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Student affairs2

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  • 1. STUDENT AFFAIRS SIDE OF THE ENTERPRISE By: Group 5 Members— Vafa Gasimova, Eric Hopfensperger, Tomeco Hubbard, Henry Salley, Camelia Sanderlin
  • 2. STUDENT AFFAIRS AND ITS IMPACT ON THE STUDENT The relationship between the college environment and the student is reciprocal and dynamic (Dey & Hurtado, pp. 81-82). Students begin a cognitive progression when entering different facets of student affairs. Socialization occurs when the student becomes more involved with their environment (Weidman, pp 114-135).
  • 3. COLLEGE STUDENT THEORIES
    • College Impact Models
      • Refers to the changes associated with between and within college effects on students.
      • Focuses on the source of the change ( programs, groups, or services offered).
    • The Undergraduate Socialization
      • Developed by John C. Weidman arguing that to fully understand the student you must understand the collegiate impact.
      • Model focuses on individual student and the groups or membership that influence the individual.
      • Model represents three socializing influences that students experience:
          • Collegiate Experience
          • Student Background Characteristics
          • Parental Socialization/Non- College Reference Groups
  • 4. STUDENT AFFAIRS DEPARTMENTS AND THEIR DIFFERENT FUNCTIONS
  • 5. ADMISSIONS
    • Purpose
    • Informing prospective students about the institution, its programs and accepting, and screening applicants
    • Admitting students through policies established by the faculty, president, governing board, or state legislature
    • Maintaining active communications with high schools, community colleges, community agencies, alumni groups, professional testing associations, parents and other interested individuals
    • Operating on a centralized level, but decentralized services also possible
    • Video: Tips Upon Entering College
  • 6. ORIENTATION
    • Purpose
    • Assisting students in getting acquainted with the history, traditions, educational programs, academic requirements and student life of the institution
    • Mostly focused on registration, finances, housing, as well as involving parents, community leaders, faculty and student leaders
    • Emphasis on student development and enhancing the first year experiences of students
    • Issues likely to be addressed in the future - linking orientation to the academic program and working on the actual content of orientation programs
  • 7. REGISTRATION
    • Purpose
    • Keeping the official academic records of current and former students
    • Realizing student enrollment for the academic courses and publishing the official schedules of courses for the institution
    • Sometimes linked with admissions, orientation or student financial aid
    • Future issues to be addressed in this area – how technology can best serve institutions and students and the legal status of student records
  • 8. FINANCIAL AID
    • Purpose
    • Helping students with educational expenses
    • Providing student support – loans, scholarships, grants and student employment
    • Student financial aid staff duties – 1. assessing student financial needs and making decisions about student aid packages; 2. working with government agencies, banks, loan guarantee agencies, parents, corporate and individual donors; 3. assisting students with their personal financial planning while in college
    • Linked with admissions, retention and registration
    • Future issues in the area - linking financial aid to the college’s academic goals and privatization of services
  • 9. COUNSELING SERVICES
    • Purpose
      • The center is to assist students to define and accomplish personal and academic goals which are congruent with the overall mission statement of the university.
      • Help students with their personal development and everyday problems.
      • Engage in outreach activities with other campus offices.
  • 10. CAREER DEVELOPMENT
    • Purpose
      • Assist students in gaining an understanding of self, interests, abilities, values, and needs
      • Help determine occupational or career goals
      • Teach students strategies on how to attain employment
  • 11. ACADEMIC ADVISING AND SUPPORT SERVICES
    • Purpose
      • Aid students in developing educational plans.
      • Plan programs to reflect student’s abilities and interests.
      • Refer students to institutional resources that will help with their educational development.
      • Depending on size of institution determines if faculty or trained professionals are in charge of this department.
      • Help in efforts to reduce retention rates
    • VIDEO: Office of Academic Advising
  • 12. COLLEGE UNIONS AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES OFFICE
    • Purpose
      • Campus hub for students, alumni, faculty, staff and visitors
      • Sometimes separate departments
      • Oversee a variety of items; programming, student organizations, co-curricular activities
  • 13. COMMUNITY SERVICE AND LEADERSHIP PROGRAMS
    • Purpose
      • Co-curricular student development
      • Not typically a separate office from Student Activities, but becoming more so lately
      • Fosters partnerships between the campus, faculty, and the surrounding community
    • e
  • 14. RESIDENCE LIFE
    • Purpose
      • Provide students with healthy, clean, safe and educationally supportive living environment that complements the academic mission of the institution.
      • Assist in the orientation to college life
      • Interpret university policies, rules and objectives to the students.
      • Help in the development of individuality
      • Provide opportunity of faculty-student contacts outside the classroom.
  • 15. SERVICES FOR STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
    • Purpose
      • Improve the success of students with disabilities and learning problems.
      • Serve an advocacy role when discussing policies and procedures affecting students with disabilities
      • Work to improve physical conditions on the campus and in the community.
  • 16. STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES AND FOOD SERVICES
    • Purpose
      • To give medical knowledge and assistance to students, faculty, and staff
      • May be linked to an academic department
      • Wide variety of food service provided
        • From vending machines to full service
        • Institution operated to private contract
      • Both are not always part of student affairs
  • 17. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SERVICES
    • Purpose
    • Assisting international students with travelling, orientation, financial aid, registration, housing, counseling, and student adjustment to campus and community
    • Responsible for study abroad programs, foreign visitors and international student organizations existing on the campus
    • Issues to be addressed in this arena – financial support, tuition, relations with US students, and immigration policies
    • Sometimes part of academic affairs or international programs division
  • 18. STUDENT RELIGIOUS PROGRAMS
    • Purpose
      • Vary from campus to campus
      • Typically provided through student organizations
      • May have part- or full-time staff members
  • 19. SPECIAL STUDENT POPULATIONS
    • Purpose
    • Focus on the needs of racial and ethnic minorities
    • Focus on the needs of LGBT students
    • Focus on the needs of female students
            • (Sandeen, p. 263)
  • 20. INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS
    • Purpose
      • Sports and athletic competitions organized and funded at institutions
      • Programs address issues of sportsmanship, training, nutrition, safety, gender equity, financial support, and institutional representation.
      • Two tiered system
        • One sanctioned by collegiate sport governing body such as the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
        • the second includes intramural and recreational sport clubs
    • VIDEO: NCAA Fan Commercial VIDEO: College Football Clips
  • 21. STUDENT RECREATION AND FITNESS PROGRAMS
    • Purpose
    • Promote good health awareness
    • Teach physical skills
    • Encourage positive social interaction
    • (Sandeen, p. 263)
  • 22. COMMUTER STUDENT SERVICES AND CHILDCARE SERVICES
    • Purpose
      • Need varies by campus
      • Is a growing population
      • Done in collaboration with student affairs, academic departments, and community partners
  • 23. STUDENT JUDICIAL AFFAIRS
    • Purpose
      • Develop, interpret, and enforce campus rules and regulations.
      • Conduct student hearings, publish rules and regulations that define procedures and student rights and encourages student learning through direct participation in the judicial system .
  • 24. PROGRAM RESEARCH AND EVALUATION
    • Purpose
      • Not typically a separate office, but part of the overall student affairs staff
      • Used to critique, modify, and develop programs to assist the students
  • 25. DEAN OF STUDENTS
    • Purpose
    • Helps to establish and enforce the community standards of the institution
    • Responds to general concerns of the students, faculty, staff, families, and community.
    • Directs Responses to student crises.
    • (Sandeen, p. 262)
  • 26. STRENGTHS CHALLENGES
    • Technological advances creating new opportunities
    • Provides community services
    • Produces leadership for the community
    • Fields are highly professionalized and specialized
    • Each area has its own national organizations and literature
    • Diminishing financial Support
    • Privatization
    • Staying united as a student affairs front
    • Larger institutions face population size challenge
    • Location will determine what type of services are of more necessity
    • Nature of the student body
    • Political and legal trends