Winnipeg Free Press
June 1, 2009 Monday Pg. A.11 ISSN: 0828-1785



Have your say
NDP needs an education

I am concerned a...
Ryerson Free Press
June 3, 2009, Wednesday



Minister defends record high tuition fees
Funding for aboriginal post-second...
Canwest News Service
June 11, 2009 Thursday



Minister's resignation demanded over interference
Meagan Fitzpatrick       ...
The Vancouver Province
June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A28



Tory minister accused of political interferenc...
Ottawa Citizen
June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A4



Academics accuse minister of meddling
Goodyear question...
National Post
June 12, 2009 Friday 
All But Toronto Edition CANADA; Pg. A6



Academic-autonomy line crossed by Goodyear: ...
National Post
June 12, 2009 Friday 
National Edition            CANADA; Pg. A7



Groups accuse Goodyear of academic inter...
The Leader-Post
June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. C9



Groups want minister to resign
Meagan Fitzpatrick,    ...
Edmonton Journal
June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A11


Minister's 'interference' sparks resignation calls fr...
Welland Tribune
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition              NEWS; Pg. B11



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER,    ...
The Standard
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition             NEWS; Pg. B4



New student assistance program gets an A
CHR...
The Simcoe Reformer
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 24



Finley and Conservatives get 'A' for effort from ...
Sault Star
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. A7



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER,            ...
The Muse
June 23, 2009 Thursday




Graduate survey brings good news, says CFS-NL chair
June 23, 2009 by Kerri Breen

A ne...
Sarnia Observer
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. A10



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER,      ...
Peterborough Examiner
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. B1



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER, ...
Pembroke Observer
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. 6



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER,      ...
Owen Sound Sun Times
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition              NEWS; Pg. A6



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER,...
Orillia Packet & Times
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition             NEWS; Pg. A7



Student loans overhauled
CHRISTINA...
North Bay Nugget
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition           NEWS; Pg. A8



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER,       ...
Niagara Falls Review
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition               NEWS; Pg. A7



Student funding changes get passin...
Kingston Whig-Standard
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. 9



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER, ...
The Globe and Mail
June 23, 2009 Tuesday                NATIONAL NEWS; EDUCATION; Pg. A4



Tories' grant program gets sma...
tributed to about 120,000 stu-
dents each year. The foundation
also provided 3,000 scholar-
ships based on merit, which wi...
Edmonton Sun
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 26



Students applaud new grants, loans
BY CHRISTINA SPENCER,...
Daily Miner and News
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. A7



Loans overhauled
EDUCATION: Student groups prais...
The Daily Herald-Tribune
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 8



Loans overhauled
BY CHRISTINA SPENCER,       ...
Cornwall Standard
                      Freeholder
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. 11



Loans o...
Chatham Daily News
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. A6



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCER,    ...
The Brockville Recorder and
           Times
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. A8



Loans overhauled
BY CHRI...
Belleville Intelligencer
June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition            NEWS; Pg. 16



Loans overhauled
CHRISTINA SPENCE...
Saskatchewan Sage
June 2009 NATIONAL NEWS; Pg. 2 Vol. 13 No. 9



Donor for scholarship shuns Aboriginal students
BY MALLO...
The Toronto Star
July 6, 2009 Monday          NEWS; Pg. A04



Stop meddling, students tell Tories
MPPs deny they were try...
UPI
July 10, 2009 Friday



High court: Political ads on buses legal
The Canadian Supreme Court ruled Friday two          ...
La Presse Canadienne
10 juillet 2009 vendredi            AUTEUR: CP



Publicité sur autobus: la Colombie-Britannique a br...
CBC News
July 10, 2009 Friday



BC Transit violated free speech with ad ban: Supreme
Court
CBC News                      ...
The Canadian Press
July 10, 2009 Friday           SUE BAILEY, CP



Top court strikes down political ad ban on B.C. buses
...
The B.C. Court of Appeal ruled        the atheist ''There's probably no      The atheist bus message move-
2-1 against him...
Canwest News Service
July 10, 2009 Friday        Philip Ling



Public transit can carry political advertising: Supreme
Co...
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Press Review Revue De Presse 2009 11

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PDF that was distributed to delegates on a CD in AGM binder. Contains favorable press of the CFS from 2009.

The Ryerson Free Press is the only student newspaper which has articles appearing on collection. The rest are from non student news papers.

Published in: News & Politics, Education
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Press Review Revue De Presse 2009 11

  1. 1. Winnipeg Free Press June 1, 2009 Monday Pg. A.11 ISSN: 0828-1785 Have your say NDP needs an education I am concerned about Manitoba minister of ad- vanced education Diane McGifford's comment that it is too soon to tell whether fees will rise in 2010-11 (Post-secondary tuition set to jump this fall, May 27). In the absence of provincial leadership, universi- ties and colleges will end up, as they generally do, making short-sighted decisions for maximum fee hikes, without evaluating the long-term con- sequences. Already, fee increases for 2009-10 for interna- tional students are outrageous, bringing them to more than triple domestic fees at the University of Manitoba. Treating visa students like cash cows might seem smart as a short-term fix, but it does serious damage to racial and cultural atti- tudes and high fees end up chasing students away from our institutions and province, hurting the university's pocket book in the end. It is time for McGifford to stop relying on uni- versities and colleges to make provincial policy decisions. It is also time for her to stop relying on half-baked research and on the policies of the previous Conservative government. If McGifford wants to emulate the Tories, why not turn to the policies of the Progressive Conservative gov- ernment in Newfoundland and Labrador? Tuition fee reductions, massive funding in- creases, funding for remote campuses in poverty- ravaged communities. Premier Danny Williams, unlike our Premier Gary Doer, has an overall plan for the most accessible, best-funded public university and college system in the country. Jonny Sopotiuk Canadian Federation Of Students
  2. 2. Ryerson Free Press June 3, 2009, Wednesday Minister defends record high tuition fees Funding for aboriginal post-secondary education the country. will be a top priority of the Canadian Federation of National Chief Phil Fontaine of the Assembly of Students (CFS) together with campaigns to combat First Nations also addressed the meeting, highlight- skyrocketing tuition fees in the upcoming 2009- ing the inadequate federal government role in Abo- 2010 school year, the CFS has announced after a riginal education. Since 1996 there has been a two membership meeting in Ottawa. per cent funding cap on many social programmes for Aboriginal peoples, including post-secondary Almost three hundred delegates attended the 55th support. This is despite persistent inflation and the CFS National General Meeting during mid-May, biggest demographic boom in Canada among Abo- which also addressed student debt and corporate riginal youth in the same time. Between 1996 and influence on campuses especially at the governing 2006 there has been a 47 per cent increase in the board level, including how to increase student rep- Aboriginal population. resentation on governing boards. According to the Assembly of First Nations, almost There have been a number of provincial mobiliza- 2,600 eligible Aboriginal students were denied tions of the Federation this past year, said Kather- access to education funding last school year. Statis- ine Giroux-Bougard, National Chairperson of the tics Canada reports that 43 per cent of Aboriginal CFS, pointing to student actions like the occupation peoples have obtained a high school diploma, while of the Manitoba Legislature and mass mobilizations only 5 per cent have a university degree. (In the across Ontario. The CFS, Giroux-Bougard said, is non-Aboriginal population the figure is 15 per cent focusing on the upcoming federal election as a fo- for both, respectively). rum to advance student issues. The CFS has also prepared fact-sheets which note “[Our] discussions around the last federal budget that while access to education is a right of all peo- have shown how it was a missed opportunity to ple, it is also a Treaty right recognized in the Cana- invest in public education,” Giroux-Bougard said, dian Constitution Act of 1982. The legacy of colo- noting that the current US administration has pro- nial education of Aboriginal peoples, however, vided greater funding towards research and acces- includes residential schools and successive failed or sibility than Harper’s Conservative government. A inadequate government programmes including the special guest to the meeting came from the United current Post Secondary Student Support Pro- States Student Association. gramme. Giroux-Bougard added that the Federal budget also short-changed students by providing no new fund- Aboriginal peoples not only need more funding, ing to the Canada summer jobs programme. one CFS fact-sheet says, noting that “the rights of Aboriginal peoples to self-governance extend to “Overall, students live the burden of student debt control over the education process.” They call for every day, and understand well the detrimental Aboriginal-led institutions that enable Aboriginal impacts of reduced access to education,” Giroux- instructors, students and elders to develop curricu- Bougard said. Through meetings like these, CFS lum reflecting the needs of communities and em- membership votes on all motions, and develops powering students. strategy as well, she said. “I think that there is a lot of interest by members in carrying out an action “The number of Aboriginal students with the plan engaged on the ground.” grades to continue post-secondary education in no way matches the funding,” Giroux-Bougard said, Although there have been some positive develop- adding that the National Aboriginal Caucus is very ments on the provincial level such as Newfound- active on the issue and that the CFS plans to make land and Labrador, Ontario is rapidly moving to raise this item much more in their general cam- become the province with the highest tuition fees in paign strategy.
  3. 3. Canwest News Service June 11, 2009 Thursday Minister's resignation demanded over interference Meagan Fitzpatrick nity,'' according to Nicholson. OTTAWA - Academic groups are accusing Gary But Goodyear has no intention of resigning, his Goodyear, minister of state for science and tech- spokesman, Gary Toft, told Canwest News Serv- nology, of political interference and want his ice, and he is strongly committed to the principle resignation after he called for a review of gov- of academic independence. ernment funding for a conference on Israel and Palestine. Concerns about the conference were expressed by members of the Jewish community, said Toft, The Social Sciences and Humanities Research and the minister received hundreds of e-mails. Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives grants to university-based researchers, ap- ``He felt it was important to bring those concerns proved a $19,750 grant for a conference orga- to SSHRC so that they could have an opportunity nized by York University and Queen's Univer- to examine those and to respond to those con- sity, titled Israel/Palestine: Mapping Models of cerns,'' said Toft. Statehood and Paths to Peace. The conference, taking place in Toronto on June 22-24, has more But James Turk, executive director of the than 50 confirmed speakers from across Canada CAUT, said contacting the SSHRC crossed the and abroad. line, and Goodyear has been in the job long enough to know better. On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the council and, the next day, released a statement ``If he's allowed to get away with this, this be- saying he had heard concerns that some speakers gins to undermine the whole kind of autonomy had made anti-Israel statements in the past. He that allows our universities to do the work they asked the council to do another peer review of do for the public,'' he said. the grant application, a move academic groups say is unprecedented for a minister. Goodyear should have advised those opposed to the conference to raise their concerns with the ``We feel that he has no business interfering in council instead of ``using his power to, implic- the peer-review process that's undertaken by itly, at least, intimidate the granting authority,'' SSHRC, and we feel this represents an overall said Turk. pattern, where the minister has demonstrated a lack of knowledge about the way science and Some Jewish organizations, including B'nai Brith social-science research works in Canada,'' said and the Jewish Defence League, are opposed to Megan Nicholson, chairwoman of the National the conference and plan to protest at it. Graduate Caucus of the Canadian Federation of Students. On Thursday, the group joined the Ca- Meir Weinstein, national director of the Jewish nadian Association of University Teachers Defence League, said Prime Minister Stephen (CAUT) in calling for Goodyear to step down. Harper's government has ``taken a clear stand that they're supportive of Israel'' and Goodyear The academics say Goodyear's actions suggest should go even further and order the funding for ``academic freedom in Canada may be under the conference reversed. attack'' and ``that these types of interference by the government will ultimately lead to a loss of standing in the international research commu-
  4. 4. The Vancouver Province June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A28 Tory minister accused of political interference Canwest News Service peer-review process that's undertaken by SSHRC, OTTAWA and we feel this represents an overall pattern, where the minister has demonstrated a lack of knowledge Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, about the way science and social-science research minister of state for science and technology, of po- works in Canada," said Megan Nicholson, chair- litical interference after he called for a review of woman of the National Graduate Caucus of the government funding for a conference on Israel and Canadian Federation of Students. The group joined Palestine. the Canadian Association of University Teachers in calling for Goodyear to quit. The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives Concerns about the conference were expressed by grants to university-based researchers, approved a members of the Jewish community, said Goodyear's $19,750 grant for a conference organized by York spokesman Gary Toft. and Queen's universities. The international confer- ence is taking place in Toronto in 10 days. "If he's allowed to get away with this, this begins to undermine the whole kind of autonomy that allows On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- our universities to do the work they do for the pub- cil, saying he had heard concerns that some speak- lic," said James Turk, executive director of the ers had made anti-Israel statements in the past. He CAUT. asked the council to do another peer review of the grant application, a move academic groups say is Goodyear should have advised those opposed to the unprecedented for a minister. conference to raise their concerns with the council instead of "using his power to, implicitly, at least, "We feel that he has no business interfering in the intimidate the granting authority," said Turk.
  5. 5. Ottawa Citizen June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A4 Academics accuse minister of meddling Goodyear questioned grant for Mideast talk Meagan Fitzpatrick, Canwest News Service On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- cil and, the next day, released a statement saying he Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, had heard concerns that some speakers had made minister of state for science and technology, of po- anti-Israel statements in the past. He asked the litical interference and are demanding his resigna- council to do another peer review of the grant ap- tion after he called for a review of government plication. funding for a conference on Israel and Palestine. "We feel that he has no business interfering in the The Social Sciences and Humanities Research peer-review process that's undertaken by SSHRC," Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives said Megan Nicholson, chairwoman of the National grants to university-based researchers, approved a Graduate Caucus of the Canadian Federation of $19,750 grant for a conference organized by York Students. University and Queen's University, titled "Is- rael/Palestine: Mapping Models of Statehood and On Thursday, the group joined the Canadian Asso- Paths to Peace." The conference, taking place in ciation of University Teachers in calling for Good- Toronto on June 22-24, has more than 50 confirmed year to resign. speakers.
  6. 6. National Post June 12, 2009 Friday 
All But Toronto Edition CANADA; Pg. A6 Academic-autonomy line crossed by Goodyear: groups Demand Resignation Review of funding for Israel, Palestine conference at issue Meagan Fitzpatrick, in the past. dreds of e-mails. Canwest News Service Mr. Goodyear asked the council to "He felt it was important to OTTAWA - Academic groups do another peer review of the bring those concerns to are accusing Gary Goodyear, grant application, a move aca- SSHRC so that they could Minister of State for Science demic groups say is unprece- have an opportunity to exam- and Technology, of political dented for a minister. ine those and to respond to interference and want his resig- those concerns," Mr. Toft said. nation after he called for a re- "We feel that he has no business view of government funding for interfering in the peer-review But James Turk, executive a conference on Israel and Pal- process that's undertaken by director of the CAUT, said estine. SSHRC, and we feel this repre- contacting the SSHRC crossed sents an overall pattern, where the the line, and Mr. Goodyear has The Social Sciences and Hu- Minister has demonstrated a lack been in the job long enough to manities Research Council, an of knowledge about the way sci- know better. arm's-length federal agency that ence and social-science research gives grants to university-based works in Canada," said Megan "If he's allowed to get away researchers, approved a $19,750 Nicholson, chairwoman of the with this, this begins to un- grant for a conference organized National Graduate Caucus of the dermine the whole kind of by York University and Queen's Canadian Federation of Students. autonomy that allows our uni- University, titled Is- versities to do the work they rael/Palestine: Mapping Models Yesterday, the group joined the do for the public," he said. of Statehood and Paths to Canadian Association of Univer- Peace. sity Teachers (CAUT) in calling Mr. Goodyear should have for Mr. Goodyear to step down. advised those opposed to the The conference, taking place in conference to raise their con- Toronto on June 22-24, has But Mr. Goodyear has no inten- cerns with the council instead more than 50 confirmed speak- tion of resigning, his spokesman, of "using his power to, implic- ers from across Canada and Gary Toft, told Canwest News itly, at least, intimidate the abroad. Service, and he is strongly com- granting authority," said Mr. mitted to the principle of aca- Turk. On June 4, Mr. Goodyear demic independence. phoned the head of the council Some Jewish organizations, and, the next day, released a Concerns about the conference including B'nai Brith and the statement saying he had heard were expressed by members of the Jewish Defence League, are concerns that some speakers Jewish community, said Mr. Toft, opposed to the conference and had made anti-Israel statements and the Minister received hun- plan to protest at it.
  7. 7. National Post June 12, 2009 Friday 
National Edition CANADA; Pg. A7 Groups accuse Goodyear of academic interference Demand Resignation Meagan Fitzpatrick, Mr. Goodyear asked the council hundreds of e-mails. Canwest News Service to do another peer review of the OTTAWA grant application, a move aca- "He felt it was important to bring demic groups say is unprece- those concerns to SSHRC so that Academic groups are accusing dented for a Minister. they could have an opportunity Gary Goodyear, Minister of State to examine those and to respond for Science and Technology, of "We feel that he has no business to those concerns," Mr. Toft said. political interference and want interfering in the peer-review his resignation after he called for process that's undertaken by But James Turk, executive direc- a review of government funding SSHRC, and we feel this repre- tor of the CAUT, said contacting for a conference on Israel and sents an overall pattern, where the SSHRC crossed the line, and Palestine. the Minister has demonstrated a Mr. Goodyear has been in the job lack of knowledge about the way long enough to know better. The Social Sciences and Hu- science and social-science re- manities Research Council, an search works in Canada," said "If he's allowed to get away with arm's-length federal agency that Megan Nicholson, chairwoman this, this begins to undermine the gives grants to university-based of the National Graduate Caucus whole kind of autonomy that researchers, approved a $19,750 of the Canadian Federation of allows our universities to do the grant for a conference organized Students. work they do for the public," he by York University and Queen's said. University, titled Israel/Palestine: Yesterday, the group joined the Mapping Models of Statehood Canadian Association of Univer- Mr. Goodyear should have ad- and Paths to Peace. sity Teachers (CAUT) in calling vised those opposed to the con- for Mr. Goodyear to step down. ference to raise their concerns The conference, taking place in with the council instead of "using Toronto on June 22-24, has more But Mr. Goodyear has no inten- his power to, implicitly, at least, than 50 confirmed speakers from tion of resigning, his spokesman, intimidate the granting author- across Canada and abroad. Gary Toft, told Canwest News ity," Mr. Turk said. Service, and he is strongly com- On June 4, Mr. Goodyear phoned mitted to the principle of aca- Some Jewish organizations, in- the head of the council and, the demic independence. cluding B'nai Brith and the Jew- next day, released a statement ish Defence League, are opposed saying he had heard concerns Concerns about the conference to the conference and plan to that some speakers had made were expressed by members of protest at it. anti-Israel statements in the past. the Jewish community, Mr. Toft said, and the Minister received
  8. 8. The Leader-Post June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. C9 Groups want minister to resign Meagan Fitzpatrick, had heard concerns that some speakers had made Canwest News Service anti-Israel statements in the past. He asked the OTTAWA council to do another peer review of the grant ap- plication, a move academic groups say is unprece- Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, dented for a minister. minister of state for science and technology, of po- litical interference and want his resignation after he "We feel that he has no business interfering in the called for a review of government funding for a peer-review process that's undertaken by SSHRC, conference on Israel and Palestine. and we feel this represents an overall pattern, where the minister has demonstrated a lack of knowledge The Social Sciences and Humanities Research about the way science and social-science research Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives works in Canada," said Megan Nicholson, chair- grants to university-based researchers, approved a woman of the National Graduate Caucus of the $19,750 grant for a conference organized by York Canadian Federation of Students. University and Queen's University, titled Is- rael/Palestine: Mapping Models of Statehood and On Thursday, the group joined the Canadian Asso- Paths to Peace. The conference, taking place in ciation of University Teachers (CAUT) in calling Toronto on June 22-24, has more than 50 confirmed for Goodyear to step down. speakers from across Canada and abroad. The academics say Goodyear's actions suggest On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- "academic freedom in Canada may be under at- cil and, the next day, released a statement saying he tack."
  9. 9. Edmonton Journal June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A11 Minister's 'interference' sparks resignation calls from academics Meagan Fitzpatrick, On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- Canwest News Service cil and, the next day, released a statement saying he OTTAWA had heard concerns that some speakers had made anti-Israel statements in the past. He asked the Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, council to do another peer review of the grant ap- minister of state for science and technology, of po- plication, a move academic groups say is unprece- litical interference and want his resignation after he dented for a minister. called for a review of government funding for a conference on Israel and Palestine. The academics say Goodyear's actions suggest "academic freedom in Canada may be under attack" The Social Sciences and Humanities Research and "that these types of interference by the gov- Council approved a $19,750 grant for the confer- ernment will ultimately lead to a loss of standing in ence, organized by York University and Queen's the international research community," according to University. The conference is to take place in To- Megan Nicholson, chairwoman of the National ronto on June 22-24. Graduate Caucus of the Canadian Federation of Students.
  10. 10. Welland Tribune June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. B11 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, The government says the new Canada Student NATIONAL BUREAU Grant program and Repayment Assistance Pro- OTTAWA gram will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the program they replace. Students in dan- Student groups gave the federal government a ger of missing payments will have an opportu- robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Fed- "There's a huge challenge for students and their eration of Students. families right now," said Arati Sharma, national director of the Canadian Alliance of Student As- Asked her advice to young people trying to de- sociations. Because of the tough economy, "stu- cide whether to continue their studies or find a dents are looking more toward loans and grants." job in a difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question that going forward, most jobs are The program, a 2008 budget promise whose de- going to require some post-secondary education. tails were fleshed out by Human Resources Min- ister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millen- "I think in these difficult times this may be a nium Scholarship Foundation set up by the for- good opportunity for students to take advantage mer Liberal government, which winds up this of these two new programs." year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at least two years of post-secondary education.
  11. 11. The Standard June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. B4 New student assistance program gets an A CHRISTINA SPENCER, SUN MEDIA OTTAWA Student groups gave the federal government a ro- bust "A" Monday for its overhauled system of post- secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking more toward loans and grants." The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- eral government, which winds up this year. The government says the new Canada Student Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the program they replace. In addition, students in dan- ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu- nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- ine Giroux-Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Students.
  12. 12. The Simcoe Reformer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 24 Finley and Conservatives get 'A' for effort from stu- dents STUDENT LOANS AND GRANTS BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program SUN MEDIA will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the Ottawa program they replace. In addition, students in dan- ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- in September. ine Giroux-Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national She said she was pleased the program was being director of the Canadian Alliance of Student administered through Finley's department and not Associations. Because of the tough economy, as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's "students are looking more toward loans and auditor general has expressed concern that arms- grants." length foundations are not sufficiently accountable The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details to Parliament. were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium Asked her advice to young people trying to decide Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a eral government, which winds up this year. difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question that going forward, most jobs are going to require The government says the new Canada Student some post-secondary education.
  13. 13. Sault Star June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A7 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student whether to continue their studies or find a job in a Associations. Because of the tough economy, difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question "students are looking more toward loans and that going forward, most jobs are going to require grants." some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  14. 14. The Muse June 23, 2009 Thursday Graduate survey brings good news, says CFS-NL chair June 23, 2009 by Kerri Breen A new report says the province’s post-secondary also give results by program. The reports will be grads are successfully transitioning into the distributed to all high schools, post-secondary workplace. institutions, and those involved in providing ca- reer counseling in the province. The Department of Education’s CareerSearch 2008 suggests that many graduates are satisfied Smith says the results are very promising, and he with their education, and finding jobs faster. expects future CareerSearch results to be even According to the report, which is based on sur- more positive. vey results, graduates of 2006 experienced higher full-time employment when compared to “[CareerSearch is] showing that the policies and graduates of 2002. Eight per cent more graduates programs that the government is implementing reported earning high wages and five per cent are working.” more found jobs within three months of graduat- ing. In 2000, the provincial government introduced a 25 per cent tuition fee reduction at Memorial, Almost 60 per cent of MUN 2006 graduates had and many funding increases and debt reduction full time jobs, and almost 95 per cent of them initiatives have been implemented since. were satisfied with their education. Smith predicts survey results from more recent “They’re not just working,” said Canadian graduates will show decreased debt loads due to Federation of Students (CFS) Provincial the tuition freeze and 2005’s up-front, needs- Chairperson Daniel Smith, “they’re working in based grants program in particular. Student aid fields related to what they studied.” usage went down from 45 to 35 per cent from 2002 to 2006. Students at private colleges and the College of the North Atlantic were slightly more satisfied “We’re really looking forward to the next data with their financial investment in their education set because for this data set, the only real thing than Memorial undergraduates. They were also that these graduates would have benefited from about ten per cent more likely to stay in the prov- would have been the tuition fee reductions.” ince, and about 18 per cent more likely to have full-time jobs a year after graduating. Overall, CareerSearch was last published in 2004. After out-migration increased by five per cent from that year, it went on hiatus to work around new 2002 to 2006. provincial privacy legislation that had forbidden private colleges from providing the Department The data, collected by The Newfoundland and of Education with personal info for graduates. Labrador Statistics Agency, accounted for almost half of MUN, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, and Smith says he is glad CareerSearch was given an Marine Institute students who graduated in 2006. opportunity to continue. The response rate for other institutions was 42.2 per cent. “It’s a tool we have to go back and use as a ref- erence,” Smith said. “It’s a check and balance, I In addition to providing general trends about guess, to see if things are working.” students’ job market transition, the two reports
  15. 15. Sarnia Observer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A10 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  16. 16. Peterborough Examiner June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. B1 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the NATIONAL BUREAU program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- OTTAWA -- Student groups gave the federal gov- ate how they pay their debt. ernment a robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine takes effect in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  17. 17. Pembroke Observer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 6 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  18. 18. Owen Sound Sun Times June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A6 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, Grant program and Repayment Assistance Pro- NATIONAL BUREAU gram will direct grants to 100,000 more students OTTAWA than the program they replace. Students in dan- ger of missing payments will have an opportu- Student groups gave the federal government a nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine effect in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Fed- eration of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to de- director of the Canadian Alliance of Student As- cide whether to continue their studies or find a sociations. Because of the tough economy, "stu- job in a difficult economy, Finley said, "There's dents are looking more toward loans and grants." no question that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose de- tails were fleshed out by Human Resources Min- "I think in these difficult times this may be a ister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millen- good opportunity for students to take advantage nium Scholarship Foundation set up by the for- of these two new programs." mer Liberal government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at least two years of post-secondary education. The government says the new Canada Student
  19. 19. Orillia Packet & Times June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A7 Student loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, SUN MEDIA OTTAWA -Student groups gave the federal gov- ernment a robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking more toward loans and grants." The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- eral government. The government says the new Canada Student Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the program they replace. In addition, students in danger of missing loan pay- ments will have an opportunity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- ine Giroux- Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Students. She said she was pleased the program was being administered through Finley's department and not as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's auditor general has expressed concern that arms- length foundations are not sufficiently accountable to Parliament. Asked her advice to young people trying to decide whether to continue their studies or find a job in a difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education."
  20. 20. North Bay Nugget June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A8 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, promise whose details were eration of Students. NATIONAL BUREAU fleshed out by Human Resources OTTAWA Minister Diane Finley, follows Asked her advice to young on from the Millennium Scholar- people trying to decide Student groups gave the federal ship Foundation set up by the whether to continue their stud- government a robust A" yester- former Liberal government, ies or find a job in a difficult day for its overhauled system of which winds up this year. economy, Finley said, There's post-secondary loans and no question that going forward, grants, which takes effect in The government says the new most jobs are going to require September. Canada Student Grant program some post-secondary educa- and Repayment Assistance Pro- tion. There's a huge challenge for gram will direct grants to students and their families right 100,000 more students than the I think in these difficult times now," said Arati Sharma, na- program they replace. Students in this may be a good opportunity tional director of the Canadian danger of missing payments will for students to take advantage Alliance of Student Associa- have an opportunity to renegoti- of these two new programs." tions. Because of the tough ate how they pay their debt. economy, students are looking Giroux-Bougard said 70% of more toward loans and grants." Average debt is about $25,000, new jobs require at least two said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, years of post-secondary educa- The program, a 2008 budget chairman of the Canadian Fed- tion.
  21. 21. Niagara Falls Review June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A7 Student funding changes get passing grade CHRISTINA SPENCER, nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. SUN MEDIA OTTAWA Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- ine Giroux-Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Student groups gave the federal government a ro- Federation of Students. bust "A" Monday for its overhauled system of post- secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in She said she was pleased the program was being September. administered through Finley's department and not as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's "There's a huge challenge for students and their auditor general has expressed concern that arms- families right now," said Arati Sharma, national length foundations are not sufficiently accountable director of the Canadian Alliance of Student to Parliament. Associations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking toward loans and grants." Asked her advice to young people trying to decide whether to continue their studies or find a job in a The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details difficult economy, Finley said: "There's no question were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister that going forward, most jobs are going to require Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium some post-secondary education. Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- eral government, which winds up this year. "I think in these difficult times this may be a good opportunity for students to take advantage of these The government says the new Canada Student two new programs." Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the Giroux-Bougard said 70 per cent of new jobs re- program they replace. In addition, students in dan- quire at least two years of post-secondary educa- ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu- tion.
  22. 22. Kingston Whig-Standard June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 9 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the NATIONAL BUREAU program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- OTTAWA -- Student groups gave the federal gov- ate how they pay their debt. ernment a robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine takes effect in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  23. 23. The Globe and Mail June 23, 2009 Tuesday NATIONAL NEWS; EDUCATION; Pg. A4 Tories' grant program gets smaller cheques to more students BILL CURRY AND ELIZA be lower. aging more students to enroll BETH CHURCH in college or university. "I sus- OTTAWA and TORONTO The government is also updating pect that it will not have the a federal program for low- effect on access that they think The Conservative government is income Canadians struggling to it will, but spreading money aligning itself with the back-to- repay federal student loans. around more is likely to be school crowd as the grim job Payments will be calculated politically popular," he said. market triggers a spike in col- based on family income rather lege and university applications. than how much is owed, and the Pollster Nik Nanos, president maximum repayment period for a of Nanos Research, said he The suburban Ottawa campus of loan will not exceed 15 years. sees a clear political dimension Algonquin University was in having a Conservative min- nearly deserted as Diane Finley, Ms. Finley said her announce- ister discussing student loan the Minister for Human Re- ment was intended to get the issues during a recession. sources and Skills Develop- word out so that low-income ment, held a news conference Canadians know they have op- "This is part of a broader nar- launching her government's new tions, particularly during a reces- rative of the government trying Canada Student Loans and sion. to reach out to middle-class Grants Program. families, which they tend to be "I think in these difficult times, quite focused on," he said, Officials have been working this may be a good opportunity noting that recessions histori- with student groups on the de- for students to take advantage of cally push Canadians into edu- tails since the program was an- these two new programs," she cation programs. nounced more than a year ago said. in the 2008 budget. This is the "If you think of this in terms of first summer that students can Two of Canada's main student what I'll say 'the Tim Hortons' apply for the new grant pro- groups - the Canadian Federation demographic, this is tailor- gram, which replaces the Mil- of Students and the Canadian made for that," Mr. Nanos lennium Scholarship Founda- Alliance of Student Associations said. "What the Conservatives tion, created by the former Lib- - said the new programs come at are trying to do is get ahead of eral government as a legacy of a good time given that recent behaviour they know is going former prime minister Jean high school graduates face grim to happen." Chrétien. job prospects unless they sign up for higher education. The Council of Ontario Uni- Under the new program, each versities has said 2009 applica- year about 245,000 college and But Alex Usher, a consultant tions are the second-highest on university students would qual- with Toronto-based Educational record, and Ontario's 24 col- ify for grants that do not have to Policy Institute, said the revised leges are reporting an 8.5 per be repaid. That would be an program does not include addi- cent spike. increase of more than 100,000 tional money for students and is students when compared to the an attempt to distribute existing The average grant handed out previous program, but the funds differently. The unan- in previous years by the Cana- individual awards of up to swered question, he said, is dian Millennium Scholarship $2,000 for eight months of whether this change will encour- Foundation was $3,000, dis- study will be lower.
  24. 24. tributed to about 120,000 stu- dents each year. The foundation also provided 3,000 scholar- ships based on merit, which will not be replaced under the new federal program. The move to new monthly pay- ments approved at the begin- ning of a school year has been characterized by the govern- ment as a more effective way of encouraging students to go on to college and university because of its predictability. Previously, students received one payment.
  25. 25. Edmonton Sun June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 26 Students applaud new grants, loans BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. OTTAWA Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ine Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of Federation of Students. post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. She said she was pleased the program was being administered through Finley's department and not HUGE CHALLENGE as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's "There's a huge challenge for students and their auditor general has expressed concern that arms- families right now," said Arati Sharma, national length foundations are not sufficiently accountable director of the Canadian Alliance of Student to Parliament. Associations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking more toward loans and STAY IN SCHOOL grants." Asked her advice to young people trying to decide The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details whether to continue their studies or find a job in a were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question Diane Finley, follows from the Millennium Schol- that going forward, most jobs are going to require arship Foundation set up by the former Liberal gov- some post-secondary education. I think in these ernment, which winds up this year. difficult times this may be a good opportunity for students to take advantage of these two new pro- The government says the new Canada Student grams." Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at program they replace. In addition, students in dan- least two years of post-secondary education. ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu-
  26. 26. Daily Miner and News June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. A7 Loans overhauled EDUCATION: Student groups praise government BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  27. 27. The Daily Herald-Tribune June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 8 Loans overhauled BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  28. 28. Cornwall Standard Freeholder June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 11 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  29. 29. Chatham Daily News June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A6 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  30. 30. The Brockville Recorder and Times June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. A8 Loans overhauled BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  31. 31. Belleville Intelligencer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 16 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  32. 32. Saskatchewan Sage June 2009 NATIONAL NEWS; Pg. 2 Vol. 13 No. 9 Donor for scholarship shuns Aboriginal students BY MALLORY who have qualified for loans," she ANDERSON After phone calls from Saskatche- said. She adds that despite organi- Sage Staff Writer wan Sage, the University of Sas- zations like NAAF that offer SASKATOON katchewan and its Aboriginal Stu- scholarships to Aboriginal students dent Centre refused to comment on in need, there is a large amount of The University of Saskatchewan the matter. Aboriginal students who they still has turned down a $500,000 en- cannot help, who do not have other dowment from a Saskatoon resi- Roberta Jamieson, President and forms of funding support available. dent, after the scholarship donor Chief Executive Officer of the instructed the money be distributed National Aboriginal Achievement "So there are many of our students specifically to non-Aboriginal Foundation (NAAF), said she be- who are not finishing school who students. lieves there is a common miscon- are not getting the support when ception by the public about fund- they do overcome all the barriers The anonymous donor, who identi- ing for Aboriginal students. and get to postsecondary," she fied herself as university alumni, said. said she hoped to "level out the "There's a myth out there that playing field" for supposedly dis- really should be challenged - that "I think we need a reality check." advantaged non- Aboriginal stu- Aboriginal students have (their) dents, according to CANWEST education paid for them, and eve- According to the Canadian Federa- news, and she claimed it was not rything else from cradle to grave. tion of Students website, education meant to be racist. And it simply is not true," she said. for Aboriginal and Inuit students from elementary through post- In an interview with The Star- "There is financial support to Abo- secondary is a treaty right recog- Phoenix, the donor said that she riginal students - to First Nation, nized in the Constitution Act of struggled through her own degree Inuit and Metis students - but it is 1982. and wants to ensure financial sup- very limited." port for other non- Aboriginal stu- The website says that the federal dents who are in the same position Jamieson points out Aboriginal government currently provides she once found herself in as a uni- students have equal opportunity to funding for status First Nations versity student. apply for student loans, further- and Inuit students through the more, she gives reasons as to why Post-Secondary Student Support University of Saskatchewan offi- Aboriginal students need the spe- Program (PSSSP). Individual band cials have said that accepting the cial support offered through desig- councils with their own eligibility money and awarding it with the nated bursaries and scholarships. criteria are responsible for distrib- stipulation it not go to Aboriginal uting the funding to students, and students would be violating Hu- "Well, frankly, most of our people oftentimes, this overlooks many man Rights Legislation, as well as are living in circumstances of pov- applicants who are not able to ac- the university's policy. erty," she said. cess funding and who must look at other funding sources. Out of all Vice President of Advancement, "We do have students that take out the Aboriginal students attending Heather Magotiaux stated to media loans... [but] by and large our peo- school, only 15% of university that "an award cannot be created to ple across Canada are living in students and only 25% of the col- exclude a disadvantaged group... circumstances where they have not lege students receive PSSSP sup- and Aboriginal persons would be had access to that kind of financial port from their registered band. considered a disadvantaged group literacy, they do not have people in requiring special action." their families who have had jobs,
  33. 33. The Toronto Star July 6, 2009 Monday NEWS; Pg. A04 Stop meddling, students tell Tories MPPs deny they were trying to sway York election results Louise Brown, eration of Students (CFS) called Toronto Star It was these events that prompted such high-level exchange "an Kent and Shurman to fire off the absolute affront to the democ- York University, still recovering emails, which various student ratic process of student govern- from a bitter 12-week strike, groups say was way out of line. ment." cannot seem to escape political fireworks, even during the sum- "The Conservative party has no "I find it bizarre for a federal mer. authority at all for getting in- minister (Kent is Canada's minis- volved in student politics and ter of state for foreign affairs in In this latest fracas, the York neither does the York admini- the Americas) to try to interfere Federation of Students is accus- stration. We're an incorporated, in a student election," said CFS ing two Conservative politicians independent body," charged chair Shelley Melanson. "If stu- - federal MP Peter Kent and pro- Krisna Saravanamuttu, who was dents were concerned about the vincial MPP Peter Shurman - of elected president of the York election process, there are interfering with York's turbulent Federation of Students in the mechanisms on campus for ex- student politics. controversial vote. "Prime Minis- pressing those concerns." ter Stephen Harper's foot soldiers Through a Freedom of Informa- are deliberately interfering with In one email to Tiffin at 2: 14 tion request, the student federa- student elections to help candi- a.m. the night of ballot counting, tion obtained 50 pages of email dates more friendly to their poli- Kent's special assistant said he exchanges in which assistants for cies." was there on campus and was the two politicians, who repre- concerned nobody from the uni- sent student-heavy ridings north Nonsense, countered Kent and versity was monitoring the proc- of the campus, repeatedly ques- Shurman, who insist they were ess. tion university executives about merely seeking updates on behalf the results of a student council of constituents, many of them In another email, Tiffin listed the vote this spring. Jewish students from Thornhill alleged voting irregularities in a who say they have concerns report to York President Mam- That election saw a more left- about anti-Semitism on campus. douh Shoukri, who was to meet wing, pro-labour, pro-Palestinian Kent. slate of candidates beat a more York vice-president Rob Tiffin conservative, pro-Israeli roster. said the university treated the "The perception (of the vote) is emails as requests for informa- not good, but it is also not proof Despite complaints of voting tion, not as political pressure. that the voting process was hi- irregularities from the losing side York has no intention of reopen- jacked," Tiffin concluded. "Bot- - that there was campaigning too ing the vote, he said, although he tom - smoke but no gun." close to the ballot box, that extra has asked the student federation ballots had been printed, that to join in seeking a review of York has seen tensions build up there were partisan stickers on York's election process by an in recent months. A February polling officers' laptops - the outside accounting firm. news conference criticizing the student election committee up- student federation drew a protest held the vote. The head of the Canadian Fed- so heated that police were called.
  34. 34. UPI July 10, 2009 Friday High court: Political ads on buses legal The Canadian Supreme Court ruled Friday two The transit groups argued the ads they refused transit systems in British Columbia were wrong weren't about a public service or goods or serv- in forbidding political advertising on city buses. ices, and said they could "cause offense to any person ... or create controversy." The unanimous ruling in Ottawa said the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority and British Writing for the court, Justice Marie Deschamps Columbia Transit breached the Charter of Rights disagreed. and Freedoms by refusing to run political ads during the 2005 provincial election, the Canwest "Like a city street, a city bus is a public place News Service reported. where individuals can openly interact with each other and their surroundings," the ruling said. The appeal was filed by the British Columbia "The side of a bus is therefore a location where Teachers' Federation and the Canadian Federa- expressive activity is protected by the charter." tion of Students.
  35. 35. La Presse Canadienne 10 juillet 2009 vendredi AUTEUR: CP Publicité sur autobus: la Colombie-Britannique a brimé la liberté d'expression OTTAWA - Dans un arrêt unanime de huit veille des élections provinciales de 2005. Ces juges, la Cour suprême du Canada a statué, ven- publicités traitaient de divers sujets, notamment dredi, que deux sociétés de transport de la Co- des frais de scolarité, de l'environnement et de lombie-Britannique avaient brimé le droit à la fermetures d'écoles. libre expression en interdisant des publicités électorales sur leurs autobus. Mais la "Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority" ainsi que la "British Columbia Tran- "Dans une ville, l'autobus comme la voie pub- sit" les avaient refusées, invoquant leur politique lique constituent des lieux publics où les gens qui interdit toute publicité dont le message "peut peuvent interagir ouvertement entre eux et avec offenser (...) ou créer la controverse". l'environnement", a écrit la juge Marie Deschamps au nom de ses collègues. La fédération étudiante voulait afficher l'image d'une foule à un concert, accompagnée du texte "Je ne vois dans ce lieu aucune caractéristique suivant: "Inscrivez-vous sur les listes électorales laissant croire que l'expression y minerait les maintenant. Prenez connaissance des enjeux. valeurs sous-jacentes à la liberté d'expression. Votez le 17 mai 2005". Au contraire, il permet à un grand nombre d'an- nonceurs de s'adresser à un large auditoire et De leur côté, les enseignants voulaient présenter promeut ainsi en fait les valeurs qui sous-tendent le message suivant: "2500 professeurs de moins. la libre expression. 113 écoles fermées. Nos élèves. Vos enfants. Il est important d'en parler". "J'arrive donc à la conclusion que l'activité ex- pressive sur le côté d'un autobus bénéficie de la En première instance, un juge avait rappelé que protection prévue (à la Charte)." les sociétés de transport, à titre de sociétés pub- liques, doivent respecter la Charte des droits et Cette décision représente une victoire pour la libertés. Toutefois, il n'avait pas estimé que la section de la Colombie-Britannique de la Fédéra- politique des deux sociétés de transport brimait tion canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants, et le droit à la liberté d'expression. pour la Fédération des enseignants de la Colom- bie-Britannique. Les deux organisations avaient La Cour d'appel de Colombie-Britannique avait tenté d'afficher des publicités sur les autobus à la renversé cette décision.
  36. 36. CBC News July 10, 2009 Friday BC Transit violated free speech with ad ban: Supreme Court CBC News the fight to preserve free speech. British Columbia Transit violated rights to free TransLink spokesman Ken Hardie said the decision speech when it refused to carry political ads on the finally clarifies the ground rules for the company. outside of its buses, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled. "What we wanted was to basically canvass the issue as thoroughly as possible, Hardie said Friday. "We The unanimous 8-0 ruling is a victory for the Cana- still have, probably, the same options that would be dian Federation of Students and the British Colum- available to any advertising medium to look at the bia Teachers' Federation, two groups that tried to appropriateness of advertising" political or other- place ads on the outside of B.C. buses in the run-up wise" and to accept or reject advertising based on to the provincial election in 2005. established critieria that has been out there for many years." Grace Pastine, litigation director for the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, said BC Transit and Hardie said TransLink will follow those guidelines, TransLink now have no choice but to change their which are set down by the Canadian Advertising policy of only allowing commercial advertising. Standards Council, which he says gives the com- pany flexibility in what advertising it does accept. "If TransLink continues to allow other types of ad- vertising" continues to allow commercial advertis- The ads in dispute raised several issues, including ing on the sides of buses" then they must also allow tuition fees, the environment and school closures. political advertising. That is, it's not for them to decide what is political and what is commercial, BC Transit had refused to run them, saying its pol- and to allow one but not the other." icy bans political ads along with any message "likely to cause offence or create controversy." Pastine called the court victory an important win in
  37. 37. The Canadian Press July 10, 2009 Friday SUE BAILEY, CP Top court strikes down political ad ban on B.C. buses OTTAWA - Watch for political watched by cities across Canada that bus officials had no prob- ads coming soon to the side of a that have so far rejected atheist lem running commercial ads. It bus near you. bus banners declaring: ''There's also said their policy attempting probably no God. Now stop wor- to vanquish all controversy ''is British Columbia transit offi- rying and enjoy your life.'' unnecessarily broad.'' cials were on the wrong side of the Charter when they refused The ruling protecting political ''Citizens, including bus riders, to carry messages on the sides ads will be viewed as a boon to are expected to put up with of their buses aimed at provin- those hoping to buy bus space for some controversy in a free and cial voters, the country's top their atheist message. democratic society.'' court said Friday. Friday's ruling is a victory for the Still, there are times when mes- The Supreme Court of Canada Canadian Federation of Students sages in publicly governed struck down transit policies and the British Columbia Teach- spaces can be justifiably re- banning all political ads, saying ers' Federation. stricted, Deschamps wrote. The they violate rights to free fact that buses are used by an speech. Both groups tried to place ads on essentially captive audience, the outside of B.C. buses leading including children, must be con- ''Like a city street, a city bus is a up to the provincial election in sidered. public place where individuals 2005. can openly interact with each ''Thus, limits on advertising are other and their surroundings,'' They raised several issues includ- contextual.'' wrote Justice Marie Deschamps ing voter turnout, tuition fees, the in the 8-0 ruling. environment and school closures. The Canadian Code of Adver- tising Standards ''could be used All nine judges heard the case The student federation had hoped as a guide to establish reason- in March 2008 but Justice to run an image of a crowd at a able limits ... on discriminatory Michel Bastarache has since concert with the text: ''Register content or on ads which incite retired. now. Learn the issues. Vote May or condone violence or other 17, 2005.'' unlawful behaviour. ''I do not see any aspect of the location that suggests that ex- The teachers union wanted to ''But the determination of what pression within it would under- post a banner on the side of buses is justified will depend on the mine the values underlying free saying: ''2,500 fewer teachers. facts in the particular case.'' expression,'' Deschamps wrote. 113 schools closed. Our students. ''On the contrary, the space al- Your kids. Worth speaking out At trial, the judge found that lows for expression by a broad for.'' transit bodies, as publicly con- range of speakers to a large trolled government entities, public audience. British Columbia Transit and must uphold the Charter of TransLink refused to run them, Rights and Freedoms. But he ''I therefore conclude that the saying policy bars political ads cited the fact that transit com- side of a bus is a location where along with any message ''likely pany policy had never allowed expressive activity is protected to cause offence ... or create con- political ads, and did not define by ... the Charter.'' troversy.'' that as a breach of free expres- sion. The judgment was being The high court pointedly noted
  38. 38. The B.C. Court of Appeal ruled the atheist ''There's probably no The atheist bus message move- 2-1 against him, and struck God'' ads. ment was born _ and it soon down any blanket ban on politi- picked up speed. cal messaging as unconstitu- That message has been placed on tional. public transit systems in several Toronto, Calgary, and Montreal countries including the U.S., It- accepted and ran the ''There's Dissenting B.C. Justice Mary aly, Spain, the Netherlands and probably no God'' ads, but they Southin said political bus ads other parts of Europe since last hit a roadblock in Ottawa. The don't qualify as the type of ex- year. capital's transit service OC pression protected by the Char- Transpo rejected them at first. ter. Forcing transit authorities to The atheist campaign began in display such messages would be Britain when a woman was an- The company wound up dis- like obliging newspapers to noyed that an ad posted in a playing the message on the side publish opinion pieces, she London bus linked her to a web- of its buses last spring after Ot- wrote. site warning that non-Christians tawa city council cast a split will ''spend all eternity in torment vote to overturn the refusal Several cities including Van- in hell.'' She decided to raise amid concerns about a costly couver, Victoria, Halifax and money for a rebuttal. legal fight. London, Ont., initially rejected
  39. 39. Canwest News Service July 10, 2009 Friday Philip Ling Public transit can carry political advertising: Supreme Court OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada has highly valued form of expression in a public lo- ruled the decision by two British Columbia tran- cation that serves as an important place for pub- sit systems banning political advertising from its lic discourse. They therefore do not constitute a bus fleet violated rights to free speech. minimal impairment of freedom of expression,'' she wrote. In a unanimous ruling Friday to strike down the policy, the country's highest court said B.C.'s In 2005, the BCTF, which represents 40,000 two transit agencies - Greater Vancouver Trans- public school teachers, went to B. C. Supreme portation Authority and British Columbia Transit Court after claiming that the refusal to run ads - violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and infringed on its right to free speech. Freedoms by rejecting advertising on the sides of buses from the Canadian Federation of Students The Canadian Federation of Students was also and the B.C. Teachers' Federation during the involved after its "Rock The Vote" ad campaign 2005 provincial election. - aimed at getting out the youth vote - was simi- larly denied. That decision was also based on company policy outlawing political advertising. The trial judge found TransLink had not in- fringed on their rights, arguing the sides of buses The transit authorities, which had adopted essen- were not protected arenas of expression. tially identical advertising policies, refused the ads because they weren't a public service or The B.C. Court of Appeal overturned that ruling about goods or services, and because the ads in 2006. would likely "cause offence to any person or group of persons or create controversy.'' On Friday, the highest court decision agreed with the original trial judge, by noting the sides of "I have some difficulty seeing how an adver- buses were not protected arenas of expression. tisement on the side of a bus that constitutes po- litical speech might create a safety risk or an "Like a city street, a city bus is a public place unwelcoming environment for transit users,'' where individuals can openly interact with each Justice Marie Deschamps wrote in her judgment. other and their surroundings,'' Deschamps wrote. "The side of a bus is therefore a location where "The policies amount to a blanket exclusion of a expressive activity is protected by the Charter.''

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