average price points for their product etc? Why? • Where does the company see themselves in two years from now? Five years? 2. Client Question and Answer Approximately 30 minutes At the end of the client presentation, students will have 30 minutes to ask their prepared research questions (Activity 1). Step 1 Activity 3 19
  26. 26. Activity 4 Brief Client Presentation Debrief & Understanding Client Constraints Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will understand that clients This activity should be conducted after have constraints based on but not limited the client presentation. to: time, budget, target market, etc. • Students will understand that 1. Client Presentation Review prioritizing and setting client constraints 2. Client Constraints Discussion will impact decision making throughout 3. Prioritizing Client Constraints the design process. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs 20 Step 1
  27. 27. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard or poster paper • Pen or pencil • Sketchbook/journal Prerequisite: N/A Step 1 21
  28. 28. Notes: 1. Client Presentation Review Approximately 15 minutes Debrief after the client presentation to reinforce the importance of client preparation and professional etiquette. This is also a good time for students to talk about their experience meeting with the client. Questions to ask students during this discussion might include: • What new information did we learn from the client? • What about your questions? Did you get them all answered? • How will we use this new information? • Do you feel like we acted in a professional manner? Give examples. 2. Client Constraints Discussion Approximately 15 minutes Although students will have a sense of constraints from their research and from the client presentation, constraints are generally a new concept for students and they will need to be guided through this process. For example, throughout this activity students have started to work with schedules and dates. This concept of time management can lead to a discussion of time as a key constraint. The discussion should then transition into client constraints. Leading questions might include: • What is a client constraint? • What constraints, or limits, must we consider for our design project? • What do we need to know before moving on to the next step within the design process? Then ask the students to brainstorm client constraints to consider for their design project, taking into account their research and the information gathered in the client presentation. Record them on the board. Client constraints include but are not limited to: time, material costs, target consumer, color, patterns, sale price, types of materials, brand identity, etc. 22 Step 1 Activity 4
  29. 29. Notes: 3. Prioritizing Client Constraints Approximately 1 hour 20 minutes Break students into groups of three or four. Have them prioritize and add to the list of client constraints (recorded on the board during the discussion). In these groups, students should discuss and debate why one constraint is a higher priority than the others. Ask students to think about the project details they Tip An example of prioritizing client learned during their research and the client constraints is the client has deter- presentation. Then, they should record mined a price range for the product. On the other hand, the client has a prioritized list of client constraints to also informed the students that the share with the group. (30 minutes) time line is lenient. Since the price is crucial to the client it becomes a Each group will then present their client higher priority than time. constraint list to the group (5-10 minutes per group), explaining their decisions to the class. This list can use color, lists, arrows, boxes, and other visuals to explain how the group came to their decision. (30 minutes) The students’ lists will be vote on, compiled into one client constraint list, and shared with the client (these lists can be e-mailed by the facilitator after the activity). The client should provide feedback (via e-mail or phone) to the facilitator on the students proposed constraints, setting priorities and adding any additional constraints that the young designers should keep in mind as they develop their projects. Once an agreement has been made on priorities, expectations to uphold and meet these from both sides of the party will be set. E-mail the client to thank them for their visit, summarizing the understanding of constraints. Step 1 Activity 4 23
  30. 30. Key Terms TERM DEFINITION Brand Unique design, sign, symbol, words, or a combination of these, used to create an image that identifies a product and differentiates it from its competitors. Over time, this image becomes associated with a level of credibility, quality, and satisfaction in the consumer’s mind. Thus brands help consumers make decisions in a crowded and complex marketplace by standing for certain benefits and value. Client A person or group that uses the professional advice or service of an expert. Competitors A company in the same industry or a similar industry which offers a similar product or service. Constraints Limitations or restrictions. Consumer A person who purchases goods or services from another; buyer. Market Actual or conceptual place in the commercial world where buyers and sellers interact to trade goods or services for money or barter. Mission A summary describing the aims, values, and overall plan of an organization or Statement individual. Product A commodity offered for sale; anything that is offered to a market that customers can acquire, use, interact with, experience, or consume, to satisfy a want or need. Products can include services, people, places, and ideas. Professional The skill, competence, or standards expected of a member of a profession, (ism) as distinguished from an amateur. Professional The code of ethical behavior regarding professional practice or action among the Etiquette members of a profession in their dealings with each other. 24 Step 1 Key Terms
  31. 31. Research Diligent and systematic inquiry or investigation into a subject in order to discover or revise facts, theories, applications, etc. Target Market/ Goal consumer. Audience/ Consumer Time Line A linear representation of important events in the order in which they occurred or will occur; a schedule; a timetable. Trends The movement in a particular direction of a variable over a period of time; style; vogue. Trend Forecast To predict a future condition or occurrence; to calculate in advance of a trend. Key Terms Step 1 Key Terms 25
  32. 32. 26 Step 2
  33. 33. Step 2 Research & Inspiration 12 hours 30 minutes Step 2
  34. 34. Research and Inspiration Overview Goal: The goal of Step 2, Research and Inspiration, is for students to gain a deeper understanding of the project by gathering and analyzing market research (including the client information, target consumers, product research, trends, etc.). Students will also learn how to find inspiration for creating preliminary design concepts. Understandings: • Students will understand that by conducting thorough market research (target consumers, competitive market, etc.) and analyzing this research, they will find patterns and trends that will help them understand how to design for their client’s target consumer. • Students will understand that by gaining a deeper understanding of their target market (competitors, consumers, trends), they will be able to design a marketable, sell-able, and innovative product. • Students will understand that through inspiration they can stimulate their own creativity. • Students will understand that inspiration follows no guidelines; they can choose how and where they find inspiration. • Students will understand that gaining a deeper knowledge of the marketplace will help them formulate clearer ideas on how to continue to gather inspiration. 28 Step 2
  35. 35. Able to Do/Apply: • Know and apply different research methods. • Conduct market research. • Collect, prepare, present and discuss information about a client’s market. • Conduct a market analysis by reviewing information collected and identifying trends and patterns in the market research. • Create, discuss and present mood boards based on inspirations. • Make connections from their market research and use that to inform their inspiration. Key Terms Primary Research Inspiration Market Segmentation Market Research (Field Research) Secondary Research Survey (Desk Research) Step 2 29
  36. 36. Research and Inspiration Activities Activity 1 – First Stage of Research- Information Gathering Approximately 7 Hours 40 Minutes Activity 2 – Market Analysis Approximately 1 Hour 40 Minutes Activity 3 – Inspiration for Innovation Approximately 3 Hours Step 2
  37. 37. Activity 1 Brief First Stage of Research- Information Gathering Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will research and understand 1. Introduction to Step 2 & Market the elements of their client’s Research marketplace (company brand, target 2. Research: Primary and Secondary consumer, competitors, trends, target Sources market-demographic, geography) and 3. Research Plan how they inform the design process. 4. Conduct Research • Students will understand that gaining 5. Debrief: Visual Presentation Market a deeper understanding of their target Research market will enable them to design a marketable, sell-able, and innovative product. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs Step 2 31
  38. 38. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard/poster or board/chart paper • Computer • Markers/chalk • Internet access • Magazines • Pen or pencil • Internet • Sketchbook/journal • Chart paper • Markers • Magazines • Adobe Illustrator or other vector design program Prerequisite: Completed Step 1 Design Challenge, Business Foundations, Design Software Foundations. 32 Step 2
  39. 39. 1. Introduction to Step 2 & Market Research Notes: Approximately 10 minutes Introduce Step 2 by sharing over arching goals and objectives of this step. During Step 2 students should gain a deeper understanding of the project by gathering market research from secondary sources (e.g. the Internet) and conducting primary research, such as interviewing and observation. They will also learn how to analyze their research and look for trends and how to use their research to inform their design inspiration. The primary goal of market research is to find a real need in the market and come up with a product or service to fulfill it. Market Tip research is comprised of: It is beneficial to break down the activities in Step 2 for students so they will be able 1. Marketplace research: to apply the design process outside of SEE identification of a specific market and speak to it during their presentations. and measurement of its size and other determining characteristics. 2. Product research: identification of a need or want in the market and identifying a good or service that will satisfy that need. 3. Consumer research: identification of the preferences, motivations, and buying behavior of the targeted customer. You may use this list as a starting point and to keep students on track during their research collecting. The information collected through market research is a critical step in the design process, because it provides the information that designers need to create marketable, sellable, and innovative products. 2. Research: Primary and Secondary Sources Approximately 15 minutes Before the students get into market research they should have an idea of the different sources of research (primary and secondary) and how to conduct various methods of research. Distribute a copy of the Resource Sources handout. Handout 1: Research Sources Using the Research Sources handout, take 10 minutes to review each mode of research with the students. Students can take turns reading the definitions out loud from the handout while you briefly explain Step 2 Activity 1 33
  40. 40. Notes: each one in more detail, giving examples. The students might realize that most existing sources of research (secondary research) can be found on the Internet, which is a powerful research tool. If the students do not make that connection, you can make it for them. If the students do not have internet access, the best way to gather information about something is to go directly to the source using primary research techniques. Transition the class into creating research plans by explaining to students that most market research is collected from primary research. This includes direct observation of the consumers (for example, in retail stores), surveys, interviews, focus groups, and conducting field tests. Let the students know that they will primarily be using “interviewing” and “observation” when they conduct their market research site visit. 3. Research Plan Approximately 45 minutes Although students will continue to gather market research using secondary research (the Internet, ads, etc.) They will also make a site visit to store(s) and/or shopping area to conduct primary research. The students will explore their topics primarily through interviews (e.g. target consumer) and observation (e.g. product research and trends) during this step. Divide the class into four groups (Groups 1- 4). Once they are in groups have the students assign themselves the roles of: Facilitator - Leads the group and encourages everyone to stay focused and on task. Presenter - Presents the findings to class, could be more than one student. Note Taker - Takes notes, or consolidates information, could be more than one student. Time Keeper - Manages time and makes sure group is on time. Assign teams one of the following topics (two teams will research the topic): • Target Consumers/Target Market • Products and Trends Research Students will be able to conduct market research more effectively with clear research targets and a plan. Therefore, providing sample questions will help students gather the information they will need to conduct a market analysis later on in Step 2. Explain that they will use 34 Step 2 Activity 1
  41. 41. questions from the Elements of the Marketplace handout to help guide them in Notes: their research. Handout 2A & B: Elements of the Marketplace, Research Questions Give students a few minutes to read over all the questions, ask clarifying questions, and to begin thinking about how they are going to approach getting their questions answered (i.e. What types of primary and secondary research sources). To get the most out their site visits, students will make a research plan. Hand out Developing a Research Plan for guidance. Give the groups 10 minutes to brainstorm how they will accomplish the tasks listed in Handout 3. Encourage them to write them on a board, journal, or paper. Handout 3: Developing a Research Plan Don’t forget to leave time for the students to use the Internet to assist with their planning and to conduct some preliminary research. The facilitator will have the students come together and quickly share their plan and, in a sentence or two, explain how they will approach their research. 4. Conduct Research Approximately 2 hours 30 minutes Select a location to conduct a site visit (shopping area, mall, etc.) during the next class, where students can conduct their primary research. Ideally Groups 1 and 2 would conduct their consumer interviews while Groups 2 and 4 are conducting their product and trends research. Students might need guidance conducting their interviews, surveys, or focus groups. Tip • Students researching consumer This activity could take 2-3 days, or trends should aim for around 10 – 15 more. It is advised that some of the interviews. research be given as an assignment to be done after the class as homework. • Students researching products and trends should visit approximately 4-6 stores to ensure variety. Step 2 Activity 1 35
  42. 42. Notes: 5. Debrief: Visual Presentation Market Research Approximately 4 hours Have students convene in their research groups to develop a short presentation of their survey findings. It is important that the students practice visually organizing their information as simply and clearly as possible. In the next activity, other groups will also refer to the information they have gathered. • 4 hours for group to develop their short presentations. • 5-10 minutes for each group to quickly explain their presentations. • 5-10 minutes for a warm and cool feedback session. 36 Step 2 Activity 1
  43. 43. Resources Conduct Market Research http://www.entrepreneur.com/12weekstostartup/week2/index.html How to Identify a Target Market http://hubpages.com/hub/How-To-Identify-a-Target-Market&usg=__EN- WPhEYn_rr1pztt_BloWNpqL3o=&h=383&w=260&sz=12&hl=en&start=1 5&um=1&tbnid=2c8yitaJfvlCNM:&tbnh=123&tbnw=83&prev=/images%3 Fq%3Dtarget%2Bmarket%26um%3D1%26hl%3Den%26client%3Dfirefox- a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official%26sa%3DN Checklist of Internet Research http://www.internettutorials.net/checklist.html Creating a Research Plan http://pblmm.k12.ca.us/PBLGuide/Activities/BeginningResearch.html Step 2 Activity 1 37
  44. 44. Activity 2 Brief Market Analysis Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will understand that by 1. Making Connections in Research analyzing their market research, they 2. What did we find? will find patterns and trends that will 3. Share Findings help them understand the marketplace. • Understanding the marketplace will help students make decisions in their design projects. • Students will understand that knowing their client and the marketplace will help them formulate clearer ideas on where and how to gather design inspiration. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs 38 Step 2
  45. 45. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard/poster board • Markers • Markers • Poster board or chart paper • Timer (Watch) • Pen or pencil • Sketchbook/journal • Computer • Computer printer • Computer scanner • Sticky notes/Post-its Prerequisite: Design Software Foundations, Design Foundations: Introduction to Brainstorming, Step 1. Step 2 39
  46. 46. Notes: 1. Making Connections in Research Approximately 30 minutes Now that students have gathered a lot of great information, they need to take some time to think about and understand their market research before moving on to concept development. Research should be analyzed to look for similarities or trends in data. At this time, the class should divide up into their research groups and examine their research for patterns and trends. In other words, students want to find instances that occur over and over again. An example of a pattern may be: Tip • 5 out of 20 consumer’s favorite colors are red. The facilitator may want to write all of these examples on a blackboard or poster • All of the competitors are trendsetters. board, communicate them to the class •15 out of 20 consumers break dance. and/or hand out a copy of these examples to the students. From these findings we can roughly conclude that using red in our designs would be appealing to consumers, we might want to incorporate break dancing or related graphics into the design, and that we should be looking to innovate and set new trends. The students will not only want to look for trends in their research, but also should note things that stand out or are out of the ordinary. They should look for things that may be unique to the client’s consumer culture or subculture (market segmentation). For example, a company’s market segment might be made up of a range of consumers, including skateboarders, hip-hop gurus, and break dancers. This finding could also be connected to a finding about the company’s competitors who, for example, may have a subculture of consumers who are only hip-hop gurus. The ability of the students to discern between the two types of subcultures within the client versus their competitors will allow the students to focus on a wider range of consumers. Walk around and assist the students with making these types of pattern connections from their research. 2. What did we find? Approximately 1 hour Continuing in their groups, students should then analyze their 40 Step 2 Activity 2
  47. 47. cumulative research and begin making connections. This includes reviewing the Notes: research they collected in Step 1: Design Challenge (internet research, client meeting information) and market research from Step 2, all of which should be documented in their sketchbooks. Students should note where information overlaps, contradicts, is new, etc. For example, the client told the students that their typical consumer is between the ages of 14 and 30, but in their consumer research they found out that 12 and 13 year olds also like buying and wearing the client’s brand. These pieces of information, together, build a clearer picture of their actual target consumer: someone between the ages of 12-30. During this step, students also should focus in on a few primary trends (e.g. colors, patterns) or needs (style, new product) they have identified in their cumulative research and which they want to incorporate in their designs. Examples might include: interviews and product research revealed that consumers like certain types of graphics that the client hasn’t been using in their products so far (noted in their Internet research). Or, the client has been using black on white (noted in their Internet research) and the competitor has been using white on black (noted in online research and in observation) and consumers seem to like that better (noted from interviews); that might lead to incorporating white on black into their design. Each group member will share their research (from Step 1 and Step 2) around a large table. Have group members examine all the research and document their connections or findings in their sketchbooks. By this point in the design process, they should know how to organize information in a visually pleasing and comprehensive way. Students will map their trends and make research conclusions by using charts (see Resources for a link to chart options). Provide students with an explanation about various chart purposes so they can understand how and when to use charts. For example, flow charts are great for explaining how a product is typically used. Although the students are working in groups, you want them to individually make and document their own connections and observations. 3. Share Findings Approximately 10 minutes Next, have students share two things they felt stood out from the complete research by writing them on a blackboard or poster. Let the students know that it’s okay if some of these connections are the Step 2 Activity 2 41
  48. 48. Notes: same. Make sure students are specific and only write two things. Students should record the group’s list in their journals for reference. Emphasize to students that they should take their list of connections (trends, findings, observations) they made from their market research into consideration when designing. This list along with the inspiration they gather will be what the students will refer to during the design process, so they can create designs that are unique but also marketable. 42 Step 2 Activity 2
  49. 49. Resources Charts http://www.sdcoe.k12.ca.us/score/actbank/torganiz.htm Step 2 Activity 2 43
  50. 50. Activity 3 Brief Inspiration for Innovation Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will understand that 1. Inspiration Warm-Up inspiration can stimulate their own 2. Discussion: What is Inspiration? design creativity. 3. Sketching Graphic Inspiration • Students will understand that to find 4. Mood Boards inspiration they have to be willing to 5. Critique look at things from different angles and perspectives. • Students will understand that inspiration follows no guidelines; they can choose how and where they find inspiration. • Students will create, discuss and present mood boards. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs 44 Step 2
  51. 51. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard or poster paper • Chart paper • Markers • Sketchbook/journal • Computer • Markers • Internet Access • Pen or pencil • Whistle • Computer • Internet access • Adobe Illustrator or other vector design program • Adobe Photoshop or other image editor design program Prerequisite: Design Foundations: 2-D Design, Design Software Foundations. Step 2 45
  52. 52. Notes: 1. Inspiration Warm-Up Approximately 20 minutes Note - This activity can also be done in groups or as a class. Ask the students to look around the room and list as many objects as they can that resemble or are shaped like something else. Have them write down the name of the object, make a very quick sketch of what the object resembles, then after the sketch, write out what it resembles. This could be done in their sketchbooks or on a large piece of paper. To do this activity in groups, divide the students into groups of four or more using a method that works for you (counting off etc.). Assign the roles of facilitator, note taker, presenter and time keeper. The facilitator makes sure that their group is staying focused and on task and encourages their team to list as many ideas as possible. The note taker(s) will list and sketch items on paper. The time keeper should make sure the group stays on time. The presenter(s) presents their group’s work to the class (approximately two minutes per group). Give the students 10 minutes to brainstorm items and 5 – 8 minutes to share their lists with the class. If doing this activity as a class, it is important for you to facilitate as much as possible; the students often get excited and things could get chaotic. To help, you can enlist a couple of students to help you facilitate. Assign the role of note taker to at least four students. The note takers will list and sketch objects while the rest of the class offers suggestions and observe. Assign the role of time keeper to one student. Give the students 10 minutes to list and sketch objects and 5 minutes to discuss as a group. Commend the students for a job well done. 46 Step 2 Activity 3
  53. 53. Notes: 2. Discussion: What is Inspiration? Approximately 20 minutes Kick off the discussion by asking the students: Why do you think you did this activity? Generally, at least one student will answer, “to learn about inspiration,” or something along those lines. Explain that sometimes to find inspiration you have to look at things in different ways and from different angles, look in places you did not think about before, and at times force yourself to think about things from a different perspective. Then, introduce a discussion about inspiration using the following prompts: • What is inspiration? • Where does inspiration come from? • How do you get inspired? • Why is it important to get inspired in the design process? Inspiration is important in this step of the design process because it stimulates creativity in designers and helps them begin to shape possible design concepts. The students do not have to understand this connection fully yet since they will experience it as they go through the design process. However, the following handout will help further their understanding of the relationship between inspiration and design. Give the students 2-3 minutes to read Handout 4, then continue the class discussion on inspiration. Handout 4: Inspiration, To Be or Not to Be? Some of the understandings you want the students to get out of the reading are: • Their own understanding of inspiration. • Inspiration is everywhere. • Anything can inspire them. • Sometimes they have to seek out inspiration, while other times inspiration just comes to them. This is a good time to show the students examples of designs of all kinds (not just objects that are inspiring or have been inspired by other things.) You can choose three blogs or web sites that you feel show inspiration and ask the students what they think inspired the designers. You can approach this how you best feel fit, the students will make Step 2 Activity 3 47
  54. 54. Notes: the connection that designers can get inspired and find inspiration everywhere and with anything. Here are two websites that have great suggestions on where and how to find inspiration: http://www.howdesign.com/article/worldinspiration/ http://www.37signals.com/svn/archives2/finding_fresh_inspiration.php 3. Sketching Graphic Inspiration Approximately 1 hour 15 minutes This next step requires that you take the students to an active open area, such as a park or an interesting neighborhood. Of course, it is very important to think about safety first, so do this during a time when you can keep an eye on all the students. While they are outside, have the students draw as many thumbnail sketches as they can of graphic elements and other things inspired by their surroundings (graphic elements were covered in 2-D Design Foundations and a brief review might be helpful). If a site visit is not possible, the alternative would be to show the students videos or images on a projector or computer and have them draw sketches. During this step, students should rapidly sketch out as many ideas as possible and also record what inspired their sketch(s). Students should take no more than 30 to 60 seconds per sketch, filling at least one or two pages in their sketchbook. Next to each sketch, the student should write what inspired their drawing. The instructor can use a whistle to pace the students. Explain to the students that the sketch does not have to always look like the source of inspiration. Encourage the students to really try to look at their surrounding in different ways, exploring the shapes and patterns of objects and what these shapes and patterns might look like if they were to merge. What would smells (both good and bad) look like if they were to sketch them out? The point here is to extract inspiration from anything and everything, even things that can’t be seen. It is up to them to interpret their inspiration in a quick visual sketch. Tip If the students have access to a digital camera or by Explain to the students that the purpose of this using their cell phones they can take pictures of the exercise was to have them things inspire them and can attempt to interpret the ideas that are being inspired in them with images. find inspiration from their Students should still make an attempt to sketch out surroundings so they can at least one page of thumbnails. This will help them improve their concept development skills. come up with innovative designs. They are drawing inspiration not only from the research they conducted on the current market place but also their environment. In addition, they will be able to come back to this inspiration if they need to re-inspire themselves in Step 4 Final 48 Step 2 Activity 3
  55. 55. Concept Development. Notes: 4. Mood Boards Approximately 1 hour The students will now create mood boards that reflect their research (from Steps 1 and 2) and their inspiration from the previous exercise. When students create their mood boards they should not develop complete concepts but instead focus on a feeling or mood that they want to convey to their target consumers. It is important for students to understand that their mood board(s) should also reflect their research connections and inspiration(s). Handout 5: Mood Boards Using the handout to guide them, students should create two digital mood boards that convey two different moods or directions. Note: Students should create two mood boards per project. For example, if they are designing two hats or shirts they should make four mood boards, three hats, six mood boards, etc. Students will use image editor and vector design programs to create their mood boards. They should have prior experience using these programs from Design Software Foundations including how to scan, crop, use the image editor, and lay out images using a vector program. If there is a scanner students can take images from books, newspapers, and magazines cut them out and scan them into an image editor program. Have them crop the images to 1” x 1” squares (the smallest) and 2” x 2” (the biggest). An alternate way to do mood boards, if students have not had enough experience with the design software programs, is to make them on 8.5” x 11” sheets of paper using magazines and newspaper cutouts. These can be scanned onto the computer to create digital copies. Encourage the students to go back to their sketches and draw inspiration from these as well. 5. Critique Approximately 30 minutes Step 2 Activity 3 49
  56. 56. Notes: Have the students present their mood boards to the group, explaining what mood or feeling they were trying to communicate. Make sure the students provide both warm and cool feedback to one another. For example, warm feedback would be that the images on the mood board collectively communicate the desired mood. Cool feedback would be that the mood board is not organized well. If a mood board does not effectively convey the mood the student was trying to com- municate he or she should go back and make changes after the critique is over. Students should refer back to their mood boards as they begin to develop their concepts to see if their designs have captured the mood or feeling they set out to capture. 50 Step 2 Activity 3
  57. 57. Resources Ways to Find Inspiration http://www.howdesign.com/article/worldinspiration/ http://www.37signals.com/svn/archives2/finding_fresh_inspiration.php Step 2 Activity 3 51
  58. 58. Key Terms TERM DEFINITION Inspiration A burst of creativity in an artistic, musical, or other intellectual endeavor. Marketing or Discovery research conducted to understand and measure a marketplace Market comprised of: Research 1. Marketplace research: identification of a specific market and measurement of its size and other determining characteristics. 2. Product research: identification of a need or want in the market and identifying a good or service that will satisfy that need. 3. Consumer research: identification of the preferences, motivations, and buying behavior of the targeted customer. Companies collect some market information through secondary research compiled from other sources that appear applicable to a new or existing product. Most marketing research is collected from direct observation of the consumers (such as in retail stores), surveys, interviews, focus groups, field tests conducted or tailored specifically to that product. The main objective is to find a real need in the market and fulfill it. Market A market segment is a subgroup of people or organizations sharing one or more Segment characteristics that cause them to have similar product and/or service needs. Primary Conducting research that requires one to extract the information directly from Research the source. Information that is gathered has not been published or distributed in (Field any way. This can be done through numerous forms, including but not limited to, Research) surveys, interviews, focus groups, or observation. Secondary Involves the summary, collation and/or synthesis of existing research. Research (Desk Research) Survey Detailed study of a market to gather data on attitudes, impressions, opinions, (Marketing) satisfaction level, etc., by polling a section of the population. Key Terms 52 Step 2 Key Terms
  59. 59. Handout 1: Research Sources Primary Research sources (non-existing) require one to extract the information directly from the source. Information that is gathered has not been published or distributed in any way. Primary Research Sources (non-existing): 1. Interview - an interview is a structured conversation between two or more people where questions are asked by the interviewer to obtain information from the interviewee. 2. Survey – an investigation or examination of the opinions or experience of a group of people based on a series of questions. 3. Questionnaire – a set of printed or written questions with a choice of answers created for the purpose of a survey or statistical study. 4. Focus Group – a group of people who are asked questions to gauge their attitudes towards a product, service, concept, advertisement, idea, or packaging. During a focus group participants are free to talk with other group members. 5. Observation – the action of or process of taking note of, or detecting carefully, the qualities and characteristics in something or someone. Secondary Research sources (existing) have been gathered by another group and published. This information has already been extracted by another group and presented in someway. Some secondary sources may not be current. Secondary Research Sources (existing): 1. Print - magazines, books, newspapers, brochures, ads 2. Media - video, movies, tv, music 3. Images - photos, ads, logos 4. Internet - (All of the above) as well as company websites, blogs, online video sites (You Tube), social networking sites (MySpace, FaceBook), user forums, etc. It is important to use both sources of research to ensure information is up to date, fill in gaps in both methods and to gain multiple perspectives. Step 2 Handouts 53
  60. 60. Handout 2A: Elements of the Marketplace Research Questions 1. Target Consumers – Understand the typical consumer by exploring their interests, age group, behaviors, lifestyle, and shopping/buying patterns. Sample Consumer Interview/Survey Questions • What do you do for fun? • What things excite you at the moment? • What is important to you? Family? Friends? Cars? Money? Clubbing? Why? • What kind of music do you listen to? Why? What is your favorite music artist? • What TV shows do you like? What movies? Why? • What websites do you like? • What social networking websites do you use? • What blogs do you read? • What kind of car do you drive? Why? If you could have any car what would it be? • What is your social scene like? • What do you wear when you go out? Why? • Do you go to nightclubs? What do you wear to a nightclub? Why? • What do you wear to school? Why? • What do you wear on a date? Why? • Where do you buy your clothes? Malls? Boutique? Department Store? Online? Malls? • Do you share clothes? • Who buys your clothes? If you don’t buy your own clothes, do you control or have input on what others buy for you? • Do you give your clothes away to charity? • Is money important to you? Why or Why not? If you could have any amount of money how much would it be? • If you were famous what product would you purchase? • How much money do you normally pay for this product? • What do you like or dislike about this product? • What is your favorite brand/s? • What is your favorite color? What is your second favorite color? • What is your favorite material? Soft, hard, warm, breathable, etc? Why? • If you could meet anyone in the world who would it be? Why? • If you could live anywhere where would it be? Why? • How old are you? Best Research Sources: • Interviews • Surveys and questionnaires • Observation • Print- magazines, books, newspapers • Internet • Focus groups • Media - video, movies, TV 54 Step 2 Handouts
  61. 61. Handout 2B: Elements of the Marketplace Research Questions 2. Product and Trends – Conduct research that investigates existing products in the market (styles, colors, fabrics, design) and current trends (what is cool). Product and Trends Questions Find 5-10 different styles of this product: • Where did you find each style? • What materials are used? • What colors are used? • How much does each of these products cost? • What type of person uses these products? What does that person like to do in their free time? Find 30-50 examples of different forms and functions on similar products: • Where did you find the item? • What type of person uses these products? What does that person like to do in their free time? • What colors are used? Find 30-50 examples of different types of aesthetics used on similar products: • Where did you find them? • What type of person likes these aesthetics? What does that person like to do in their free time? • How were these made? • What colors are used? Find 20 different types of materials being used to design similar products: • Where did you find each material sample? • What type of person likes these types of materials? What does that person like to do in their free time? • What colors are used? • What textures are used? • What materials are used? Best Research Sources: • Images • Media - video, movies, TV • Print- magazines, books, newspapers • Focus groups • Observation • Internet Step 2 Handouts 55
  62. 62. Handout 3: Developing a Research Plan Research Tasks: 1. Discuss a plan on how your team will conduct your market research. Things to consider when planning: • What sources will you use to conduct your research (interviews, observation, Internet, etc.)? • What group member(s) will conduct which type(s) of research? • Where should you go to conduct research? What types of places? Which stores (e.g. places that sell the brand, sell competitors brand, etc.)? • If you are doing consumer surveys, who should you target? What age group? What kind of style? Near or at what kind of stores? • What kind of information do you want to gather? What questions might you want to ask when conducting your interviews? • How will you document your research (record in journal, on a tape recorder, with photos)? • How much time do you have to conduct the research? 2. Come up with questions (at least 10) to use for interviews or observation tasks, using the list provided by the instructor. 3. Assign team roles (who will ask questions, record/document information, develop the questionnaire etc.). 4. Write up a plan capturing your decisions from tasks 1-3. 56 Step 2 Handouts
  63. 63. Handout 4: Inspiration, To Be or Not to Be? Inspiration, To Be or Not to Be: Sometimes to be able to think of new ideas, or think of an old idea in a new way, you have to be willing to look at things from different angles. Where does this willingness to want to look at things from different angles come from? Does it come from inside you? Is it triggered? Does it get triggered in the face of a challenge? Or, is it because your job required it? None of these are right or wrong. In any field of design if you want to be able to create designs that are innovative you have to be able to look for inspiration anywhere and in anything. Whether you were taught to think outside of the box or whether it is natural to you, make an attempt to do so and begin to question and bend your perception of anything and everything. Step 2 Handouts 57
  64. 64. Handout 5: Mood Boards What is a Mood Board? A mood board allows designers to visually demonstrate a style they want to pursue in their design concept. Mood boards set a mood, feeling, or tone for the design. They also serve as a visual tool to quickly convey information to the client on the overall ‘feel’ that a designer is trying to achieve. Mood boards can be created using digital formats, physical objects, or magazine cutouts. Many designers create mood boards in digital form because it is quick and easy. However, creating mood boards using physical objects and/or magazine cut outs are more visually impacting than flat digital mood boards because of the range of design elements (color, texture, shapes, etc) that can be used to elicit a feeling. That is not to say that digital mood boards do not serve their function. If done well they can communicate one or more design directions. Mood boards are primarily composed of images and occasionally they will include writing. For example, if you were inspired by a poem and want to include a phrase or sentence from a poem that summarizes how it made you feel for your mood board. 58 Step 2 Handouts
  65. 65. Handout 5: Continued Mood Board Structures Here are two examples of structures you can use to organize your mood board(s). In Structure A images are all approximately the same size and are organized so that images do not overlap or bleed into each other. Structure B is organized without strict lines to separate the images. They overlap or bleed into each other. The images in B vary in sizes and shapes. Mood Board Structure A Mood Board Structure B Clean and simple example of a digital Simple and clean example of digital mood board with white spaces mood board with images that between images. blend into each other. Step 2 Handouts 59
  66. 66. 60 Step 3
  67. 67. Step 3 Concept Development 10 hours 30 minutes Step 3
  68. 68. Concept Development Overview Goal: In Step 3, SEE’s young designers will create their initial design concepts through brainstorming and clarify concept directions through funneling, goal-setting, and applying constraints. Students will begin this step with a creative brainstorm to generate design concepts. Then, they will learn how to apply client, market, and project constraints to funnel these ideas to focused, goal-driven concepts. Young designers will create a one-sentence project goal statement which will help them articulate their design concept to an audience. Finally, they will present their concepts to a focus group to obtain feedback. Understandings: • Students will understand that tools such as brainstorming help designers develop new ideas and creative concepts. • Students will understand that during the brainstorm process client and project constraints must be set aside to allow room for new thoughts and innovative concepts to develop. • Students will understand that goal setting helps refocus the project after a brainstorm. Setting project goals helps funnel initial ideas into goal-driven concepts. • Students will understand that while the design process is creative, there are also constraints, needs, and desires of the client and consumers which need to be determined and considered during concept development. However, this can be done in a creative and thought-provoking manner. • Students will understand that focus groups can provide designers with valuable information that will influence their final design concepts. • Students will understand that allowing others to become involved in the design process can enhance and clarify their designs. • Students will understand that the research step influences final design concepts. 62 Step 3
  69. 69. Able to Do/Apply: • Brainstorm around a topic • Visually represent concepts through hand sketching, vector-based software programs, and other applicable mediums • Funnel many concepts, by determining goals and revisiting constraints, into a few technically viable, consumer-driven, and marketable concepts • Clean up sketches and save them in an organized folder on a computer • Document process using vector-based software • Present initial concepts and refined concepts Key Terms Brainstorm Focus Group Interjecting Revise Concept Development Form Materials Statement Consumer-driven Function Patterns Features Funnel Refine Step 3 63
  70. 70. Concept Development Activities Activity 1 – Brain Stimulation 30 Minutes Activity 2 – The Concept Developing Funnel 5 Hours 30 Minutes Activity 3 – 3rd and 4th Stages of Funneling 4 Hours Step 3
  71. 71. Activity 1 Brief Brain Stimulation Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will understand that tools such 1. Brain Stimulation as brainstorming help designers develop new ideas and innovative concepts. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs Step 3 65
  72. 72. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard/ chart paper • Markers/colored pencils • Markers/chalk • Internet access • Pen/pencil • Sketchbook/journal Prerequisite: Step 1 & 2, Introduction to Brainstorming, 2-D Design 66 Step 3
  73. 73. 1. Brain Stimulation Notes: Approximately 30 minutes After a long research process, designers may need to take a break from gathering and analyzing information so they can get ready to begin concept developing. There are many exercises that can be done to accomplish this: some designers will sketch random things, others will begin another project. The following is an exercise that will: • Engage students in sketching as a form of brainstorming, so they can get ready for sketching. • Enable students to brainstorm as a group and explore how concepts develop through peer feedback. Conduct this exercise on a large piece of paper (1 meter by 2 meters is an ideal size). The paper should be large enough to fit multiple drawings, but small enough to force the drawings, to interact with each other. Instructor Worksheet: Secret Topics Have the students take one to two Tip Print out the Teacher Handout: Secret topics, depending on how many Topics before class and cut the secret topic students are in the class. Place the words into squares. Put the topics in a hat sheet of paper on the middle of a or bowl and have the students pick one. table and have all the students gather around it. Provide each student with a different colored marker or colored pencil. Choose one student to draw their secret topic on the poster board with their marker or colored pencil. Then the student next to him/her will draw their secret topic somewhere on the previous student’s drawing. The student next to that student will begin the same process and so on, until all students have drawn somewhere on the poster board. The goal is to allow freedom in thought and allow new things to happen while drawing. • Encourage students to place their secret topic in unusual places on the drawing. • Encourage students to use all of the space, by drawing to the edges, drawing big and small and not to worry about drawing over the other drawings. • Encourage students to draw their secret topic in a new way or different from what they perceive the word to mean or the object to resemble. Step 3 Activity 1 67
  74. 74. Notes: The poster board is likely to look like a chaotic mass of drawings scattered atop, around, under and along one another. If it doesn’t look like this while they are in middle of the exercise encourage the students to keep drawing. After all students have drawn their secret topic on the poster board, hang it on the wall for everyone to see clearly. Ask students the following questions about what they see on the poster board: •What does this remind you of? • How would you describe certain sections? • How would you describe this to someone? Have students write a brief summary explaining what is happening on the poster as a whole. The summaries should be shared to the entire group. 68 Step 3 Activity 1
  75. 75. Resources N/A Step 3 Activity 1 69
  76. 76. Activity 2 Brief The Concept Developing Funnel Objectives: Activity Procedural Overview: • Students will understand that tools such as 1. 1st Stage of Funneling: Brainstorming brainstorming help designers develop new Initial Concept ideas and concepts. 2. 2nd Stage of Funneling: Selections of • Students will understand that during 15 Best Sketches the brainstorm process client and project 3. Goal Setting constraints must be set aside, until the 4. The One Sentence Statement funneling stage, to allow room for new 5. Developing Concepts around Set thoughts and innovative concepts to develop. Goals • Students will understand that sketching, creating lists, using creative writing and words all assist in the brainstorming process. • Students will understand that goal setting and reviewing client and market analysis/project constraints helps refocus the project after the brainstorm. • Students will understand that while the design process is creative, there are also constraints, needs, and desires of the client and consumers, which need to be considered during concept development. However, this can be done so in a creative and thought-provoking manner. • Students will understand that by creating a one sentence statement and setting goals they will be able to funnel their initial concepts into goal- driven concepts. Constant Reinforcements Reading Discussion Presentation File Preparation Writing Visual Design Programs 70 Step 3
  77. 77. Materials for Facilitator: Materials for Students: • Blackboard/poster board • Markers/colored pencils • Basic imagery (see Brain Warm-ups) • Computer with printer • Colored pencils • Pen or pencil • Computer with printer • Sketchbook/journal • Layout from Design Basics Course Prerequisite: Step 1 and 2 completed: Client Constraints, Market Analysis, Mood Boards, Foundations: 2D Design, Drawing and Composition, Introduction to Brainstorming Step 3 71

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