Tomeco Hubbard Spring 2011  Dr. Barry Dotson The Community College  The  Florida College System
Background
Background <ul><li>First private junior college established in 1927. </li></ul><ul><li>First public community college Palm...
The  Florida  College System  <ul><li>Chancellor Willis N. Holcombe is the 2 nd   chancellor under new college system.  </...
28 Institutions  <ul><li>Brevard Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Broward College </li></ul><ul><li>Chipola College </l...
Students
Students <ul><li>Open admissions policies allows for a diverse student population. </li></ul><ul><li>66 percent of the sta...
Students <ul><li>Four Florida community colleges are participating in Achieve the Dream (AtD). </li></ul><ul><li>Over 800,...
Students <ul><li>In 2009- 2010 the college awarded 86,970 degrees.  </li></ul><ul><li>39.3 percent of students with an A.A...
Faculty
Faculty <ul><li>Who is the faculty within the FCS?  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>18,048  or 75 percent part-time faculty employed...
Part-Time Faculty <ul><li>3:1 ratio of part-time to full- time instructors. </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce education, adult b...
Part-time faculty guidelines  <ul><li>Colleges should recruit and maintain a pool of qualified part-time faculty. </li></u...
Governance  and  Administration
<ul><li>Colleges and community colleges within the FCS report to the Florida State Board of Education. </li></ul><ul><li>T...
Governance <ul><li>Colleges within the Florida College System are locally based and governed by a district  </li></ul><ul>...
Faculty/ Administration  <ul><li>Florida Association of Community Colleges  was created to help the Florida Legislature un...
Finance
<ul><li>Tuition  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>$2,765 is average in the FCS.  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$4, 886 is average for th...
2009-2010
<ul><li>Funding  for the 2009-2010 fiscal year.  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General Revenue,  $828 million  </li></ul></ul><ul>...
Vocational  Education
Types of Programs  <ul><li>Technical Degree  </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce Education  </li></ul><ul><li>Educator Preparation...
Workforce Education
Career/ Technical Programs <ul><li>Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture & Construction </l...
Development  Education
History  <ul><li>1985 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>rules implemented by Florida Legislature that requires all first –time-in-coll...
<ul><li>Only the colleges in the FCS and Florida A&M offer developmental education. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Florida relies h...
Success Rates
Community  Education
Types of Programs  <ul><li>Adult Basic Education  </li></ul><ul><li>Adult Secondary Education  </li></ul><ul><li>English f...
Student Enrollment
Funding <ul><li>Adult Education is a program run by the school districts and community colleges in Florida.  </li></ul><ul...
Collegiate Education
Background  <ul><li>Degrees Awarded:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bachelors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Associate of Arts (AA) </...
Bachelors  <ul><li>Broward College </li></ul><ul><li>Chipola College </li></ul><ul><li>Daytona State College </li></ul><ul...
Trends
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Final project tomeco_hubbard

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  • In 1927, the first junior college in Florida St. Petersburg Junior College was under the private sector which all eventually failed and were converted to public community colleges. The first public junior college was founded in 1933, Palm Beach Junior College. Palm Beach Junior College would be the only public two-year college in the state from 1933- 1947. In 1948, four public institutions existed. Though the creation of the community college segment in 1957 they still remained under the jurisdiction of the local school boards. http://www.facc.org/facc/Community_College_History.asp?SnID=2 In 2009, The Florida Community College System changed names to The Florida College System due to the fact that some of institutions now offer four- year degrees.
  • Renamed The Florida College System in 2009 because some community colleges began offering baccalaureate degrees. The first college to offer a baccalaureate degree was St. Petersburg Junior College in 2001 which followed a name change to St. Petersburg College. Within the system there are nine community colleges, eight colleges and eleven state colleges. Within the state of Florida they have eleven state universities as additional options and 29 private not for-profit institutions.
  • 28 institutions with 64 campuses and 182 sites throughout the state of Florida. The institutions offer career- related instructions, adult general education, workforce education, and college preparatory instruction.
  • In 2008-09, 152,546 Florida students graduated from college. Sixty-one percent of the graduates enrolled in a postsecondary institution in Florida. Sixty- seven percent of those students entered a Florida College. Twenty-nine percent of the students entered a state university and five percent an independent university. However, since not all students are eligible to receive aid, the percent of eligible students receiving aid is much higher. Pell grants are the major source of aid. Thus, the typical Florida community college student is a 31-year-old, white female freshman attending part-time and not receiving aid. http://www.leecountytimes.com/florida-college-system-tops-national-rankings-for-eighth-straight-year/
  • Achieve the Dream(AtD) is a program occurring in nine states at 58 community colleges to help increase the success rate of minority, low-income students who enter college in developmental education courses. Their focus is to increase retention and graduation rates. The dual enrollment program allows high school students to enroll in postsecondary course to receive both high school and postsecondary credit. This program helps to incorporate Florida seamless education mission.
  • Community College Week ranked institutions within the Florida College System as Top 100 Associate Degree Producers. 17 institutions were among the Top 100. Miami Dade College ranked number one in the nation for higher number of associates awarded to Hispanic and minority students. Florida institutions enroll a high number of non-traditional students that are working full-time jobs and attending school part- time. Most students in the system are the first in their family to attend college. This system gives students hope of success at any point in their life. These institutions supplies Florida with the top performers for the workforce. Of the 86,970 degrees awarded 48,763 were Associate of Arts degrees, 22,113 career and technical certificates, 12,936 Associate of Science degrees, 1,556 Educator Preparation Institute, and 1,602 baccalaureate degrees. http://www.hccfl.edu/media/415688/zoom%202011-01%20fcs%20trends.pdf
  • Just like most community college The Florida College System has a high dependence on part-time faculty. As stated by Cohen and Brawer the higher demand for part-time faculty is because they are cost effective and they can be employed and dismissed as needed (2008). Most men within the FCS are administrators instead of faculty. The Florida College Systems produces a high number of associates degrees in comparison to other states. The faculty has a huge impact on the success of the students. 3, 087 faculty members hold a master’s degree and only about 1,400 hold a doctorate degree in the system. Doctorate degree holders are not favorable for the community colleges due to preparation for teaching. Most doctorate holders are prepared for research instead of teaching and desire higher salaries. In comparison to most states within the South region The Florida College System faculty make approximately $5,000 more than faculty in other states such as Mississippi and Alabama. https://dax.dpe.edu/Reports/Public/Salary%20Schedules%200910.pdf http://www.sbcjc.cc.ms.us/pdfs/fn/avgsalfy06-11.pdf
  • Part-time faculty are there to exceed with the often changing dynamics of the community colleges. Due to the part-time faculty community colleges are better able to handle the economic crisis that higher education faces today. Part-time faculty teach about 40 percent of classes within the FCS. The part-time and full-time faculty are equally educated. In 2005, 8 percent of part-time faculty held doctorates compared to the 19 percent held by full-time faculty. Thirty-eight percent of part-time faculty held masters degree compared to 59 percent of full-time faculty. Full-time faculty are required to teach a minimum of 15 classroom contact hours per week at such institution. www.fldoe.org/cc
  • These guidelines were set in 1994 to ensure the part-time faculty would not be overworked or misused, but treated equally like full-time faculty. A general agreement that a substantial portion of instruction should be provided by full-time faculty to assure continuity in the curriculum and availability of faculty for student advising, curriculum development, work with college committees, and other important non-class activities accomplished by faculty. http://www.fldoe.org/cc/policy/pdf/guidelines_procedures_manual.pdf
  • All private and public community colleges, except the State University System report to the Florida State Board of Education in order to provide a seamless education system. The Division of Florida Colleges assists in program review and coordination for the Florida College System. The State of Board of Education is established as a body corporate. This Board makes all necessary governance for K-20 education in Florida. The Board consists of seven members who are appointed by the Governor to serve a four-year term. The Commissioner of Education is the chief educational officer of the state. The Commissioner supports and enforces all missions and goals for the State Board of Education. The Commissioner recommends a long-range plan from kindergarten to graduate school for the students in the State of Florida. The Florida College System shall work collaboratively with the Board of Governors, ICUF, the Commission for Independent Education and the business community regarding the development of baccalaureate programs which meet the postsecondary needs of the state. Governance Timeline: http://www.facc.org/facc/Community_College_Chronology.asp?SnID=929467832 Reference: http://www.fldoe.org/board/meetings/July01/statutoryResponsibilitiesDoc.pdf http://www.fldoe.org/cc/pdf/missionvision http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&amp;Search_String=&amp;URL=1000-1099/1001/Sections/1001.01.html .pdf
  • The local board of trustees are responsible for the total operation of the local community college. Their actions must be within the laws and rules of the State Board of Education. Community college boards of trustees shall be comprised of five members when a 1 community college district is confined to one school board district; seven members when a 1 community college district is confined to one school board district and the board of trustees so elects; and not more than nine members when the district contains two or more school board districts, as provided by rules of the State Board of Education. Trustees are appointed by the Governor and receive no compensation but may receive reimbursement. Their duties include the appointment of the college president and approving funding. The Division of Community colleges Chancellor is appointed by the Board of Education. The Chancellor serves a four-year term like http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&amp;Search_String=&amp;URL=1000-1099/1001/Sections/1001.61.html http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?App_mode=Display_Statute&amp;Search_String=&amp;URL=1000-1099/1001/Sections/1001.64.html
  • Established in 1949 as the Florida Association of Public Junior Colleges replaced as the Florida Association of Community Colleges in 1971. This system is the only one in existence that represents all the trustees, employees, and presidents within the community college system. This association is a membership organization that represents over 9,000 members. This association advocates for the voice of it’s members to Legislature. Some of the community colleges have faculty senates or collective bargaining units to advise the administration on faculty issues. The faculty within the FCS are involved in their union and/or senate at their institution. http://www.facc.org/facc/Community_College_History.asp?SnID=2
  • Both systems have seen increases from last year due to the enrollments increasing and funding decreasing. The state universities seen a 13.2 percent increase but still remain the third lease expensive system within the United States. FCS had a 8.31 percent increase with Tallahassee Community College having the highest increase at 16.01 percent spike in tuition. The FTE is increasing amongst the community colleges while the funding from the state and federal government is decreasing. http://www.flbog.org/about/_doc/budget/tuition/national_tuition_comparison.pdf
  • $1,816,934,239 was the total expenditures amount for 2009-10 year. The Personnel Costs covers part-time and full-time personnel part-time personnel make up about 13.62 percent while the full- time personnel takes the biggest chunk of the operating budget at 62.09 percent. Advanced and Professional courses take the largest of the operating budget at 54.10 percent. The operating budget figures for the personnel cost are full- time is $1,128,185,529 and the part-time figure is $247,398,590 . $412,469,079 is the current expense and $28,881,041 for the capital expenses. The money comes from various areas such federal, state, student fees, and etc. Fact Book: http://www.fldoehub.org/CCTCMIS/c/Documents/Fact%20Books/fb2011.pdf
  • Funding for the 2010-2011 fiscal year: General Revenue, $890 million; Student Fees, $851 million; Lottery Funding , $127 million; Federal Stabilization Funds, $82 million. Totaling $1,794,111,471 as the revenue to be used among each institution within the FCS. The institution that used the most funding was Miami Dade College. Miami Dade College spent over close to half the budget on direct instruction. Fact Book: http://www.fldoehub.org/CCTCMIS/c/Documents/Fact%20Books/fb2011.pdf
  • The vocational department in the FCS is extensive covering over 500 careers and technical programs. The Educator Preparation Institute(EPI) is an alternate route program for individuals who hold a bachelor’s degree, but did not major in education. The EPI offer professional development, substitute teaching/ paraprofessional training, and alternative certification. The technical degree education program offers course of study that leads to an associate in applied science degree or an associate in science degree. A technical degree program may contain within it one or more program progression points and may lead to certificates or diplomas within the course of study. The term is interchangeable with the term “degree career education program.” The vocational-preparatory instruction offers adult general education through which persons attain academic and workforce readiness skills at the level of functional literacy grade levels 6- 9 or higher so that such persons may pursue technical certificate education or higher-level technical education. The career program means a group of identified competencies leading to occupations identified by a Classification of Instructional Programs number. The workforce education program offers adult general education or career education and may consist of a continuing workforce education course or a program of study leading to an occupational completion point, a career certificate, an applied technology diploma, or a career degree.
  • Enrollment is steadily increasing in the Florida College System. More students are returning to school to change careers or start new careers. Vocational Education in the Florida College System is comprised of workforce education, apprenticeship and vocational programs. Workforce Education is designed to meet the needs of our customers, which include students, business and industry, school districts, community colleges, community-based organizations, and correctional institutions. This area represents a significant collaboration and partnership across both private and public sectors throughout the state of Florida to improve Florida&apos;s workforce. The workforce education has the 2 nd largest enrollment of students close to college and vocational preparatory at 179,039 and 152,218 , respectively. The health field had a gradual increase, but a steady lead upon the areas in workforce education. Business and industrial seen a dramatic increase within 2009-10 year. The enrollment among the workforce in 2009-10 was 156,170. By attending an institution within the FCS most students that receive vocational/ technical training earn at least $10,000 more than individuals with only a high school diploma. The continuing workforce education offer instruction that does not result in a technical certificate, diploma, associate in applied science degree, or associate in science degree. Continuing workforce education is for: individuals who are required to have training for licensure renewal or certification renewal by a regulatory agency or credentialing body; new or expanding businesses; business, industry, and government agencies whose products or services are changing so that retraining of employees is necessary or whose employees need training in specific skills to increase efficiency and productivity; or individuals who are enhancing occupational skills necessary to maintain current employment, to cross train, or to upgrade employment.
  • According to the U.S. Office of Education programs of trade and industrial education less than college grade if college requirements were not prerequisites for admission, the objective was to prepare for employment in industry, the program did not lead to a degree, and the program was not required constitute as vocational (Cohen and Brawer, 2008). The career program means a group of identified competencies leading to occupations identified by a classification of instructional programs number. http://fldoehub.org/CCTCMIS/wdis/WDIS%20Handbooks/2010-11/1011.pdf
  • Students with minimum scores for the elementary algebra, reading comprehension, and sentence skills portions of the CPT are considered “ready” for college-level math, reading, and writing. Students earning scores less than those listed below shall enroll in college preparatory communication and computation instruction:(a) Reading Comprehension, 83; (b) Sentence Skills ,83; and (c) Elementary Algebra, 72. Students may exempt the CPT if they make passing levels on the SAT or ACT because the scores were increased in 2000 to align with the CPT. While the exact percentages vary by term and year, slightly over one-third of an entering community college class will be college ready, another third will need only one area of remediation, and the final third will need College Preparatory courses in two or more areas. http://www.fldoe.org/CC/OSAS/FastFacts/ff15.asp
  • The State paid $31,387,102. For recent high school graduates, i.e., people who have been out of high school for three years or less, the State paid $12,299,622 or 1.7% of the $725,107,669 total State appropriations to the CCS. The Florida College System offer college-preparatory instruction courses through which a high school graduate who applies for any college credit program may attain the communication and computation skills necessary to enroll in college credit instruction. Older students are enrolling in college with more than one year off after high school and find themselves enrolled in developmental classes. In 2000-01, 65.63 percent of students failed at least one portion of the CPT. Fifty- five percent of the students failed math while, forty percent failed reading, and thirty- one percent failed writing. Math consistently has the highest failure ratings on the CPT. After enrolling in the remedial classes most students will pass math and English two years later.
  • Math is the highest entry level test portion that students fail in the FCS. Two years later 53 percent of students that were enrolled in developmental math will pass the highest level math. A little bit over half yet still a high percentage. Only 16 percent of the student will pass with an A grade. In English after two years 47 percent of the students would earn an A. Math seems to be the subject that gives most FTIC degree seeking students trouble. There is an 84.12% success rate of students who either graduate or leave the university in good standing after being enrolled in a developmental course upon arrival. http://www.fldoe.org/CC/OSAS/FastFacts/FastFacts.asp http://www.fldoe.org/cc/OSAS/Evaluations/pdf/fyi2010-04.pdf
  • Community education use the school or other public facility as a community center operated in conjunction with other public, private, and governmental organizations for the purpose of providing educational, recreational, social, cultural, health, and community services for persons in the community in accordance with the needs, interests, and concerns of that community, including lifelong learning. Lifelong learning is a noncredit course or activity offered by a school district or community college that seeks to address community social and economic issues related to health and human relations, government, parenting, consumer economics, and senior citizens. Florida’s adult education system includes a range of instructional programs that help adults get the basic skills they need to be productive workers, family members, and citizens. The major program areas are Adult Basic Education (ABE), Adult Secondary Education (ASE), and English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL). These programs emphasize basic skills such as reading, writing, math, and English language competency. Adult education programs also help adult learners gain the knowledge and skills they need to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. Miami Dade College being the most innovative within the FCS offers corporate training classes. http://www.leg.state.fl.us/statutes/index.cfm?mode=View%20Statutes&amp;SubMenu=1&amp;App_mode=Display_Statute&amp;Search_String=1004.02&amp;URL=1000-1099/1004/Sections/1004.02.html
  • Adult basic education are courses of instruction designed to improve the employability of the state’s workforce through instruction in mathematics, reading, language, and workforce readiness skills at an appropriate grade level. Adult ESOL or adult ESL are noncredit English literacy courses designed to improve the employability of the state’s workforce through acquisition of communication skills and cultural competencies that enhance ability to read, write, speak, and listen in English. ESOL means English for Speakers of Other Languages. ESL means English as a Second Language. The two terms are interchangeable. Adult general education are comprehensive instructional programs designed to improve the employability of the state’s workforce through adult basic education, adult secondary education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, vocational-preparatory instruction, and instruction for adults with disabilities. Adult high school credit program help award credits upon completion of courses and passing of state mandated assessments necessary to qualify for a high school diploma. Except as provided elsewhere in law, the graduation standards for adults shall be the same as those for secondary students. Adult secondary education offer courses through which a person receives high school credit that leads to the award of a high school diploma or courses of instruction through which a student prepares to take the General Educational Development (GED) test.
  • The Adult Education and GED Program receives its funding through general revenue appropriations and federal flow-through dollars. Information on legislative appropriations, allocations, and the state funding process for community colleges, school districts, and career and technical centers and community colleges is available in the program summary for  Department of Education,   School District Career and Adult Education   .   Community colleges spent $53,059,776 in Fiscal Year 2007-08. The federal government provides grants to the colleges and districts which is why most colleges and districts do not charge tuition, but small fees. In 2010-11, 30 million dollar grant was awarded to the adult education program. Fees and tuition are not forbidden, but not likely. http://www.oppaga.state.fl.us/MonitorDocs/Reports/pdf/1104rpt.pdf
  • The enrollment numbers in 2009- 10 for all the programs: Bachelors degree program, 13,171; Associate in Arts, 333,272; and Associate of Science, 103,741. The Florida 2+2 transfer agreement guarantees students with a Florida College System AA degree admission to a state university. The articulation agreement is to help integrate the seamless education system present in Florida. The AA degree program includes 36 hours of general education credits (liberal arts) and 24 credit hours in the program area in which the student intends to complete a bachelor’s degree. The AA program is the most popular program within the FCS and enrollment is steadily increasing. 48, 763 AA degrees and 12, 936 AS degrees were awarded in 2009-10. The AA program is funded by the Florida Legislature as part of the appropriation for the Community College Program Fund.  In 2007-08, the Florida College System spent approximately $379 million on direct instruction costs and $511 million on support costs for the associate in arts degree programs. In Fiscal Year 2007-08, the Florida College System spent approximately $394 million for associate in science programs, an increase of about $16 million from the previous fiscal year.  Associate in science program expenditures accounted for 34% of total workforce expenditures and 62% of Florida College System workforce expenditures. Florida Statues: http://www.leg.state.fl.us/Statutes/index.cfm?mode=View%20Statutes&amp;SubMenu=1&amp;App_mode=Display_Statute&amp;Search_String=1007.23&amp;URL=1000-1099/1007/Sections/1007.23.html ICUF Agreement: http://www.fldoe.org/articulation/pdf/ICUF_Agreement.pdf Statewide Manual: http://www.fldoe.org/articulation/pdf/statewide-postsecondary-articulation-manual.pdf Associate of Science: http://www.oppaga.state.fl.us/profiles/2061/ Associate of Art: http://www.oppaga.state.fl.us/profiles/2060/
  • These are all the colleges within the FCS that offer a Bachelors degree. Two types of baccalaureate degrees are offered: the baccalaureate of science degree and the baccalaureate of applied science degree.  Currently, 9 Florida College System institutions offer the baccalaureate of science degree and 11 institutions offer the baccalaureate of applied science degree. The Bachelor of Science has 14 different areas of study and the Bachelor of Applied Science has 27 areas of study. In 2009-10, the FCS awarded 1,602 bachelor degrees. The Florida Legislature appropriates funding for the Florida College System’s baccalaureate degree program through specific grants to each college with authorized programs.  The total appropriation for Fiscal Year 2009-10 was $9.5 million. Though the FCS offers bachelor degrees currently a high percentage of students still transfer to State Universities, but the enrollment among the program is increasing. http://www.oppaga.state.fl.us/profiles/2062/ http://www.fldoe.org/cc/students/bach_degree.asp
  • Most AA recipients who did not transfer to pursue a baccalaureate degree never applied for admission to the State University System. 77.9 percent of students who did not transfer never applied to a State University, two percent were denied admission, eight percent applications were cancelled, and twelve percent were accepted, but declined acceptance. Most students, 40 percent, are not applying to State Universities because of the lack of knowledge, 27 percent due to financial reasons and 14 percent transfer to another system. http://www.oppaga.state.fl.us/MonitorDocs/Reports/pdf/1001rpt.pdf
  • Final project tomeco_hubbard

    1. 1. Tomeco Hubbard Spring 2011 Dr. Barry Dotson The Community College The Florida College System
    2. 2. Background
    3. 3. Background <ul><li>First private junior college established in 1927. </li></ul><ul><li>First public community college Palm Beach Junior College established in 1933. </li></ul><ul><li>Florida Community College System established in 1957. </li></ul>
    4. 4. The Florida College System <ul><li>Chancellor Willis N. Holcombe is the 2 nd chancellor under new college system. </li></ul><ul><li>Systems consist of 28 institutions both community colleges and four-year state colleges. </li></ul><ul><li>Only 9 of the 28 institutions are community colleges. </li></ul><ul><li>64 campuses with 182 sites. </li></ul>
    5. 5. 28 Institutions <ul><li>Brevard Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Broward College </li></ul><ul><li>Chipola College </li></ul><ul><li>College of Central Florida </li></ul><ul><li>Daytona State College </li></ul><ul><li>Edison State College </li></ul><ul><li>Florida Gateway College </li></ul><ul><li>Florida Keys Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Florida State College at Jacksonville </li></ul><ul><li>Gulf Coast Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Hillsborough Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Indian River State College </li></ul><ul><li>Lake –Sumter Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Miami Dade College </li></ul><ul><li>North Florida Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Northwest Florida State College </li></ul><ul><li>Palm Beach State College </li></ul><ul><li>Pasco-Hernando Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Pensacola State College </li></ul><ul><li>Polk State College </li></ul><ul><li>Santa Fe College </li></ul><ul><li>Seminole State College of Florida </li></ul><ul><li>South Florida Community College </li></ul><ul><li>St. Johns River State College </li></ul><ul><li>St. Petersburg College </li></ul><ul><li>State College of Florida, Manatee-Sarasota </li></ul><ul><li>Tallahassee Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Valencia Community College </li></ul>
    6. 6. Students
    7. 7. Students <ul><li>Open admissions policies allows for a diverse student population. </li></ul><ul><li>66 percent of the state’s high school graduates attend institutions within the Florida College System. </li></ul><ul><li>Florida ranks number one in the producing more students with associate’s degrees compared to other southern states. </li></ul><ul><li>1 in 5 receive some type of aid. </li></ul>
    8. 8. Students <ul><li>Four Florida community colleges are participating in Achieve the Dream (AtD). </li></ul><ul><li>Over 800,000 students enrolled in the 2009-2010 school year. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>39 percent full-time students. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>61 percent part-time students. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>59 percent of the students are female. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>41 percent minority enrollment. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Median age is 25 years. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>41,991 of the students are dually enrolled high school students. </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Students <ul><li>In 2009- 2010 the college awarded 86,970 degrees. </li></ul><ul><li>39.3 percent of students with an A.A. transfer from the Florida College System to the State University System (SUS). </li></ul><ul><li>1.4 percent of students with an A.S. transfer to the SUS. </li></ul><ul><li>76 percent of students that transfer to an SUS maintain a 2.5 GPA. </li></ul>
    10. 10. Faculty
    11. 11. Faculty <ul><li>Who is the faculty within the FCS? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>18,048 or 75 percent part-time faculty employed by the FCS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5, 715 or 25 percent full- time faculty employed by the FCS. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>75 percent of tenured faculty within the FCS. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Females in the FCS outnumber the males. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Whites lead the FCS in part-time and full-time faculty. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over half the faculty hold a master’s or higher degree. </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Part-Time Faculty <ul><li>3:1 ratio of part-time to full- time instructors. </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce education, adult basic education, and English as a second language rely heavily on part-time faculty. </li></ul><ul><li>48 percent are female. </li></ul><ul><li>Five or more years experience at current institution. </li></ul><ul><li>Teach 40% of classes. </li></ul>
    13. 13. Part-time faculty guidelines <ul><li>Colleges should recruit and maintain a pool of qualified part-time faculty. </li></ul><ul><li>Qualifications of part-time faculty should be consistent with the Criteria for Accreditation of the Commission on Colleges for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools </li></ul><ul><li>Orientation of part-time faculty </li></ul><ul><li>A current faculty handbook should be provided. </li></ul><ul><li>Full-time faculty members should be assigned as mentors to new part-time faculty </li></ul><ul><li>Appropriate workspace should be provided . </li></ul><ul><li>Provided with a sample course syllabus for each course they teach. </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation and supervision such as student feedback. </li></ul><ul><li>Participation in departmental and college faculty meetings and professional development activities and included on distribution list for college newsletters and other publications. </li></ul><ul><li>Compensation for teaching by should cover not only the course hours but also out-of-class activities such as course preparation, orientation, faculty meetings, and identified hours to meet with students outside the class time. </li></ul><ul><li>Colleges should consider implementing a program to recognize part-time faculty for outstanding teaching performance. </li></ul>
    14. 14. Governance and Administration
    15. 15. <ul><li>Colleges and community colleges within the FCS report to the Florida State Board of Education. </li></ul><ul><li>The Florida College System shall be supported by the Division of Community Colleges within the Department of Education reporting to the Commissioner of Education. </li></ul>
    16. 16. Governance <ul><li>Colleges within the Florida College System are locally based and governed by a district </li></ul><ul><li>board of trustees appointed by the Governor. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Board of Trustees serve a four-year term. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Chancellor Dr. Willis N. Holcombe is at the apex of the Florida College System. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Appointed by the Florida Board of Education </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. Faculty/ Administration <ul><li>Florida Association of Community Colleges was created to help the Florida Legislature understand and advocate for the community college. </li></ul><ul><li>Faculty governance either consists of </li></ul><ul><ul><li>collective bargaining units </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>and/ or faculty senate </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. Finance
    19. 19. <ul><li>Tuition </li></ul><ul><ul><li>$2,765 is average in the FCS. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$4, 886 is average for the State Universities. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The FTE increased to 383,408 in 2010-2011 from 359,900 in 2009- 2010. </li></ul><ul><li>State and federal funding decreased to $2,867 per FTE in 2010-2011. </li></ul>
    20. 20. 2009-2010
    21. 21. <ul><li>Funding for the 2009-2010 fiscal year. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>General Revenue, $828 million </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student Fees, $768 million </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Lottery Funding , $117 million </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Federal Stabilization Funds, $82 million </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Vocational Education
    23. 23. Types of Programs <ul><li>Technical Degree </li></ul><ul><li>Workforce Education </li></ul><ul><li>Educator Preparation Institute (EPI) </li></ul><ul><li>Career Education </li></ul><ul><li>Pre-Apprenticeship </li></ul>
    24. 24. Workforce Education
    25. 25. Career/ Technical Programs <ul><li>Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture & Construction </li></ul><ul><li>Arts, A/V Technology & Communication </li></ul><ul><li>Business, Management & Administration </li></ul><ul><li>Education & Training </li></ul><ul><li>Energy </li></ul><ul><li>Finance </li></ul><ul><li>Government & Public Administration </li></ul><ul><li>Health Science </li></ul><ul><li>Hospitality & Tourism </li></ul><ul><li>Human Services </li></ul><ul><li>Information Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Law, Public Safety & Security </li></ul><ul><li>Manufacturing </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing, Sales & Service </li></ul><ul><li>Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics (STEM) </li></ul><ul><li>Transportation, Distribution & Logistics </li></ul><ul><li>Additional CTE Programs/Courses </li></ul><ul><li>Diversified Education </li></ul><ul><li>Instructional Support Services (Special Needs) </li></ul>
    26. 26. Development Education
    27. 27. History <ul><li>1985 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>rules implemented by Florida Legislature that requires all first –time-in-college degree seeking students to take a test before registration. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If students score below standards they are placed in developmental classes. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1997 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>All community colleges required to administer the Florida College Entry Level Placement Test(CPT). </li></ul></ul>
    28. 28. <ul><li>Only the colleges in the FCS and Florida A&M offer developmental education. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Florida relies heavily on the FCS for developmental education. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Higher percentage of the students are: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Low-income </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Minority </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Older students who took time off from college </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Success Rates
    30. 30. Community Education
    31. 31. Types of Programs <ul><li>Adult Basic Education </li></ul><ul><li>Adult Secondary Education </li></ul><ul><li>English for Speakers of Other Languages </li></ul><ul><li>Lifelong learning </li></ul><ul><li>Recreation and Leisure </li></ul><ul><li>Citizenship Program </li></ul>
    32. 32. Student Enrollment
    33. 33. Funding <ul><li>Adult Education is a program run by the school districts and community colleges in Florida. </li></ul><ul><li>Funding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Highest percentage from state appropriations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In 2008-09 4 colleges charged the student fees. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student fees or tuition exempted in Florida Statues. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$10 - $15 registration fee to take test. </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. Collegiate Education
    35. 35. Background <ul><li>Degrees Awarded: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bachelors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Associate of Arts (AA) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Associate of Science (AS) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Statewide Articulation Agreement </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Guarantees all student credits will transfers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No retaking of courses. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Partnership between all institutions within the State of Florida. </li></ul></ul>
    36. 36. Bachelors <ul><li>Broward College </li></ul><ul><li>Chipola College </li></ul><ul><li>Daytona State College </li></ul><ul><li>Edison State College </li></ul><ul><li>Indian River State College </li></ul><ul><li>State College of Florida </li></ul><ul><li>Florida College at Jacksonville </li></ul><ul><li>Manatee-Sarasota </li></ul><ul><li>Miami Dade College </li></ul><ul><li>Northwest Florida State College </li></ul><ul><li>Palm Beach Community College </li></ul><ul><li>Polk State College </li></ul><ul><li>Santa Fe College </li></ul><ul><li>Seminole State College of Florida </li></ul><ul><li>St. Petersburg College </li></ul>
    37. 37. Trends
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