progressivePLAY
visualeducationinthedigitalage




                                 project by Thomas Reynolds & Jaclyn St...
What is play?
play [pley] n.
 spontaneous activity as a means
of developing physical, intellectual,
       emotional, social and
       ...
grossmotor
    finemotor
      sensory
       social
    functional
   constructive
       object
  music/dance
   imagina...
Educator
  Socialogist
   Biologist
 Psychologist
Anthropologist
Mathematician
Educator
  Socialogist
   Biologist
 Psychologist
Anthropologist
Mathematician

Designhat
Why is play
important?
Playisimportanttocreativity.
Creativityisimportanttoeducation.
 Educationisimportanttodesign.
“From the moment the child enters the classroom,
 each step in his education is seen as a progressive
building block, ulti...
Maslow’s HierarchyofNeeds




                         physical
          food, shelter, water, warmth, health
security
safety, stability, work, protection


               physical
food, shelter, water, warmth, health
social needs
family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy


                           security
      ...
esteem from others
     recognition, appreciation, responsibility, reputation

                         social needs
famil...
self- esteem
             achievment, competence, confidence


                     esteem from others
     recognition, a...
self-determination
                 freedom, integrity, creativity

                        self- esteem
             achi...
self-transcendence
                        helping, others
                        self determine


                      ...
self-transcendence
                        helping, others
                        self determine


                      ...
self-transcendence
                        helping, others
                        self determine


                      ...
ChildDependencyonAdult




  infant
infant   toddler
infant   toddler   preschool
infant   toddler   preschool   school age
infant   toddler   preschool   school age   teenage
infant   toddler   preschool   school age   teenage   young adult
infant   toddler   preschool   school age   teenage   young adult   adult
toddlerscan:   count to 5

               point & name many colors

               begin to understand order & process

  ...
How do
children learn?
colorandshapeassociation
infant
infant   12 months
infant   12 months   toddler
infant   12 months   toddler   pre school
RectilinearShapeBreakdown
CurvilinearShapeBreakdown
kindergarten
Friedrich Froebel
Froebel’sphilosophy:
       1. free self activity

           2. creativity

      3. social participation

      4. motor...
What about
outside of school?
childcaregivers




       parent     other
under 2




parent     other
under 2   under 2




parent               other
3-6

 under 2   under 2



                     3-6




parent               other
3-6

 under 2                 under 2



                                   3-6




parent                             oth...
“Theplaygroundhasbecomesosafethatitnolongerallowschildrentotakeonchallenges
             thatwillfurthereducationalandemot...
OFFI            Children’sFactory
Scott Klinker
Naef
Kurt Naef
theoriginalsoundtrack
Ricardo Seola




                “Educationaltoysstimulatechildren’scognitiveabilities”
teddybearband
Phillippe Starck
Children and media
“Fouryearoldsarethepeoplewhoaresoakingmost
    deeplyinthecurrentmediaenvironment.
                                      ”...
The average American Child watches 3-4 hours of television per day.
                    American Academy of Pediatrics



...
Iloveyou,youloveme!
WejustfiguredoutBlue’sClues!
How can education
 be more playful?
Please Touch Museum
imagination playground in a box
san francisco children’s garden
KaBOOM!
It starts with a playground.


            A great place to play within walking distance of every child in America.
the d*school
progressivePLAY
visualeducationinthedigitalage
advisors:
Annaprofessor and folklorist
associate
          Beresin

Caleb Marshall
KaBOOM! project senior manager




Nora...
questions:
questions:
How are children being challenged creatively today?
questions:
        How are children being challenged creatively today?

How can a child build on the skills they developed...
questions:
        How are children being challenged creatively today?

How can a child build on the skills they developed...
questions:
        How are children being challenged creatively today?

How can a child build on the skills they developed...
questions:
        How are children being challenged creatively today?

How can a child build on the skills they developed...
questions:
        How are children being challenged creatively today?

How can a child build on the skills they developed...
Y
   progressivePLA challenges the current application of
  fundamental skills in the digital age. Today, forced visual
st...
Recommendedtimespent




          10hrs   sleeping
6hrs    school




10hrs   sleeping
3hrs    television



6hrs    school




10hrs   sleeping
2hrs    eating

3hrs    television


6hrs    school




10hrs   sleeping
playing

2hrs    eating

3hrs    television


6hrs    school




10hrs   sleeping
playallofthetime
Progressive Playfinal
Progressive Playfinal
Progressive Playfinal
Progressive Playfinal
Progressive Playfinal
Progressive Playfinal
Progressive Playfinal
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Final Presentation for progressive Play project by Jackie Starker and Thomas Reynolds

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Progressive Playfinal

  1. 1. progressivePLAY visualeducationinthedigitalage project by Thomas Reynolds & Jaclyn Starker
  2. 2. What is play?
  3. 3. play [pley] n. spontaneous activity as a means of developing physical, intellectual, emotional, social and moral capacities.
  4. 4. grossmotor finemotor sensory social functional constructive object music/dance imaginative roughandtumble dramatic games/sports
  5. 5. Educator Socialogist Biologist Psychologist Anthropologist Mathematician
  6. 6. Educator Socialogist Biologist Psychologist Anthropologist Mathematician Designhat
  7. 7. Why is play important?
  8. 8. Playisimportanttocreativity. Creativityisimportanttoeducation. Educationisimportanttodesign.
  9. 9. “From the moment the child enters the classroom, each step in his education is seen as a progressive building block, ultimately forming the whole person, in the emergence from childhood to adult. All focus is on the needs of the child. ” Dr. Maria Montessori physician, educator, philosopher, humanitarian
  10. 10. Maslow’s HierarchyofNeeds physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  11. 11. security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  12. 12. social needs family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  13. 13. esteem from others recognition, appreciation, responsibility, reputation social needs family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  14. 14. self- esteem achievment, competence, confidence esteem from others recognition, appreciation, responsibility, reputation social needs family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  15. 15. self-determination freedom, integrity, creativity self- esteem achievment, competence, confidence esteem from others recognition, appreciation, responsibility, reputation social needs family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  16. 16. self-transcendence helping, others self determine self-determination freedom, integrity, creativity self- esteem achievment, competence, confidence esteem from others recognition, appreciation, responsibility, reputation social needs family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  17. 17. self-transcendence helping, others self determine self-determination freedom, integrity, creativity self- esteem achievment, competence, confidence esteem from others recognition, appreciation, responsibility, reputation social needs family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  18. 18. self-transcendence helping, others self determine self-determination freedom, integrity, creativity self- esteem achievment, competence, confidence esteem from others recognition, appreciation, responsibility, reputation social needs progressivePLAY family, friends, community, love, belonging, affection, intimacy security safety, stability, work, protection physical food, shelter, water, warmth, health
  19. 19. ChildDependencyonAdult infant
  20. 20. infant toddler
  21. 21. infant toddler preschool
  22. 22. infant toddler preschool school age
  23. 23. infant toddler preschool school age teenage
  24. 24. infant toddler preschool school age teenage young adult
  25. 25. infant toddler preschool school age teenage young adult adult
  26. 26. toddlerscan: count to 5 point & name many colors begin to understand order & process draw a person with detail draw, name & describe pictures recognize patterns among objects
  27. 27. How do children learn?
  28. 28. colorandshapeassociation
  29. 29. infant
  30. 30. infant 12 months
  31. 31. infant 12 months toddler
  32. 32. infant 12 months toddler pre school
  33. 33. RectilinearShapeBreakdown
  34. 34. CurvilinearShapeBreakdown
  35. 35. kindergarten Friedrich Froebel
  36. 36. Froebel’sphilosophy: 1. free self activity 2. creativity 3. social participation 4. motor expression
  37. 37. What about outside of school?
  38. 38. childcaregivers parent other
  39. 39. under 2 parent other
  40. 40. under 2 under 2 parent other
  41. 41. 3-6 under 2 under 2 3-6 parent other
  42. 42. 3-6 under 2 under 2 3-6 parent other 2000 Census Report
  43. 43. “Theplaygroundhasbecomesosafethatitnolongerallowschildrentotakeonchallenges thatwillfurthereducationalandemotionaldevelopment. ” Susan G. Solomon curator, writer, and speaker
  44. 44. OFFI Children’sFactory Scott Klinker
  45. 45. Naef Kurt Naef
  46. 46. theoriginalsoundtrack Ricardo Seola “Educationaltoysstimulatechildren’scognitiveabilities”
  47. 47. teddybearband Phillippe Starck
  48. 48. Children and media
  49. 49. “Fouryearoldsarethepeoplewhoaresoakingmost deeplyinthecurrentmediaenvironment. ” Clay Shirky writer and NYU professor
  50. 50. The average American Child watches 3-4 hours of television per day. American Academy of Pediatrics 1hr 1hr 1hr 1hr
  51. 51. Iloveyou,youloveme!
  52. 52. WejustfiguredoutBlue’sClues!
  53. 53. How can education be more playful?
  54. 54. Please Touch Museum
  55. 55. imagination playground in a box
  56. 56. san francisco children’s garden
  57. 57. KaBOOM! It starts with a playground. A great place to play within walking distance of every child in America.
  58. 58. the d*school
  59. 59. progressivePLAY visualeducationinthedigitalage
  60. 60. advisors: Annaprofessor and folklorist associate Beresin Caleb Marshall KaBOOM! project senior manager Nora Donaldson KaBOOM! project senior manager Catherine Zrinko elementary school teacher and mother of two
  61. 61. questions:
  62. 62. questions: How are children being challenged creatively today?
  63. 63. questions: How are children being challenged creatively today? How can a child build on the skills they developed in early childhood?
  64. 64. questions: How are children being challenged creatively today? How can a child build on the skills they developed in early childhood? Could there be a connection between media and physical play?
  65. 65. questions: How are children being challenged creatively today? How can a child build on the skills they developed in early childhood? Could there be a connection between media and physical play? During what activities do kids have control and spontaneity?
  66. 66. questions: How are children being challenged creatively today? How can a child build on the skills they developed in early childhood? Could there be a connection between media and physical play? During what activities do kids have control and spontaneity? Where is the fun after preschool?
  67. 67. questions: How are children being challenged creatively today? How can a child build on the skills they developed in early childhood? Could there be a connection between media and physical play? During what activities do kids have control and spontaneity? Where is the fun after preschool?
  68. 68. Y progressivePLA challenges the current application of fundamental skills in the digital age. Today, forced visual stimulation is hindering children’s development of creativity, imagination and collaboration at an early age. Play transpires through all aspects of a child’s life, connecting play and informal education will build upon early fundamental skills.
  69. 69. Recommendedtimespent 10hrs sleeping
  70. 70. 6hrs school 10hrs sleeping
  71. 71. 3hrs television 6hrs school 10hrs sleeping
  72. 72. 2hrs eating 3hrs television 6hrs school 10hrs sleeping
  73. 73. playing 2hrs eating 3hrs television 6hrs school 10hrs sleeping
  74. 74. playallofthetime

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