2008 Hadassah

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A presentation titled Buildings & Climate Change delivered at the Hadassah international conference held in Los Angeles, CA

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2008 Hadassah

  1. 1. Buildings & Climate Change Hadassah National Convention July 14, 2008 Kevin Foster O’Donnell
  2. 2. 5 miles 5 miles
  3. 3. 7926 miles
  4. 4. Some energy is radiated back into space by the earth in the form of infrared waves Most of this radiation is absorbed by the Earth and warms it
  5. 5. visible light waves CO 2
  6. 6. visible light waves CO 2 infrared heat waves
  7. 7. Some energy is radiated back into space by the earth in Some of this outgoing the form of infrared waves infrared radiation is trapped by the earth’s atmosphere and warms it Most of this radiation is absorbed by the Earth and warms it
  8. 8. 28 million 67 million 97 million 154 million miles miles miles miles Mercury Venus Earth Mars -300 to 800˚ F 900˚ F -128 to 136˚ F -115 to 32˚ F 332˚ F 57˚ F -67˚ F
  9. 9. Kilimanjaro Africa 1970 2000
  10. 10. Kilimanjaro 2005
  11. 11. Portage Glacier Alaska 1914 2004 Photos: NOAA Photo Collection and Gary Braasch – WorldViewOfGlobalWarming.org
  12. 12. Boulder Glacier Glacier National Park 1932 1988 Photos: George Grant, Glacier National Archive; Jerry DeSanto, national Park Service
  13. 13. Upsala Glacier Argentina 1928 Photo: © Greenpeace/De Agostini/Beltra 2004
  14. 14. Tschierva Glacier
  15. 15. Rhone Glacier
  16. 16. Rhone Glacier
  17. 17. Adamello- Mandron Glacier
  18. 18. Quelccaya Ice Cap Peru, 1977 Lonnie G. Thompson
  19. 19. 600 500 400 Today’s CO2 Concentration 300 CO2 Concentration 280 260 240 CO2 [ppmv] 220 200 180 Temp. in F° 600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 Age (yr BP)
  20. 20. 600 After 45 More Years of current energy use patterns 500 400 300 CO2 Concentration 280 260 240 CO2 [ppmv] 220 200 180 Temp. in F° 600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000 200,000 100,000 0 Age (yr BP)
  21. 21. Global Temperature Since 1860 Combined annual land air and sea surface temperatures from 1860-2003 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.2 0 -0.2 -0.4 -0.6 -0.8 1860 1880 1900 1920 1940 1960 1980 2000 Source: Climatic Research Unit, University of East Anglia and Hadley Centre, The Met Office, UK http://www.knmi.nl/voorl/nader/globaltemperaturein2003thirdwarmest.htm
  22. 22. The Ten Hottest Years on Record 2005 2007 1998 2002 2003 2006 2004 2001 1990 1999 Nine have occurred in the last ten years Source: NASA/GISS
  23. 23. Switzerland August 23, 2005 AP Photo/Keystone, Sigi Tischler
  24. 24. Mumbai, India July 26, 2005 • 37 inches of rain in 24 hours • Water levels reached seven feet • The most any Indian city has ever received in one day • The death toll in western India reached 1,000 Source: CNN.com 8/1/2005
  25. 25. AP Photo/Dietmar Stiplovsek
  26. 26. India Flooding August 11, 2006 Photo: Reuters/ Amit Dave
  27. 27. 90% of the City underwater. India Flooding Over 4 million people left homeless. August 11, 2006 350 people killed. Photo: Reuters/ Amit Dave
  28. 28. Neighboring Provinces, China Summer, 2005 Photo: Rueters/China News Photo
  29. 29. Amazon River Brazil, October 2005 Photo: Daniel Beltra/Greenpeace
  30. 30. Photo: Laister/Hulton Archive/Getty Images
  31. 31. 1980
  32. 32. 2007
  33. 33. Warwick Vincent - Center for Northern Studies, Laval University
  34. 34. © Bryon and Cherry Alexander
  35. 35. Alaska Winter Tundra Travel Days 1970-2002 250 200 150 100 50 0 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 © 2004 ACIA
  36. 36. Larsen Ice Shelf January 31, 2002 MODIS images courtesy of NASA's Terra satellite
  37. 37. Larsen Ice Shelf February 17, 2002 MODIS images courtesy of NASA's Terra satellite
  38. 38. Larsen Ice Shelf February 23, 2002 MODIS images courtesy of NASA's Terra satellite
  39. 39. Larsen Ice Shelf March 5, 2002 MODIS images courtesy of NASA's Terra satellite
  40. 40. Photo courtesy Peter Essick/National Geographic Society
  41. 41. Source: Reuters
  42. 42. Photo: Manuel Jung, www.sternklar.ch
  43. 43. Italy’s Project to Protect Venice
  44. 44. The Netherlands’ Levees
  45. 45. U.S. Protection for New Orleans
  46. 46. “The maps of the world will have to be redrawn.” Sir David King, U.K. Science Advisor, in regard to what is happening in Greenland
  47. 47. “…the countries with the ! fewest resources are likely to bear the greatest burden of climate change in terms of loss of life and relative effect on investment and economy.” Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Source: Poverty and Climate Change, 2005, World Bank et al.
  48. 48. Population Growth Throughout History World Population 9 2050 – 9.1 Billion 8 7 2006 – 6.5 Billion 6 5 Billions 4 3 1945 – 2.3 Billion 2 1 1776 – 1 Billion First Modern Humans 1492 – 500 Million 0 160,000 100,000 10,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 1 1,000 2,000 2,150 B.C. B.C. B.C. B.C. B.C. B.C. B.C. B.C. B.C. B.C. A.D. A.D. A.D. A.D. Source: United Nations
  49. 49. Global Population 8% 6% Population (Billions) 4% Developing Nations 2% Developed Nations 0% 1975 2000 2025 Source: United Nations Population Division, 2000
  50. 50. 3 Considerations 1 Reduce Carbon Emissions 2 Rethink Waste and Resource Use 3 Create Healthier Environments
  51. 51. Global CO2 Emissions 1751–2002 8000 7000 6000 5000 Million Metric Tons 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 1750 1800 1850 1900 1950 2000
  52. 52. industry transportation buildings 800 700 Metric Tons of Carbon (millions) 600 500 400 300 25% 200 100 0 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  53. 53. industry transportation buildings 800 700 Metric Tons of Carbon (millions) 600 27% 500 400 300 25% 200 100 0 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  54. 54. industry transportation buildings 800 48% 700 Metric Tons of Carbon (millions) 600 27% 500 400 300 25% 200 100 0 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 64 66 68 70 72 74 76 78 80 82 84 86 88 90 92 94 96 98 00 02 source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  55. 55. Buildings - 48% Residential Commercial Industrial 21% 17% 10% source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  56. 56. US Energy Production 54% of American adults think electricity is produced by a combination of solar, nuclear and hydropower. (2006 Roper Report) source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  57. 57. US Energy Production 54% of American adults think electricity is produced by a combination of solar, nuclear and hydropower. (2006 Roper Report) oil - 2% hydro - 4% solar/wind - 1% gas - 18% coal - 55% nuclear - 20% source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  58. 58. US Energy Production 54% of American adults think electricity is produced by a combination of solar, nuclear and hydropower. (2006 Roper Report) oil - 2% hydro - 4% solar/wind - 1% 75% gas - 18% Fossil Fuels coal - 55% nuclear - 20% source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  59. 59. In 1979, the US energy producing landscape was dramatically altered.
  60. 60. Three Mile Island Nuclear Accident In 1979, the US energy producing landscape was dramatically altered.
  61. 61. Growth in Fuel Use oil renewables natrual gas nuclear coal 900 750 600 Growth (billion kWh) 450 300 150 0 -150 -300 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 97 97 98 99 00 01 02 03 source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  62. 62. Building Energy Consumption How does a typical building use energy? other - 10% heating - 29% equipment - 13% refrigeration - 3% cooking - 1% cooling - 7% lighting - 22% ventilation - 11% water heating - 4% source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  63. 63. Building Energy Consumption other - 10% heating - 29% equipment - 13% refrigeration - 3% 69% cooking - 1% cooling - 7% lighting - 22% ventilation - 11% water heating - 4% source: 2005 US Energy Information Administration
  64. 64. CFL LED
  65. 65. Energy Consumption/SF 60 50 53 40 36 30 27 20 19 Average for all commercial 15 buildings - 13.4 kWh/sf 10 12 8 7 5 4 0 les ice e ce g y n se nt us in bl ar io ca ou gio ffi Sa rv dg m at C O Va eh se Se uc Lo li od lth Re As ar Ed od Fo ea W ic H Fo bl Pu source: 1995 US Energy Information Administration
  66. 66. Energy Consumption/SF 60 40 kWh/sf greater 53 than the average 50 40 400% 36 30 27 20 19 Average for all commercial 15 buildings - 13.4 kWh/sf 10 12 8 7 5 4 0 les ice e ce g y n se nt us in bl ar io ca ou gio ffi Sa rv dg m at C O Va eh se Se uc Lo li od lth Re As ar Ed od Fo ea W ic H Fo bl Pu source: 1995 US Energy Information Administration
  67. 67. Retailer Stores Total SF Area in Chain Wal-Mart 4,091 923,136,390 Home Depot 2,215 287,950,000 The Kroger Company 3,645 144,483,350 Costco Wholesale 513 68,229,000 Target Corporation 1,537 295,202,368 Sears Holdings 3,800 342,000,000 Walgreens Company 5,858 82,012,000 Lowe’s Companies 1,425 165,300,000 CVS Corporation 6,200 71,300,000 Safeway Incorporated 1,755 80,730,000 31,039 2,460,343,108
  68. 68. 2,460,343,108 sf x 13.4 kWh/sf = insanity
  69. 69. 32,968,597 mWh Nevada 32,500,630 mWh
  70. 70. Alaska Delaware Hawaii Idaho Maine Montana Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Mexico North Dakota Rhode Island South Dakota Utah Vermont West Virginia Wyoming
  71. 71. 3 Considerations 1 Reduce Carbon Emissions 2 Rethink Waste and Resource Use 3 Create Healthier Environments
  72. 72. Human consumption surpassed the regenerative capacity of the planet around 1980, and we are now pushing its systems well beyond their ability to heal. National Academy of Sciences
  73. 73. Industrial Age Business Model Virtually endless supply of cheap raw materials. Abundant cheap energy. Plentiful cheap labor that’s easy to replace. The ability to externalize costs.
  74. 74. 37% of all landfill refuse is generated by building related construction source: EPA
  75. 75. 1 31 source: Ray Anderson, CEO of Interface Carpet
  76. 76. TRASH
  77. 77. TRASH
  78. 78. Sourcing Store Design Fabrication Installation Opening End of Life Waste Waste Waste
  79. 79. Rapidly Renewable Reduce Sustainable Harvest New Technologies Salvage Reuse Reclamation Recycled Content Recycle Store Sourcing Design Fabrication Installation Opening Re-Source End of Life
  80. 80. 3 Considerations 1 Reduce Carbon Emissions 2 Rethink Waste and Resource Use 3 Create Healthier Environments
  81. 81. Environmental Facts Exposure Size: 1 Hour (60 minutes) Exposures Per Day: 8 Amount Per Exposure Toxic Score 100 PPM VOC Paint 124.05 Stains 37.44 Adhesives 67.30 Coatings 0 Formaldehyde MDF Panels 105.41 Acoustic Ceiling Tiles 59.72 Carcinogens 22 Hormone Disruptors 15 srotpursiD enomroH 51 snegonicraC 22 seliT gnilieC citsuocA 27.95 slenaP FDM 14.501 edyhedlamroF
  82. 82. Pollutant Uses Health Risk VOC Building materials, textiles, furniture, Hormone disruption, finishes cleaning products, dust autism, neurotoxicity Formaldehyde Building materials - wood products Cancer Mercury Fluorescent light fixtures, thermostats Reproductive damage VCT Building materials, finishes, upholstery Endocrine disruption Flame Retardants Building materials, furniture Reproductive damage
  83. 83. Profit Planet ECOLogic Design Place
  84. 84. Questions? Thank you.

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