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Lessons from Experiences of E-Governance in India

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  • 1. Lessons From Experiences of E-Governance in India Shirin Madon, Dept. of Intl. Development Dept. of Management (Information Systems) LSE. Intl. Seminar “Concepts and Practices of eGovernment” organised by THINK! and Forum for Public Administration, Rome, 24 th October 2011
  • 2. In developing countries, this governance ideology is linked to human development India’s national 2003 E-Governance Action Plan In rural areas, e-governance implementation is established through telecentres in a PPP model Entrepreneur as the new interface for provision of social welfare to citizens Objective to establish 100,000 telecentres across India – one serving every 6 villages
  • 3. But what has been the experience of telecentres in rural India so far? Lessons from project Akshaya piloted in 2003 in one district in Kerala, South India Kerala’s unique characteristics .... but neglect of public investment and unemployment E-governance seen as a solution to increase economic productivity and maintain social welfare
  • 4.
    • Malappuram district
    • Business/social model:
    • demand from local politicians
    • public-private franchise
    • selection of entrepreneurs
    • location of centres (630 centres initially)
    • Project has been running for 8 years
    • Currently 212 centres
  • 5. ~ 50% of activity (revenue) comes from training (mainly IT and language skills) ~ 20% comes from E-payment of government bills ~ other 30% a mix of: browsing assisting citizen applications for govt schemes facilitating farmers’ clubs, self-help group activity
  • 6. Drawing lessons from Akshaya: Citizens may ‘see the state’ through the entrepreneur but the role of local government officers remains crucial e.g. health-mapping e.g. e-commerce agro system e.g. expert system for treating crop diseases
  • 7. As well, the role of local political players in affairs of the community remains crucial e.g. entrepreneurs selected for social bias e.g. community support for Akshaya e.g. identifying relevant activities e.g. coordinating informal groups
  • 8.
    • … Drawing implications for rural e-governance implementation in developing countries
    • Understanding governance as dynamic and
    • constructed ‘bottom-up’
    • Sustainability depends on good relations
    • between entrepreneur and state/political
    • players
    • Monitoring & evaluation needed to address
    • how these relations evolve over time
    • THANK YOU!