Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Weather And Meteorology Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Weather And Meteorology Presentation

4,212
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology

0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
4,212
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
170
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Transcript

    • 1. Weather and Meteorology Presentation Presented by : Tesmond Hurd LMS Weather Station (La Grande Weather Service) http://lagrande.weatherchecker.us http://www.weatherchecker.us
    • 2. The Definition of Weather
      • Weather is the state of the atmosphere regarding wind, moisture, temperature, cloud coverage, pressure, and other meteorological conditions.
      • Meteorology is the scientific study of the Earth’s atmosphere, especially its patterns or climate and weather
    • 3. What’s the difference between weather and climate???
      • Weather is what is currently going on. When somebody says, “It is 32 degrees…” they are talking about weather .
      • Climate is weather, in a sense, but as an average. When somebody says, “The average temperature in July for the last 15 years is 80 degrees…” they are talking about the climate . Climate varies from place to place.
    • 4. What do I do…
      • I collect data
      • Analyze weather patterns
      • Maintain/Manage a website
      • Predict weather/specifically hazardous weather (e.g.: snow, thunderstorms, etc.)
    • 5. About the National Weather Service
      • Mostly meteorologists work for the NWS. The
      • NWS’ job is to analyze and monitor weather conditions and issue advisories, watches, and warnings when weather becomes hazardous. The motto for the NWS is: “For the protection of life and property.” There are several branches of the NWS. Storm Spotters are important to the NWS because they REPORT hazardous weather.
    • 6. NOAA Field Map
    • 7. About meteorologists
      • Starting Pay: $30,000; Top Pay: $146,000
      • EX: Dennis Hull-Warning Coordinator Meteorologist
      • 30 years as meteorologist/10 in PDT
      • His Pay: $100-105,000
      • Education: Bachelor’s degree in Meteorology
      • 3-year internship
      • Meteorology, math, and physics
    • 8. What meteorologists use to help predict the weather… 0.50 0.40 0.30 0.20 0.10 0.00
    • 9. Clouds
      • Clouds are formed when water evaporates in the sky and changes into the gas form, we them as clouds.
      • There are 32 types of clouds including tornadoes!
      Fractus Cirrus, Cumulus, Stratus, Cumulonimbus, Shelf ,Wave, & Wall cloud, Mammatus, and tornado Other Strato Alto Cumulus Nimbo Alto Stratus Cumulus Stratus Cirro
    • 10. Warm/Cold Fronts
      • Warm Fronts
      • A transition zone
      • between a mass of
      • warm air and the
      • colder air it is replacing.
      • Cold Fronts
      • A transition zone
      • between a mass of cold
      • air and the warm air it
      • is replacing.
    • 11. Stationary/Occluded Fronts
      • Stationary Fronts
      • A front between warm and
      • cold air masses that is
      • moving very slowly or not
      • at all.
      • Occluded Fronts
      • A composite front formed
      • when a cold air mass meets
      • and undercuts a warm air
      • mass, and forces the warm
      • air upwards and way from
      • contact with the earths
      • surface.
    • 12. High/Low Pressures
      • High Pressure
      • An area of pressure
      • that is higher than
      • surrounding, lower
      • pressures. High
      • pressures circle
      • clockwise.
      • Low Pressure
      • An area of pressure that
      • is lower than
      • surrounding, higher
      • pressures. Low pressures
      • circle counter-clockwise.
      H L
    • 13. Terminology…
      • Millibar -A unit of atmospheric pressure equal to 1/1000 bar; one unit that is used to measure air pressure.
      • Isobar -A line on a weather map connecting equal pressures.
      • Barometric Pressure -The pressure of the atmosphere, as indicated by a barometer.
      • Radar -A radio device used for locating an object by using ultrahigh-frequency radio waves reflected from the object and received, observed, and analyzed. In this case, precipitation.
      • Weather Balloon -a balloon used to carry meteorological instruments.
      • Weather Station -an observation post where meteorological conditions are (observed and) recorded.
    • 14. National Weather Service Doppler Radar United States of America Canada Pacific Ocean Gulf of Mexico Atlantic Ocean
    • 15. Mixed Surface Analysis Mixed Surface Analysis
    • 16. Snow | Snow Level 8000 ft. 7000 ft. 6000 ft. 5000 ft. 4000 ft. 3000 ft. 2000 ft. 1000 ft. 0 ft. 0 50 100 150 200 250 miles
    • 17. Question: Why does the Grande Ronde Valley get so much wind? Baker City La Grande Ladd Canyon L H
    • 18. Last Weekend H Maritime Polar (mP) Maritime Tropical (mT)
    • 19. Tornadoes
        • Tornadoes are violently
        • rotating column of air, usually
        • suspended to a Cumulonimbus
        • cloud, with circulation reaching
        • the ground. It nearly always
        • starts as a funnel cloud and
        • may be accompanied by a
        • loud roaring noise. On a local
        • scale, it is the most
        • destructive of all atmospheric
        • phenomena. (VIDEO)
      SPRING SEASON : March-June FALL SEASON : August-October
    • 20. Types of Tornadoes
      • Weak Tornadoes
      • 88% of all tornadoes
      • <5% of tornado deaths
      • Lifetime: 1-10+ minutes
      • Winds <110 mph
      • Violent Tornadoes
      • <1% of all tornadoes
      • 70% of all tornado deaths
      • Lifetime can exceed 1 hour
      • Winds >205 mph
      • Strong Tornadoes
      • 11% of all tornadoes
      • Nearly 30% of all tornado deaths
      • May last 20+ minutes
      • Winds 110-205 mph
    • 21. STEP #1 How Tornadoes Form…
    • 22. STEP #2 How Tornadoes Form
    • 23. STEP #3 | Final Step How Tornadoes Form… Low – Level Wind = Updraft
    • 24. [Enhanced] Fujita (Tornado Intensity) Scale E-F6 318+ Inconceivable E-F5 261-317 Incredible E-F4 207-260 Devastating E-F3 158-206 Severe E-F2 113-157 Considerable E-F1 73-112 Moderate E-F0 40-72 Light E. Fujita # Wind Damage
    • 25. Tornado: Fact or Fiction ?
      • Every state has had at least one tornado.
      • Tornadoes can’t form anytime during the year.
      • People caught in the open, should seek shelter under highway overpasses.
      • Areas near lakes, rivers, and the ocean aren’t safe from tornadoes.
      • Tornadoes can happen in the mountains or in high elevations.
      True False False True True
    • 26. Tornado Facts
      • Tornado State Rankings
      • Florida
      • Kansas
      • Illinois
      • Iowa
      • Alabama
      • Oregon
      • # of Tornadoes
      • 1999-2008
      • 1291 tornadoes
      • 123 EF2+ tornadoes
      • 1989-1998
      • 1165 tornadoes
      • 143 EF2+ tornadoes
      • 1979-1988
      • 820 tornadoes
      • 161 EF2+ tornadoes
    • 27. UNION COUNTY TORNADO Begin Date: June 21, 1983; 1415 (2:15) PDT Begin Location: Not Known Begin LAT/LON: 45°22'N / 118°03'W (LADD CANYON) End Location: Not Known Length: 0 Mile Width: 17 Yards Magnitude: F0 Fatalities: 0 Injuries: 0 Property Damage: $25,000.00 Crop Damage: $0.00 Description: None Reported
    • 28. Hurricanes
      • A tropical cyclone in the
      • Atlantic, Caribbean Sea,
      • Gulf of Mexico, or
      • eastern Pacific, which
      • the maximum 1-minute
      • sustained surface wind is
      • 74 mph greater. Hurricanes
      • are classified on the Saffir-
      • Simpson Scale to describe
      • their wind speeds. (VIDEO)
    • 29. Step #1 How Hurricanes Form… L
    • 30. Step #2 How Hurricanes Form
    • 31. Step #3 | Final Step How Hurricanes Form… H
    • 32. Saffir-Simpson (Hurricane Intensity) Scale
    • 33. NWS Building Entrance
    • 34. NWS Office
    • 35. NWS Office
    • 36. NWS Office
    • 37. NWS Radar What does RADAR stand for? RA dio Detection A nd R anging
    • 38. NOAA Weather Radio NWR N OAA W eather R adio
    • 39. Thank you for listening to my presentation…I hope you enjoyed it! Copyright © 2009 La Grande Weather Service, National Weather Service/NOAA, & Intellicast/WSI.com

    ×