Slide Makeover #79: Comparing groups broken into segments

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When you want to compare the breakdown of a total amount into segments between multiple groups, the temptation is to use two pie charts. Pie charts are the default most presenters turn to when showing the breakdown of an amount into segments. This makeover shows why a stacked bar chart is often better than two pie charts for comparing groups broken down into segments.

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Slide Makeover #79: Comparing groups broken into segments

  1. 1. Slide Makeover Video Podcast #79: Comparing groups broken into segments Based on the ideas in “Present It So They Get It” by Dave Paradi www.PresentItSoTheyGetIt.com
  2. 2. When you want to compare the breakdown of a total amount into segments between multiple groups, here is what presenters typically use …
  3. 3. Assessment 18% Medication 13% Scheduling 2% After Call 20% Non Documentation Activity 47% Group B Medication 13% Scheduling 5% After Call ABC 20% After Call DEF 0% Goals 9% Assessments 6% Other 47% Group A Documentation Time
  4. 4. Here’s why the audience will find it difficult to compare the two groups using this visual
  5. 5. Assessment 18% Medication 13% Scheduling 2% After Call 20% Non Documentation Activity 47% Group B Medication 13% Scheduling 5% After Call ABC 20% After Call DEF 0% Goals 9% Assessments 6% Other 47% Group A Documentation Time The 3D effect makes it hard to judge the true size of each segment
  6. 6. Assessment 18% Medication 13% Scheduling 2% After Call 20% Non Documentation Activity 47% Group B Medication 13% Scheduling 5% After Call ABC 20% After Call DEF 0% Goals 9% Assessments 6% Other 47% Group A Documentation Time The color used for each segment is not consistent in each graph
  7. 7. Assessment 18% Medication 13% Scheduling 2% After Call 20% Non Documentation Activity 47% Group B Medication 13% Scheduling 5% After Call ABC 20% After Call DEF 0% Goals 9% Assessments 6% Other 47% Group A Documentation Time The order of the segments is different in each graph
  8. 8. Assessment 18% Medication 13% Scheduling 2% After Call 20% Non Documentation Activity 47% Group B Medication 13% Scheduling 5% After Call ABC 20% After Call DEF 0% Goals 9% Assessments 6% Other 47% Group A Documentation Time The labels of the same segment are different in each graph
  9. 9. As a result, the audience can’t figure out what the message is because they can’t really compare the two groups accurately. Instead, use a stacked bar graph, like this …
  10. 10. 47% of documentation time spent on other tasks; Group B 3X more time on Assessment 47% 47% 20% 20% 13% 13% 6% 18% 5% 2% 9%Group A Group B Other After call Medication Assessment Scheduling Goals 47% of time supposed to be documenting is spent on other tasks Group B spends 3X what Group A does on Assessment
  11. 11. 47% of documentation time spent on other tasks; Group B 3X more time on Assessment 47% 47% 20% 20% 13% 13% 6% 18% 5% 2% 9%Group A Group B Other After call Medication Assessment Scheduling Goals 47% of time supposed to be documenting is spent on other tasks Group B spends 3X what Group A does on Assessment Order, label name, and color of segments is consistent
  12. 12. 47% of documentation time spent on other tasks; Group B 3X more time on Assessment 47% 47% 20% 20% 13% 13% 6% 18% 5% 2% 9%Group A Group B Other After call Medication Assessment Scheduling Goals 47% of time supposed to be documenting is spent on other tasks Group B spends 3X what Group A does on Assessment Callouts direct attention to issues the audience should focus on
  13. 13. 47% of documentation time spent on other tasks; Group B 3X more time on Assessment 47% 47% 20% 20% 13% 13% 6% 18% 5% 2% 9%Group A Group B Other After call Medication Assessment Scheduling Goals 47% of time supposed to be documenting is spent on other tasks Group B spends 3X what Group A does on Assessment Overall: Much easier to compare one group to the other
  14. 14. What lessons can we learn about comparing the breakdown of multiple groups into segments?
  15. 15. Lesson #1: Don’t use 3-D graphs. The third dimension distorts our interpretation of the size or position of items, making accurate comparison impossible.
  16. 16. Lesson #2: When comparing graphs, make sure that the order, color, and text labels are consistent in each graph.
  17. 17. Lesson #3: A stacked bar chart is a better choice to compare segments within a total amount. This type of graph places the information to be compared close to each other. It is a standard graph in Excel or PowerPoint.
  18. 18. Lesson #4: Use callouts to direct the viewer’s attention to the important points they should be noticing in the graph. It ensures they come to the conclusion you want them to.
  19. 19. Before After Lessons: 1. Don’t use 3-D graphs 2. Have consistency when comparing graphs 3. Use a stacked bar chart instead of two pie charts 4. Use callouts to direct attention Quick recap: More makeovers available at www.SlideMakeoverVideos.com
  20. 20. If you would like me to help your team create presentations that have a clear message with focused content and effective visuals, get in touch: P: 905-510-4911 E: Dave@ThinkOutsideTheSlide.com W: www.ThinkOutsideTheSlide.com

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