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Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics
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Adv 206 spring 14 class 16 media basics

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  • So, where would the Chick fil A cows be without billboards? In the advertising communications model, the channel carries the message from the advertiser to the target audience. Without the channel, there is no message delivery. So now we’ll begin a study of media – the message pipeline.First a little housekeeping.
  • First, some help from him.Any body know this guy? Well, he has something to tell us about media.
  • Discuss – the age of the AM jock. What that environment was like. Is there a parallel today?Media is changing. Many people see certain media categories as old and out dated. There are many new consumer media use patterns. Do any come to mind?In addition, our text references the change in media in terms of how media is used in a integrated marketing communications model and the channels-to-contact points. We’ll dive deeper into this in our next class on media. What’s most important here is not whether media is old or new. The important this is the change in how we look at media today.
  • Three sections so far: Advertising, its role and its workings…strategy, planning… and creative.Now we’ll explore another section, Media. Today we’ll look at media basics and topline traditional media and digital mediaNext we’ll cover media planning and bring in an expert media planner and buyer to do a workshop that will help you with the media part of your campaign project.So in the context of media do you think I mean by “A New Creative?”Far more media options now….digital properties, two-way conversations and interactive, IMC creating more opportunities to use media in different ways
  • A new way to use transit. And outdoor as a media category.
  • A tee shirt becomes a new medium
  • A wall becomes a new, creative billboard for a martial arts school.
  • A shelter becomes a vending machine…for what?
  • Oh, this explains it!Media is becoming far more integrated with the creative process. Instead of media being just a passive channel, a featureless conduit for the creative message, media is now becoming active in the delivery of the message.Today we have the opportunity to use media in ways the industry has never done before.
  • And, today, we look at media categories differently. It’s not just the platforms of TV, magazines and online, it’s this:Ask class to define
  • Discuss all threeKeeping this in mind, let’s look at media’s more formal definition.
  • You’ll remember this figure from the book.
  • The print era – ink and print images reproduced as newspapers, magazines and postersThe broadcast era – visual and audio information in the form of radio and tv programsThe digital era – electronic information transmitted through the internet, cable and satellitePrinciple: every technological advance has threatened older media, and every new medium is launched in the footprints of its predecessor media.A more serious shift is occurring now as computers and the internet personalize media.
  • So, what’s the media landscape look like today?Television: network, cable, syndicated, local and Hispanic and other emerging special interest channelsRadio: network, national, local and satellite Newspapers and magazines: consumer, B2B, Sunday, local, ethnic magazines; national, local and ethnic newspapersAnd hundreds of new media forms unavailable just 20 years ago, like game advertising, products placements and branded entertainment (another example of owned media)Let’s take a look now at this big and broad media landscape.
  • So, what’s the media landscape look like today?Television: network, cable, syndicated, local and Hispanic and other emerging special interest channelsRadio: network, national, local and satellite Newspapers and magazines: consumer, B2B, Sunday, local, ethnic magazines; national, local and ethnic newspapersAnd hundreds of new media forms unavailable just 20 years ago, like game advertising, products placements and branded entertainment (another example of owned media)Let’s take a look now at this big and broad media landscape.
  • We’ll start with traditional media – print, broadcast and outdoor.So… What are the advantages of print?
  • We’ll start with traditional media – print, broadcast and outdoor.So… What are the advantages of print?
  • What do you think is special about Newspapers?Remember, often people read newspapers for the ads, e.g. retail ads of the week for groceries, wine, activities and events. And of course there are all those coupon clippers.
  • Newspapers serve a very important function in the media space.What’s happening to newspapers today?
  • What makes magazines special? When would you use magazines?
  • Magazines can provide very targeted exposure. There is a magazine for everything.
  • Let’s define outdoor beyond the billboard. What else falls into the outdoor or out of home category?
  • Why would you use outdoor over other media or in combination.
  • Let’s stay with traditional media but switch to broadcast like radio, TV, movie and video.What do you think are the characteristics of broadcast overall?
  • Let’s stay with traditional media but switch to broadcast like radio, TV, movie and video.What do you think are the characteristics of broadcast overall?
  • So, radio. Do you know her? Cora Thomas, Gospel. What does this suggest to us about the efficacy of radio as a medium?
  • So, radio. Do you know her? Cora Thomas, Gospel. What does this suggest to us about the efficacy of radio as a medium?
  • Now, television. Some people have said that TV is the most powerful medium on the planet. Why? And do you agree?Any questions about “traditional” media.Now on to digital.
  • What is the draw of TV for a brand and a media buyer?Any questions about “traditional” media.Now on to digital.
  • Now let’s examine where it’s going and growing – digital and interactive.Look at all the ways digital plays out as a medium.Why do you think this category of media options is growing?
  • Why are websites and “owned” media attractive to advertisers?
  • Why are websites and “owned” media attractive to advertisers?And in the BtoB space, manufacturer or brand websites are the go-to source for product and application information.
  • Why do you think email is effective – or not!
  • Why do you think email is effective – or not!
  • And the real growth area, and perhaps the most confusing? Why confusing? (Metrics, effectiveness. Facebook’s stock has been on a roller coaster)
  • Why should we consider social media?
  • Publishers/owners create the medium or media. They develop the concept or idea for the medium, build a circulation or listenership and develop a business model that offers advertisers a way to access their audience for a price. Who’s this guy and what did he do?In the late 1970s he conceived the idea for an all-news network. CNN first aired in 1980. In 1985, he bought MGM. In the 1990s he launched the Cartoon Network, TNT and TCM. In 1996, he sold Turner Broadcasting to Time Warner for $7.5 billion dollars and stayed on to run the company’s cable networks. In 2001, Time Warner merged with AOL.Media salespeople work for a magazine or TV station; provide sales kits with information about audience and medium.Media reps or brokers are people/companies who sell space and time for a variety of media, allowing the media buyer to make an entire buy with one order.Media researchers compile audience measurement data, media costs, and availability for various media.Media planners develop the strategic decisions outlined in the media plan, such as where and when to advertise and which type of media to use.Media buyers implement the media plan by contracting for specific amounts of time or space, based on the plan developed by the media planner. Media buying companies specialize in media research, planning, and buying. They may be a spinoff from an advertising agency, and work for a variety of clients.
  • These three categories encompass the fundamentals. In just these three areas we will understand the essence of media, media buying and its importance.
  • This part of our discussion will help you plan for the media part of your campaign project. Between what we cover now and your text, you’ll get the essence of how media professional analyze, evaluate, select and buy media.
  • The goal of the media plan is to reach as many people in the target audience as often as the budget allows.Reach is the percentage of the media audience exposed at least once to the advertiser’s message during a specific timeframe. Example: a Super Bowl spot will reach some 501,000 US households or 1,298,367 people.Frequency is the number of times a person is exposed to an advertisements. You must see/hear an ad three times for it to make an impact.
  • All about the eyeballs.Expressed usually in numbers…thousands and millions typically. How many people have the potential or the opportunity to see, hear or engage in your message.What do you think the exposure potential would be for a billboard on the 405 freeway in LA? Exposure doesn’t equate to readership or viewership. Just because the TV is on doesn’t mean anyone is paying attention to it.
  • One person’s opportunity to be exposed one time to an ad in a specific vehicle. Impressions is a number usually expressed in thousands and millions, even billions. If one 30 second TV spot offers 1,000,000 impressions. How many impressions does 2 30 second spots offer? 2,000,000. Impressions are a function of readership and viewership but impressions only represent opportunities, not a guaranteed audience for your message.Example: online display – pay for impressions but that doesn’t mean people will see the ad or read it.
  • The total number of copies of a magazine, newspaper, etc. sold. In broadcast, this would be total audience or total viewers or listeners.Gross impressions is the ESTIMATION of total impressions across a publication’s total circulation. That includes pass-along readership.So if a newspaper offers one issue impressions of 1,000,000 readers and has a pass-along readership of .5, what are the gross impressions? 1.5 million.
  • You will hear these terms a lot in media…mostly broadcast media. Ratings and share.Ratings. Anybody know what a 20 rating is?CLICK – a measure that converts gross impressions to a percentage of households. It’s shorthand for big gross impression numbers. Share. Who knows what a 10 share is? The percent of views based on the number of sets turned on. Any questions on impressions, gross impressions, circulation, pass-along, ratings and share?
  • You will hear these terms a lot in media…mostly broadcast media. Ratings and share.Ratings. Anybody know what a 20 rating is?CLICK – a measure that converts gross impressions to a percentage of households. It’s shorthand for big gross impression numbers. Share. Who knows what a 10 share is? The percent of views based on the number of sets turned on. Any questions on impressions, gross impressions, circulation, pass-along, ratings and share?
  • IntrusivenessThe ability of a medium to grab attention by being disruptive or unexpected. The more intrusive a medium, the more it can be personalized, but also more costly to use. If a message is too disruptive or irritating, it may not help build a positive brand relationship.
  • Media is a critically important facet of advertising and not just for the obvious reasons.The goal of media planning is to maximize impact while minimizing costs. Ultimately, all decision making comes together in a media plan. Like this.
  • Look at what goes into a media plan. This one cost $40,000 to prepare and consists of many steps.
  • To my mind, there is a major change in how we want media and message. I use a five-pointed star as the model.Relevance – discussthe message and media need to be relevant to me and my interests. I don’t have a lot of time for things that don’t relate to me and what I’m doing.Authenticity – discussI want to be able to trust what I see and here. I value truth and reliability. I don’t want to be fooled.Experiential – discussI don’t want just information and data. I want an experience. This is one reason why games have become a popular medium. But, it’s not just playing a game, it’s the way we can get involved with a brand through interactivity and conversation that creates memorable brand experiences.Access – discussToday we want our information and interactions the way we want it. We want to be able to access what we want at home, at school,in the office and on the fly. Personal – discussWe want our content delivered the way we want it and tuned to our interests. The more personal it is the more valuable it is and the more I’ll trust it, rely on it and, yes, buy it.
  • Media isn’t about TV spots, online video, print ads and website banners. It’s about connecting brands to buyers, pure and simple.
  • Transcript

    • 1. ADVERTISING PRACTICE IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY Discussion 15 Channels of Communication March 27, 2014
    • 2. Name tags and team tags out Cell phones off Campaign project –  Situation Analysis/Persona  Media Plan – Workshop coming up; how to prepare Updated syllabus on BB Exam HOUSEKEEPING
    • 3. Media’s different look and media’s not-so-different look, i.e. traditional views and contemporary The media landscape Fundamentals of media strategy TODAY WE’LL EXPLORE
    • 4. A NEW SECTION. A NEW CREATIVE? Advertising Practice in a Diverse Society
    • 5. MEDIA, MEDIA EVERYWHERE Media/Medium Media vehicles Mass media Broadcast Narrowcast Niche Addressable
    • 6. A NEW CREATIVE?
    • 7. A NEW CREATIVE?
    • 8. A NEW CREATIVE?
    • 9. A NEW CREATIVE?
    • 10. A NEW CREATIVE?
    • 11. A NEW LOOK AT MEDIAPAID, EARNED, OWNED
    • 12. PAID, EARNED, OWNED
    • 13. Technically, what do we mean by media?  Refers to the way – the mode that messages are delivered to target audiences and increasingly, back to brands and among other audience members  The bridge between the advertiser and the audience  The go-between step in the communications model MEDIA, BY THE BOOK
    • 14. Principle: every technological advance has threatened older media, and every new medium is launched in the footprints of its predecessor media. MEDIA IS EVOLVING Print Era Broadcast Era Digital Era
    • 15. THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Up to 200 TV channels in some markets Print is still a strong and viable category There are millions of websites Totally new media forms
    • 16. THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Hundreds of channels in some markets Print is still a strong and viable category There are millions of websites Totally new media forms Totally new media forms
    • 17. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Print Media
    • 18. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Print Media • Newspaper • Magazine • Outdoor • Posters • Inserts Print provides more information, richer imagery, and longer, more in-depth messages than broadcast. Often used to generate cognitive responses. More flexible, less fleeting, more engaging when targeted to special interest audiences. Print can engage senses (sight, touch and smell).
    • 19. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Newspaper
    • 20. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Newspaper Primary function: news; so useful for sales, events, “newsy” advertising. Local, mass media but can target consumer groups. Readership declining especially among youth. 50% of Americans read the newspaper daily. Readers usually older with higher income, education. Can connect national brands to a locale. Use to announce something new and target local markets. ABC, Simmons measures circulation and readership
    • 21. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Magazine
    • 22. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Magazine Over 90% of all US adults read one magazine a month and spend 44 minutes an issue. Targeted content and quality of reproduction is greatest asset. Consumer and business choices: general, biz, vertical biz, women’s, men’s, shelter. Use magazines to target people with special interests. Controlled circulation, uncontrolled. Consider reader profile, geography, editorial. SRDS, ABC, MRI, Simmons, S tarch, Gallup
    • 23. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Outdoor
    • 24. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Outdoor Billboards, balloons, buses, shelters, kiosks, airport displays, on-premise signs. Situational: can target specific people at a specific place, or at a time when they’re most interested. Use as reminder advertising, new product introduction, leverage or counter a routine. Use outdoor to target audiences on the move and to provide directional information. Outdoor effective for “shock value” and high impact – the “big stage” effect.
    • 25. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Broadcast • Radio • TV/video • Movie
    • 26. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Broadcast • Radio • TV/video • Movie Ads typically bought in units of time. Utilizes sight, sound, and motion. Entertaining and informative. Uses emotion to elicit feelings and repetition to intensify memory.
    • 27. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Radio More than 10,000 stations mostly serving local markets: AM, FM, public, cable, satelli te, web; every household has a radio.
    • 28. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Radio More than 10,000 stations mostly serving local markets: AM, FM, public, cable, satelli te, web; every household has a radio. Tightly targeted based on geos and special interest: news, religion, talk, ethnic, music genres. Radio engages the imagination, i.e. drama via “theater of the mind”; more personal. Often an “in-transit” medium. Daypart strategy; audiences by time of day so timing critical. Delivers high frequency through repetition, reminder capabilities; inexpensive.
    • 29. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Television
    • 30. “Traditional” Media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Television Reach!..98% of US homes have one or more sets; network, local, cable, pay. Heavy use by younger demo. Effectiveness determined by program viewership. Highly visual (HDTV, 3D), innovation via DVR, interactive; impactful. Good when action and movement needed. Nielsen measures local and national audiences; HUT measures exposure. Tells stories, engages emotions, creates fantasies, demos how things work or how-to. Brings brand images to life and adds personality. Issues: clutter, waste, zip and zap, irritation.
    • 31. Digital Delta
    • 32. Emerging, digit al media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Digital and interactive Internet, websites, E- mail, banner, display, video, search, soci al. URLs, portals, search engines, netcasting, broadband. E-commerce, information, social, WOM; learning and buying in one. Access to millions of sites, fast, choice, data, exchange of data, youth market. Ultimate niche medium, high selectivity for info and entertainment. Great versatility in ad formats. Brand reminder to visitors, informational and persuasive, drives traffic, default information provider, enables interactivity with brands, people, institutions. Motion, audio, low cost; widgets, apps, superstitials, microsites. Easy to track and measure, reaches people off TV/not reading, can customize/personalize messages, small
    • 33. Emerging, digit al media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Websites
    • 34. Emerging, digit al media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Websites News, advertising, entertainme nt; a mashup medium. Big variety of advertising formats. Selectivity by content, by behavior on site and search history; choice of content delivery, i.e. static, motion Consumers seek them out; can tune in or out. Expenses can be controlled. Fueled by search and offline advertising and promo.
    • 35. Emerging, digit al media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE E-mail
    • 36. Emerging, digit al media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE E-mail Can be very inexpensive and intrusive! Can be highly targeted, but e- mail addresses can be difficult and expensive to get. “House” or customer lists often built over time and can be a rich source of repeat business. Can use for loyalty and reward programs.
    • 37. Emerging, digit al media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Social media
    • 38. Emerging, digit al media THE MEDIA LANDSCAPE Social media Linked social sites, online communities and groups, blogs, micro-blogs, chat rooms. Builds relationships with customers and who they know. Can promote brands, incite engagement. Common interests can enable high levels of targeting and prospecting. Vector to younger markets. Information, opinion, experience, video, preference sharing. Conversations and WOM.
    • 39. MEDIA’S KEY PLAYERS Publishers/Owners Media sales people Media rep/brokers Media researchers Media planners Media buyers Media buying companies and agencies
    • 40. MEDIA FUNDAMENTALS ©MauroNewMedia
    • 41. FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDIA STRATEGY Strategic Media Concepts The Basis for the Buy The Media Plan
    • 42. FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDIA STRATEGY Strategic Media Concepts Mix: The way various types of media are strategically combined to create a certain kind of impact. Platforms: Multichannel and opportunities like: print, broadcast, social media, branded entertainment, video games and guerilla. Targets/audiences: Media planners match the target audience with the audience of a particular medium. Timing: The best time (day, week, months, season, year) to reach the target audience.
    • 43. FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDIA STRATEGY The Basis for the Buy Very important terms to understand and remember
    • 44. A key goal of the media plan is to reach as many people in the target audience as often as the budget allows. REACH AND FREQUENCY Reach is the percentage of the media audience exposed at least once to the advertiser’s message during a specific timeframe. Frequency is the number of times a person is exposed to an advertisement. Generally accepted: you must see/hear an ad at least three times before it can make an impact.
    • 45. EXPOSURE = POTENTIAL How many people have the potential to see, hear or engage in your message. Remember – you are buying access to audiences…eyes, ears and minds.
    • 46. IMPRESSIONS One person’s opportunity to be exposed one time to an ad in one specific vehicle. Think of Impressions as: One – One -- One
    • 47. CIRCULATION AND GROSS IMPRESSIONS The total number of copies of a magazine, newspaper, etc. sold. In broadcast, this would be total audience or total viewers or listeners. Gross impressions is the ESTIMATE of total impressions across a publication’s total circulation. That includes pass-along readership or number of people in a household.
    • 48. RATINGS AND SHARE Ratings is a percentage representing how many households a given program reaches compared to total households. A 20 rating equals 20% of all US households. Share is share of real audience, or the percent of viewers based on the number of TVs or radios turned on. A 10 share means that a given show reaches 10% of all TVs or radios turned on at a given time.
    • 49. RATINGS AND SHARE Remember rating and share by “10 fingers” What does it mean if a TV show has a 20 rating? What does it mean if a TV show has a 40 share?
    • 50. INTRUSIVENESS
    • 51. The Media Plan Media placement is often the largest single cost item in the marketing communications budget, Especially for consumer goods and services. The goal of media planning is to maximize impact while minimizing cost. FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDIA STRATEGY
    • 52. MEDIA PLAN MAKE-UP © NextMark©
    • 53. FUNDAMENTALS OF MEDIA STRATEGY The Media Plan Mix Platforms Audiences Timing
    • 54. ATF THE 5- POINTED STAR Relevance Authenticity Experiential Accessible Personal
    • 55. Media is critically important because it is the link between the advertiser and the consumer. And, it carries the message. Media planning consists of research, analysis, number crunching and intuition. Reach and frequency are the most fundamental planning considerations Media has been called the new creative because of expanding consciousness, options and flexibility KEY TAKEAWAYS
    • 56. Single Most Important Point MEDIA BEGINS AND ENDS WITH THE AUDIENCE.
    • 57. Read Chapter 11 and 13 in the text Read headlines www.adage.com Prepare for your media workshop Optional homework – worth two extra points in your bank  Choose one media platform/channel (e.g. TV, radio, mobile, internet/websites, print, etc.) and analyze (e.g. strengths and weaknesses) it according to the “Five- pointed star”  Not more than one page BE PREPARED
    • 58. A one-month media schedule consists of the following:  One magazine with a total circulation of 1,000  Three TV programs reach households of 1,000 each  A highway billboard with 5,000 vehicle pass-bys  A radio program with 1,000 listeners How many exposures in this media plan? 10,000 SOLVE THIS:
    • 59. A two-month (8 week) media schedule consists of the following:  One monthly magazine with a total circulation of 1,000 and a pass-along of .5  One TV program/week reaching 1,000 households, each with an average of 2.3 people/household  A highway billboard with 5,000 vehicle pass-bys/month, each vehicle having an average of 1.8 people  A radio program with 1,000 listeners per week How many gross impressions in this media plan? 47,400 SOLVE THIS:

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