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How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action
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How to Use Feedback and Online Surveys to Drive Action

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What do your customers and prospects really think about your business or organization? Do you know? Do you care? You should. What you don’t know could be impacting your sales and donations. …

What do your customers and prospects really think about your business or organization? Do you know? Do you care? You should. What you don’t know could be impacting your sales and donations.

Asking for and getting feedback from your customers or supporters through the use of online Surveys, Polls, or Reviews, can not only be an eye opening experience, it can be a profitable one. This Power Point will reveal simple but highly effective best practices and considerations for how to build a survey that allows you to gather valuable insights and suggestions from your audience.

This presentation covers:
How to set survey objectives
The importance of listening
Developing good questions
Knowing the difference between too much and not enough
When to survey
Who to survey
What to do with the results

Learn great new strategies to help you get insightful and important information from your customers, donors, clients, or supporters about what they really want and need from your business or organization.

View the webinar version of this presentation at: http://www.prescriptionsforonlinesuccess.com/portfolio-item/feedback-surveys-webinar/

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  • Welcome to Our Prescriptions for Online Success Webinar Series. Today we’re focusing on Feedback and Online Surveys. I’m going to show you how to get valuable insights from asking the right questions in the right format to help drive your success.
  • I am Kim Butler, The URL Dr., and I am a Constant Contact Platinum Level Solution Provider, a Constant Contact Authorized Local Expert, and winner of the 2013 Constant Contact All Star Award. Our presentation today is provided by Constant Contact but the information provided here is based on best practices and can be utilized by any small business or nonprofit, regardless of whether or not you are using Constant Contact.

    If you have questions during or after the presentation, you can use the hashtag #theurldrwebinar on Twitter to ask your questions. I’ll be responding to questions from all the webinars this month at that hashtag.


  • For those of you not familiar with Constant Contact’s new Toolkit product, it provides you with the ability to send email newsletters, online coupons, social promotions on Facebook, local deals, feedback and online surveys, and market events, all through one tool for one low price. I’ve been using Constant Contact in my own business and I recommend Toolkit to all my clients. I truly believe this is the best and most cost effective online marketing tool available to small businesses.


    At the core of marketing is the idea that it’s intended to elicit a physical, measurable response…you don’t create and send newsletters, or post updates, or solicit feedback or plan events without some objective in mind, some goal in mind that your campaign is intended to achieve.
    We often refer to the “call to action” as part of your communications…the request for someone to join your mailing list, to visit your store, to sign up for your annual fundraising gala…because at the end of the day that’s what marketing is all about. It’s about getting someone with whom you, your business or your organization has a relationship to take an action that will help your organization to succeed.
    This webinar isn’t intended to educate you about goals/objectives, but I have a wonderful webinar on demand called How to Market Your Small Business in 2014, that deals in large part with helping you develop goals and objectives, so I would invite you to search for this webinar on our PrescriptionsForOnlineSuccess.com website or TheURLdr.com website.
    Today we’re here to talk about marketing campaigns: those collections of marketing activities that make up an effort intended to drive an action that leads to achieving a specific goal. Specifically we’ll be focusing on newsletters and announcements, and their close cousin, social engagement.
    Simply put, these activities are primarily about communication, and about connecting with your readers. But that doesn’t mean that they aren’t also a great way to drive action. And today we’re going to talk about how you can deliver the most effective newsletters possible.


  • I want to give you a simple definition, or a framework, for what marketing really is.
    You already know, generally, what it is – but when I say the word marketing, I mean something very specific and it’s important that we are on the same page. My definition of marketing has three simple parts – you define an audience: a group of people that you want to target. You reach out to them with a message that is specific to that audience. And you seek to elicit a physical and measurable response. A click, a reply, a call, a purchase, a referral – these are all actions that represent a decision made by a human to react to your message.

    Keep this in mind as we discuss marketing and marketing campaigns and the ways to deliver the most effective campaigns. You’re doing these things because you want people – your customers, your clients, your donors or supporters – to DO SOMETHING.

    Our topic for today, the campaign type “Surveys and Feedback,” is absolutely about getting a response.


    [click to next slide]
  • We’re not going to talk about marketing principles, or goals and objectives today. No, today we’re here to talk about marketing campaigns: those collections of marketing activities that make up an effort intended to drive an action that leads to achieving a specific goal. Specifically we’ll be focusing on seeking feedback from your customers or supporters through surveys, polls or reviews. Campaigns in general are about [click to build] pushing out some sort of content, and getting back some sort of response.
  • In the case of surveys, you push out questions, and hope to get back insights from your readers.

    On the surface the idea of collecting feedback seems pretty simple. You ask some questions and get some answers…easy!! In truth, there are entire businesses that form around the act of surveying audiences, measuring the responses and then figuring out some next step from there. Input from your audiences can be an incredibly valuable tool – one that allows you to make corrections to how you approach your business, that allows your audience to feel more connected (committed?) to your organization, that allows you to hold up an objective mirror to your efforts and allow you to learn and adapt as you move forward.

  • Here’s what we’re going to do today…
    [click to build] we’ll make sure we all have the same understanding of what we’re talking about when we talk about feedback instruments, and why you should consider using them.
    [click to build] next we’ll talk about some ways to start thinking about the structure of your survey, with an emphasis on asking good questions
    [click to build] Then we’ll focus for a bit on the “When?” and “Who?” of surveys…two critical elements of the process
    [click to build] finally, we’ll discuss results and the follow-up after a survey is complete.

    I also want to make a quick not about “for” and “non” profits, and industry verticals…I’m often asked how the things I’m talking about should be adjusted or changed for a nonprofit or a services (B2B firm) or someone in a different industry vertical. I hear “I’m not a brick-and-mortar business, so how does this apply to me. The good news is that the principles that will be discussed are largely universal…they can benefit a non-profit just as much as they can a for-profit, a B2B business can follow these just as readily as a B2C, that a restaurant can succeed with these ideas just as readily as a yoga studio, a church or a book store. Yes, you may have different considerations to make for your select audiences, but in large part what we’re teaching are best practices, and they’re best practices across the board.
     
  • What are we talking about when we say online surveys and why should small business use them?
  • Understanding your audience makes you a better marketer. Knowing your customers and the things that interest them, make them happy, disappoint them, allows you to serve their needs and grow your business. You want to hear [click to build] the things that your customers, supporters, donors, clients and volunteers have to say.

    Through listening, we learn what people want from us, what’s working and what’s not

    We can make informed decisions – ones that will keep your customers coming back to do business with you. Online surveys and other data-gathering tools can help you understand what your customers like, want and need.

    “We have two ears and one mouth, so we should listen more than we say.” 

  • Start by ensuring that you have a clear objective for the survey.
    [click to build] what is it that you need to know to help you run your organization more effectively?
    [click to build] you should only plan to ask about ONE THING that you want to know…keep your survey FOCUSED!!
    [click to build] don’t ask a question if you’re not prepared to use the answer to help you take an action or do something for your organization
  • Here are some examples of objectives that aren’t so great, and different ways to rethink them…notice how the “better” options are all more specific, and would allow you to take an action
  • Let’s take a look at a more complete example, including the objective and some sample questions and the actions that would be taken based on the answers.

    In Scenario #1, I want to use social media to boost sales. My objective: to learn if my customers, supporters, and clients are using social media. This objective is OK, but it’s really better suited for a single poll question, not a survey.

    [Click to Build] A better objective would be to identify how I could use social media to better engage with my customers. Now that we have an objective, let’s look at some sample questions we can ask to get the answer.

    [Click to Build] So if I’m trying to find out what how I can better engage with my customers through social media, the first question I better ask is: What social platforms do you use? Possible answers are Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, and Pinterest.

    [Click to Build] Now I know where my customers are and I can re-focus my social media strategy on the channel that is the most popular with my audience.
  • It would be really helpful if I knew what my audience was doing on the social media networks they were using. That would help me decide what kind of content to write and what kind of posts would get the most interaction. So I could ask, “What kind of content do you look for on social media?” I might get answers like articles, pictures, deals and coupons, jokes, quick tips.

    [Click to Build] This information allows me to custom tailor my content to exactly what my audience is looking for. It also gives me targeted content to add to my newsletters.

  • It would also be extremely helpful to know how often my audience expects to see information from me. Do they expect to see it daily, a couple times a week, twice a month?

    [Click to Build] Now I have the information to develop a posting schedule that matches what my audience wants.
  • [This slide hidden and only to be used for printing purposes]
  • In Scenario #2, there are not enough people coming to my live events. I need to know what I can do to grow event attendance. My original objective was to figure out how to get more people to my events. But a better objective was to find out why past registrants didn’t show up and then figure out what would encourage them to attend.

    [Click to Build] A question I could ask would be what kind of an area someone would be most likely to travel to for an event.
    [Click to Build] This is going to give me the information I need to start looking for venues in the area that had the greatest response.
  • [Click to Build] I could also ask what kind of entertainment people are looking for at an event.
    [Click to Build] With this information, I can look for type of talent that people expect to see.
  • [Click to Build] Important information for me to have in planning an event is what time of the day my audience would be most likely to attend.
    [Click to Build] Now I can schedule the event for the most popular time frame.
  • [This slide hidden and only to be used for printing purposes]
  • There are three primary survey types that you should think about…
    [click to build] surveys (most of what we’re talking about today) – these are generally longer
    [click to build] polls are great ways to get a quick response to a question…and usually they’re just that, only one question
    [click to build] reviews allow your customers, patrons or supporters to provide feedback on their experience in a public way. Think of review sites on the web – Trip Advisor for travel-related experiences, Angie’s List for services, Yelp for dining.
  • How do you structure your questions and what questions do you ask?
  • We just talked about three different types of surveys, but those are at a very high level…once you go deeper, you’ll see that there are a lot of ways to think about why you would run one – they all seek to collect information, but that information can inform a wide range of ideas [click to build] The real answer to the question starts after you’ve identified your objectives for the survey or what you plan to do with the feedback
  • As you start to think about the questions you’re going to ask, you also need to think about the NUMBER of questions you’re going to ask. [click to build] Keep in mind that as the number of questions increases, the response rate generally decreases. This may not be a problem if you’re confident you’ll get the number of responses you need for meaningful insights even if the response rate is low, but it’s a factor to keep in mind. People are busy, and while they may be willing to give feedback, they’ll “bail out” of a survey if they feel it’s getting too long.
  • What kind of questions are the best to ask?

    [Click to Build] Close-ended questions are easy to answer, easy to analyze, allow for great comparison, and ensure you get a clear, balanced scale with which to judge your responses.
  • [click to build] Open ended questions can give you more information since it allows someone to type in their opinion, but be aware that too many open-ended questions will lead to more people bailing out of your survey. They are more time consuming not only for the person to answer, but also for you to analyze.

    The best practice is to use a combination of open-ended questions and close-ended questions. You can always ask close-ended questions and include the option to comment if the respondents want to go into more detail.
  • Let’s go through some examples of bad questions and a better way to rewrite them.

    [Click to Build] Here’s a leading question about Joe Dimaggio. How would you rate the career of legendary outfielder Joe Dimaggio? A better way to ask that question would be How would you rate Joe Dimaggio’s career?
    [Click to Build] Are you very satisfied or very dissatisfied with us? This limits the evaluation. A better way to ask that question would be, Overall, how satisfied are you with us?
    [Click to Build] What suggestions do you have for improving Tom’s Tomato Juice? This question is too general. How about, What suggestions do you have for improving the taste of Tom’s Tomato Juice? Now you’ll get answers and opinion you can really gain some knowledge from.
  • [Click to Build] How about, What did you think of the service? The way this question is phrased, it’s harder to compare the results. A better way to ask would be, You found the service to be blank and provide 3 or 4 choices. Better answers and still quick for the person to answer.
    [Click to Build] If we ask, How would you rate the food and the entertainment at the event, we actually asking two questions in one. It would be much better to ask these questions separately.
    [Click to Build] How well did the RDD explain the use of CTAs to drive CTs? What? There is too much jargon and too many abbreviations in this question. Remember your audience may not know what all this means. It’s much better to ask the question clearly, How effectively did the speaker explain calls to action? Now that your audience will understand.
  • Here are some additional tips on planning your questions and their order:

    [Click to Build] Make your first question easy to answer.
    [Click to Build] Place your most important questions up front.
    [Click to Build] Ask for profile and demographic information at the end.
    [Click to Build] Explain why you need the information.
    [Click to Build] Keep it simple..don’t get too personal.
    [Click to Build] Don’t make these questions mandatory.

  • Some “don’ts” [Click to Build] when it comes to survey questions and length…

    [Click to Build] Don’t ask questions that aren’t relevant
    [Click to Build] Don’t ask two questions if one question is enough
    [Click to Build] Don’t ask too many open-ended questions (which feel longer and take longer to fill out)
    [Click to Build] Don’t ask too many demographic questions
  • How long is long enough? Everyone wants to know how long their survey should be…well, that depends. But one rule of thumb is: “only as long as you need to get the information you really need and intend to act on.’ And don’t ask questions that you can’t act on. Completion time is ultimately more important than number of questions…still, you want to keep # of questions down.

    [Click to Build] Do have no more than 10-12 questions
    [Click to Build] Do ask multiple-choice questions
    [Click to Build] Do limit open-ended questions to no more than 3
    [Click to Build] Do target a 5-8 minute completion time
    [Click to Build] And, take it yourself!
  • When & Who do you send surveys to?
  • With the ease of sending surveys in Toolkit, you can be very flexible with timing.

    You can send surveys on the fly, whenever you need to know something.
  • You can send a survey after an interaction with a customer or prospect or an event.
  • You can send out regularly scheduled surveys at different times throughout the year.
  • Don’t forget to send out a survey after you’ve done business with someone. This is the perfect opportunity to ask for feedback and get a testimonial that you can post throughout your social media and on your website (with permission).
  • As you think about who to survey, think about segmenting your audience to help you ask the right questions of the group best situated to give you the answers you need.
    This will also help you avoid “survey burnout” – which happens when people get surveyed again and again and again. For better results….send surveys to those who are interested.

    [Click to Build]
    Don’t send a survey about a product to people who don’t buy the product you are analyzing.
    Don’t send an online shopping satisfaction survey to people who only buy instore
    New customers = shorter, lighter survey. More established customers more in-depth survey.
  • Here’s a way to think about the segmentation of your audience and when you survey.
    [Click to Build] You could send out one large survey every year…that allows you to get a lot of input from your entire customer, donor or client base.
    [Click to Build] Then, send out smaller surveys throughout the year to “take the pulse” of smaller segments of your audience.
    [Click to Build] Pulse surveys are sent to smaller groups, or subsets of groups that you sometimes survey in their entirety – you don’t need the entire group to respond to get a sense of “directionality”
  • What do you do after the survey has been filled out? Let’s look at Results & Follow-up
  • Depending on who your survey is aimed at, you may need to actually promote the survey a bit. You can:


    Embed polls on a website or in an email
    Send out links
    Use facebook feature to conduct a poll
    LinkedIn has a feature to conduct a poll
  • Be patient.

    [Click to Build] Over half of survey responses come back the first day.
    [Click to Build] 7 out of 8 arrive within the first week.
    One week is sufficient if time is more important than maximizing results.
    [Click to Build] Two weeks is recommended run time (enough time to send a reminder).
  • When you’re building your survey, you’re going to want to consider where a respondent goes after they click the submit button. You can:

    [Click to Build] Send respondents to a closing page where you can thank them, provide access to an incentive, share info on distribution of results.
    [Click to Build] Send respondents to a website where they can access an incentive, register for your next event, review testimonials.
  • Don’t forget when all the hard work of sending out the survey is done and the results are in, that all this great information should inspire you to do something. What did you learn from the results?

    [Click to Build] Results can be reviewed as they come in
    [Click to Build] When you view results in a chart, you can see trends. Look for those trends. They can really help to uncover golden nuggets of information.
    [Click to Build] Use findings to create an action plan – this is the most important part!!! This is where you start to turn those insights and responses into actual, organization-changing actions!!
    [Click to Build] You’re going to want to follow up with your respondents…share the action plan or the results with them…if they know that their feedback is being listened to, and that it’s making a difference, then they’ll be more likely to respond to your surveys in the future. They’ll also be developing a deeper connection to your organization.
    [Click to Build] Don’t stop at just one survey…build a strategy around collecting feedback (remember, you can do them periodically, after interactions, on a schedule…whatever works for your organization and your audience)





  • Some of the tools you can use to plan and promote events return your results instantaneously, and others take 24 hours – some tools used to run webinars will take that long for the recording and list of attendees and non-attendees. Make sure you know which option your tool is so you can plan accordingly.

    In either case, once the event is concluded, [click to build] you can go ahead and check your results and reporting and get a few different things.
    You can pull a list of attendees and no-shows. Once you have your list, send an email to attendees and to registrants that didn’t attend. To attendees, send all the resources. If you had a live event, photos videos, results like who won raffle prizes or silent auction prizes, additional info you’ll be sharing on your webpage – send a link.
    Make sure to nurture them to the next step, whatever step you decide, with a call to action. And make sure that next step stands out. Some common CTA are to ask questions on a Facebook page, purchase a product, start a trial, attending the next event.
    For non-attendees, send a Sorry-you-couldn’t-attend, Here’s-what-you-missed email, provide a recording or photos or videos, and let them know when the next event is. Use the follow up email to drive registrations.
    You can use the reporting features to check on revenue from ticket sales or donations (if the tool you’re using allowed you to collect them)
    And if you asked questions during the registration process and that information can be synced with your attendee lists, you can go ahead and start segmenting your lists of names based on responses. This will help you with your follow-up over time.
  • There are many great results that can come from the information you gain from doing online surveys:
    [Click to Build] You use customer suggestions to introduce new services, products, and programs
    [Click to Build] You might make improvements to your website in navigation or the types of content you’re creating
    [Click to Build] You might make your communications with your audience more relevant
    [Click to Build] You can attract new customers, clients, and donors
    [Click to Build] You can better segment your audience to deliver messages and offers that they really want and need
  • I can’t repeat this enough!!! You HAVE TO MOVE from results to engagement. [click to build sequence while talking through points below] You pushed questions out to your audience, then pulled in the responses. Now it’s time to share the results….

    Once you’ve collected feedback you must respond. After you have summarized the results, read them and shared them, communicate back to customers/employees/donors that you have heard their concerns.

    By letting customers know they have been heard and action is being taken, you improve the experience for them and others. This builds trust, trust builds advocacy and brand advocates are essential to growing your business.

    What are your important business outcomes? Increased retention, productivity, profitability, customer engagement, improvements in safety, absenteeism, attendance, etc?
    Studies showed that surveys that result in an action plan increase engagement scores by an average of 10%. In contrast, those who perceive limited or no action-saw their engagement scores decrease by an average of 3%.

    Why? BECAUSE MY OPINIONS COUNT!!!

  • So what are the next steps?
  • Here’s some practical advice in using surveys:

    [Click to Build] Use consistent branding
    [Click to Build] Personalize it
    [Click to Build] Clearly state the purpose
    [Click to Build] Clearly state any incentives
    [Click to Build] Specify time involved
  • Inform of confidentiality
    [Click to Build] Clearly display call to action
    [Click to Build] Include a closing date
    [Click to Build] Include a thank you upon completion

    [Click to Build] Make people feel like they are part of helping your organization improve
  • visual of starting small…you don’t have to ask every question you’ve ever wanted an answer to…

    [Click to Build] Start small. Start with a single-item poll on your website or via social media. Grow to 2-3 questions and start delivering them via your newsletter.

    [Click to Build] Eventually build to 10-12 questions. Share results with respondents. Send out additional pulse surveys to smaller segments throughout the year.


    We’ll be working together to build more surveys and opportunities to collect customer feedback into your online marketing program, just like we started with the poll in your newsletter. Now you know the basics and we can do even more in the upcoming weeks with using online survey in Toolkit. Thanks for watching!
  • I want to thank you for joining me today…I’m going to take questions in the last minutes of our webinar, but first, I have a few suggestions for next steps you might take next if you’re interested more in what The URL Dr. and Constant Contact has to offer.

    The URL Dr. is online marketing and web design firm that specializes in small business marketing. You can visit our website to view our services and pricing at www.TheURLdr.com
  • All of the various online surveys, polls, and feedback I discussed today including mobile marketing can all be done with Constant Contact’s new all in one Toolkit product.

    When you sign up for Constant Contact through The URL Dr. (for the same great low price)
  • You also get our new online training for Constant Contact Toolkit, absolutely free. I developed this online learning system especially for Toolkit customers. To get it you can visit theurldr.com and from our home page [Click to Build]
    Click on this orange button that says “Get Online Training for Toolkit Free”
  • Then you’ll have the opportunity to [Click to Build] sign up for Toolkit and the learning tool, if you don’t have it yet and you’re ready to get started on your new online marketing campaign

    [Click to Build] If you already have Toolkit, you can still get the online training by clicking on this button and filling out the form.

    This system is designed to walk you through the set up of Toolkit, all the best practices in email, social media, online promotions, event marketing, and using online surveys, and then it walks you through how to implement these different marketing efforts in your business with Toolkit.
  • I have one more fun announcement. For all of our attendees today, you have the opportunity to win a featured spot on my new radio show, “Prescriptions for Online Success.” My new show will premiere on Saturday, June 7th at 1:30 PM on AM1450 The Source out of Frederick, MD, but we’ll also be streaming audio and video of every show to The URL Dr.’s website and our new Prescriptions for Online Success website. Each show will have a segment where we bring on real small businesses who have a problem with their online marketing or their website. They’ll get a free exam and a prescription from The URL Dr. Then they’ll be invited on the show to talk about the results they got. It should be a lot of fun, but we really need you to help make this a success, so go to The URL Dr.’s Facebook page and like us to enter. You’ll get a follow-up email that will ask you a couple of questions about what you are struggling with. We’ll go through all the entries and pick a winner to work with on the air.
  • If you have a question for me on any type of online marketing or website problem you’re having, you can visit PrescriptionsForOnlineSuccess.com/ask-the-url-dr-question/ And you can send me a voice message. Just click on the Start recording button and you can record up to a 3 minute question. Include your name and company in the recording and it may be answered on my radio show or in my social media. At the very least, you’ll be sent an email with a response.
  • So here’s all the contact information once again. Now let’s take some questions from our audience.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q Feedback and Surveys Get valuable insights to help drive your success. © 2014 Prescriptions For Online Success Series
    • 2. 2013 Constant Contact All Star Award Winner Kim Butler, The URL Dr. KimButler@TheURLdr.com facebook.com/theurldr @theurldr #theurldrwebinar
    • 3. Grow with Constant Contact Get results fast, with affordable, easy-to-use engagement marketing tools and free coaching. Offers & Promotions Events & Registrations Newsletters & Announcements Feedback & Surveys
    • 4. marketing At its core, marketing is about eliciting a physical and measureable response
    • 5. Pull response What is a 2 SUBMIT 1 SURVEY campaign? Push content
    • 6. What is a 2 SUBMIT 1 SURVEY campaign? Pull insights Push questions
    • 7. Agenda What are surveys, polls, reviews…and why should you do them? How to structure your survey and how to plan “good” questions When? & Who? – two important questions Results and follow-up What’s next?
    • 8. What & Why | Structure & Questions | When & Who | Results & Follow-up | Next Steps
    • 9. What & Why The importance of listening “I’d spend more if the customer service was better.” “If I have a good experience, I definitely tell my friends.” “I don’t worry as much about the prices if the experience is great.”
    • 10. What do you need to know to help you take action or to make your business more successful? Pick one thing and ask questions about that thing…be focused. Every question you ask should already have a possible action associated with it. What & Why Know your objective
    • 11. What & Why Know your objective Do they like our product? (i.e. Do you like our orange juice?) Do you think our Homestyle OJ is more or less bitter than other brands? Did they like our event? Did they like the layout of our event venue? Was the program too short, too long, or just right? Do you prefer a plated dinner or a buffet? Find out if our Facebook fans prefer pictures or links to articles Find out if people read our Facebook posts
    • 12. Objective (OK): Learn if my customers/supporters/clients are using social media. (Good for a single poll question, but not so much for a survey.) Objective (Better): Identify how I could use social media to better engage with my customers. What & Why Scenario #1 Sample question (answer choices) What social platforms do you use? (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, Pinterest) Possible actions based on response Re-focus social media strategy on most popular channel.
    • 13. Objective (OK): Learn if my customers/supporters/clients are using social media. (Good for a single poll question, but not so much for a survey.) Objective (Better): Identify how I could use social media to better engage with my customers. What & Why Scenario #1 What kind of content do you look for on social media? (articles, pictures of friends or organizations you follow, deals/coupons, jokes, quick tips, other) Develop desired content and feature in our social posts…also use results to build content for newsletter. Sample question (answer choices) Possible actions based on response
    • 14. How often do you expect to see new content posted? (daily, 2-3x per week, weekly, 2x per month, monthly) Develop posting schedule to match desired frequency. newsletter. Sample question (answer choices) Possible actions based on response Objective (OK): Learn if my customers/supporters/clients are using social media. (Good for a single poll question, but not so much for a survey.) Objective (Better): Identify how I could use social media to better engage with my customers. What & Why Scenario #1
    • 15. Objective (OK): I want to figure out how to get more people to my events. Objective (Better): Survey past registrants that didn’t show up, and figure out what would encourage them to attend. What & Why Scenario #2 Sample question (answer choices) To which area would you most likely travel to attend an event? (in the city, western suburbs, our store, dinner cruise) Possible actions based on response Start investigating venues in the area of the greatest response.
    • 16. What kind of entertainment would you be most interested to see? (comedian, musician, performance artist, other) Leverage local network to find talent based on responses. Sample question (answer choices) Possible actions based on response Objective (OK): I want to figure out how to get more people to my events. Objective (Better): Survey past registrants that didn’t show up, and figure out what would encourage them to attend. What & Why Scenario #2
    • 17. Objective (OK): I want to figure out how to get more people to my events. Objective (Better): Survey past registrants that didn’t show up, and figure out what would encourage them to attend. What & Why Scenario #2 At what time of day are you most likely to attend? (morning, afternoon, early evening, late evening) Develop venue strategy and pricing based on responses. Sample question (answer choices) Possible actions based on response
    • 18. What & Why Types of Surveys • Sent through email and/or social media • Get feedback, segment your audience by interest • Can be longer, but don’t have to be Surveys • Good for quick insight on one question • Pushed out through email, on your website or through social media Polls • Ask for feedback on a specific product or experience • Ask readers to rate your organization (directly or on a review site) Reviews
    • 19. What & Why | Structure & Questions | When & Who | Results & Follow-up | Next Steps
    • 20. Structure & Questions Reasons for Surveys Employee needs Customer profiles All about events Relevance Customer experience Customer satisfaction
    • 21. Structure & Questions Got questions? Response rate # of questions
    • 22. Close-ended Easy to answer Easy to analyze and allow for great comparison Ensure scales are balanced and clear Structure & Questions Got questions? SURVEY
    • 23. Open-ended Not limited by options Provide deeper insights Harder to answer = respondent fatigue Harder to analyze, time-consuming to evaluate Limits comparison Structure & Questions Got questions? SURVEY “Do you have any suggestions for improving our products?” Answer up to 1,000 characters Avoid a common mistake: Using too many open-ended questions.
    • 24. Structure & Questions Question tips How would you rate Joe Dimaggio’s career? Are you very satisfied or very dissatisfied with us? (limits evaluation) Overall, how satisfied are you with us? What suggestions do you have for improving Tom’s Tomato Juice? (too general) What suggestions do you have for improving the taste of Tom’s Tomato Juice? How would you rate the career of legendary outfielder Joe Dimaggio? (leading question)
    • 25. Structure & Questions Question tips You found the service to be _____ (provide 3-4 choices) How would you rate the food and the entertainment at the event? (double-barreled question) How would you rate the food? How would you rate the entertainment? How well did the RDD explain the use of CTAs to drive CTs? (jargon, abbreviations) How effectively did the speaker explain calls to action? What did you think of the service? (harder to compare results)
    • 26. Make your first question easy to answer. Place your most important questions up front. Ask for profile and demographic information at the end. Explain why you need the information. Keep it simple…don’t get too personal. Don’t make these questions mandatory. Structure & Questions Question tips
    • 27. How long is long enough? 203 ? 204 ? 205 ? 206 ? 207 ? 208 ? 209 ? 210 ? 211 ? 212 ? 213 ? 214 ? • Don’t ask questions that aren’t relevant • Don’t ask two questions if one question is enough • Don’t ask too many open- ended questions (which feel longer) • Don’t ask too many demographic questions…
    • 28. How long is long enough? • Do have no more than 10-12 questions. • Do ask multiple-choice questions (feels shorter). • Do limit open-ended questions to no more than 3. • Do target a 5-8 minute completion time. • Take it yourself!
    • 29. What & Why | Structure & Questions | When & Who | Results & Follow-up | Next Steps
    • 30. On the fly (as you need to know something) When & Who When to survey? ? ? ?
    • 31. After an interaction When & Who When to survey? Event Survey
    • 32. Regularly scheduled When & Who When to survey?
    • 33. After a sale to get customer feedback and a testimonial When & Who When to survey? After Sale
    • 34. When & Who Categorize your audience Regular customers or donors VIPs Seasonal customers or supporters New!
    • 35. When & Who Segment your audience Longer survey of entire group January Short survey of small segment of group May Short survey of small segment of group September
    • 36. What & Why | Structure & Questions | When & Who | Results & Follow-up | Next Steps
    • 37. Results & Follow-up Get the word out TXT
    • 38. Results & Follow-up Hurry up and wait! 50% or more of survey responses come back the first day. 88% of responses will be submitted in the first week. 2 weeks is generally enough time to leave the survey open to maximize responses.
    • 39. Results & Follow-up I’m finished. Now what? Send respondents to a website where they can access an incentive, register for your next event, review testimonials, etc. Send respondents to a closing page where you can thank them, provide access to an incentive, share info on distribution of results
    • 40. Results & Follow-up Results should inspire action Review and analyze 1 Spot trends 2 Create an action plan 3 Follow up with people 4 Survey again! 5
    • 41. Results & Follow-up Review statistics and data % • Ensure staff is trained to redeem or honor offers and coupons. • Collect list sign-ups at redemption. • Collect information about their experience with the deal. • Use the same tools to follow up: email, social media and surveys.
    • 42. Introduce new services, products, programs Improve your website Make communications more relevant Attract new customers, clients, donors Segment your audience for better targeting Results & Follow-up Create an action plan from results
    • 43. Engage in conversation 2 SUBMIT 1 SURVEY Pull insights THANK YOU! RESULTSPush questions Share results
    • 44. What & Why | Structure & Questions | When & Who | Results & Follow-up | Next Steps
    • 45. Use consistent branding. Personalize it. Clearly state the purpose. Clearly state any incentives. Specify time involved. Next Steps Practical advice
    • 46. Inform of confidentiality. Clearly display call to action. Include a closing date. Include a thank you upon completion. Next Steps Practical advice Make people feel like they are part of helping your organization improve!
    • 47. Next Steps Start small 2 2 of 10 1 SURVEY • Start with a single-item poll on your website or via social media. • Grow to 2-3 questions and start delivering them via your newsletter. • Eventually build to 10-12 questions, use different question types. • Share results with respondents. • Send out additional pulse surveys to smaller segments throughout the year.
    • 48. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q © 2014 Next Steps Want help? www.TheURLdr.com The URL Dr. is your partner in online marketing & web design
    • 49. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q © 2014 email survey promos events www.TheURLdr.com
    • 50. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q
    • 51. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q
    • 52. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q Win the chance for your small business to be on the radio To Enter: Like The URL Dr.’s Facebook page
    • 53. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q Win the chance for your small business to be on the radio To Enter: Like The URL Dr.’s Facebook page www.PrescriptionsForOnlineSuccess.com/ask-the-url-dr-question/
    • 54. Halfmoon YogaHalfmoon Yoga B•B•Q Get started today… www.TheURLdr.com Constant Contact Toolkit Want to learn more? PrescriptionsForOnlineSuccess.com Select Webinars and Radio Online webinars & Radio show Want help? 301-363-2710 KimButler@TheURLDr.com The URL Dr. is your partner… © 2014

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