UCLAx C2C Class 2

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A slide show from the second class of a course titled Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems, which is part of the Certificate for Global Sustainability at the University of California Los Angeles Extension program.

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UCLAx C2C Class 2

  1. 1. c 2c Cradle to Cradle Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension V5018 January 14, 2010 Kevin Foster O’Donnell fundamentalist @ threadcollaborative
  2. 2. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension transition template industrial age ecology energy society economy green greener greenest sustainable age
  3. 3. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension transition template industrial age ecology energy society economy green greener greenest sustainable age
  4. 4. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension
  5. 5. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Energy Consumption per SF source: 1995 Energy Information Administration 60 50 53 40 36 30 27 20 19 Average for all commercial 15 buildings - 13.4 kWh/sf 10 12 8 7 5 4 0 les ice e ce g y n se nt us in bl ar io ca ou gio ffi Sa rv dg m at C O Va eh se Se uc Lo li od lth Re As ar Ed & Fo ea W ic ail H bl t Re Pu
  6. 6. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Energy Consumption per SF source: 1995 Energy Information Administration 60 40 kWh/sf greater 53 than the average 50 40 400% 36 30 27 20 19 Average for all commercial 15 buildings - 13.4 kWh/sf 10 12 8 7 5 4 0 s e e e g y n se nt us le bl ar ic c io in ca ou io ffi Sa rv m dg at C ig O Va Se eh se uc lth Lo l d Re As ar Ed o ea l& Fo W H lic i ta b Re Pu
  7. 7. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension U.S. Largest Retailers source: 2008 Corporate web sites & Hoovers Retailer Stores Total SF Area in Chain Wal-Mart 4,091 923,136,390 Home Depot 2,215 287,950,000 The Kroger Company 3,645 144,483,350 Costco Wholesale 513 68,229,000 Target Corporation 1,537 295,202,368 Sears Holdings 3,800 342,000,000 Walgreens Company 5,858 82,012,000 Lowe’s Companies 1,425 165,300,000 CVS Corporation 6,200 71,300,000 Safeway Incorporated 1,755 80,730,000 31,039 2,460,343,108
  8. 8. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension 2,460,343,108 sf x 13.4 kWh insanity
  9. 9. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Alaska Delaware Hawaii Idaho Maine 32,968,597 mWh Montana Nebraska Nevada Nevada New Hampshire New Mexico 32,500,630 mWh North Dakota Rhode Island South Dakota Utah Vermont West Virginia Wyoming
  10. 10. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension World Energy source: 2005 Energy Information Administration of World Energy 24% used by U.S. buildings 17%
  11. 11. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Energy Conservation source: 2008 Energy Efficiency in California Report, California Energy Commission 14,000 12,000 United States 2005 Differences = 5,300kWh/yr 10,000 = $165/capita 8,000 6,000 California 4,000 2,000 0 1960 1962 1964 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 Per Capita Electricity Sales (not including self-generation) (kWh/person) (2006 to 2008 are forecast data)
  12. 12. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Embodied Energy source: Cole and Kernan Material Btu/lb. Material Btu/lb. Baled Straw 6,499 Mineral Wool Insulation 395,365 Stone (local) 21,685 Glass 430,564 Concrete Block 24,388 Fiberglass Insulation 820,524 Concrete 35,199 Steel 866,534 Lumber 67,696 PVC 1,895,615 Brick 67,696 Copper 1,911,832 Gypsum Wallboard 165,185 Paint 2,526,565 Particle Board 216,665 Linoleum 3,141,298 Aluminum (recycled) 219,367 Polystyrene Insulation 3,168,389 Steel (recycled) 240,990 Carpet (synthetic) 4,007,832 Plywood 281,658 Aluminum 6,147,204
  13. 13. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Embodied Energy source: Cole and Kernan Material Btu/lb. Material Btu/lb. Baled Straw 6,499 Mineral Wool Insulation 395,365 Stone (local) 21,685 Glass 430,564 Concrete Block 24,388 Fiberglass Insulation 820,524 Concrete 35,199 Steel 866,534 Lumber 67,696 PVC 1,895,615 Brick 67,696 Copper 1,911,832 Gypsum Wallboard 165,185 Paint 2,526,565 Particle Board 216,665 Linoleum 3,141,298 Aluminum (recycled) 219,367 Polystyrene Insulation 3,168,389 Steel (recycled) 240,990 Carpet (synthetic) 4,007,832 Plywood 281,658 Aluminum 6,147,204
  14. 14. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Embodied Energy source: Cole and Kernan:
  15. 15. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension
  16. 16. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Environmental Facts Exposure Size: 1 Hour (60 minutes) Exposures Per Day: 8 Amount Per Exposure Toxic Score 100 PPM VOC Paint 124.05 Stains 37.44 Adhesives 67.30 Coatings 0 Formaldehyde MDF Panels 105.41 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles 59.72 Carcinogens 22 Hormone Disruptors 15 srotpursiD enomroH 51 snegonicraC 22 seliT gnilieC citsuocA 27.95 slenaP FDM 14.501 edyhedlamroF
  17. 17. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Common Material Pollutants Pollutant Uses Health Risk VOC Building materials, textiles, furniture, Hormone disruption, finishes cleaning products, dust autism, neurotoxicity Formaldehyde Building materials - wood products Cancer Mercury Fluorescent light fixtures, thermostats Reproductive damage PVC Building materials, finishes, upholstery Endocrine disruption, cancer Flame Retardants Building materials, furniture Reproductive damage
  18. 18. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Life Cycle Assessment Input Output Source Extraction Raw Materials Atmospheric Emissions Raw Materials Manufacturing Waterborne Wastes Fuel Packaging & Transport Solid Wastes Energy Use & Maintenance Co-products Recycle or Waste Other Releases
  19. 19. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Life Cycle Assessment Bamboo Input Output Source Extraction Raw Materials Atmospheric Emissions Raw Materials Manufacturing Waterborne Wastes Fuel Packaging & Transport Solid Wastes Energy Use & Maintenance Co-products Recycle or Waste Other Releases
  20. 20. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Life Cycle Assessment Vinyl Input Output Source Extraction Raw Materials Atmospheric Emissions Raw Materials Manufacturing Waterborne Wastes Fuel Packaging & Transport Solid Wastes Energy Use & Maintenance Environmental Hazards Recycle or Waste Landfill Hazards
  21. 21. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension January Introduction Transition Template Community Engagement Jason Panneton Visit Project Introductions Eliminate Toxins Ray C. Anderson Event Required Reading Profile Presentations 1
  22. 22. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension February Waste Reduction InterfaceFLOR Field Trip Story of Stuff Resource Preservation John Stein/Kirei USA Visit Required Reading Profile Presentations 2 Life Cycle Analysis MBDC Visit
  23. 23. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension March Steelcase Field Trip Required Reading Profile Presentations 3 Closed Loop Systems AIGA Visit Required Reading Disassembly Project
  24. 24. UCLA Extension Winter 2010 Disassembly Project V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems Class 2 UCLA Extension Instructor Information Disassembly Project Kevin O’Donnell, fundamentalist and founder @ threadcollaborative contact: teaching@threadcollaborative.com Project Overview Students will bring to class a found object of their choice. They will disassemble it completely and catalogue all of its components, identifying all of the various types of materials encountered. They will then delve into the research phase, where they will gather detailed information on these materials. Students will then present a report on what the materials are and what is required for each of them to be manufactured. In the process, they will learn about embodied energy, embodied water, biological nutrients, technical nutrients, and many other topics. Students will also be asked to envision future lives for all components and materials. A final presentation of disassembly, documentation, and research will occur on the last day of class in front of a visiting review group. Phases The project tasks will be separated in the following phases: • Discovery: Students will seek out an everyday object, preferably one they use routinely without thinking deeply about its manufacture or make up. The size of the object is not critical. More important is the complexity of the manufactured components. An object with few parts or a limited number of different materials will not yield enough research and future potential. • Disassembly: Students will carefully disassemble the object. It will be critical to break down the object into all its individual component parts. • Catalogue: Students will catalogue and document, in detail, the disassembly process and all the disassembled parts of the object. The manner of documentation is up to each individual student, but the chosen method must be easily communicated and/or shared with other students. • Trace: Since few companies today manufacture every individual component of their products, each student will be required to trace the history of each part. It will be very important to do a trace of all materials used. Students must trace the material back to its most likely point of origin. A key part of cradle to cradle thinking is understanding that some manufactured components have future technological value, and others can serve as biological nutrients. Students will research the technological or biological potential of all parts. • Analysis: Students will be asked to explore the uses of the individual components. Are they unique to this object or product? Are they standard components found in other objects or products? • Proposal for Revision: A critical aspect of cradle to cradle thinking is determining how materials can have additional lives by being reused, reclaimed, and salvaged. To understand how this might happen, students will evaluate each part and components of their object and envision other potential uses or functions. Since some currently manufactured components cannot have a second live and are potentially hazardous, their disposal or treatment must also be explored.
  25. 25. UCLA Extension Winter 2010 Profile Presentations 1 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems Class 2 – Materials & Resources UCLA Extension Instructor Information Profile Presentation 1 Kevin O’Donnell, fundamentalist and founder @ threadcollaborative materials & resources contact: teaching@threadcollaborative.com Project Overview Most designers only have a passing knowledge of material or product background. To understand how to implement cradle to cradle strategies you need to have more detailed knowledge of how materials are harvested, extracted, manipulated, processed, and manufactured. Students will be asked to select a material/resource, perform research, analyze historical importance, and deliver their findings in detail before the class as a presentation. Students are encouraged to select based on personal interest and connection to current work. Suggested Materials & Resources No two students may research the same material/resource. They will be chosen on a “first come, first served” basis. The earlier you select your material/resource, the better. The following are suggestions for potential materials/ resources: • Aluminum • Glass • Steel • Water • Wood • Paper • Plastic • Silicone • Oil • Coal • Fertilizer • Leather • Ceramic • Ink • Adhesives • Paint • Stone • Rubber • Cloth • Meat Feel free to suggest or select your own. Critical Dates The following dates are important to keep in mind: • January 21, 2010: students must select material/resource • January 28, 2010: presentation to class and delivery of research Presentation Requirements • Students must present, in front of the class, a 10 minute synopsis of their research. • Presentation material should include history, development of use, context, reasons for increased use, key figures, key advancements in technology that changed the material/resource use, current uses, and more.
  26. 26. ➜ ➜ questions?
  27. 27. Cradle to Cradle Local Cultivation
  28. 28. cul-ti-vate (verb) = to grow or tend = to nurture or foster = to seek the acquaintance of = make friends with
  29. 29. •Community Support •Integrity •Sustainability •Excellent Quality •Dedication •Respect
  30. 30. reflection + incorporation + repurpose
  31. 31. reflection of the community
  32. 32. stylized map of west side santa cruz
  33. 33. stylized forest pattern
  34. 34. tactile coastline illustration
  35. 35. surf culture influences
  36. 36. kite inspired aisle markers
  37. 37. incorporation of local materials & artisans
  38. 38. Fireclay
  39. 39. fire clay bone yard seconds
  40. 40. Johnson Art
  41. 41. Communal Fire
  42. 42. repurpose of materials
  43. 43. reclaimed wine bottles
  44. 44. sail cloth lanterns
  45. 45. Q&A
  46. 46. thank you archred15@yahoo.com
  47. 47. Community Engagement
  48. 48. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Industrial Transition from farms to factories
  49. 49. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Industrial Transition from farms to factories
  50. 50. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Industrial Transition from farms to factories
  51. 51. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Industrial Transition from country to city
  52. 52. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Industrial Transition from country to city
  53. 53. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Industrial Transition from country to city
  54. 54. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Industrial Transition from country to city
  55. 55. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Globalization extraction close to use
  56. 56. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Globalization extraction close to use
  57. 57. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Globalization the next new labor market
  58. 58. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Creating a Mass Market print
  59. 59. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Creating a Mass Market point to point
  60. 60. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Creating a Mass Market radio
  61. 61. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Creating a Mass Market television
  62. 62. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Creating a Mass Market world wide web
  63. 63. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Familiarity people and companies
  64. 64. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food the 100 mile challenge
  65. 65. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food 100 mile challenge
  66. 66. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food growth of the farmer’s market
  67. 67. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food fast food
  68. 68. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food meat production
  69. 69. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food chicken production
  70. 70. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food potato production
  71. 71. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food wheat production
  72. 72. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food plastic production
  73. 73. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food paper production
  74. 74. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food California agriculture
  75. 75. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food California agriculture field crops - 9% livestock & poultry - 29% floriculture - 11% fruits & nuts - 29% vegetables & melons - 22%
  76. 76. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food California agriculture
  77. 77. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Food is local really local 1500 miles
  78. 78. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Landscape LA water usage residential - 68% commercial - 17% government - 7% non-revenue - 4% industrial - 4%
  79. 79. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Landscape LA water usage Mono Lake LA aqueduct Owens Lake Colorado River Aqueduct California Aqueduct Colorado River LA metro area
  80. 80. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Landscape LA water usage toilet - 11% washer - 8% misc. outdoor - 10% leaks - 6% shower - 7% faucet - 6% dishwasher - 1% other - 2% landscaping - 49%
  81. 81. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Landscape desert
  82. 82. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Landscape arid Mediterranean
  83. 83. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Local Landscape climate appropriate landscape
  84. 84. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Homogeneous fast food
  85. 85. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Homogeneous general merchandise and grocery
  86. 86. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Homogeneous electronics
  87. 87. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Homogeneous home improvement
  88. 88. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Homogeneous community gathering
  89. 89. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Community Engagement local research
  90. 90. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Community Engagement local research
  91. 91. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Community Engagement local research
  92. 92. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Community Engagement
  93. 93. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Community Engagement
  94. 94. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension
  95. 95. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension
  96. 96. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Waste Reduction
  97. 97. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension
  98. 98. Class 2 V5018 Cradle to Cradle: Closed Loop Systems UCLA Extension Class Participation - Required Reading Cradle to Cradle
  99. 99. ➜ ➜ questions?

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