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07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona
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07-OnlineMillionairePlan-Emersona

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  1. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep It MONEY How To Get It. How To Keep It. Napoleon Hill Benjamin Franklin P.T. Barnum Frederick Van Rensselaer Day Russell Conwell George Clason Ralph Waldo Emerson Thomas Troward Wallace D. Wattles edited and with forward by Dr. Robert C. WorstellVisit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com i
  2. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editorCopyright © 2007 by Robert C. Worstell. All rights reserved.No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, scanning, or otherwise, except as permitted under Section 107 or 108 of the 1976 United States Copyright Act, without the prior written permission of the Author.Limit of Liability/Disclaimer of Warranty: While the publisher and the author have used their best efforts in preparing this book, they make no representations or warranties with respect to the accuracy or completeness of the contents of this book and specifically disclaim any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. No warranty may be created or extended by sales representatives or written sales materials. The advice and strategies contained herein may not be suitable for your situation. You should consult with a professional where appropriate. Neither the publisher nor the author shall be liable for any loss of profit or any other commercial damages, including but not limited to special, incidental, consequential, or other damages.Beta release 0.1This book contains an excerpt of the original 1937 version of Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill, originally published by The Ralston Society and now in the public domain. This edited edition is not sponsored or endorsed by, or otherwise affiliated with, Napoleon Hill or his family and heirs, the Napoleon Hill Foundation, The Ralston Society, or any other person or entity.ii Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  3. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editor Table of ContentsFORWARD........................................................................................1THINK AND GROW RICH: Napoleon Hill ..............................................................................3THE WAY TO WEALTH: Benjamin Franklin .....................................................................30THE ART OF MONEY GETTING: P.T. Barnum ..............................................................................41THE MAGIC STORY: Frederick Van Rensselaer Day...................................................80ACRES OF DIAMONDS: Russell H. Conwell................................................................... 102THE RICHEST MAN IN BABYLON: George S. Clason ......................................................................132COMPENSATION: Ralph Waldo Emerson..............................................................156THE SPIRIT OF OPULENCE: Thomas Troward......................................................................178THE SCIENCE OF GETTING RICH: Wallace D. Wattles ...................................................................182WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW WHEN PURSUING WEALTH: Anonymous..............................................................................185BOOKS IN THE GO THUNK YOURSELF REFERENCE LIBRARY:.......................................................242iv Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  4. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editor COMPENSATION: Ralph Waldo Emerson from Essays: First Series (1841) Emerson tackles the interesting problem of how the universe treats both criminal and devout, pauper and millionaire – they compense that person according to their own actions. So you see both Law of Attraction and the Golden Rule being explained in this single essay. And so, to be rich without, one must first be rich within. While the grammar of the 1840s can be a stretch to modern minds, please take your time and savor each paragraph as you read...156 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  5. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep It THE WINGS OF TIME are black and white, Pied with morning and with night. Mountain tall and ocean deep Trembling balance duly keep. In changing moon, in tidal wave, Glows the feud of Want and Have. Gauge of more and less through space Electric star and pencil plays. The lonely Earth amid the balls That hurry through the eternal halls, A makeweight flying to the void, Supplemental asteroid, Or compensatory spark, Shoots across the neutral Dark. Mans the elm, and Wealth the vine; Stanch and strong the tendrils twine: Though the frail ringlets thee deceive, None from its stock that vine can reave. Fear not, then, thou child infirm, Theres no god dare wrong a worm. Laurel crowns cleave to deserts, And power to him who power exerts; Hast not thy share? On winged feet, Lo! it rushes thee to meet; And all that Nature made thy own, Floating in air or pent in stone, Will rive the hills and swim the sea, And, like thy shadow, follow thee. EVER since I was a boy I have wished to write a discourse onCompensation; for it seemed to me when very young that on this subjectLife was ahead of theology and the people knew more than the preacherstaught. The documents too from which the be doctrine is to drawn, Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 157
  6. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editorcharmed my fancy by their endless variety, and lay always before me,even in sleep; for they are the tools in our hands, the bread in our basket,the transactions of the street, the farm and the dwelling-house; thegreetings, the relations, the debts and credits, the influence of character,the nature and endowment of all men. It seemed to me also that in itmight be shown men a ray of divinity, the present action of the Soul ofthis world, clean from all vestige of tradition; and so the heart of manmight be bathed by an inundation of eternal love, conversing with thatwhich he knows was always and always must be, because it really is now.It appeared moreover that if this doctrine could be stated in terms withany resemblance to those bright intuitions in which this truth issometimes revealed to us, it would be a star in many dark hours andcrooked passages in our journey, that would not suffer us to lose ourway. I was lately confirmed in these desires by hearing a sermon atchurch. The preacher, a man esteemed for his orthodoxy, unfolded in theordinary manner the doctrine of the Last Judgment. He assumed thatjudgment is not executed in this world; that the wicked are successful;that the good are miserable; and then urged from reason and fromScripture a compensation to be made to both parties in the next life. Nooffense appeared to be taken by the congregation at this doctrine. As faras I could observe when the meeting broke up they separated withoutremark on the sermon. Yet what was the import of this teaching? What did the preachermean by saying that the good are miserable in the present life? Was it that houses and lands, offices, wine, horses, dress, luxury,are had by unprincipled men, whilst the saints are poor and despised; andthat a compensation is to be made to these last hereafter, by giving themthe like gratifications another day,— bank-stock and doubloons, venisonand champagne? This must be the compensation intended; for what else?Is it that they are to have leave to pray and praise? to love and serve men?Why, that they can do now. The legitimate inference the disciple would158 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  7. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itdraw was, “We are to have such a good time as the sinners have now”;—or, to push it to its extreme import,— “You sin now, we shall sin by-andby; we would sin now, if we could; not being successful we expect ourrevenge tomorrow.” The fallacy lay in the immense concession that the bad aresuccessful; that justice is not done now. The blindness of the preacherconsisted in deferring to the base estimate of the market of whatconstitutes a manly success, instead of confronting and convicting theworld from the truth; announcing the Presence of the Soul; theomnipotence of the Will; and so establishing the standard of good and ill,of success and falsehood, and summoning the dead to its presenttribunal. I find a similar base tone in the popular religious works of the dayand the same doctrines assumed by the literary men when occasionallythey treat the related topics. I think that our popular theology has gainedin decorum, and not in principle, over the superstitions it has displaced.But men are better than this theology. Their daily life gives it the lie.Every ingenuous and aspiring soul leaves the doctrine behind him in hisown experience, and all men feel sometimes the falsehood which theycannot demonstrate. For men are wiser than they know. That which theyhear in schools and pulpits without afterthought, if said in conversationwould probably be questioned in silence. If a man dogmatize in a mixedcompany on Providence and the divine laws, he is answered by a silencewhich conveys well enough to an observer the dissatisfaction of thehearer, but his incapacity to make his own statement. I shall attempt in this and the following chapter to record somefacts that indicate the path of the law of Compensation; happy beyondmy expectation if I shall truly draw the smallest arc of this circle. POLARITY, or action and reaction, we meet in every part ofnature; in darkness and light, in heat and cold; in the ebb and flow of Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 159
  8. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editorwaters; in male and female; in the inspiration and expiration of plants andanimals; in the systole and diastole of the heart; in the undulations offluids and of sound; in the centrifugal and centripetal gravity; inelectricity, galvanism, and chemical affinity. Superinduce magnetism atone end of a needle, the opposite magnetism takes place at the other end.If the south attracts, the north repels. To empty here, you must condensethere. An inevitable dualism bisects nature, so that each thing is a half,and suggests another thing to make it whole; as, spirit, matter; man,woman; subjective, objective; in, out; upper, under; motion, rest; yea, nay. Whilst the world is thus dual, so is every one of its parts. Theentire system of things gets represented in every particle. There issomewhat that resembles the ebb and flow of the sea, day and night, manand woman, in a single needle of the pine, in a kernel of corn, in eachindividual of every animal tribe. The reaction, so grand in the elements, isrepeated within these small boundaries. For example, in the animalkingdom the physiologist has observed that no creatures are favorites,but a certain compensation balances every gift and every defect. Asurplusage given to one part is paid out of a reduction from another partof the same creature. If the head and neck are enlarged, the trunk andextremities are cut short. The theory of the mechanic forces is another example. What wegain in power is lost in time, and the converse. The periodic orcompensating errors of the planets is another instance. The influences ofclimate and soil in political history are another. The cold climateinvigorates. The barren soil does not breed fevers, crocodiles, tigers, orscorpions. The same dualism underlies the nature and condition of man.Every excess causes a defect; every defect an excess. Every sweet hath itssour; every evil its good. Every faculty which is a receiver of pleasure hasan equal penalty put on its abuse. It is to answer for its moderation withits life. For every grain of wit there is a grain of folly. For every thing youhave missed, you have gained something else; and for every thing you160 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  9. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itgain, you lose something. If riches increase, they are increased that usethem. If the gatherer gathers too much, nature takes out of the man whatshe puts into his chest; swells the estate, but kills the owner. Nature hatesmonopolies and exceptions. The waves of the sea do not more speedilyseek a level from their loftiest tossing than the varieties of condition tendto equalize themselves. There is always some leveling circumstance thatputs down the overbearing, the strong, the rich, the fortunate,substantially on the same ground with all others. Is a man too strong andfierce for society and by temper and position a bad citizen,— a moroseruffian, with a dash of the pirate in him?— nature sends him a troop ofpretty sons and daughters who are getting along in the dame’s classes atthe village school, and love and fear for them smooths his grim scowl tocourtesy. Thus she contrives to intenerate the granite and feldspar, takesthe boar out and puts the lamb in and keeps her balance true. The farmer imagines power and place are fine things. But thePresident has paid dear for his White House. It has commonlycost him all his peace, and the best of his manly attributes. To preservefor a short time so conspicuous an appearance before the world, he iscontent to eat dust before the real masters who stand erect behind thethrone. Or do men desire the more substantial and permanent grandeurof genius? Neither has this an immunity. He who by force of will or ofthought is great and overlooks thousands, has the responsibility ofoverlooking. With every influx of light comes new danger. Has he light?he must bear witness to the light, and always outrun that sympathy whichgives him such keen satisfaction, by his fidelity to new revelations of theincessant soul. He must hate father and mother, wife and child. Has heall that the world loves and admires and covets?— he must cast behindhim their admiration and afflict them by faithfulness to his truth andbecome a byword and a hissing. This Law writes the laws of the cities and nations. It will not bebaulked of its end in the smallest iota. It is in vain to build or plot orcombine against it. Things refuse to be mismanaged long. Res nolunt diumale administrari. Though no checks to a new evil appear, the checksexist, and will appear. If the government is cruel, the governor’s life is Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 161
  10. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editornot safe. If you tax too high, the revenue will yield nothing. If you makethe criminal code sanguinary, juries will not convict. Nothing arbitrary,nothing artificial can endure. The true life and satisfactions of man seemto elude the utmost rigors or felicities of condition and to establishthemselves with great indifferency under all varieties of circumstance.Under all governments the influence of character remains the same,— inTurkey and New England about alike. Under the primeval despots ofEgypt, history honestly confesses that man must have been as free asculture could make him. These appearances indicate the fact that the universe isrepresented in every one of its particles. Every thing in nature contains allthe powers of nature. Every thing is made of one hidden stuff; as thenaturalist sees one type under every metamorphosis, and regards a horseas a running man, a fish as a swimming man, a bird as a flying man, a treeas a rooted man. Each new form repeats not only the main character ofthe type, but part for part all the details, all the aims, furtherances,hindrances, energies and whole system of every other. Every occupation,trade, art, transaction, is a compend of the world and a correlative ofevery other. Each one is an entire emblem of human life; of its good andill, its trials, its enemies, its course and its end. And each one mustsomehow accommodate the whole man and recite all his destiny. The world globes itself in a drop of dew. The microscope cannotfind the animalcule which is less perfect for being little. Eyes, ears, taste,smell, motion, resistance, appetite, and organs of reproduction that takehold on eternity,— all find room to consist in the small creature. So dowe put our life into every act. The true doctrine of omnipresence is thatGod reappears with all his parts in every moss and cobweb. The value ofthe universe contrives to throw itself into every point. If the good isthere, so is the evil; if the affinity, so the repulsion; if the force, so thelimitation. Thus is the universe alive. All things are moral. That soul whichwithin us is a sentiment, outside of us is a law. We feel its inspirations;162 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  11. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itout there in history we can see its fatal strength. It is almighty. All naturefeels its grasp. “It is in the world, and the world was made by it.” It iseternal but it enacts itself in time and space. Justice is not postponed. Aperfect equity adjusts its balance in all parts of life. The dice of God arealways loaded. The world looks like a multiplication-table, or amathematical equation, which, turn it how you will, balances itself. Takewhat figure you will, its exact value, nor more nor less, still returns toyou. Every secret is told, every crime is punished, every virtue rewarded,every wrong redressed, in silence and certainty. What we call retributionis the universal necessity by which the whole appears wherever a partappears. If you see smoke, there must be fire. If you see a hand or a limb,you know that the trunk to which it belongs is there behind. Every act rewards itself, or in other words integrates itself, in atwofold manner: first in the thing, or in real nature; and secondly in thecircumstance, or in apparent nature. Men call the circumstance theretribution. The casual retribution is in the thing and is seen by the soul.The retribution in the circumstance is seen by the understanding; it isinseparable from the thing, but is often spread over a long time and sodoes not become distinct until after many years. The specific stripes mayfollow late after the offense, but they follow because they accompany it.Crime and punishment grow out of one stem. Punishment is a fruit thatunsuspected ripens within the flower of the pleasure which concealed it.Cause and effect, means and ends, seed and fruit, cannot be severed; forthe effect already blooms in the cause, the end preexists in the means, thefruit in the seed. Whilst thus the world will be whole and refuses to be disparted,we seek to act partially, to sunder, to appropriate; for example,— togratify the senses we sever the pleasure of the senses from the needs ofthe character. The ingenuity of man has been dedicated to the solution ofone problem,— how to detach the sensual sweet, the sensual strong, thesensual bright, etc., from the moral sweet, the moral deep, the moral fair;that is, again, to contrive to cut clean off this upper surface so thin as toleave it bottomless; to get a one end, without an other end. The soul says,Eat; the body would feast. The soul says, The man and woman shall be Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 163
  12. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editorone flesh and one soul; the body would join the flesh only. The soul says,Have dominion over all things to the ends of virtue; the body would havethe power over things to its own ends. The soul strives amain to live and work through all things. Itwould be the only fact. All things shall be added unto it, power, pleasure,knowledge, beauty. The particular man aims to be somebody; to set upfor himself; to truck and higgle for a private good; and, in particulars, toride that he may ride; to dress that he may be dressed; to eat that he mayeat; and to govern, that he may be seen. Men seek to be great; they wouldhave offices, wealth, power, and fame. They think that to be great is toget only one side of nature,— the sweet, without the other side,— thebitter. Steadily is this dividing and detaching counteracted. Up to thisday it must be owned no projector has had the smallest success. Theparted water reunites behind our hand. Pleasure is taken out of pleasantthings, profit out of profitable things, power out of strong things, themoment we seek to separate them from the whole. We can no morehalve things and get the sensual good, by itself, than we can get an insidethat shall have no outside, or a light without a shadow. “Drive out naturewith a fork, she comes running back.” Life invests itself with inevitable conditions, which the unwiseseek to dodge, which one and another brags that he does not know,brags that they do not touch him;— but the brag is on his lips, theconditions are in his soul. If he escapes them in one part they attack himin another more vital part. If he has escaped them in form and in theappearance, it is because he has resisted his life and fled from himself,and the retribution is so much death. So signal is the failure of allattempts to make this separation of the good from the tax, that theexperiment would not be tried,— since to try it is to be mad,— but forthe circumstance that when the disease began in the will, of rebellion andseparation, the intellect is at once infected, so that the man ceases to seeGod whole in each object, but is able to see the sensual allurement of an164 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  13. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itobject and not see the sensual hurt; he sees the mermaid’s head but notthe dragon’s tail, and thinks he can cut off that which he would havefrom that which he would not have. “How secret art thou who dwellestin the highest heavens in silence, O thou only great God, sprinkling withan unwearied providence certain penal blindnesses upon such as haveunbridled desires!” The human soul is true to these facts in the painting of fable, ofhistory, of law, of proverbs, of conversation. It finds a tongue inliterature unawares. Thus the Greeks called Jupiter, Supreme Mind; buthaving traditionally ascribed to him many base actions, they involuntarilymade amends to Reason by tying up the hands of so bad a god. He ismade as helpless as a king of England. Prometheus knows one secretwhich Jove must bargain for; Minerva, another. He cannot get his ownthunders; Minerva keeps the key of them: Of all the gods, I only know the keys That ope the solid doors within whose vaults His thunders sleep. A plain confession of the in-working of the All and of its moralaim. The Indian mythology ends in the same ethics; and indeed it wouldseem impossible for any fable to be invented and get any currency whichwas not moral. Aurora forgot to ask youth for her lover, and though soTithonus is immortal, he is old. Achilles is not quite invulnerable; forThetis held him by the heel when she dipped him in the Styx and thesacred waters did not wash that part. Siegfried, in the Nibelungen, is notquite immortal, for a leaf fell on his back whilst he was bathing in theDragon’s blood, and that spot which it covered is mortal. And so italways is. There is a crack in every thing God has made. Always it wouldseem there is this vindictive circumstance stealing in at unawares eveninto the wild poesy in which the human fancy attempted to make boldholiday and to shake itself free of the old laws,— this back-stroke, thiskick of the gun, certifying that the law is fatal; that in nature nothing canbe given, all things are sold. Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 165
  14. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editor This is that ancient doctrine of Nemesis, who keeps watch in theUniverse and lets no offense go unchastised. The Furies they said areattendants on Justice, and if the sun in heaven should transgress his paththey would punish him. The poets related that stone walls and ironswords and leathern thongs had an occult sympathy with the wrongs oftheir owners; that the belt which Ajax gave Hector dragged the Trojanhero over the field at the wheels of the car of Achilles, and the swordwhich Hector gave Ajax was that on whose point Ajax fell. Theyrecorded that when the Thasians erected a statue to Theogenes, a victorin the games, one of his rivals went to it by night and endeavored tothrow it down by repeated blows, until at last he moved it from itspedestal and was crushed to death beneath its fall. This voice of fable has in it somewhat divine. It came fromthought above the will of the writer. That is the best part of each writerwhich has nothing private in it; that is the best part of each which hedoes not know; that which flowed out of his constitution and not fromhis too active invention; that which in the study of a single artist youmight not easily find, but in the study of many you would abstract as thespirit of them all. Phidias it is not, but the work of man in that earlyHellenic world that I would know. The name and circumstance ofPhidias, however convenient for history, embarrasses when we come tothe highest criticism. We are to see that which man was tending to do ina given period, and was hindered, or, if you will, modified in doing, bythe interfering volitions of Phidias, of Dante, of Shakespeare, the organwhereby man at the moment wrought. Still more striking is the expression of this fact in the proverbs ofall nations, which are always the literature of Reason, or the statements ofan absolute truth without qualifications. Proverbs, like the sacred booksof each nation, are the sanctuary of the Intuitions. That which thedroning world, chained to appearances, will not allow the realist to say inhis own words, it will suffer him to say in proverbs withoutcontradiction. And this law of laws, which the pulpit, the senate and thecollege deny, is hourly preached in all markets and all languages by flights166 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  15. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itof proverbs, whose teaching is as true and as omnipresent as that of birdsand flies. All things are double, one against another.— Tit for tat; an eyefor an eye; a tooth for a tooth; blood for blood; measure for measure;love for love.— Give, and it shall be given you.— He that watereth shallbe watered himself.— What will you have? quoth God; pay for it andtake it.— Nothing venture, nothing have.— Thou shalt be paid exactlyfor what thou hast done, no more, no less.— Who doth not work shallnot ear.— Harm watch, harm catch.— Curses always recoil on the headof him who imprecates them.— If you put a chain around the neck of aslave, the other end fastens itself around your own.— Bad counselconfounds the adviser.— The devil is an ass. It is thus written, because it is thus in life. Our action isovermastered and characterized above our will by the law of nature. Weaim at a petty end quite aside from the public good, but our act arrangesitself by irresistible magnetism in a line with the poles of the world. A man cannot speak but he judges himself. With his will oragainst his will he draws his portrait to the eye his companions by everyword. Every opinion reacts on him who utters it. It is a thread-ballthrown at a mark, but the other end remains in the thrower’s bag. Or,rather, it is a harpoon thrown at the whale, unwinding, as it flies, a coil ofcord in the boat, and, if the harpoon is not good, or not well thrown, itwill go nigh to cut the steersman in twain or to sink the boat. You cannot do wrong without suffering wrong. “No man hadever a point of pride that was not injurious to him,” said Burke. Theexclusive in fashionable life does not see that he excludes himself fromenjoyment, in the attempt to appropriate it. The exclusionist in religiondoes not see that he shuts the door of heaven on himself, in striving toshut out others. Treat men as pawns and nine-pins and you shall suffer aswell as they. If you leave out their heart, you shall lose your own. The Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 167
  16. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editorsenses would make things of all persons; of women, of children, of thepoor. The vulgar proverb, “I will get it from his purse or get it from hisskin,” is sound philosophy. All infractions of love and equity in our social relations arespeedily punished. They are punished by Fear. Whilst I stand in simplerelations to my fellow-man, I have no displeasure in meeting him. Wemeet as water meets water, or as two currents of air mix, with perfectdiffusion and interpenetration of nature. But as soon as there is anydeparture from simplicity and attempt at halfness, or good for me that isnot good for him, my neighbor feels the wrong; he shrinks from me asfar as I have shrunk from him; his eyes no longer seek mine; there is warbetween us; there is hate in him and fear in me. All the old abuses in society, the great and universal and the pettyand particular, all unjust accumulations of property and power, areavenged in the same manner. Fear is an instructor of great sagacity andthe herald of all revolutions. One thing he always teaches, that there isrottenness where he appears. He is a carrion crow, and though you seenot well what he hovers for, there is death somewhere. Our property istimid, our laws are timid, our cultivated classes are timid. Fear for ageshas boded and mowed and gibbered over government and property. Thatobscene bird is not there for nothing. He indicates great wrongs whichmust be revised. Of the like nature is that expectation of change which instantlyfollows the suspension of our voluntary activity. The terror of cloudlessnoon, the emerald of Polycrates, the awe of prosperity, the instinct whichleads every generous soul to impose on itself tasks of a noble asceticismand vicarious virtue, are the tremblings of the balance of justice throughthe heart and mind of man. Experienced men of the world know very well that it is best topay scot and lot as they go along, and that a man often pays dear for a168 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  17. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itsmall frugality. The borrower runs in his own debt. Has a man gained anything who has received a hundred favors and rendered none? Has hegained by borrowing, through indolence or cunning, his neighbor’swares, or horses, or money? There arises on the deed the instantacknowledgment of benefit on the one part and of debt on the other;that is, of superiority and inferiority. The transaction remains in thememory of himself and his neighbor; and every new transaction altersaccording to its nature their relation to each other. He may soon come tosee that he had better have broken his own bones than to have ridden inhis neighbor’s coach, and that “the highest price he can pay for a thing isto ask for in.” A wise man will extend this lesson to all parts of life, and knowthat it is always the part of prudence to face every claimant and pay everyjust demand on your time, your talents, or your heart. Always pay; forfirst or last you must pay your entire debt. Persons and events may standfor a time between you and justice, but it is only a postponement. Youmust pay at last your own debt. If you are wise you will dread aprosperity which only loads you with more. Benefit is the end of nature.But for every benefit which you receive, a tax is levied. He is great whoconfers the most benefits. He is base,— and that is the one base thing inthe universe,— to receive favors and render none. In the order of naturewe cannot render benefits to those from whom we receive them, or onlyseldom. But the benefit we receive must be rendered again, line for line,deed for deed, cent for cent, to somebody. Beware of too much goodstaying in your hand. It will fast corrupt and worm worms. Pay it awayquickly in some sort. Labor is watched over by the same pitiless laws. Cheapest, saysthe prudent, is the dearest labor. What we buy in a broom, a mat, awagon, a knife, is some application of good sense to a common want. Itis best to pay in your land a skillful gardener, or to buy good senseapplied to gardening; in your sailor, good sense applied to navigation; inthe house, good sense applied to cooking, sewing, serving; in your agent,good sense applied to accounts and affairs. So do you multiply yourpresence, or spread yourself throughout your estate. But because of the Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 169
  18. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editordual constitution of things, in labor as in life there can be no cheating.The thief steals from himself. The swindler swindles himself. For the realprice of labor is knowledge and virtue, whereof wealth and credit aresigns. These signs, like paper money, may be counterfeited or stolen, butthat which they represent, namely, knowledge and virtue, cannot becounterfeited or stolen. These ends of labor cannot be answered but byreal exertions of the mind; and in obedience to pure motives. The cheat,the defaulter, the gambler, cannot extort the benefit, cannot extort theknowledge of material and moral nature which his honest care and painsyield to the operative. The law of nature is, Do the thing, and you shallhave the power; but they who do not the thing have not the power. Human labor, through all its forms, from the sharpening of astake to the construction of a city or an epic, is one immense illustrationof the perfect compensation of the universe. Everywhere and always thislaw is sublime. The absolute balance of Give and Take, the doctrine thatevery thing has its price, and if that price is not paid, not that thing butsomething else is obtained, and that it is impossible to get anythingwithout its price, is not less sublime in the columns of a ledger than inthe budgets of states, in the laws of light and darkness, in all the actionand reaction of nature. I cannot doubt that the high laws which each mansees ever implicated in those processes with which he is conversant, thestern ethics which sparkle on his chisel-edge, which are measured out byhis plumb and foot-rule, which stand as manifest in the footing of theshop-bill as in the history of a state,— do recommend to him his trade,and though seldom named, exalt his business to his imagination. The league between virtue and nature engages all things toassume a hostile front to vice. The beautiful laws and substances of theworld persecute and whip the traitor. He finds that things are arrangedfor truth and benefit, but there is no den in the wide world to hide arogue. Commit a crime, and the earth is made of glass. There is no suchthing as concealment. Commit a crime, and it seems as if a coat of snowfell on the ground, such as reveals in the woods the track of everypartridge and fox and squirrel and mole. You cannot recall the spokenword, you cannot wipe out the foot-track, you cannot draw up the170 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  19. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itladder, so as to leave no inlet or clew. Always some damningcircumstances transpires. The laws and substances of nature, water,snow, wind, gravitation, become penalties to the thief. On the other hand the law holds with equal sureness for all rightaction. Love, and you shall be loved. All love is mathematically just, asmuch as the two sides of an algebraic equation. The good man hasabsolute good, which like fire turns every thing to its own nature, so thatyou cannot do him any harm; but as the royal armies sent againstNapoleon, when he approached cast down their colors and from enemiesbecame friends, so do disasters of all kinds, as sickness, offense, poverty,prove benefactors. Winds blow and waters roll Strength to the brave and power and deity, Yet in themselves are nothing. The good are befriended even by weakness and defect. As noman had ever a point of pride that was not injurious to him, so no manhad ever a defect that was not somewhere made useful to him. The stagin the fable admired his horns and blamed his feet, but when the huntercame, his feet saved him, and afterwards, caught in the thicket, his hornsdestroyed him. Every man in his lifetime needs to thank his faults. As noman thoroughly understands a truth until first he has contended againstit, so no man has a thorough acquaintance with the hindrances or talentsof men until he has suffered from the one and seen the triumph of theother over his own want of the same. Has he a defect of temper thatunfits him to live in society? Thereby he is driven to entertain himselfalone and acquire habits of self-help; and thus, like the wounded oyster,he mends his shell with pearl. Our strength grows out of our weakness. Not until we arepricked and stung and sorely shot at, awakens the indignation which armsitself with secret forces. A great man is always willing to be little. Whilsthe sits on the cushion of advantages, he goes to sleep. When he is Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 171
  20. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editorpushed, tormented, defeated, he has a chance to learn something; he hasbeen put on his wits, on his manhood; he has gained facts; learns hisignorance; is cured of the insanity of conceit; has got moderation and realskill. The wise man always throws himself on the side of his assailants. Itis more his interest than it is theirs to find his weak point. The woundcicatrizes and falls off from him like a dead skin and when they wouldtriumph, lo! he has passed on invulnerable. Blame is safer than praise. Ihate to be defended in a newspaper. As long as all that is said is saidagainst me, I feel a certain assurance of success. But as soon as honiedwords of praise are spoken for me I feel as one that lies unprotectedbefore his enemies. In general, every evil to which we do not succumb isa benefactor. As the Sandwich Islander believes that the strength andvalor of the enemy he kills passes into himself, so we gain the strength ofthe temptation we resist. The same guards which protect us from disaster, defect andenmity, defend us, if we will, from selfishness and fraud. Bolts and barsare not the best of our institutions, nor is shrewdness in trade a mark ofwisdom. Men suffer all their life long under the foolish superstition thatthey can be cheated. But it is as impossible for a man to be cheated byany one but himself, as for a thing to be and not to be at the same time.There is a third silent party to all our bargains. The nature and soul ofthings takes on itself the guaranty of the fulfillment of every contract, sothat honest service cannot come to loss. If you serve an ungratefulmaster, serve him the more. Put God in your debt. Every stroke shall berepaid. The longer the payment is withholden, the better for you; forcompound interest on compound interest is the rate and usage of thisexchequer. The history of persecution is a history of endeavors to cheatnature, to make water run up hill, to twist a rope of sand. It makes nodifference whether the actors be many or one, a tyrant or a mob. A mobis a society of bodies voluntarily bereaving themselves of reason andtraversing its work. The mob is man voluntarily descending to the natureof the beast. Its fit hour of activity is night. Its actions are insane, like itswhole constitution. It persecutes a principle; it would whip a right; it172 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  21. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itwould tar and feather justice, by inflicting fire and outrage upon thehouses and persons of those who have these. It resembles the prank ofboys, who run with fire-engines to put out the ruddy aurora streaming tothe stars. The inviolate spirit turns their spite against the wrongdoers.The martyr cannot be dishonored. Every lash inflicted is a tongue offame; every prison a more illustrious abode; every burned book or houseenlightens the world; every suppressed or expunged word reverberatesthrough the earth from side to side. The minds of men are at lastaroused; reason looks out and justifies her own and malice finds all herwork in vain. It is the whipper who is whipped and the tyrant who isundone. Thus do all things preach the indifferency of circumstances. Theman is all. Every thing has two sides, a good and an evil. Every advantagehas its tax. I learn to be content. But the doctrine of compensation is notthe doctrine of indifferency. The thoughtless say, on hearing theserepresentations,— What boots it to do well? there is one event to goodand evil; if I gain any good I must pay for it; if I lose any good I gainsome other; all actions are indifferent. There is a deeper fact in the soul than compensation, to wit, itsown nature. The soul is not a compensation, but a life. The soul is.Under all this running sea of circumstance, whose waters ebb and flowwith perfect balance, lies the aboriginal abyss of real Being. Existence, orGod, is not relation or a part, but the whole. Being is the vast affirmative,excluding negation, self-balanced, and swallowing up all relations, partsand times within itself. Nature, truth, virtue, are the influx from thence.Vice is the absence or departure of the same. Nothing, Falsehood, mayindeed stand as the great Night or shade on which as a background theliving universe paints itself forth; but no fact is begotten by it; it cannotwork, for it is not. It cannot work any good; it cannot work any harm. Itis harm inasmuch as it is worse not to be than to be. We feel defrauded of the retribution due to evil acts, because thecriminal adheres to his vice and contumacy and does not come to a crisis Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 173
  22. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editoror judgment anywhere in visible nature. There is no stunning confutationof his nonsense before men and angels. Has he therefore outwitted thelaw? Inasmuch as he carries he malignity and the lie with him he so fardecreases from nature. In some manner there will be a demonstration ofthe wrong to the understanding also; but, should we not see it, thisdeadly deduction makes square the eternal account. Neither can it be said, on the other hand, that the gain ofrectitude must be bought by any loss. There is no penalty to virtue; nopenalty to wisdom; they are proper additions of being. In a virtuousaction I properly am;in a virtuous act I add to the world; I plant intodeserts conquered from Chaos and Nothing and see the darknessreceding on the limits of the horizon. There can be no excess to love,none to knowledge, none to beauty, when these attributes are consideredin the purest sense. The soul refuses all limits. It affirms in man always anOptimism, never a Pessimism. His life is a progress, and not a station. His instinct is trust. Ourinstinct uses “more” and “less” in application to man, always of thepresence of the soul, and not of its absence; the brave man is greater thanthe coward; the true, the benevolent, the wise, is more a man and notless, than the fool and knave. There is therefore no tax on the good ofvirtue, for that is the incoming of God himself, or absolute existence,without any comparative. All external good has its tax, and if it camewithout desert or sweat, has no root in me, and the next wind will blow itaway. But all the good of nature is the soul’s, and may be had if paid forin nature’s lawful coin, that is, by labor which the heart and the headallow. I no longer wish to meet a good I do not earn, for example to finda pot of buried gold, knowing that it brings with it new responsibility. Ido not wish more external goods,— neither possessions, nor honors, norpowers, nor persons. The gain is apparent; the tax is certain. But there isno tax on the knowledge that the compensation exists and that it is notdesirable to dig up treasure. Herein I rejoice with a serene eternal peace. Icontract the boundaries of possible mischief. I learn the wisdom of St.Bernard, “Nothing can work me damage except myself; the harm that I174 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  23. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itsustain I carry about with me, and never am a real sufferer but by myown fault.” In the nature of the soul is the compensation for the inequalitiesof condition. The radical tragedy of nature seems to be the distinction ofMore and Less. How can Less not feel the pain; how not feel indignationor malevolence towards More? Look at those who have less faculty, andone feels sad and knows not well what to make of it. Almost he shunstheir eye; he fears they will upbraid God. What should they do? It seemsa great injustice. But see the facts nearly and these mountainousinequalities vanish. Love reduces them as the sun melts the iceberg in thesea. The heart and soul of all men being one, this bitterness of His andMine ceases. His is mine. I am my brother and my brother is me. If I feelovershadowed and outdone by great neighbors, I can get love; I can stillreceive; and he that loveth maketh his own the grandeur he loves.Thereby I make the discovery that my brother is my guardian, acting forme with the friendliest designs, and the estate I so admired and envied ismy own. It is the eternal nature of the soul to appropriate and make allthings its own. Jesus and Shakespeare are fragments of the soul, and bylove I conquer and incorporate them in my own conscious domain. Hisvirtue,— is not that mine? His wit,— if it cannot be made mine, it is notwit. Such also is the natural history of calamity. The changes whichbreak up at short intervals the prosperity of men are advertisements of anature whose law is growth. Evermore it is the order of nature to grow,and every soul is by this intrinsic necessity quitting its whole system ofthings, its friends and home and laws and faith, as the shellfish crawls outof its beautiful but stony case, because it no longer admits of itsgrowth,and slowly forms a new house. In proportion to the vigor of theindividual these revolutions are frequent, until in some happier mind theyare incessant and all worldly relations hang very loosely about him,becoming as it were a transparent fluid membrane through which theliving form is always seen, and not, as in most men, an induratedheterogeneous fabric of many dates and of no settled character, in whichthe man is imprisoned. Then there can be enlargement, and the man of Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 175
  24. Dr. Robert C. Worstell, editorto-day scarcely recognizes the man of yesterday. And such should be theoutward biography of man in time, a putting off of dead circumstancesday by day, as he renews his raiment day by day. But to us, in our lapsedestate, resting, not advancing, resisting, not cooperating with the divineexpansion, this growth comes by shocks. We cannot part with our friends. We cannot let our angels go. Wedo not see that they only go out that archangels may come in. We areidolaters of the old. We do not believe in the riches of the soul, in itsproper eternity and omnipresence. We do not believe there is any forcein to-day to rival or re-create that beautiful yesterday. We linger in theruins of the old tent where once we had bread and shelter and organs,nor believe that the spirit can feed, cover, and nerve us again. We cannotagain find aught so dear, so sweet, so graceful. But we sit and weep invain. The voice of the Almighty saith, “Up and onward forevermore!”We cannot stay amid the ruins. Neither will we rely on the New; and sowe walk ever with reverted eyes, like those monsters, who lookbackwards. And yet the compensations of calamity are made apparent to theunderstanding also, after long intervals of time. A fever, a mutilation, acruel disappointment, a loss of wealth, a loss of friends, seems at themoment unpaid loss, and unpayable. But the sure years reveal the deepremedial force that underlies all facts. The death of a dear friend, wife,brother, lover, which seemed nothing but privation, somewhat laterassumes the aspect of a guide or genius; for it commonly operatesrevolutions in our way of life, terminates an epoch of infancy or of youthwhich was waiting to be closed, breaks up a wonted occupation, or ahousehold, or style of living, and allows the formation of new ones morefriendly to the growth of character. It permits or constrains theformation of new acquaintances and the reception of new influences thatprove of the first importance to the next years; and the man or womanwho would have remained a sunny garden-flower, with no room for itsroots and too much sunshine for its head, by the falling of the walls andthe neglect of the gardener is made the banyan of the forest, yielding176 Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  25. Money: How To Get It - How To Keep Itshade and fruit to wide neighborhoods of men. Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com 177
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  27. Go Thunk Yourself!TM - the bookWhat do Napoleon Hill, Norman Vincent Peale, Dale Carnegie, andStephen Covey all have in common?They all THUNK the same way. They each discovered the same basicsecrets behind wealth, success, and fame - and became wealthy,successful and famous. You can, too!This books simple 14-day program allows you to recreate your own life,just the way you want it to be!All you have to do is invest some time each day to read these simplechapters and do the exercises. You can learn these secrets and start takingcontrol over your own life, to start achieving the riches, fame and successyouve always dreamed of. Dreams CAN BECOME Reality!Hardcover edition is also available.Also visit GoThunkYourself.com for more books by this author. Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  28. Books in the Go Thunk Yourself Reference Library: THINK, THANK, THUNK! There are three authors who have completely changed your world - Charles F. Haanel - "The Master Key System" Wallace D. Wattles - "The Science of Getting Rich" Napoleon Hill - "Think and Grow Rich"Every major self-help author and every true success on this planet all usethe same underlying system. I cover this in "Go Thunk Yourself". Thissystem as actual and underlying all that exists in our world - which is aswe create it. From them, you can work out the solution to anyproblem - if you apply what they teach to yourself and your dreams. Secrets Between Your Ears There is a way to re-program yourself to achieve the greatness you know is there. Contained in this volume are three masterworks: "Wake Up and Live!" by Dorothea Brande, "The Secret of the Ages" by Robert Collier, and "Self-Mastery and the Practice of Autosuggestion" byEmile Coue and C. Harry Brooks.Within this text are the simple techniques (known and used by NapoleonHill, author of "Think and Grow Rich") that will make it possible toacquire any amount of money, degree of happiness, and quality of healthyou desire. Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com
  29. Getting Rich, Being Well, Being Great If you are familiar with the perennial bestselling classic, The Science of Getting Rich, you may or may not know that Wallace D. Wattles also wrote two other works which were meant to be following texts. You can be rich, but you can also be healthy and youcan also be great. Read this book and you can be well on your way togetting everything you want in life. By reading and comparing thesethree books in one volume, you will see how there are basic, underlyinglaws and principles at work in this universe - and you can put them towork for you. The Complete Thomas Troward Collection Thomas Troward is perhaps the single most influential writer in self-help. Napoleon Hill (Think and Grow Rich), Charles F. Haanel (The Master Key System) and many other authors either quote Troward directly or have been influenced by those who studied Trowards lectures and books.This is a collection of his complete works, with a combined table ofcontents and easy-to-read format. A reference no professional or casualstudent of self-help should be without.This is a key reference behind the successful Go Thunk Yourself! series. View more resources at http://stores.lulu.com/robertworstell Visit http://onlinemillionaireplan.com

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