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An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences
 

An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences

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An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences

An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences

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    An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences Presentation Transcript

    • An Analysis of the Educational Impact of Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences
      By Richard X. Thripp
      April 16, 2011
      EDF 1005Prof. John Connor
      Daytona State College
    • Howard Gardner
    • Howard Gardner
      Howard Gardner:
      Is a Harvard psychologist
      A well-known proponent and researcher in multiple intelligences
      Says overall intelligence is divided into eight independent categories
    • Overview
      The 8 categories are:
      Linguistic intelligence
      Logical-mathematical intelligence
      Musical intelligence
      Spatial intelligence
      Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence
      Interpersonal intelligence
      Intrapersonal intelligence
      Naturalist intelligence
    • Overview
      The 8 categories are: (examples)
      Linguistic intelligence (poets)
      Logical-mathematical intelligence (scientists)
      Musical intelligence (violinists)
      Spatial intelligence (sculptors)
      Bodily-kinesthetic intelligence (dancers)
      Interpersonal intelligence (therapists)
      Intrapersonal intelligence (spiritualists)
      Naturalist intelligence (biologists)
    • Implications
      Our school system, textbooks, and standardized tests tend to focus on linguistic and logical-mathematical intelligence while ignoring the six other intelligences
    • Implications
      The traditional model says students who are talented in one area of school tend to be talented in all the others, but the theory of multiple intelligences challenges tradition
    • Implications
      Some students are better at logical-mathematics than others, while others may specialize in pattern matching (naturalist intelligence) or some other area
    • Implications
      Field trips and sports programs may be more important than we realize, because they encourage bodily-kinesthetic intelligence and on-foot learning
    • Applications
      By dividing students into groups for team projects, teachers can foster interpersonal intelligence, and, indirectly, intrapersonal intelligence
    • Applications
      Ability grouping places students of similar aptitude and achievement together so they receive instruction targeted to their specialty
    • Applications
      Within-class ability grouping divides students in one class into groups, whereas between-class ability grouping divides all students in a whole grade into classes
    • Applications
      In middle and high school, tracking places students into classes on the basis of ability and career goals (an academic “track”), hopefully developing their preferred intelligences
    • The Intelligences
    • Linguistic Intelligence
      Characterized by a sensitivity to language arts, the meaning of words, their order, and inflections
      Examples:
      Poet, linguist
    • Logical-Mathematical Intelligence
      Characterized by the ability to process long strings of information, complex reasoning, and recognize patterns in the world
      Examples: Scientist, mathematician
    • Musical Intelligence
      Characterized by a sensitivity to pitch, melody, tone, rhythm, harmony, timbre, and other elements of music
      Examples:
      Composer, violinist
    • Spatial Intelligence
      Characterized by accurate three-dimensional perception of the world and the ability to control perceptions
      Examples:
      Sculptor, navigator
    • Bodily-Kinesthetic Intelligence
      Characterized by a fine-tuned ability to use the body and to handle objects
      Examples:
      Dancer, athlete
    • Interpersonal Intelligence
      Characterized by an understanding of interpersonal relations an and understanding of others
      Examples: Therapist, salesperson
    • Intrapersonal Intelligence
      Characterized by access to one’s own “feeling life,” and an understanding of one’s self
      Examples: Philosopher, self-aware individual
    • Naturalist Intelligence
      Characterized by the ability to recognize similarities and differences in the physical world
      Examples: Biologist, anthropologist
    • Criticisms
      While M.I.-theory is popular among educators, some critics say it has not been validated by research.
      Others disagree that the different domains, such as spatial and naturalist, qualify as different forms of intelligences.
      Either way, students need experience with each dimension to develop different skills and be well-rounded.
    • Conclusion
      Gardner’s theory of multiple intelligences is a useful tool for explaining specialties and student achievement.