8 Week Specialist Kicking Legend Coaching Clinic:
Week 1: (2 hour session):
The coaching blue print – theory:
The science ...
and coaches alike understand and fully internalize this foundational principle so that
they understand the gravity of the ...
Week 2: (2 hours)
Video and kicking technique analysis at 95 Wellington Street E Upper (30 mins)
The spiral and on end kic...
side (right touch for right footed kicker, left touch for left footed kicker) that the on-end
rugby kick would be a better...
task. The on-end kick lends itself perfectly to high arching kicks (it can easily be
kicked straight up in the air if nece...
dominant foot assures that it will be in the proper place to be kicked once it hits
the ground.
3. Keep Your Eye on the Ba...
STEP TWO:
Before pacing out your run-up, stand over the ball in the kicking position to make
sure it is in the right place...
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KAIWHANA Kicking Clinics: 8 Week Specialist Kicking Coaching Course

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We'll cover all aspects of kicking - touch, goal and tactical kicking most importantly we will focus on the mental aptitude that sets an average kicker apart from a game changer/match winner! The latest video technology will be used to analyze the players technique. “The Science and Methodology of Kicking” is part of my coaching philosophy detailing the technical aspects of kick coaching.
“SMOK is based on the teaching foundation that successful kick coaching can only be achieved through a clear study and application of the methodology of kicking. Key points of attention will cover balance, weight distribution, posture, point of contact control and the mental aptitude that is needed to consistently perform at the highest level of kicking…” Coach Pienaar

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KAIWHANA Kicking Clinics: 8 Week Specialist Kicking Coaching Course

  1. 1. 8 Week Specialist Kicking Legend Coaching Clinic: Week 1: (2 hour session): The coaching blue print – theory: The science of kicking < Basic Rugby Kicking Principles (30 mins) In rugby union, kicking is easily one of the most important and potentially devastating methods of attack/defence in the game. An excellent clearance kick can take pressure off of your defence or put pressure onto your opposition's defence. Likewise a well placed grubber or chip kick is nearly impossible to fully account for defensively and will pressure even the most well prepared side. But kicking is a two edged sword. While it can be hugely beneficial to your side when employed correctly, it can be an equal hindrance to your team if used improperly and indiscriminately. Below we will take a look at some of the foundational principles for constructing an effective and beneficial kicking game for your rugby team, assuming you have a technically proficient kicker (i.e. they can actually kick properly, but might not be a tactically sound kicker). The Bed Rock Principle- Kicking ALWAYS Turns Over Possession: This may seem an obvious point, but it is the most fundamental principle to understand as it applies to ALL kicks. This does not mean you should avoid kicking. In fact far from it! Kicking is a necessity and a great tool when used properly. What it does mean is that coaches and players need to be aware that as soon as a ball has been kicked they have lost possession (even grubbers and chip kicks which are intended to be recovered). This does not necessarily mean that the opposition has possession, but it does mean your team no longer has the ball in hand which means you cannot score. Since scoring is the main point of rugby, it is important that players
  2. 2. and coaches alike understand and fully internalize this foundational principle so that they understand the gravity of the kicking game. While good kicking enhances your possession, indiscriminate kicking simply turns over possession and gives your opposition more opportunities to do what you should be doing- scoring points. Now that we have established this most bedrock of all rugby kicking principles, we will turn our attention to the three constitutive parts of a well executed kick. Every kick should be chased every single time if it is to be maximally effective. No exceptions. There is never a situation or type of kick where this is not true. Again this may seem like an obvious point, but it is amazing to see how many teams neglect this aspect of their kicking game. Every player, particularly the deep three, needs to fully understand this principle and keep it in mind at all times. The reason is that ideally your kicker should not be the chaser. Kickers typically come to a standstill while kicking and this puts them at a disadvantage for really pressing the opposition receivers and running onto the ball. When players around and behind the kicker see him preparing to kick, they then need to prepare themselves to run after the ball so they can more effectively challenge for the ball and disrupt the opposition. Another important aspect to remember here is communication. Because kickers need support BEHIND THEM to chase the ball once it has been kicked, kickers and supporters alike need to be talking to and watching one another constantly so that they can get in the proper positions. Indiscriminate kicking kills this line of communication and makes chasing far less effective. This is yet another reason indiscriminate kicking is so harmful. Hammering home the idea to your players that every kick is to be chased and challenged will get their mindset ready to put up a real contest for the ball and hopefully turn some ball over. The kicking game is fundamental to a great rugby team. Without a good kicking strategy a team is almost assured of mediocrity. But one should always be wary of indiscriminate kicking, because kicking always turns over possession even if only temporarily. In order for a kick to be maximally effective proper chasers must be employed with the intent to regain possession on each and every kick and kicks must be placed in areas that cause the most headaches for the opposition. If a team can internalize these principles and successfully apply them to their rugby, they will be well on their way to a great season! Video recording session < Touch finders, up and unders, grubber, chip kick, goal kicks, 22 and half way drop outs (1h30mins)
  3. 3. Week 2: (2 hours) Video and kicking technique analysis at 95 Wellington Street E Upper (30 mins) The spiral and on end kick for touch: (1h30 mins) Kicking the ball - for distance, accuracy and speed: In a frictionless world, every kicked ball would follow your basic "inverted parabolic path", which would look like an upside down cereal bowl! But in reality, none of them do. Sailing through air creates friction and puts drag on a ball, slowing it down and counteracting the lift you give it with your boot. The physics of kicking is not pretty, but basically it's about getting more lift, less drag, and picking the right angle. The more lift you impart with your boot, the further the ball can sail before giving in to gravity. And you can cut drag by adding a bit of spin. Spin creates turbulence around the ball, which lets it scoot through the air more quickly. Without spin, and with a smooth surface, you get a fat layer of air 'sticking' to the ball. Turbulence 'thins out' the sticky air layer. Because of the lowered drag and the piercing torpedo-like action, spin also makes your kick more accurate. Once you've got lots of lift and enough spin to cut the drag and improve your accuracy, you can kick at a lower angle - that'll let the ball travel further. For a long, accurate kick you want: - grunt in the kick, for maximum lift; - spin on the ball, for accuracy and distance, and; - an angle below 45°, for maximum distance The On-End Rugby Kick: The on-end rugby kick has become increasingly popular in rugby union, though this kicking style has its roots in Aussie rules football. The on-end kick is performed by kicking the ball on one of its ends, rather than on the side of the ball, and tends to either go end-over-end or simply fly through the air in a 'dead' position. While the on- end rugby kick does not give the absolute distance of the spiral rugby kick, its principle advantage is that it can be a far more accurate kick. The on-end rugby kick also allows for a tremendous amount of height to a kick (though there tends to be a linear decrease in distance the higher it goes). Kicking for Touch: When kicking for touch, especially if you are kicking to your kicker's preferred side, the spiral rugby kick seems to be a clear favourite. It offers superior distance and a natural hook which can help find touch while not decreasing the overall length of the kick. One exception could be argued here that if your kicker is kicking to his weak
  4. 4. side (right touch for right footed kicker, left touch for left footed kicker) that the on-end rugby kick would be a better option as it is more accurate and has less natural hook (which would be going in the opposite direction of the touch line). Regardless, make no mistake the on-end kick will get less distance though even if it does help them find touch. Both styles of kicking have their merits and neither kick is perfect for all situations. It is important to work with your primary kickers (fullbacks, scrum halves, fly halves, etc.) so that they can be proficient in both styles of kicking and know the proper time to use either method to fit your overall game plan and kicking strategy. Week 3: Tactical kicking – grubber, chip and up & unders: (2hours) Grubber kicks: The rugby grubber kick is an offensive kick designed to put the ball behind the defence during offensive play with the intent to recollect the ball immediately. A well executed grubber kick will typically roll and bounce along the ground making it difficult for the defence to get a hold of, but sending it straight into open space to either be recollected by the kicker himself or an oncoming teammate. A good grubber kick should pop up at the end of its roll to make it easier to collect. Points to Remember: 1. Sight Your Target- Make sure you are keeping your eyes open for the best place to land your kick. 2. Hold the Ball End Up Over Dominant Foot- This will put the ball in the best position to be struck once you drop the ball. 3. Strike the Top of the Ball- Once you drop the ball, strike the top of the ball using either the inside of your foot or the top of your foot to create the forward spin to make the ball roll along the ground. Make sure to kick the ball before it hits the ground. 4. Follow Up Your Kick- Whether you are intending to recollect the ball yourself or are trying to grubber kick onto a teammate, it is important to follow up your grubber kick either to challenge to recover it or to support your teammate. Chip Kicks and the High Ball Attack/Clearance: When it comes to chipping over the defence, distance ceases to be a serious concern and accuracy becomes all important. The spiral rugby kick is simply ill suited for this
  5. 5. task. The on-end kick lends itself perfectly to high arching kicks (it can easily be kicked straight up in the air if necessary) and is extremely accurate. Both requirements of an excellent chip kick. In this area of attack, the on-end kick is a must. Another area of the kicking game that the on-end kick lends itself perfectly to is the high ball. Whether you are using the high ball to clear your lines when you are in front of the 22 meter line or you want to use it as an attacking weapon, the on-end kick will give you the massive height and accuracy good high ball needs. In such instances, while distance is still important, it is often more important to place the ball into the spaces between the opposition and to give enough height to the ball so your team can get under the ball and pressure the receiver. Week 4: The 22/halfway drop out and match winning 3 pointers: (2 hours) There are a number of situations during a rugby match where you have to drop kick the ball notably kick offs and 22 meter drop outs. Drop kicking for points during a match, while never required, is almost impossible to defend against if done properly and can earn your team three points even if the opposition defence is air tight. The 22 meter drop is very simple. All you have to do is drop kick the ball from some point behind the 22 meter line to restart play. You can kick the ball short and try to recover it or kick it deep for territory, it is all up to the kicker to decide. Points to Remember When Drop Kicking 1. Sight Your Target- Before you kick the ball make sure you have your target firmly in sight in order to orient your body properly 2. Hold the Ball End Up Over Dominant Foot- Make sure the top end of the ball is tilted slightly back towards you so that when the ball hits the ground it bounces slightly back into your kicking foot. Placing the ball end up over your
  6. 6. dominant foot assures that it will be in the proper place to be kicked once it hits the ground. 3. Keep Your Eye on the Ball- Once you have sighted your target and are ready to drop the ball, make sure you shift your focus to the rugby ball as you are dropping it. You should have already positioned your body in the right direction and should know where you are kicking the ball. Now you need to focus your attention on the ball to make sure you strike it cleanly and accurately. 4. Step into the Kick- Make sure you step into the kick as well once you have dropped the ball. You should start with the ball over your dominant foot and your weight on your dominant foot. Once you drop the ball, step forward onto your non-dominant foot with that foot beside and in line with the rugby ball. Swing through with your dominant foot. Make sure not to rock back onto your heels as you want all of your power moving forward. You should finish on the balls of you feet going forward. 5. Use the Top of Your Foot- When you are swinging through the ball, make sure to use the inside top of your foot for the best striking surface. This will provide the most power and accuracy for your drop kick. Week 5: Goal kicking: (2 hours) STEP ONE: Use a kicking tee or sand to build a mound for the ball, or dig a divot in the ground with your heel and place the ball, tilting the ball so it is aiming straight towards the intended direction. Lean the ball forwards slightly to expose the "sweet spot". This is the area of the ball where you will get the best distance - about a third of the way up the ball.
  7. 7. STEP TWO: Before pacing out your run-up, stand over the ball in the kicking position to make sure it is in the right place to strike. Measure out a run up and concentrate on the sweet spot. The length of the run up is entirely down to you, just as long as you feel comfortable. Relax and focus on the job at hand - think positively - think of the ball going straight through the posts. Johnny Wilkinson practises by aiming not just at the stands - but a particular seat in the stands! STEP THREE: Run up to the ball in an arc with your body turned 45 degrees. Turn your non-kicking shoulder side on to the target. Place your supporting foot as near to the ball as possible for stability. Keep your body weight forward and over the ball. STEP FOUR: Swing through the strike zone, making contact with the instep of your foot. Make sure you follow through with your toes pointing in the direction of the ball, bringing your leg up high. The coaching blue print – physical: Week 5: The 2 hour kicking session according to diagram above: Week 6: The 2 hour kicking session according to diagram above: Week 7: The 2 hour kicking session according to diagram above: Week 8: 1 Hour session plus one hour statistical review. Targets to be set! NB: VARIOUS SOURCES AND CONSULTANT COLLABORATION HAS GONE INTO PRODUCINGTHIS DOCUMENT: CONCEPTUALISED: THINUS PIENAAR. TECHNICAL DIRECTOR OF RUGBY AND KICKING COACH. AURORABARBARIANS.

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