Visualising the user experience

  • 4,079 views
Uploaded on

Design visualisations are information products that communicate how new products or services will work. The way they do this is by showing the new product or service in action, using a combination of …

Design visualisations are information products that communicate how new products or services will work. The way they do this is by showing the new product or service in action, using a combination of text and pictures to tell the story of the future user experience.

More in: Design , Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Real helpful!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Hello, I’ve designed UIs with Balsamiq Mockups for websites and web telephony applications, as well as worked on requirements definition for a student project here. So those recall me lots of things... I think that I still miss feedback from from the actual end-user during that UI/UX design phase....

    Thank you for having posted online these good slides.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
4,079
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
279
Comments
2
Likes
23

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Visualising design Darren Menachemson
  • 2. the problem Humans’ ability to make a rational This is not decision is inversely proportional to the complexity of the your audience. information upon which the decision is based.
  • 3. the problem “You can’t eat an elephant in one So why do we bite” do this? - Some Guy “We need a smaller elephant.” - Me “That’s like 200 pages of high- level design. Um, do you know what high-level actually means?” - Anon
  • 4. Defining the “design” bit Strategic design Business architecture Interaction design Information architecture Aesthetic
  • 5. the solution What is a visualisation? Shows the future solution in operation Scope is as big as it needs to be Narrative is led by an experience set Uses visual language
  • 6. the solution What is a visualisation Shows the future solution in operation Construction complete Deployment complete System in use Jan Jul Jan Jul Time Scope is as big as it needs to be Narrative is led by an experience set Uses visual language
  • 7. the solution What is a visualisation Shows the future solution in operation Scope is as big as it needs to be people things channels process location Time & messaging Systems & sequence tech Narrative is led by an experience set Uses visual language
  • 8. the solution What is a visualisation Shows the future solution in operation Scope is as big as it needs to be Narrative is led by an experience set Uses visual language
  • 9. the solution What is a visualisation Shows the future solution in operation Scope is as big as it needs to be Narrative is led by an experience set Uses visual language From http://www.kwikpoint.com
  • 10. Reuse factor Who are they for? Bridesmaid Execs – decision making dress Stakeholders – consultations Users – design walkthroughs Other project teams – shared vision Comms, training, etc, etc Jeans
  • 11. Some examples… Simple one-pager…tells a story in a single page, describing key people, systems, processes, UI features, business outcomes. Don’t just tell the design decision makers – show them, warts and all. Get beyond the hype and the confusion!
  • 12. Some examples… Simple one-pager…tells a story in a single page, describing key people, systems, processes, UI features, business outcomes. Don’t just tell the design decision makers – show them, warts and all. Get beyond the hype and the confusion!
  • 13. Some examples… Full scenario spelling out the design, including: • High-level overview • Persona • Stepped process • User impact lenses
  • 14. Some examples… Comic book, focussing on a user experience. From http://www.boxesandarrows.com
  • 15. Some examples… Hand drawn systems, post-it messages and play-actor actors… nager Service user Client ma Lo-fi works too! CRM Register Inbox
  • 16. How much detail is enough? A. As much as is needed (sorry) Simple, Somewhat complex, Very complex, highly detailed. unambiguous. detailed, informative. Some Specialist analysis required. understanding and analysis required Very simple Very complex
  • 17. Principles for getting the right pitch… • Show what you need ‘em to know • Generate the right discussion • Let them walk away with clarity Discuss business outcome Abstract an Demonstrate a interaction strategic risk set eventuating Show a service desk interaction Examine the user’s outcome Show a message flow Highlight a bit of UI
  • 18. The process of visualising Understand the context Learn about the context, systems, users, and the desired business outcomes Find the senior sponsor Understand the issues and solve them, review regularly, escalate, add value Pick the right brains Facilitated workshops, interviews, project meetings, documentation, user discovery Partner with the team Build strong relationships, share the work, build a sense of contribution and ownership Have a deadline Get something out EARLY, and an event Senior stakeholder commitment review, iterate, repeat v. important
  • 19. Visual ideas Know your “style” Branding, recognition, consistency Gather your resources (photos, icons, abstract people etc) Have techniques for dealing with issues (breakouts, post-its, zooms, relationships/groupings)
  • 20. A visualisation workbench Source images Edit images Layout visualisation www.istockphoto.com Photoshop/Illustrator PowerPoint Others: • Adobe Flash • Plasq Comic Life • Etc
  • 21. A visualiser ! ! The offspring of a talented BA, a passionate user experience architect and a mad information designer (process mapping + design) ! ! Very strong communicator (including storytelling, facilitation) ! ! Able to facilitate and build relationships with senior people ! An understanding of IT concepts and business Hard to find, sometimes hard to hold onto. architecture ! Preferably people and project management experience ! Ability to help lead and shape solutions, championing the user and the business outcome
  • 22. The “maybe we should visualise it” phase The “Oh, hai, The “I’ve got to The “I’ve got real The “All these hard The “At last! The nice to meet do a WHAT?” work to do and questions and nasty right conversation” you” phase phase we’re drawing issues. I wish it were all phase piccies?” phase still ambiguous!” phase
  • 23. Drawbacks Time-intensive Specialist skills Sounds “funky” until you see it The fun doesn’t end after the event
  • 24. What it avoids/provides • Cultural/semantic misunderstanding • “I didn’t think that’s what I agreed to” • Early review at concept stage • Contextualising issues • Shaping the right solution
  • 25. Try it… Choose one of these • Last meal you cooked… • How you booked your last flight… • Your last big shop at a supermarket… Sketch up a rich visualisation showing the user experience, process, channels, technology, data etc – either in-line or layered (60 seconds) Walk the person next to you through it (60 seconds)
  • 26. Stories can bind complexity, because stories are fundamental to our humanity.