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Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
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Hume
Hume
Hume
Hume
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    • 1. HumeAn Empiricist
    • 2. HumeAll knowledge comes from experience
    • 3. Hume All knowledge comes from experienceAll experience comes from the senses images from http://www.cerebromente.org.br/n16/mente/senses1.html
    • 4. Hume All knowledge comes from experienceAll experience comes from the senses images from http://www.create-a-healthy-flexible-body.com/images/pain-relief-using-the-mind.jpg
    • 5. Hume All knowledge comes from experience GoldAll experience comes from the senses
    • 6. Hume All knowledge comes from experience MountainAll experience comes from the senses
    • 7. Hume All knowledge comes from Gold Mountain experience +All experience comes from the senses
    • 8.      “On a long journey of human life, faith is the best of companions; it is the best refreshment on Hold faithfulness and sincerity as first principles. the journey; and it is the greatest property.” Confucius, The Confucian Analects Gautama Siddharta, the founder of Buddhism, 563-483 B.C. Hume I have set before you life and death, blessing and cursing: therefore choose life, that both thou and thy seed may live Moses, Deuteronomy 30:19The word virtue, with its equivalent in every tongue, implies praise; as that of vice does blame: And no one, without the most You shall love your neighbor as yourself. Jesus, Mark 12:28-31obvious and grossest impropriety, could affix reproach to a term, which in general acceptation is understood in a good sense; But with love, we are creative. With it, we or bestow applause, where the idiom march tirelessly. With it, and with it alone, we are able to sacrifice for others. Chief Dan George requires disapprobation.
    • 9. Hume It is natural for us to seek a Standard ofTaste; a rule, by which the various sentiments of men may be reconciled; at least, adecision, afforded, confirming one sentiment, and condemning another.
    • 10. Ghiberti, The Sacrifice of Isaac
    • 11. Brunelleschi, The Sacrifice of Isaac
    • 12. Hume Beauty is no quality in thingsthemselves: It exists merely in the mind which contemplates them; and each mind perceives a different beauty. Is beauty merely in the eye of the beholder?
    • 13. Hume Whoever would assert anequality of genius and elegance Mount Teneriffebetween OGILBY and MILTON,would be thought to defend no less an extravagance, than if hehad maintained a molehill to be as high as TENERIFFE. some molehill
    • 14. Hume Whoever would assert anequality of genius and elegance Milton: Paradise Lostbetween OGILBY and MILTON,would be thought to defend no less an extravagance, than if hehad maintained a molehill to be as high as TENERIFFE. Ogilby
    • 15. The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood Hume And looked down one as far as I could To where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, And having perhaps the better claim, Because it was grassy and wanted wear; Though as for that the passing there But though poetry can never Had worn them really about the same, And both that morning equally laysubmit to exact truth, it must be In leaves no step had trodden black. Oh, I kept the first for another day! confined by rules of art, Yet knowing how way leads on to way, I doubted if I should ever come back. I shall be telling this with a sighdiscovered to the author either Somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I- by genius or observation. I took the one less traveled by, And that has made all the difference.
    • 16. The Road Not Takenby Robert FrostTwo roads diverged in a yellow wood,And sorry I could not travel bothAnd be one traveler, long I stoodAnd looked down one as far as I couldTo where it bent in the undergrowth;Then took the other, as just as fair,And having perhaps the better claim,Because it was grassy and wanted wear;Though as for that the passing thereHad worn them really about the same,And both that morning equally layIn leaves no step had trodden black.Oh, I kept the first for another day!Yet knowing how way leads on to way,I doubted if I should ever come back.I shall be telling this with a sighSomewhere ages and ages hence:Two roads diverged in a wood, and I-I took the one less traveled by,And that has made all the difference.
    • 17. Humeall the general rules of art are founded only on experience and on the observation of the common sentiments of human nature.
    • 18. Homer’s Popularity Over Time 100 Hume 75 50The same HOMER, who Rome Parispleased at ATHENS and 25 ROME two thousand Athens Londonyears ago, is still admired 0 700 BCE 350 BCE 0 350 ACE 700 ACE 1050 ACE 1750 ACE 2000 ACE at PARIS and at LONDON.
    • 19. The Test of Time Homer’s Popularity Over Time 100 Hume 75 50 amidst all the variety and Rome Paris caprice of taste, there are 25 certain general principles of Athens Londonapprobation or blame, whose 0 700 BCE 350 BCE 0 350 ACE 700 ACE 1050 ACE 1750 ACE 2000 ACE influence a careful eye maytrace in all operations of the mind.
    • 20. The Critic Hume a strong sense, united to delicate sentiment, improved by practice, perfected by comparison, and cleared of all prejudice, can alone entitle critics to this valuable character; and the joint verdict of such, wherever they are to befound, is the true standard of taste and beauty.
    • 21. The Critic Hume a strong sense, united to delicate sentiment, improved by practice, perfected by comparison, and cleared of all prejudice, can alone entitle critics to this valuable character; and the joint verdict of such, wherever they are to befound, is the true standard of taste and beauty.

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