Press Review   Revue De Presse   2009 11
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Press Review Revue De Presse 2009 11

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PDF that was distributed to delegates on a CD in AGM binder. Contains favorable press of the CFS from 2009. ...

PDF that was distributed to delegates on a CD in AGM binder. Contains favorable press of the CFS from 2009.

The Ryerson Free Press is the only student newspaper which has articles appearing on collection. The rest are from non student news papers.

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Press Review   Revue De Presse   2009 11 Press Review Revue De Presse 2009 11 Document Transcript

  • Winnipeg Free Press June 1, 2009 Monday Pg. A.11 ISSN: 0828-1785 Have your say NDP needs an education I am concerned about Manitoba minister of ad- vanced education Diane McGifford's comment that it is too soon to tell whether fees will rise in 2010-11 (Post-secondary tuition set to jump this fall, May 27). In the absence of provincial leadership, universi- ties and colleges will end up, as they generally do, making short-sighted decisions for maximum fee hikes, without evaluating the long-term con- sequences. Already, fee increases for 2009-10 for interna- tional students are outrageous, bringing them to more than triple domestic fees at the University of Manitoba. Treating visa students like cash cows might seem smart as a short-term fix, but it does serious damage to racial and cultural atti- tudes and high fees end up chasing students away from our institutions and province, hurting the university's pocket book in the end. It is time for McGifford to stop relying on uni- versities and colleges to make provincial policy decisions. It is also time for her to stop relying on half-baked research and on the policies of the previous Conservative government. If McGifford wants to emulate the Tories, why not turn to the policies of the Progressive Conservative gov- ernment in Newfoundland and Labrador? Tuition fee reductions, massive funding in- creases, funding for remote campuses in poverty- ravaged communities. Premier Danny Williams, unlike our Premier Gary Doer, has an overall plan for the most accessible, best-funded public university and college system in the country. Jonny Sopotiuk Canadian Federation Of Students
  • Ryerson Free Press June 3, 2009, Wednesday Minister defends record high tuition fees Funding for aboriginal post-secondary education the country. will be a top priority of the Canadian Federation of National Chief Phil Fontaine of the Assembly of Students (CFS) together with campaigns to combat First Nations also addressed the meeting, highlight- skyrocketing tuition fees in the upcoming 2009- ing the inadequate federal government role in Abo- 2010 school year, the CFS has announced after a riginal education. Since 1996 there has been a two membership meeting in Ottawa. per cent funding cap on many social programmes for Aboriginal peoples, including post-secondary Almost three hundred delegates attended the 55th support. This is despite persistent inflation and the CFS National General Meeting during mid-May, biggest demographic boom in Canada among Abo- which also addressed student debt and corporate riginal youth in the same time. Between 1996 and influence on campuses especially at the governing 2006 there has been a 47 per cent increase in the board level, including how to increase student rep- Aboriginal population. resentation on governing boards. According to the Assembly of First Nations, almost There have been a number of provincial mobiliza- 2,600 eligible Aboriginal students were denied tions of the Federation this past year, said Kather- access to education funding last school year. Statis- ine Giroux-Bougard, National Chairperson of the tics Canada reports that 43 per cent of Aboriginal CFS, pointing to student actions like the occupation peoples have obtained a high school diploma, while of the Manitoba Legislature and mass mobilizations only 5 per cent have a university degree. (In the across Ontario. The CFS, Giroux-Bougard said, is non-Aboriginal population the figure is 15 per cent focusing on the upcoming federal election as a fo- for both, respectively). rum to advance student issues. The CFS has also prepared fact-sheets which note “[Our] discussions around the last federal budget that while access to education is a right of all peo- have shown how it was a missed opportunity to ple, it is also a Treaty right recognized in the Cana- invest in public education,” Giroux-Bougard said, dian Constitution Act of 1982. The legacy of colo- noting that the current US administration has pro- nial education of Aboriginal peoples, however, vided greater funding towards research and acces- includes residential schools and successive failed or sibility than Harper’s Conservative government. A inadequate government programmes including the special guest to the meeting came from the United current Post Secondary Student Support Pro- States Student Association. gramme. Giroux-Bougard added that the Federal budget also short-changed students by providing no new fund- Aboriginal peoples not only need more funding, ing to the Canada summer jobs programme. one CFS fact-sheet says, noting that “the rights of Aboriginal peoples to self-governance extend to “Overall, students live the burden of student debt control over the education process.” They call for every day, and understand well the detrimental Aboriginal-led institutions that enable Aboriginal impacts of reduced access to education,” Giroux- instructors, students and elders to develop curricu- Bougard said. Through meetings like these, CFS lum reflecting the needs of communities and em- membership votes on all motions, and develops powering students. strategy as well, she said. “I think that there is a lot of interest by members in carrying out an action “The number of Aboriginal students with the plan engaged on the ground.” grades to continue post-secondary education in no way matches the funding,” Giroux-Bougard said, Although there have been some positive develop- adding that the National Aboriginal Caucus is very ments on the provincial level such as Newfound- active on the issue and that the CFS plans to make land and Labrador, Ontario is rapidly moving to raise this item much more in their general cam- become the province with the highest tuition fees in paign strategy.
  • Canwest News Service June 11, 2009 Thursday Minister's resignation demanded over interference Meagan Fitzpatrick nity,'' according to Nicholson. OTTAWA - Academic groups are accusing Gary But Goodyear has no intention of resigning, his Goodyear, minister of state for science and tech- spokesman, Gary Toft, told Canwest News Serv- nology, of political interference and want his ice, and he is strongly committed to the principle resignation after he called for a review of gov- of academic independence. ernment funding for a conference on Israel and Palestine. Concerns about the conference were expressed by members of the Jewish community, said Toft, The Social Sciences and Humanities Research and the minister received hundreds of e-mails. Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives grants to university-based researchers, ap- ``He felt it was important to bring those concerns proved a $19,750 grant for a conference orga- to SSHRC so that they could have an opportunity nized by York University and Queen's Univer- to examine those and to respond to those con- sity, titled Israel/Palestine: Mapping Models of cerns,'' said Toft. Statehood and Paths to Peace. The conference, taking place in Toronto on June 22-24, has more But James Turk, executive director of the than 50 confirmed speakers from across Canada CAUT, said contacting the SSHRC crossed the and abroad. line, and Goodyear has been in the job long enough to know better. On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the council and, the next day, released a statement ``If he's allowed to get away with this, this be- saying he had heard concerns that some speakers gins to undermine the whole kind of autonomy had made anti-Israel statements in the past. He that allows our universities to do the work they asked the council to do another peer review of do for the public,'' he said. the grant application, a move academic groups say is unprecedented for a minister. Goodyear should have advised those opposed to the conference to raise their concerns with the ``We feel that he has no business interfering in council instead of ``using his power to, implic- the peer-review process that's undertaken by itly, at least, intimidate the granting authority,'' SSHRC, and we feel this represents an overall said Turk. pattern, where the minister has demonstrated a lack of knowledge about the way science and Some Jewish organizations, including B'nai Brith social-science research works in Canada,'' said and the Jewish Defence League, are opposed to Megan Nicholson, chairwoman of the National the conference and plan to protest at it. Graduate Caucus of the Canadian Federation of Students. On Thursday, the group joined the Ca- Meir Weinstein, national director of the Jewish nadian Association of University Teachers Defence League, said Prime Minister Stephen (CAUT) in calling for Goodyear to step down. Harper's government has ``taken a clear stand that they're supportive of Israel'' and Goodyear The academics say Goodyear's actions suggest should go even further and order the funding for ``academic freedom in Canada may be under the conference reversed. attack'' and ``that these types of interference by the government will ultimately lead to a loss of standing in the international research commu- View slide
  • The Vancouver Province June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A28 Tory minister accused of political interference Canwest News Service peer-review process that's undertaken by SSHRC, OTTAWA and we feel this represents an overall pattern, where the minister has demonstrated a lack of knowledge Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, about the way science and social-science research minister of state for science and technology, of po- works in Canada," said Megan Nicholson, chair- litical interference after he called for a review of woman of the National Graduate Caucus of the government funding for a conference on Israel and Canadian Federation of Students. The group joined Palestine. the Canadian Association of University Teachers in calling for Goodyear to quit. The Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives Concerns about the conference were expressed by grants to university-based researchers, approved a members of the Jewish community, said Goodyear's $19,750 grant for a conference organized by York spokesman Gary Toft. and Queen's universities. The international confer- ence is taking place in Toronto in 10 days. "If he's allowed to get away with this, this begins to undermine the whole kind of autonomy that allows On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- our universities to do the work they do for the pub- cil, saying he had heard concerns that some speak- lic," said James Turk, executive director of the ers had made anti-Israel statements in the past. He CAUT. asked the council to do another peer review of the grant application, a move academic groups say is Goodyear should have advised those opposed to the unprecedented for a minister. conference to raise their concerns with the council instead of "using his power to, implicitly, at least, "We feel that he has no business interfering in the intimidate the granting authority," said Turk. View slide
  • Ottawa Citizen June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A4 Academics accuse minister of meddling Goodyear questioned grant for Mideast talk Meagan Fitzpatrick, Canwest News Service On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- cil and, the next day, released a statement saying he Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, had heard concerns that some speakers had made minister of state for science and technology, of po- anti-Israel statements in the past. He asked the litical interference and are demanding his resigna- council to do another peer review of the grant ap- tion after he called for a review of government plication. funding for a conference on Israel and Palestine. "We feel that he has no business interfering in the The Social Sciences and Humanities Research peer-review process that's undertaken by SSHRC," Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives said Megan Nicholson, chairwoman of the National grants to university-based researchers, approved a Graduate Caucus of the Canadian Federation of $19,750 grant for a conference organized by York Students. University and Queen's University, titled "Is- rael/Palestine: Mapping Models of Statehood and On Thursday, the group joined the Canadian Asso- Paths to Peace." The conference, taking place in ciation of University Teachers in calling for Good- Toronto on June 22-24, has more than 50 confirmed year to resign. speakers.
  • National Post June 12, 2009 Friday 
All But Toronto Edition CANADA; Pg. A6 Academic-autonomy line crossed by Goodyear: groups Demand Resignation Review of funding for Israel, Palestine conference at issue Meagan Fitzpatrick, in the past. dreds of e-mails. Canwest News Service Mr. Goodyear asked the council to "He felt it was important to OTTAWA - Academic groups do another peer review of the bring those concerns to are accusing Gary Goodyear, grant application, a move aca- SSHRC so that they could Minister of State for Science demic groups say is unprece- have an opportunity to exam- and Technology, of political dented for a minister. ine those and to respond to interference and want his resig- those concerns," Mr. Toft said. nation after he called for a re- "We feel that he has no business view of government funding for interfering in the peer-review But James Turk, executive a conference on Israel and Pal- process that's undertaken by director of the CAUT, said estine. SSHRC, and we feel this repre- contacting the SSHRC crossed sents an overall pattern, where the the line, and Mr. Goodyear has The Social Sciences and Hu- Minister has demonstrated a lack been in the job long enough to manities Research Council, an of knowledge about the way sci- know better. arm's-length federal agency that ence and social-science research gives grants to university-based works in Canada," said Megan "If he's allowed to get away researchers, approved a $19,750 Nicholson, chairwoman of the with this, this begins to un- grant for a conference organized National Graduate Caucus of the dermine the whole kind of by York University and Queen's Canadian Federation of Students. autonomy that allows our uni- University, titled Is- versities to do the work they rael/Palestine: Mapping Models Yesterday, the group joined the do for the public," he said. of Statehood and Paths to Canadian Association of Univer- Peace. sity Teachers (CAUT) in calling Mr. Goodyear should have for Mr. Goodyear to step down. advised those opposed to the The conference, taking place in conference to raise their con- Toronto on June 22-24, has But Mr. Goodyear has no inten- cerns with the council instead more than 50 confirmed speak- tion of resigning, his spokesman, of "using his power to, implic- ers from across Canada and Gary Toft, told Canwest News itly, at least, intimidate the abroad. Service, and he is strongly com- granting authority," said Mr. mitted to the principle of aca- Turk. On June 4, Mr. Goodyear demic independence. phoned the head of the council Some Jewish organizations, and, the next day, released a Concerns about the conference including B'nai Brith and the statement saying he had heard were expressed by members of the Jewish Defence League, are concerns that some speakers Jewish community, said Mr. Toft, opposed to the conference and had made anti-Israel statements and the Minister received hun- plan to protest at it.
  • National Post June 12, 2009 Friday 
National Edition CANADA; Pg. A7 Groups accuse Goodyear of academic interference Demand Resignation Meagan Fitzpatrick, Mr. Goodyear asked the council hundreds of e-mails. Canwest News Service to do another peer review of the OTTAWA grant application, a move aca- "He felt it was important to bring demic groups say is unprece- those concerns to SSHRC so that Academic groups are accusing dented for a Minister. they could have an opportunity Gary Goodyear, Minister of State to examine those and to respond for Science and Technology, of "We feel that he has no business to those concerns," Mr. Toft said. political interference and want interfering in the peer-review his resignation after he called for process that's undertaken by But James Turk, executive direc- a review of government funding SSHRC, and we feel this repre- tor of the CAUT, said contacting for a conference on Israel and sents an overall pattern, where the SSHRC crossed the line, and Palestine. the Minister has demonstrated a Mr. Goodyear has been in the job lack of knowledge about the way long enough to know better. The Social Sciences and Hu- science and social-science re- manities Research Council, an search works in Canada," said "If he's allowed to get away with arm's-length federal agency that Megan Nicholson, chairwoman this, this begins to undermine the gives grants to university-based of the National Graduate Caucus whole kind of autonomy that researchers, approved a $19,750 of the Canadian Federation of allows our universities to do the grant for a conference organized Students. work they do for the public," he by York University and Queen's said. University, titled Israel/Palestine: Yesterday, the group joined the Mapping Models of Statehood Canadian Association of Univer- Mr. Goodyear should have ad- and Paths to Peace. sity Teachers (CAUT) in calling vised those opposed to the con- for Mr. Goodyear to step down. ference to raise their concerns The conference, taking place in with the council instead of "using Toronto on June 22-24, has more But Mr. Goodyear has no inten- his power to, implicitly, at least, than 50 confirmed speakers from tion of resigning, his spokesman, intimidate the granting author- across Canada and abroad. Gary Toft, told Canwest News ity," Mr. Turk said. Service, and he is strongly com- On June 4, Mr. Goodyear phoned mitted to the principle of aca- Some Jewish organizations, in- the head of the council and, the demic independence. cluding B'nai Brith and the Jew- next day, released a statement ish Defence League, are opposed saying he had heard concerns Concerns about the conference to the conference and plan to that some speakers had made were expressed by members of protest at it. anti-Israel statements in the past. the Jewish community, Mr. Toft said, and the Minister received
  • The Leader-Post June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. C9 Groups want minister to resign Meagan Fitzpatrick, had heard concerns that some speakers had made Canwest News Service anti-Israel statements in the past. He asked the OTTAWA council to do another peer review of the grant ap- plication, a move academic groups say is unprece- Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, dented for a minister. minister of state for science and technology, of po- litical interference and want his resignation after he "We feel that he has no business interfering in the called for a review of government funding for a peer-review process that's undertaken by SSHRC, conference on Israel and Palestine. and we feel this represents an overall pattern, where the minister has demonstrated a lack of knowledge The Social Sciences and Humanities Research about the way science and social-science research Council, an arm's-length federal agency that gives works in Canada," said Megan Nicholson, chair- grants to university-based researchers, approved a woman of the National Graduate Caucus of the $19,750 grant for a conference organized by York Canadian Federation of Students. University and Queen's University, titled Is- rael/Palestine: Mapping Models of Statehood and On Thursday, the group joined the Canadian Asso- Paths to Peace. The conference, taking place in ciation of University Teachers (CAUT) in calling Toronto on June 22-24, has more than 50 confirmed for Goodyear to step down. speakers from across Canada and abroad. The academics say Goodyear's actions suggest On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- "academic freedom in Canada may be under at- cil and, the next day, released a statement saying he tack."
  • Edmonton Journal June 12, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A11 Minister's 'interference' sparks resignation calls from academics Meagan Fitzpatrick, On June 4, Goodyear phoned the head of the coun- Canwest News Service cil and, the next day, released a statement saying he OTTAWA had heard concerns that some speakers had made anti-Israel statements in the past. He asked the Academic groups are accusing Gary Goodyear, council to do another peer review of the grant ap- minister of state for science and technology, of po- plication, a move academic groups say is unprece- litical interference and want his resignation after he dented for a minister. called for a review of government funding for a conference on Israel and Palestine. The academics say Goodyear's actions suggest "academic freedom in Canada may be under attack" The Social Sciences and Humanities Research and "that these types of interference by the gov- Council approved a $19,750 grant for the confer- ernment will ultimately lead to a loss of standing in ence, organized by York University and Queen's the international research community," according to University. The conference is to take place in To- Megan Nicholson, chairwoman of the National ronto on June 22-24. Graduate Caucus of the Canadian Federation of Students.
  • Welland Tribune June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. B11 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, The government says the new Canada Student NATIONAL BUREAU Grant program and Repayment Assistance Pro- OTTAWA gram will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the program they replace. Students in dan- Student groups gave the federal government a ger of missing payments will have an opportu- robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Fed- "There's a huge challenge for students and their eration of Students. families right now," said Arati Sharma, national director of the Canadian Alliance of Student As- Asked her advice to young people trying to de- sociations. Because of the tough economy, "stu- cide whether to continue their studies or find a dents are looking more toward loans and grants." job in a difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question that going forward, most jobs are The program, a 2008 budget promise whose de- going to require some post-secondary education. tails were fleshed out by Human Resources Min- ister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millen- "I think in these difficult times this may be a nium Scholarship Foundation set up by the for- good opportunity for students to take advantage mer Liberal government, which winds up this of these two new programs." year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at least two years of post-secondary education.
  • The Standard June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. B4 New student assistance program gets an A CHRISTINA SPENCER, SUN MEDIA OTTAWA Student groups gave the federal government a ro- bust "A" Monday for its overhauled system of post- secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking more toward loans and grants." The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- eral government, which winds up this year. The government says the new Canada Student Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the program they replace. In addition, students in dan- ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu- nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- ine Giroux-Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Students.
  • The Simcoe Reformer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 24 Finley and Conservatives get 'A' for effort from stu- dents STUDENT LOANS AND GRANTS BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program SUN MEDIA will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the Ottawa program they replace. In addition, students in dan- ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- in September. ine Giroux-Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national She said she was pleased the program was being director of the Canadian Alliance of Student administered through Finley's department and not Associations. Because of the tough economy, as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's "students are looking more toward loans and auditor general has expressed concern that arms- grants." length foundations are not sufficiently accountable The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details to Parliament. were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium Asked her advice to young people trying to decide Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a eral government, which winds up this year. difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question that going forward, most jobs are going to require The government says the new Canada Student some post-secondary education.
  • Sault Star June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A7 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student whether to continue their studies or find a job in a Associations. Because of the tough economy, difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question "students are looking more toward loans and that going forward, most jobs are going to require grants." some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • The Muse June 23, 2009 Thursday Graduate survey brings good news, says CFS-NL chair June 23, 2009 by Kerri Breen A new report says the province’s post-secondary also give results by program. The reports will be grads are successfully transitioning into the distributed to all high schools, post-secondary workplace. institutions, and those involved in providing ca- reer counseling in the province. The Department of Education’s CareerSearch 2008 suggests that many graduates are satisfied Smith says the results are very promising, and he with their education, and finding jobs faster. expects future CareerSearch results to be even According to the report, which is based on sur- more positive. vey results, graduates of 2006 experienced higher full-time employment when compared to “[CareerSearch is] showing that the policies and graduates of 2002. Eight per cent more graduates programs that the government is implementing reported earning high wages and five per cent are working.” more found jobs within three months of graduat- ing. In 2000, the provincial government introduced a 25 per cent tuition fee reduction at Memorial, Almost 60 per cent of MUN 2006 graduates had and many funding increases and debt reduction full time jobs, and almost 95 per cent of them initiatives have been implemented since. were satisfied with their education. Smith predicts survey results from more recent “They’re not just working,” said Canadian graduates will show decreased debt loads due to Federation of Students (CFS) Provincial the tuition freeze and 2005’s up-front, needs- Chairperson Daniel Smith, “they’re working in based grants program in particular. Student aid fields related to what they studied.” usage went down from 45 to 35 per cent from 2002 to 2006. Students at private colleges and the College of the North Atlantic were slightly more satisfied “We’re really looking forward to the next data with their financial investment in their education set because for this data set, the only real thing than Memorial undergraduates. They were also that these graduates would have benefited from about ten per cent more likely to stay in the prov- would have been the tuition fee reductions.” ince, and about 18 per cent more likely to have full-time jobs a year after graduating. Overall, CareerSearch was last published in 2004. After out-migration increased by five per cent from that year, it went on hiatus to work around new 2002 to 2006. provincial privacy legislation that had forbidden private colleges from providing the Department The data, collected by The Newfoundland and of Education with personal info for graduates. Labrador Statistics Agency, accounted for almost half of MUN, Sir Wilfred Grenfell College, and Smith says he is glad CareerSearch was given an Marine Institute students who graduated in 2006. opportunity to continue. The response rate for other institutions was 42.2 per cent. “It’s a tool we have to go back and use as a ref- erence,” Smith said. “It’s a check and balance, I In addition to providing general trends about guess, to see if things are working.” students’ job market transition, the two reports
  • Sarnia Observer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A10 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • Peterborough Examiner June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. B1 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the NATIONAL BUREAU program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- OTTAWA -- Student groups gave the federal gov- ate how they pay their debt. ernment a robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine takes effect in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • Pembroke Observer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 6 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • Owen Sound Sun Times June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A6 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, Grant program and Repayment Assistance Pro- NATIONAL BUREAU gram will direct grants to 100,000 more students OTTAWA than the program they replace. Students in dan- ger of missing payments will have an opportu- Student groups gave the federal government a nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine effect in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Fed- eration of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to de- director of the Canadian Alliance of Student As- cide whether to continue their studies or find a sociations. Because of the tough economy, "stu- job in a difficult economy, Finley said, "There's dents are looking more toward loans and grants." no question that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose de- tails were fleshed out by Human Resources Min- "I think in these difficult times this may be a ister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millen- good opportunity for students to take advantage nium Scholarship Foundation set up by the for- of these two new programs." mer Liberal government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at least two years of post-secondary education. The government says the new Canada Student
  • Orillia Packet & Times June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A7 Student loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, SUN MEDIA OTTAWA -Student groups gave the federal gov- ernment a robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking more toward loans and grants." The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- eral government. The government says the new Canada Student Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the program they replace. In addition, students in danger of missing loan pay- ments will have an opportunity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- ine Giroux- Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Students. She said she was pleased the program was being administered through Finley's department and not as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's auditor general has expressed concern that arms- length foundations are not sufficiently accountable to Parliament. Asked her advice to young people trying to decide whether to continue their studies or find a job in a difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education."
  • North Bay Nugget June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A8 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, promise whose details were eration of Students. NATIONAL BUREAU fleshed out by Human Resources OTTAWA Minister Diane Finley, follows Asked her advice to young on from the Millennium Scholar- people trying to decide Student groups gave the federal ship Foundation set up by the whether to continue their stud- government a robust A" yester- former Liberal government, ies or find a job in a difficult day for its overhauled system of which winds up this year. economy, Finley said, There's post-secondary loans and no question that going forward, grants, which takes effect in The government says the new most jobs are going to require September. Canada Student Grant program some post-secondary educa- and Repayment Assistance Pro- tion. There's a huge challenge for gram will direct grants to students and their families right 100,000 more students than the I think in these difficult times now," said Arati Sharma, na- program they replace. Students in this may be a good opportunity tional director of the Canadian danger of missing payments will for students to take advantage Alliance of Student Associa- have an opportunity to renegoti- of these two new programs." tions. Because of the tough ate how they pay their debt. economy, students are looking Giroux-Bougard said 70% of more toward loans and grants." Average debt is about $25,000, new jobs require at least two said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, years of post-secondary educa- The program, a 2008 budget chairman of the Canadian Fed- tion.
  • Niagara Falls Review June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A7 Student funding changes get passing grade CHRISTINA SPENCER, nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. SUN MEDIA OTTAWA Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- ine Giroux-Bougard, chairwoman of the Canadian Student groups gave the federal government a ro- Federation of Students. bust "A" Monday for its overhauled system of post- secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in She said she was pleased the program was being September. administered through Finley's department and not as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's "There's a huge challenge for students and their auditor general has expressed concern that arms- families right now," said Arati Sharma, national length foundations are not sufficiently accountable director of the Canadian Alliance of Student to Parliament. Associations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking toward loans and grants." Asked her advice to young people trying to decide whether to continue their studies or find a job in a The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details difficult economy, Finley said: "There's no question were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister that going forward, most jobs are going to require Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium some post-secondary education. Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- eral government, which winds up this year. "I think in these difficult times this may be a good opportunity for students to take advantage of these The government says the new Canada Student two new programs." Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the Giroux-Bougard said 70 per cent of new jobs re- program they replace. In addition, students in dan- quire at least two years of post-secondary educa- ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu- tion.
  • Kingston Whig-Standard June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 9 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the NATIONAL BUREAU program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- OTTAWA -- Student groups gave the federal gov- ate how they pay their debt. ernment a robust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine takes effect in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • The Globe and Mail June 23, 2009 Tuesday NATIONAL NEWS; EDUCATION; Pg. A4 Tories' grant program gets smaller cheques to more students BILL CURRY AND ELIZA be lower. aging more students to enroll BETH CHURCH in college or university. "I sus- OTTAWA and TORONTO The government is also updating pect that it will not have the a federal program for low- effect on access that they think The Conservative government is income Canadians struggling to it will, but spreading money aligning itself with the back-to- repay federal student loans. around more is likely to be school crowd as the grim job Payments will be calculated politically popular," he said. market triggers a spike in col- based on family income rather lege and university applications. than how much is owed, and the Pollster Nik Nanos, president maximum repayment period for a of Nanos Research, said he The suburban Ottawa campus of loan will not exceed 15 years. sees a clear political dimension Algonquin University was in having a Conservative min- nearly deserted as Diane Finley, Ms. Finley said her announce- ister discussing student loan the Minister for Human Re- ment was intended to get the issues during a recession. sources and Skills Develop- word out so that low-income ment, held a news conference Canadians know they have op- "This is part of a broader nar- launching her government's new tions, particularly during a reces- rative of the government trying Canada Student Loans and sion. to reach out to middle-class Grants Program. families, which they tend to be "I think in these difficult times, quite focused on," he said, Officials have been working this may be a good opportunity noting that recessions histori- with student groups on the de- for students to take advantage of cally push Canadians into edu- tails since the program was an- these two new programs," she cation programs. nounced more than a year ago said. in the 2008 budget. This is the "If you think of this in terms of first summer that students can Two of Canada's main student what I'll say 'the Tim Hortons' apply for the new grant pro- groups - the Canadian Federation demographic, this is tailor- gram, which replaces the Mil- of Students and the Canadian made for that," Mr. Nanos lennium Scholarship Founda- Alliance of Student Associations said. "What the Conservatives tion, created by the former Lib- - said the new programs come at are trying to do is get ahead of eral government as a legacy of a good time given that recent behaviour they know is going former prime minister Jean high school graduates face grim to happen." Chrétien. job prospects unless they sign up for higher education. The Council of Ontario Uni- Under the new program, each versities has said 2009 applica- year about 245,000 college and But Alex Usher, a consultant tions are the second-highest on university students would qual- with Toronto-based Educational record, and Ontario's 24 col- ify for grants that do not have to Policy Institute, said the revised leges are reporting an 8.5 per be repaid. That would be an program does not include addi- cent spike. increase of more than 100,000 tional money for students and is students when compared to the an attempt to distribute existing The average grant handed out previous program, but the funds differently. The unan- in previous years by the Cana- individual awards of up to swered question, he said, is dian Millennium Scholarship $2,000 for eight months of whether this change will encour- Foundation was $3,000, dis- study will be lower.
  • tributed to about 120,000 stu- dents each year. The foundation also provided 3,000 scholar- ships based on merit, which will not be replaced under the new federal program. The move to new monthly pay- ments approved at the begin- ning of a school year has been characterized by the govern- ment as a more effective way of encouraging students to go on to college and university because of its predictability. Previously, students received one payment.
  • Edmonton Sun June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 26 Students applaud new grants, loans BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, nity to renegotiate how they pay their debt. OTTAWA Average student debt is about $25,000, said Kather- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ine Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of Federation of Students. post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect in September. She said she was pleased the program was being administered through Finley's department and not HUGE CHALLENGE as a stand-alone foundation. In the past, Canada's "There's a huge challenge for students and their auditor general has expressed concern that arms- families right now," said Arati Sharma, national length foundations are not sufficiently accountable director of the Canadian Alliance of Student to Parliament. Associations. Because of the tough economy, "students are looking more toward loans and STAY IN SCHOOL grants." Asked her advice to young people trying to decide The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details whether to continue their studies or find a job in a were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question Diane Finley, follows from the Millennium Schol- that going forward, most jobs are going to require arship Foundation set up by the former Liberal gov- some post-secondary education. I think in these ernment, which winds up this year. difficult times this may be a good opportunity for students to take advantage of these two new pro- The government says the new Canada Student grams." Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at program they replace. In addition, students in dan- least two years of post-secondary education. ger of missing loan payments will have an opportu-
  • Daily Miner and News June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. A7 Loans overhauled EDUCATION: Student groups praise government BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • The Daily Herald-Tribune June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 8 Loans overhauled BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • Cornwall Standard Freeholder June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 11 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • Chatham Daily News June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A6 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • The Brockville Recorder and Times June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. A8 Loans overhauled BY CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • Belleville Intelligencer June 23, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 16 Loans overhauled CHRISTINA SPENCER, will direct grants to 100,000 more students than the OTTAWA program they replace. Students in danger of miss- ing payments will have an opportunity to renegoti- Student groups gave the federal government a ro- ate how they pay their debt. bust "A" yesterday for its overhauled system of post-secondary loans and grants, which takes effect Average debt is about $25,000, said Katherine in September. Giroux-Bougard, chairman of the Canadian Federa- tion of Students. "There's a huge challenge for students and their families right now," said Arati Sharma, national Asked her advice to young people trying to decide director of the Canadian Alliance of Student Asso- whether to continue their studies or find a job in a ciations. Because of the tough economy, "students difficult economy, Finley said, "There's no question are looking more toward loans and grants." that going forward, most jobs are going to require some post-secondary education. The program, a 2008 budget promise whose details were fleshed out by Human Resources Minister "I think in these difficult times this may be a good Diane Finley, follows on from the Millennium opportunity for students to take advantage of these Scholarship Foundation set up by the former Lib- two new programs." eral government, which winds up this year. Giroux-Bougard said 70% of new jobs require at The government says the new Canada Student least two years of post-secondary education. Grant program and Repayment Assistance Program
  • Saskatchewan Sage June 2009 NATIONAL NEWS; Pg. 2 Vol. 13 No. 9 Donor for scholarship shuns Aboriginal students BY MALLORY who have qualified for loans," she ANDERSON After phone calls from Saskatche- said. She adds that despite organi- Sage Staff Writer wan Sage, the University of Sas- zations like NAAF that offer SASKATOON katchewan and its Aboriginal Stu- scholarships to Aboriginal students dent Centre refused to comment on in need, there is a large amount of The University of Saskatchewan the matter. Aboriginal students who they still has turned down a $500,000 en- cannot help, who do not have other dowment from a Saskatoon resi- Roberta Jamieson, President and forms of funding support available. dent, after the scholarship donor Chief Executive Officer of the instructed the money be distributed National Aboriginal Achievement "So there are many of our students specifically to non-Aboriginal Foundation (NAAF), said she be- who are not finishing school who students. lieves there is a common miscon- are not getting the support when ception by the public about fund- they do overcome all the barriers The anonymous donor, who identi- ing for Aboriginal students. and get to postsecondary," she fied herself as university alumni, said. said she hoped to "level out the "There's a myth out there that playing field" for supposedly dis- really should be challenged - that "I think we need a reality check." advantaged non- Aboriginal stu- Aboriginal students have (their) dents, according to CANWEST education paid for them, and eve- According to the Canadian Federa- news, and she claimed it was not rything else from cradle to grave. tion of Students website, education meant to be racist. And it simply is not true," she said. for Aboriginal and Inuit students from elementary through post- In an interview with The Star- "There is financial support to Abo- secondary is a treaty right recog- Phoenix, the donor said that she riginal students - to First Nation, nized in the Constitution Act of struggled through her own degree Inuit and Metis students - but it is 1982. and wants to ensure financial sup- very limited." port for other non- Aboriginal stu- The website says that the federal dents who are in the same position Jamieson points out Aboriginal government currently provides she once found herself in as a uni- students have equal opportunity to funding for status First Nations versity student. apply for student loans, further- and Inuit students through the more, she gives reasons as to why Post-Secondary Student Support University of Saskatchewan offi- Aboriginal students need the spe- Program (PSSSP). Individual band cials have said that accepting the cial support offered through desig- councils with their own eligibility money and awarding it with the nated bursaries and scholarships. criteria are responsible for distrib- stipulation it not go to Aboriginal uting the funding to students, and students would be violating Hu- "Well, frankly, most of our people oftentimes, this overlooks many man Rights Legislation, as well as are living in circumstances of pov- applicants who are not able to ac- the university's policy. erty," she said. cess funding and who must look at other funding sources. Out of all Vice President of Advancement, "We do have students that take out the Aboriginal students attending Heather Magotiaux stated to media loans... [but] by and large our peo- school, only 15% of university that "an award cannot be created to ple across Canada are living in students and only 25% of the col- exclude a disadvantaged group... circumstances where they have not lege students receive PSSSP sup- and Aboriginal persons would be had access to that kind of financial port from their registered band. considered a disadvantaged group literacy, they do not have people in requiring special action." their families who have had jobs,
  • The Toronto Star July 6, 2009 Monday NEWS; Pg. A04 Stop meddling, students tell Tories MPPs deny they were trying to sway York election results Louise Brown, eration of Students (CFS) called Toronto Star It was these events that prompted such high-level exchange "an Kent and Shurman to fire off the absolute affront to the democ- York University, still recovering emails, which various student ratic process of student govern- from a bitter 12-week strike, groups say was way out of line. ment." cannot seem to escape political fireworks, even during the sum- "The Conservative party has no "I find it bizarre for a federal mer. authority at all for getting in- minister (Kent is Canada's minis- volved in student politics and ter of state for foreign affairs in In this latest fracas, the York neither does the York admini- the Americas) to try to interfere Federation of Students is accus- stration. We're an incorporated, in a student election," said CFS ing two Conservative politicians independent body," charged chair Shelley Melanson. "If stu- - federal MP Peter Kent and pro- Krisna Saravanamuttu, who was dents were concerned about the vincial MPP Peter Shurman - of elected president of the York election process, there are interfering with York's turbulent Federation of Students in the mechanisms on campus for ex- student politics. controversial vote. "Prime Minis- pressing those concerns." ter Stephen Harper's foot soldiers Through a Freedom of Informa- are deliberately interfering with In one email to Tiffin at 2: 14 tion request, the student federa- student elections to help candi- a.m. the night of ballot counting, tion obtained 50 pages of email dates more friendly to their poli- Kent's special assistant said he exchanges in which assistants for cies." was there on campus and was the two politicians, who repre- concerned nobody from the uni- sent student-heavy ridings north Nonsense, countered Kent and versity was monitoring the proc- of the campus, repeatedly ques- Shurman, who insist they were ess. tion university executives about merely seeking updates on behalf the results of a student council of constituents, many of them In another email, Tiffin listed the vote this spring. Jewish students from Thornhill alleged voting irregularities in a who say they have concerns report to York President Mam- That election saw a more left- about anti-Semitism on campus. douh Shoukri, who was to meet wing, pro-labour, pro-Palestinian Kent. slate of candidates beat a more York vice-president Rob Tiffin conservative, pro-Israeli roster. said the university treated the "The perception (of the vote) is emails as requests for informa- not good, but it is also not proof Despite complaints of voting tion, not as political pressure. that the voting process was hi- irregularities from the losing side York has no intention of reopen- jacked," Tiffin concluded. "Bot- - that there was campaigning too ing the vote, he said, although he tom - smoke but no gun." close to the ballot box, that extra has asked the student federation ballots had been printed, that to join in seeking a review of York has seen tensions build up there were partisan stickers on York's election process by an in recent months. A February polling officers' laptops - the outside accounting firm. news conference criticizing the student election committee up- student federation drew a protest held the vote. The head of the Canadian Fed- so heated that police were called.
  • UPI July 10, 2009 Friday High court: Political ads on buses legal The Canadian Supreme Court ruled Friday two The transit groups argued the ads they refused transit systems in British Columbia were wrong weren't about a public service or goods or serv- in forbidding political advertising on city buses. ices, and said they could "cause offense to any person ... or create controversy." The unanimous ruling in Ottawa said the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority and British Writing for the court, Justice Marie Deschamps Columbia Transit breached the Charter of Rights disagreed. and Freedoms by refusing to run political ads during the 2005 provincial election, the Canwest "Like a city street, a city bus is a public place News Service reported. where individuals can openly interact with each other and their surroundings," the ruling said. The appeal was filed by the British Columbia "The side of a bus is therefore a location where Teachers' Federation and the Canadian Federa- expressive activity is protected by the charter." tion of Students.
  • La Presse Canadienne 10 juillet 2009 vendredi AUTEUR: CP Publicité sur autobus: la Colombie-Britannique a brimé la liberté d'expression OTTAWA - Dans un arrêt unanime de huit veille des élections provinciales de 2005. Ces juges, la Cour suprême du Canada a statué, ven- publicités traitaient de divers sujets, notamment dredi, que deux sociétés de transport de la Co- des frais de scolarité, de l'environnement et de lombie-Britannique avaient brimé le droit à la fermetures d'écoles. libre expression en interdisant des publicités électorales sur leurs autobus. Mais la "Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority" ainsi que la "British Columbia Tran- "Dans une ville, l'autobus comme la voie pub- sit" les avaient refusées, invoquant leur politique lique constituent des lieux publics où les gens qui interdit toute publicité dont le message "peut peuvent interagir ouvertement entre eux et avec offenser (...) ou créer la controverse". l'environnement", a écrit la juge Marie Deschamps au nom de ses collègues. La fédération étudiante voulait afficher l'image d'une foule à un concert, accompagnée du texte "Je ne vois dans ce lieu aucune caractéristique suivant: "Inscrivez-vous sur les listes électorales laissant croire que l'expression y minerait les maintenant. Prenez connaissance des enjeux. valeurs sous-jacentes à la liberté d'expression. Votez le 17 mai 2005". Au contraire, il permet à un grand nombre d'an- nonceurs de s'adresser à un large auditoire et De leur côté, les enseignants voulaient présenter promeut ainsi en fait les valeurs qui sous-tendent le message suivant: "2500 professeurs de moins. la libre expression. 113 écoles fermées. Nos élèves. Vos enfants. Il est important d'en parler". "J'arrive donc à la conclusion que l'activité ex- pressive sur le côté d'un autobus bénéficie de la En première instance, un juge avait rappelé que protection prévue (à la Charte)." les sociétés de transport, à titre de sociétés pub- liques, doivent respecter la Charte des droits et Cette décision représente une victoire pour la libertés. Toutefois, il n'avait pas estimé que la section de la Colombie-Britannique de la Fédéra- politique des deux sociétés de transport brimait tion canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants, et le droit à la liberté d'expression. pour la Fédération des enseignants de la Colom- bie-Britannique. Les deux organisations avaient La Cour d'appel de Colombie-Britannique avait tenté d'afficher des publicités sur les autobus à la renversé cette décision.
  • CBC News July 10, 2009 Friday BC Transit violated free speech with ad ban: Supreme Court CBC News the fight to preserve free speech. British Columbia Transit violated rights to free TransLink spokesman Ken Hardie said the decision speech when it refused to carry political ads on the finally clarifies the ground rules for the company. outside of its buses, the Supreme Court of Canada has ruled. "What we wanted was to basically canvass the issue as thoroughly as possible, Hardie said Friday. "We The unanimous 8-0 ruling is a victory for the Cana- still have, probably, the same options that would be dian Federation of Students and the British Colum- available to any advertising medium to look at the bia Teachers' Federation, two groups that tried to appropriateness of advertising" political or other- place ads on the outside of B.C. buses in the run-up wise" and to accept or reject advertising based on to the provincial election in 2005. established critieria that has been out there for many years." Grace Pastine, litigation director for the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, said BC Transit and Hardie said TransLink will follow those guidelines, TransLink now have no choice but to change their which are set down by the Canadian Advertising policy of only allowing commercial advertising. Standards Council, which he says gives the com- pany flexibility in what advertising it does accept. "If TransLink continues to allow other types of ad- vertising" continues to allow commercial advertis- The ads in dispute raised several issues, including ing on the sides of buses" then they must also allow tuition fees, the environment and school closures. political advertising. That is, it's not for them to decide what is political and what is commercial, BC Transit had refused to run them, saying its pol- and to allow one but not the other." icy bans political ads along with any message "likely to cause offence or create controversy." Pastine called the court victory an important win in
  • The Canadian Press July 10, 2009 Friday SUE BAILEY, CP Top court strikes down political ad ban on B.C. buses OTTAWA - Watch for political watched by cities across Canada that bus officials had no prob- ads coming soon to the side of a that have so far rejected atheist lem running commercial ads. It bus near you. bus banners declaring: ''There's also said their policy attempting probably no God. Now stop wor- to vanquish all controversy ''is British Columbia transit offi- rying and enjoy your life.'' unnecessarily broad.'' cials were on the wrong side of the Charter when they refused The ruling protecting political ''Citizens, including bus riders, to carry messages on the sides ads will be viewed as a boon to are expected to put up with of their buses aimed at provin- those hoping to buy bus space for some controversy in a free and cial voters, the country's top their atheist message. democratic society.'' court said Friday. Friday's ruling is a victory for the Still, there are times when mes- The Supreme Court of Canada Canadian Federation of Students sages in publicly governed struck down transit policies and the British Columbia Teach- spaces can be justifiably re- banning all political ads, saying ers' Federation. stricted, Deschamps wrote. The they violate rights to free fact that buses are used by an speech. Both groups tried to place ads on essentially captive audience, the outside of B.C. buses leading including children, must be con- ''Like a city street, a city bus is a up to the provincial election in sidered. public place where individuals 2005. can openly interact with each ''Thus, limits on advertising are other and their surroundings,'' They raised several issues includ- contextual.'' wrote Justice Marie Deschamps ing voter turnout, tuition fees, the in the 8-0 ruling. environment and school closures. The Canadian Code of Adver- tising Standards ''could be used All nine judges heard the case The student federation had hoped as a guide to establish reason- in March 2008 but Justice to run an image of a crowd at a able limits ... on discriminatory Michel Bastarache has since concert with the text: ''Register content or on ads which incite retired. now. Learn the issues. Vote May or condone violence or other 17, 2005.'' unlawful behaviour. ''I do not see any aspect of the location that suggests that ex- The teachers union wanted to ''But the determination of what pression within it would under- post a banner on the side of buses is justified will depend on the mine the values underlying free saying: ''2,500 fewer teachers. facts in the particular case.'' expression,'' Deschamps wrote. 113 schools closed. Our students. ''On the contrary, the space al- Your kids. Worth speaking out At trial, the judge found that lows for expression by a broad for.'' transit bodies, as publicly con- range of speakers to a large trolled government entities, public audience. British Columbia Transit and must uphold the Charter of TransLink refused to run them, Rights and Freedoms. But he ''I therefore conclude that the saying policy bars political ads cited the fact that transit com- side of a bus is a location where along with any message ''likely pany policy had never allowed expressive activity is protected to cause offence ... or create con- political ads, and did not define by ... the Charter.'' troversy.'' that as a breach of free expres- sion. The judgment was being The high court pointedly noted
  • The B.C. Court of Appeal ruled the atheist ''There's probably no The atheist bus message move- 2-1 against him, and struck God'' ads. ment was born _ and it soon down any blanket ban on politi- picked up speed. cal messaging as unconstitu- That message has been placed on tional. public transit systems in several Toronto, Calgary, and Montreal countries including the U.S., It- accepted and ran the ''There's Dissenting B.C. Justice Mary aly, Spain, the Netherlands and probably no God'' ads, but they Southin said political bus ads other parts of Europe since last hit a roadblock in Ottawa. The don't qualify as the type of ex- year. capital's transit service OC pression protected by the Char- Transpo rejected them at first. ter. Forcing transit authorities to The atheist campaign began in display such messages would be Britain when a woman was an- The company wound up dis- like obliging newspapers to noyed that an ad posted in a playing the message on the side publish opinion pieces, she London bus linked her to a web- of its buses last spring after Ot- wrote. site warning that non-Christians tawa city council cast a split will ''spend all eternity in torment vote to overturn the refusal Several cities including Van- in hell.'' She decided to raise amid concerns about a costly couver, Victoria, Halifax and money for a rebuttal. legal fight. London, Ont., initially rejected
  • Canwest News Service July 10, 2009 Friday Philip Ling Public transit can carry political advertising: Supreme Court OTTAWA - The Supreme Court of Canada has highly valued form of expression in a public lo- ruled the decision by two British Columbia tran- cation that serves as an important place for pub- sit systems banning political advertising from its lic discourse. They therefore do not constitute a bus fleet violated rights to free speech. minimal impairment of freedom of expression,'' she wrote. In a unanimous ruling Friday to strike down the policy, the country's highest court said B.C.'s In 2005, the BCTF, which represents 40,000 two transit agencies - Greater Vancouver Trans- public school teachers, went to B. C. Supreme portation Authority and British Columbia Transit Court after claiming that the refusal to run ads - violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and infringed on its right to free speech. Freedoms by rejecting advertising on the sides of buses from the Canadian Federation of Students The Canadian Federation of Students was also and the B.C. Teachers' Federation during the involved after its "Rock The Vote" ad campaign 2005 provincial election. - aimed at getting out the youth vote - was simi- larly denied. That decision was also based on company policy outlawing political advertising. The trial judge found TransLink had not in- fringed on their rights, arguing the sides of buses The transit authorities, which had adopted essen- were not protected arenas of expression. tially identical advertising policies, refused the ads because they weren't a public service or The B.C. Court of Appeal overturned that ruling about goods or services, and because the ads in 2006. would likely "cause offence to any person or group of persons or create controversy.'' On Friday, the highest court decision agreed with the original trial judge, by noting the sides of "I have some difficulty seeing how an adver- buses were not protected arenas of expression. tisement on the side of a bus that constitutes po- litical speech might create a safety risk or an "Like a city street, a city bus is a public place unwelcoming environment for transit users,'' where individuals can openly interact with each Justice Marie Deschamps wrote in her judgment. other and their surroundings,'' Deschamps wrote. "The side of a bus is therefore a location where "The policies amount to a blanket exclusion of a expressive activity is protected by the Charter.''
  • Broadcast News July 10, 2009 Friday GENERAL AND NATIONAL NEWS Top court strikes down ad ban on B.C. buses OTTAWA - Canada's highest court says British B.C. buses leading up to the provincial election Columbia Transit violated rights to free speech in 2005. when it refused to carry political ads on the out- side of its buses. The ads raised several issues including tuition fees, the environment and school closures. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled 8-0 to strike down the policy. British Columbia Transit refused to run them, saying its policy bars political ads along with any The ruling is a victory for the Canadian Federa- message 'likely to cause offence ... or create con- tion of Students and the British Columbia Teach- troversy.' ers' Federation. (The Canadian Press) Both groups tried to place ads on the outside of
  • globeandmail.com July 10, 2009 Friday NATIONAL Court strikes down bus ad ban Supreme Court unanimously rules B.C. transit agencies violated rights to free speech when they refused to carry political ads on the outside of their vehicles Kirk Makin form of expression in a public education system. Its ad was to location that serves as an impor- have read: "2,500 fewer teach- The Supreme Court of Canada tant place for public discourse," ers, 114 schools closed. Your has given the green light to po- she said. "They therefore do not kids. Our students. Worth litical advertising on the sides of constitute a minimal impairment speaking out for." transit vehicles, in an important of freedom of expression. Adver- test of free expression. tising on buses has become a In 2006, the B.C. Court of Ap- widespread and effective means peal ruled that the refusal to In an 8-0 ruling this morning, for conveying messages to the carry political and controversial the court said two B.C. mass general public." advertising violated the Cana- transit agencies were wrong to dian Charter of Rights and Free- refuse political ads the Cana- In the summer and fall of 2004, doms. dian Federation of Students and CFS and the British Columbia a teachers union attempted to Teachers' Federation (BCTF), The publicly owned transit purchase in 2004. attempted to purchase advertising companies argued that main- space on the sides of buses oper- taining the ban was in the public The agencies - the Greater Van- ated by the transit authorities. interest by ensuring "a safe and couver Transportation Authority welcoming environment" for (TransLink) and British Colum- The CFS wanted to encourage riders and drivers and minimiz- bia Transit (BC Transit) - re- more young people to vote in a ing exposure to "potentially jected the ads based on internal provincial election scheduled for offensive messages." policies that focused on making May 17, 2005 by posting adver- riders feel comfortable with tisements about the election. The The agencies argued their poli- their surroundings. first advertisement, which was to ties were created in order to run the length of the bus, would prevent anyone from thinking The corporate policy permitted have depicted a silhouette of a the corporations endorsed po- commercial advertising on the crowd at a concert, with the litical views that advertisers outside of transit vehicles, but words: "Register now. Learn the might seek to place on them. banned political ads that were issues. Vote May 17, 2005. They said passengers have to "likely to cause offence to any ROCK THE VOTE BC.com." approach, enter and ride on the person or group of persons or vehicles, and thus are "captive" create controversy." The second advertisement would to the messages on the inside have run along the top of the bus, and outside of them. "It is difficult to see how an and read: "Tuition fees ROCK advertisement on the side of a THE VOTE BC.com Minimum An intervenor in the case - the bus that constitutes political wage ROCK THE VOTE B.C. Civil Liberties Association speech might create a safety risk BC.com Environment ROCK - argued that political advertis- or an unwelcoming environment THE VOTE BC.com." ing lies at the heart of the Char- for transit users," Madam Jus- ter section that protects freedom tice Marie Deschamps wrote The BCTF, the exclusive bar- of expression. today for the Court. gaining agent for more than 40,000 public school teachers in "In a world where advertising is "The policies amount to a blan- B.C., wanted to express its con- ubiquitous and appears in public ket exclusion of a highly valued cern about changes in the public spaces of every description
  • ranging from billboards on pri- "Many public mediums, includ- The BCCLA pointed out the vate buildings to web pages of ing magazines and newspapers, same ads that were rejected private search engines, every routinely accept political and were run in alternative media, citizen has learned to distin- advocacy advertising, while "and met normal community guish between the message and maintaining editorial and content standards of good taste and ap- the owner of the location where independence for the newspaper propriateness for public dis- the message is delivered," the itself." play." BCCLA argued.
  • Windsor Star July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A11 Political ads OK on buses, top court says Philip Ling, by rejecting advertising on the sides of buses from Canwest News Service the Canadian Federation of Students and the B.C. OTTAWA Teachers' Federation during the 2005 provincial election. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled the deci- sion by two B.C. transit systems banning political That decision was also based on company policy advertising from bus fleets violated rights to free outlawing political advertising. speech. The transit authorities, which had adopted essen- In a unanimous ruling Friday to strike down the tially identical policies, refused the ads because policy, the country's highest court said B.C.'s two they weren't a public service or about goods or transit agencies -- Greater Vancouver Transporta- services, and because the ads would likely "cause tion Authority and British Columbia Transit -- vio- offence to any person or group of persons or create lated the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms controversy."
  • The Vancouver Sun July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition WESTCOAST NEWS; Peter McKnight; Pg. A13 Decision on TransLink ads a victory for freedom of speech Peter McKnight, Vancouver Sun The court first concluded that as a government entity, all of TransLink's activities are subject to The right to freedom of speech, it has been said, the Charter of Rights, including its activities re- refers to protection for speech we don't like. Af- garding advertisements on the sides of buses. ter all, speech we like needs no protection. Further, since TransLink has accepted (commer- cial) advertisements since its inception, it is clear In contrast, speech that creates controversy or that this "expressive activity" doesn't impede the offends us -- by challenging our deeply held con- primary function of buses or the right to freedom victions, for example -- is constantly under of speech. threat, even in free societies like Canada. Moreover, since political advertisements on Take for example, TransLink's (now erstwhile) buses could actually further the values underly- policy regarding bus advertising. The policy, ing the Charter right, the court held that which was itself both controversial and offen- TransLink's policy prohibiting political ads in- sive, prohibited any advertisement "which advo- fringes the right to freedom of speech. cates or opposes any ideology or political phi- losophy, point of view, policy or action ..." In response, TransLink argued that the infringe- ment was justified because the policy was meant That pretty much leaves discussions about the to provide "a safe, welcoming public transit sys- weather -- but not climate change, for Heaven's tem." sake -- though it still wasn't enough for TransLink, which saw fit to further ban any ad- Yet the court noted, among other things, that the vertisement likely "to cause offence to any per- blanket ban on political ads -- or ads that "create son or group of persons or create controversy." controversy" -- was overly broad in that not all such ads would create a safety risk or an unwel- There's still more, but that should be sufficient to coming environment. One has to wonder, for convince us that in our milquetoast culture -- a example, how an ad encouraging students to vote culture where giving offence has itself become could create a deleterious environment for bus an offence -- speech that makes us uncomfort- riders. able is, and will always be, under threat. Consequently, the court declared the TransLink This is not an academic point, since TransLink policy of no force and effect. But this does not used its draconian policy in 2004 to prohibit the mean, as some have suggested, that TransLink Canadian Federation of Students and the B.C. must now accept every ad, political or otherwise. Teachers' Federation from buying advertising For instance, TransLink would likely be well space on the sides of buses. The teachers wanted within its rights to ban ads that do threaten the to publicize school closings, and the students -- safety or welfare of the public, such as ones that well, they wanted to encourage young people to incite or condone violence or include discrimina- vote. In a culture where politics might actually tory content. offend someone, we can't have any of that. This will still leave many grey areas, of course, Fortunately, the teachers and students wanted areas in which TransLink will have to exercise some of that, so they took TransLink to court. some judgment. But that's what this all boils On Friday, the Supreme Court of Canada re- down to: judgment. solved the matter once and for all.
  • Judgment has, unfortunately, become as unpopu- But TransLink's day of judgment has arrived. lar today as controversial speech, as is evidenced From now on, instead of prohibiting all speech by the proliferation of zero tolerance policies that makes people uncomfortable, TransLink which effectively remove from decision-makers officials will have to exercise their judgment the onerous responsibility of making judgments. when it comes to accepting or rejecting ads. And they will be judged accordingly.
  • The Vancouver Sun July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition WESTCOAST NEWS; Pg. A4 Supreme Court rules political ads on buses okay TransLink, BC Transit had rejected ads during 2005 election Philip Ling, ices, and because the ads would "Rock The Vote" ad campaign -- Canwest News Service likely "cause offence to any per- aimed at getting out the youth OTTAWA son or group of persons or create vote -- was similarly denied. controversy." The Supreme Court of Canada The trial judge found TransLink has ruled the decision by two "I have some difficulty seeing had not infringed on their rights. B.C. transit agencies banning how an advertisement on the side political advertising from its bus of a bus that constitutes political The B.C. Court of Appeal over- fleet violated rights to free speech might create a safety risk turned that ruling in 2006. speech. or an unwelcoming environment for transit users," Justice Marie On Friday, the highest court de- In a unanimous ruling Friday to Deschamps wrote in her judg- cision agreed with the original strike down the policy, the coun- ment. trial judge, by noting the sides of try's highest court said the two buses were not protected arenas agencies -- TransLink and BC "The policies amount to a blan- of expression. Transit -- violated the Canadian ket exclusion of a highly valued Charter of Rights and Freedoms form of expression in a public "Like a city street, a city bus is a by rejecting advertising on the location that serves as an impor- public place where individuals sides of buses from the Canadian tant place for public discourse. can openly interact with each Federation of Students and the They therefore do not constitute other and their surroundings," B.C. Teachers' Federation during a minimal impairment of free- Deschamps wrote. "The side of a the 2005 provincial election. dom of expression," she wrote. bus is therefore a location where expressive activity is protected That decision was also based on In 2005, the BCTF, which repre- by the Charter." company policy outlawing po- sents 40,000 public school teach- litical advertising. ers, went to B.C. Supreme Court TransLink provides transit serv- after claiming that the refusal to ices in Metro Vancouver, while The transit authorities, which had run ads infringed on its right to Victoria-based BC Transit serves adopted essentially identical ad- free speech. other urban areas around the vertising policies, refused the ads province. because they weren't a public The Canadian Federation of Stu- service or about goods or serv- dents was also involved after its
  • Times Colonist July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A8 Court OKs political ads on buses Philip Ling, general public. In exercising their control over such Canwest News Service advertising, the transit authorities have failed to OTTAWA minimize the impairment of political speech," Jus- tice Marie Deschamps wrote in her judgment. The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that the decision by two B.C. transit systems to ban political "The policies amount to a blanket exclusion of a advertising from their bus fleets violated the right highly valued form of expression in a public loca- to free speech. tion that serves as an important place for public discourse. In a unanimous ruling yesterday to strike down the policies, the country's highest court said B.C.'s two They therefore do not constitute a minimal impair- transit agencies -- Greater Vancouver Transporta- ment of freedom of expression," she wrote. tion Authority (TransLink) and British Columbia Transit -- violated the Canadian Charter of Rights TransLink spokesman Ken Hardie said the original and Freedoms by rejecting advertising on the sides policy against political advertising was to create a of buses from the B.C. Teachers' Federation and the system that was "free of controversy." Canadian Federation of Students during the 2005 provincial election. "As a public transport agency, not primarily an ad- vertising medium . . . [passengers] are there to be That decision was based on company policies out- moved from one place to another, not to necessarily lawing political advertising. have their ideas or beliefs challenged," he ex- plained. The transit authorities, which had adopted essen- tially identical advertising policies, refused the ads "At the same time, the transit system is a place of because they weren't a public service or about work. In the past, certain types of advertising have goods or services, and because the ads would likely offended transit staff." "cause offence to any person or group of persons or create controversy." Hardie said TransLink, which operates the transit system in the Vancouver area, exercised its right to "Advertising on buses has become a widespread have the policy adjudicated by the Supreme Court. and effective means for conveying messages to the
  • Prince George Citizen July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 7 Politicians will do more than ride buses in next campaign The Citizen "I do not see any aspect of the OTTAWA location that suggests that ex- Both groups tried to place ads on pression within it would under- the outside of B.C. buses leading Watch for political ads coming mine the values underlying free up to the provincial election in soon to the side of a bus near expression," Deschamps wrote. 2005. you. "On the contrary, the space al- lows for expression by a broad They raised several issues in- British Columbia transit officials range of speakers to a large pub- cluding voter turnout, tuition were on the wrong side of the lic audience. fees, the environment and school Charter when they refused to closures. carry messages on the sides of "I therefore conclude that the their buses aimed at provincial side of a bus is a location where The student federation had hoped voters, the country's top court expressive activity is protected to run an image of a crowd at a said Friday. by ... the Charter." concert with the text: "Register now. Learn the issues. Vote May The Supreme Court of Canada The judgment was being 17, 2005." struck down transit policies ban- watched by cities across Canada ning all political ads, saying they that have so far rejected atheist The teachers union wanted to violate rights to free speech. bus banners declaring: "There's post a banner on the side of probably no God. Now stop wor- buses saying: "2,500 fewer "Like a city street, a city bus is a rying and enjoy your life." teachers. 113 schools closed. Our public place where individuals students. Your kids. Worth can openly interact with each The ruling protecting political speaking out for." other and their surroundings," ads will be viewed as a boon to wrote Justice Marie Deschamps those hoping to buy bus space British Columbia Transit and in the 8-0 ruling. for their atheist message. TransLink refused to run them, saying policy bars political ads All nine judges heard the case in Friday's ruling is a victory for the along with any message "likely March 2008 but Justice Michel Canadian Federation of Students to cause offence ... or create con- Bastarache has since retired. and the British Columbia Teach- troversy." ers' Federation.
  • National Post July 11, 2009 Saturday 
National Edition CANADA; Pg. A5 Transit systems can't ban political ads: court Freedom Of Speech Philip Ling, vertising policies, refused the ads Canwest News Service because they weren't a public The Canadian Federation of Stu- OTTAWA service or about goods or serv- dents was also involved after its ices, and because the ads would Rock The Vote ad campaign -- The Supreme Court of Canada likely "cause offence to any per- aimed at getting out the youth has ruled the decision by two son or group of persons or create vote-- was similarly denied. British Columbia transit systems controversy." banning political advertising The trial judge found TransLink from its bus fleet violated rights "I have some difficulty seeing had not infringed on their rights, to free speech. how an advertisement on the side arguing the sides of buses were of a bus that constitutes political not protected arenas of expres- In a unanimous ruling yesterday speech might create a safety risk sion. to strike down the policy, the or an unwelcoming environment country's highest court said B. for transit users," Justice Marie The B. C. Court of Appeal over- C.'s two transit agencies -- Deschamps wrote in her judg- turned that ruling in 2006. Greater Vancouver Transporta- ment. tion Authority and British Co- Yesterday, the highest court de- lumbia Transit -- violated the "The policies amount to a blan- cision agreed with the original Canadian Charter of Rights and ket exclusion of a highly valued trial judge, by noting the sides of Freedoms by rejecting advertis- form of expression in a public buses were not protected arenas ing on the sides of buses from location that serves as an impor- of expression. the Canadian Federation of Stu- tant place for public discourse. dents and the B. C. Teachers' They therefore do not constitute "Like a city street, a city bus is a Federation during the 2005 pro- a minimal impairment of free- public place where individuals vincial election. dom of expression," she wrote. can openly interact with each other and their surroundings," That decision was also based on In 2005, the BCTF, which repre- Ms. Deschamps wrote. "The side company policy outlawing po- sents 40,000 public school teach- of a bus is therefore a location litical advertising. ers, went to B. C. Supreme Court where expressive activity is pro- after claiming that the refusal to tected by the charter." The transit authorities, which had run ads infringed on its right to adopted essentially identical ad- free speech.
  • Nanaimo Daily News July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition BRITISH COLUMBIA; Pg. A6 Transit ad bans said to violate Charter of Rights Philip Ling, "Advertising on buses has become a widespread Canwest News Service and effective means for conveying messages to the OTTAWA general public. In exercising their control over such advertising, the transit authorities have failed to The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that the minimize the impairment of political speech," Jus- decision by two B.C. transit systems to ban political tice Marie Deschamps wrote in her judgment. advertising from their bus fleets violated the right to free speech. "The policies amount to a blanket exclusion of a highly valued form of expression in a public loca- In a unanimous ruling Friday to strike down the tion that serves as an important place for public policies, the country's highest court said B.C.'s two discourse. transit agencies -- the Greater Vancouver Transpor- tation Authority (TransLink) and British Columbia "They therefore do not constitute a minimal im- Transit -- violated the Canadian Charter of Rights pairment of freedom of expression," she wrote. and Freedoms by rejecting advertising on the sides of buses from the B.C. Teachers' Federation and the TransLink spokesman Ken Hardie said the original Canadian Federation of Students during the 2005 policy against political advertising was to create a provincial election. system that was "free of controversy." That decision was based on company policies out- "As a public transport agency, not primarily an ad- lawing political advertising. vertising medium . . . (passengers) are there to be moved from one place to another, not to necessarily The transit authorities, which had adopted essen- have their ideas or beliefs challenged," he ex- tially identical advertising policies, refused the ads plained. on the grounds that they were neither a public serv- ice nor about goods or services, and because they "At the same time, the transit system is a place of felt that the ads would likely "cause offence to any work. In the past, certain types of advertising have person or group of persons or create controversy." offended transit staff."
  • Kamloops Daily News July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A2 Public transit can carry political ads, court rules Philip Ling, vertising policies, refused the ads of controversy." Canwest News Service because they weren't a public OTTAWA service or about goods or serv- "As a public transport agency, ices, and because the ads would not primarily an advertising me- The Supreme Court of Canada likely "cause offence to any per- dium . . . (passengers) are there has ruled that the decision by son or group of persons or create to be moved from one place to two B.C. transit systems to ban controversy." another, not to necessarily have political advertising from their their ideas or beliefs challenged," bus fleets violated the right to "Advertising on buses has be- he explained. "At the same time, free speech. come a widespread and effective the transit system is a place of means for conveying messages work. In the past, certain types of In a unanimous ruling Friday to to the general public. In exercis- advertising have offended transit strike down the policies, the ing their control over such adver- staff." country's highest court said tising, the transit authorities have B.C.'s two transit agencies -- failed to minimize the impair- Hardie said TransLink, which Greater Vancouver Transporta- ment of political speech," Justice operates the transit system in the tion Authority (TransLink) and Marie Deschamps wrote in her Vancouver area, exercised its British Columbia Transit -- vio- judgment. right to have the policy adjudi- lated the Canadian Charter of cated by the Supreme Court. Rights and Freedoms by reject- "The policies amount to a blan- ing advertising on the sides of ket exclusion of a highly valued But Deschamps challenged the buses from the BC Teachers' form of expression in a public transit authorities' policies in her Federation and the Canadian location that serves as an impor- judgment. Federation of Students during the tant place for public discourse. 2005 provincial election. They therefore do not constitute "I have some difficulty seeing a minimal impairment of free- how an advertisement on the side That decision was based on dom of expression," she wrote. of a bus that constitutes political company policies outlawing po- speech might create a safety risk litical advertising. TransLink spokesman Ken Har- or an unwelcoming environment die said the original policy for transit users." The transit authorities, which had against political advertising was adopted essentially identical ad- to create a system that was "free
  • The Hamilton Spectator July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition CANADA/WORLD; Pg. A07 Political bus ads given green light Supreme Court strikes down transit ban policies Sue Bailey, expressive activity is protected TransLink refused to run them, The Canadian Press by ... the Charter." saying policy bars political ads OTTAWA along with any message "likely The judgment was being to cause offence ... or create con- Watch for political ads coming watched by cities across Canada troversy." soon to the side of a bus near that have so far rejected atheist you. bus banners declaring: "There's The high court pointedly noted probably no God. Now stop wor- that bus officials had no problem British Columbia transit officials rying and enjoy your life." running commercial ads. It also were on the wrong side of the said their policy attempting to Charter when they refused to The ruling protecting political vanquish all controversy "is un- carry messages on the sides of ads will be viewed as a boon to necessarily broad." their buses aimed at provincial those hoping to buy bus space voters, the country's top court for their atheist message. "Citizens, including bus riders, said yesterday. are expected to put up with some Yesterday's ruling is a victory for controversy in a free and democ- The Supreme Court of Canada the Canadian Federation of Stu- ratic society." struck down transit policies ban- dents and the British Columbia ning all political ads, saying they Teachers' Federation. Still, there are times when mes- violate rights to free speech. sages in publicly governed Both groups tried to place ads on spaces can be justifiably re- "Like a city street, a city bus is a the outside of B.C. buses leading stricted, Deschamps wrote. The public place where individuals up to the provincial election in fact that buses are used by an can openly interact with each 2005. essentially captive audience, other and their surroundings," including children, must be con- wrote Justice Marie Deschamps They raised several issues in- sidered. in the 8-0 ruling. cluding voter turnout, tuition fees, the environment and school "Thus, limits on advertising are All nine judges heard the case in closures. contextual." The Canadian Code March 2008 but Justice Michel of Advertising Standards "could Bastarache has since retired. The student federation had hoped be used as a guide to establish to run an image of a crowd at a reasonable limits ... on discrimi- "I do not see any aspect of the concert with the text: "Register natory content or on ads which location that suggests that ex- now. Learn the issues. Vote May incite or condone violence or pression within it would under- 17, 2005." other unlawful behaviour. mine the values underlying free expression," Deschamps wrote. The teachers union wanted to "But the determination of what is "On the contrary, the space al- post a banner on the side of justified will depend on the facts lows for expression by a broad buses saying: "2,500 fewer in the particular case." range of speakers to a large pub- teachers. 113 schools closed. Our lic audience. students. Your kids. Worth At trial, the judge found that speaking out for." transit bodies, as publicly con- "I therefore conclude that the trolled government entities, must side of a bus is a location where British Columbia Transit and uphold the Charter of Rights and
  • Freedoms. But he cited the fact lish opinion pieces, she wrote. ment was born -- and it soon that transit company policy had picked up speed. never allowed political ads, and Several cities, including Van- did not define that as a breach of couver, Victoria, Halifax and Toronto, Calgary and Montreal free expression. London, Ont., initially rejected accepted and ran the "There's the atheist "There's probably no probably no God" ads, but they The B.C. Court of Appeal ruled God" ads. hit a roadblock in Ottawa. The 2-1 against him, and struck down capital's transit service OC any blanket ban on political mes- The atheist campaign began in Transpo rejected them at first. saging as unconstitutional. Britain when a woman was an- noyed that an ad posted in a The company wound up display- Dissenting B.C. Justice Mary London bus linked her to a web- ing the message on the side of its Southin said political bus ads site warning that non-Christians buses last spring after Ottawa don't qualify as the type of ex- will "spend all eternity in tor- city council cast a split vote to pression protected by the Char- ment in hell." She decided to overturn the refusal amid con- ter. Forcing transit authorities to raise money for a rebuttal. cerns about a costly legal fight. display such messages would be like obliging newspapers to pub- The atheist bus message move-
  • The Globe and Mail July 11, 2009 Saturday 
National Edition NATIONAL NEWS; SUPREME COURT; Pg. A8 Transit must allow political ads: court KIRK MAKIN lawyer for the B.C. Civil Liber- said. "Unlike the activities which JUSTICE REPORTER ties Association. "What govern- occur in certain government ment does have to be able to do buildings or offices, those which The Supreme Court of Canada is justify any limitations it puts occur on a public bus do not re- has given a green light to politi- on free expression." quire privacy and limited ac- cal advertising on the sides of cess." transit vehicles, ruling that a bus Yesterday's ruling has no bearing is a "public place" where free on private companies or com- Lawyers for the transit compa- expression should rarely be cur- mercial vehicles, which are not nies had argued that their adver- tailed. bound by the Charter of Rights tising ban was necessary to guar- and Freedoms. antee "a safe and welcoming The court ruled 8-0 against a environment" for riders and driv- policy that two B.C. mass transit The case arose in 2004, when the ers. agencies, TransLink and BC B.C. component of the Canadian Transit, invoked to refuse politi- Federation of Students and the They said that passengers are cal ads that they feared might British Columbia Teachers' Fed- "captive" to messages on the make passengers uncomfortable. eration were refused permission inside and outside of vehicles to buy ad space on buses. The because they have to approach, "I have some difficulty seeing CFS wanted to encourage young enter and ride on them. how an advertisement on the side people to vote in a forthcoming of a bus that constitutes political provincial election. The BCTF The agencies also maintained speech might create a safety risk intended to express concern that the policy was created to or an unwelcoming environment about changes in the public edu- prevent the public from conclud- for transit users," Madam Justice cation system. ing that they endorsed any politi- Marie Deschamps said for the cal view that advertisers might court. TransLink and B.C. Transit pol- seek to place on them. icy permitted commercial adver- "Citizens, including bus riders, tising with the exception of po- The B.C. Civil Liberties Asso- are expected to put up with some litical ads that were "likely to ciation argued during the appeal controversy in a free and democ- cause offence to any person or that political advertising lies at ratic society." group of persons or create con- the heart of the Charter section troversy." that protects freedom of expres- The court concluded that an ad- sion, and noted that citizens have vertising ban could be justified Judge Deschamps said that the "learned to distinguish between only to screen out ads that could policies "amount to a blanket the message and the owner of the create a dangerous, offensive or exclusion of a highly valued locationwhere the message is hostile environment, such as form of expression in a public delivered. ones extolling the virtues of ter- location that serves as an impor- rorism. tant place for public discourse." In 2006, the B.C. Court of Ap- peal ruled in favour of striking "It does not follow that govern- "Moreover, an important aspect down the advertising restrictions. ment has to abandon any notion of a bus is that it is by nature a of taste," said Chris Sanderson, a public, not a private, space," she
  • The Calgary Herald July 11, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A4 Political ad ban violated charter Philip Ling, general public. In exercising their control over such Canwest News Service advertising, the transit authorities have failed to minimize the impairment of political speech," Jus- The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that the tice Marie Deschamps wrote in her judgment. decision by two B. C. transit systems to ban politi- cal advertising from their bus fleets violated the "The policies amount to a blanket exclusion of a right to free speech. highly valued form of expression in a public loca- tion that serves as an important place for public In a unanimous ruling Friday to strike down the discourse. They therefore do not constitute a mini- policies, the country's highest court said B. C.'s two mal impairment of freedom of expression," she transit agencies--Greater Vancouver Transportation wrote. Authority (TransLink) and British Columbia Tran- sit -- violated the Canadian Charter of Rights and TransLink spokesman Ken Hardie said the original Freedoms by rejecting advertising on the sides of policy against political advertising was to create a buses from the B. C. Teachers' Federation and the system that was "free of controversy." Canadian Federation of Students during the 2005 provincial election. In 2005, the BCTF went to the B. C. Supreme Court after claiming that the refusal to run ads in- That decision was based on company policies out- fringed on its right to free speech. lawing political advertising. On Friday, the highest court agreed with the appeal The transit authorities, which had adopted essen- judge, by noting the sides of buses are not "charter- tially identical advertising policies, refused the ads free" zones. because they weren't a public service or about goods or services, and because the ads would likely "Like a city street, a city bus is a public place where "cause offence to any person or group of persons or individuals can openly interact with each other and create controversy." their surroundings," Deschamps wrote. "The side of a bus is therefore a location where expressive activ- "Advertising on buses has become a widespread ity is protected by the charter." and effective means for conveying messages to the
  • The Vancouver Province July 12, 2009 Sunday 
Final EditionNEWS; Pg. A10 Political ads OK on transit, court rules Frank Luba, Shamus Reid, B.C. chairman of the CFS, said The Province teachers and students worked jointly on their case and the bill ran into the "hundreds of thousands" of Taxpayers will be on the hook for hundreds of dollars. thousands of dollars in legal fees after the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that TransLink and B.C. TransLink spokesman Ken Hardie said his organi- Transit were wrong to ban a series of ads from its zation's legal bill was likely about the same. vehicles. The taxpayer-funded transit authorities initially The money will cover costs awarded to the B.C. won the right to reject the ads in B.C. Supreme division of the Canadian Federation of Students and Court, but lost in the B.C. Court of Appeal and then the B.C. Teachers Federation as the culmination of took the case to the Supreme Court of Canada. a legal wrangle that began before the provincial election in 2005, when TransLink and B.C. Transit Hardie said the authorities' reasoning was that their refused to run their advertisements. primary function was to provide transit and riders were "not there to have their beliefs and political The students group wanted to wrap buses with a affiliations challenged." There was a concern that large ad that read: "Register now. Learn the issues. such challenges could result in passengers confront- Vote May 17, 2005. ROCK THE VOTE BC.com." ing staff, he said. A smaller ad from the teachers' group would have read: "2,500 fewer teachers, 114 schools closed. And there was concern the ads might be a work- Your kids. Our students. Worth speaking out for." place issue, much like an ad by the Hooters restau- The court denied appeals by the transit agencies, rant chain that offended female drivers. citing the Charter of Rights' protections of freedom of expression. The Supreme Court disagreed.
  • Woodstock Sentinel-Review July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 4 No more bus fuss over political ads BY MINDELLE JACOBS, the B.C. transit authorities. Ban- SUN MEDIA The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of well to encourage more young high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme people to vote. One of their ads Court of Canada ruling to uphold showed an image of a crowd at a 'It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? concert. The text read: "Register tisement on the side of a bus that now. Learn the issues. Vote May constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we 17, 2005." create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- Neither ad would have sparked ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the riots in the streets. Both issues are Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. legitimate topics for public discus- sion. The education system is un- This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- der strain and fewer people are to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- bothering to vote. likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. But the B.C. transit authorities the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it were apparently frightened that on. The freedom to express all kinds permitting political advertising of views; within reason; consti- would trigger some kind of social Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy cataclysm. agencies - such as those in To- country. In open societies, it' s a ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary right we're supposed to cherish. In "No advertisement will be ac- and Winnipeg - typically have totalitarian states, it's a right peo- cepted which advocates or opposes reasonable ad rules, generally ple fight and die for. any ideology or political philoso- based on the Canadian Code of phy, point of view or action ...," Advertising Standards. In B.C., the transit authorities fig- the policy states. ured too much politics was bad for In addition, Edmonton Transit democracy. During the 2005 pro- Also banned are ads that are stipulates that ads be of "a moral vincial election campaign, B.C. 'likely' to cause offence or create and reputable character." And the Transit and TransLink refused to controversy. Yikes! Sounds more City of Ottawa bans ads that "con- run political ads. like North Korea than Canada. vey a negative religious message Sort of puts a different spin on that might be deemed prejudicial" Were the ads incendiary or racist? your vision of laid-back Lo- or that are likely to cause "wide- Did they threaten violence or pro- tuslanders. spread offence." mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can There are bound to be others will- Not at all. The ad the B.C. Teach- we? Why, that would make people ing to push the bounds of tolerance ers57; Federation wanted to run think! It might even convince them in the name of free expression. So addressed concerns about the edu- to get socially and politically in- what? We're supposed to be a ma- cation system. The proposed bus volved in their communities. ture democracy. We should behave ad said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 like one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. kids. Worth speaking out for." last week to knock some sense into
  • Winnipeg Sun July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 9 Fuss on the bus? Ads about education too hot for B.C. authorities BY MINDELLE JACOBS, LEGITIMATE TOPICS SUN MEDIA Neither ad would have sparked riots in the How did we become a nation of wimps? Why streets. Both issues are legitimate topics for pub- did it take a Supreme Court of Canada ruling to lic discussion. The education system is under uphold our right to freedom of expression? strain and fewer people are bothering to vote. Somewhere along the way, we evolved into a But the B.C. transit authorities were apparently people who blanch at controversy, tiptoe around frightened that permitting political advertising politics and religion and can't bear the thought of would trigger some kind of social cataclysm. being offended. "No advertisement will be accepted which advo- Democracy is supposed to be elastic enough to cates or opposes any ideology or political phi- embrace disagreement, debate and the clash of losophy, point of view or action ...," the policy ideologies. states. The freedom to express all kinds of views; Also banned are ads that are 'likely' to cause of- within reason; constitutes the lifeblood of a fence or create controversy. Yikes! Sounds more healthy country. In open societies, it' s a right like North Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a we're supposed to cherish. In totalitarian states, different spin on your vision of laid-back Lo- it's a right people fight and die for. tuslanders. In B.C., the transit authorities figured too much We can't have controversy, can we? Why, that politics was bad for democracy. During the 2005 would make people think! It might even con- provincial election campaign, B.C. Transit and vince them to get socially and politically in- TransLink refused to run political ads. volved in their communities. Were the ads incendiary or racist? Did they It took a Supreme Court judgment last week to threaten violence or promote hatred? knock some sense into the B.C. transit authori- ties. Banning political ads on public buses is a Not at all. The ad the B.C. Teachers57; Federa- violation of free speech, the high court declared. tion wanted to run addressed concerns about the education system. The proposed bus ad said: 'It is difficult to see how an advertisement on the "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 schools closed. Our side of a bus that constitutes political speech students. Your kids. Worth speaking out for." might create a safety risk or an unwelcome envi- ronment for transit users," wrote Supreme Court The Canadian Federation of Students wanted to Justice Marie Deschamps. buy bus ads as well to encourage more young people to vote. One of their ads showed an image This will probably open the door to all sorts of of a crowd at a concert. The text read: "Register other ads from the likes of, say, anti-abortion now. Learn the issues. Vote May 17, 2005." activists and atheists to Bible-thumpers and the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on.
  • REASONABLE RULES City of Ottawa bans ads that "convey a negative religious message that might be deemed prejudi- Fortunately, our major transit agencies - such as cial" or that are likely to cause "widespread of- those in Toronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary fence." and Winnipeg - typically have reasonable ad rules, generally based on the Canadian Code of There are bound to be others willing to push the Advertising Standards. bounds of tolerance in the name of free expres- sion. So what? We're supposed to be a mature In addition, Edmonton Transit stipulates that ads democracy. We should behave like one and stop be of "a moral and reputable character." And the acting like scared chickens.
  • Welland Tribune July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A6 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS kids. Worth speaking out for." last week to knock some sense into the B. C. transit authorities. Ban- How did we become a nation of The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses wimps? Why did it take a Supreme dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the Court of Canada ruling to uphold well to encourage more young high court declared. our right to freedom of expression? people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- Somewhere along the way, we One of their ads showed an image tisement on the side of a bus that evolved into a people who blanch of a crowd at a concert. The text constitutes political speech might at controversy, tiptoe around poli- read: "Register now. Learn the create a safety risk or an unwel- tics and religion and can't bear the issues. Vote May 17, 2005." come environment for transit us- thought of being offended. ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice Neither ad would have sparked Marie Deschamps. Democracy is supposed to be elas- riots in the streets. Both issues are tic enough to embrace disagree- legitimate topics for public discus- This will probably open the door ment, debate and the clash of ide- sion. The education system is un- to all sorts of other ads from the ologies. der strain and fewer people are likes of, say, anti-abortion activists bothering to vote. and atheists to Bible-thumpers and The freedom to express all kinds the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it of views -- within reason -- consti- But the B. C. transit authorities on. tutes the lifeblood of a healthy were apparently frightened that country. permitting political advertising Fortunately, our major transit would trigger some kind of social agencies -- such as those in To- In open societies, it's a right we're cataclysm. ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary supposed to cherish. In totalitarian and Winnipeg -- typically have states, it's a right people fight and "No advertisement will be ac- reasonable ad rules, generally die for. cepted which advocates or opposes based on the Canadian Code of any ideology or political philoso- Advertising Standards. In B. C., the transit authorities phy, point of view or action . . . " figured too much politics was bad the policy states. In addition, Edmonton Transit for democracy. stipulates that ads be of "a moral Also banned are ads that are and reputable character." During the 2005 provincial elec- "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads tion campaign, B. C. Transit and controversy. that "convey a negative religious TransLink refused to run political message that might be deemed ads. Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." Were the ads incendiary or racist? different spin on your vision of Did they threaten violence or pro- laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- mote hatred? ing to push the bounds of tolerance We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- we? Why, that would make people what? ers' Federation wanted to run ad- think! It might even convince them dressed concerns about the educa- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature tion system. The proposed bus ad volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens.
  • The Toronto Sun July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 16 Fuss on the bus? Ads about education too hot for B.C. authorities BY MINDELLE JACOBS, The Canadian Federation of Stu- the B.C. transit authorities. Ban- SUN MEDIA dents wanted to buy bus ads as ning political ads on public buses well to encourage more young is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of people to vote. One of their ads high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme showed an image of a crowd at a Court of Canada ruling to uphold concert. The text read: "Register 'It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? now. Learn the issues. Vote May tisement on the side of a bus that 17, 2005." constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch LEGITIMATE TOPICS come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- Neither ad would have sparked ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the riots in the streets. Both issues are Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. legitimate topics for public discus- sion. The education system is un- This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- der strain and fewer people are to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- bothering to vote. likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. But the B.C. transit authorities the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it were apparently frightened that on. The freedom to express all kinds permitting political advertising of views; within reason; consti- would trigger some kind of social REASONABLE RULES tutes the lifeblood of a healthy cataclysm. Fortunately, our major transit country. In open societies, it' s a agencies - such as those in To- right we're supposed to cherish. In "No advertisement will be ac- ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary totalitarian states, it's a right peo- cepted which advocates or opposes and Winnipeg - typically have ple fight and die for. any ideology or political philoso- reasonable ad rules, generally phy, point of view or action ...," based on the Canadian Code of In B.C., the transit authorities fig- the policy states. Advertising Standards. ured too much politics was bad for democracy. During the 2005 pro- Also banned are ads that are In addition, Edmonton Transit vincial election campaign, B.C. 'likely' to cause offence or create stipulates that ads be of "a moral Transit and TransLink refused to controversy. Yikes! Sounds more and reputable character." And the run political ads. like North Korea than Canada. City of Ottawa bans ads that "con- Sort of puts a different spin on vey a negative religious message Were the ads incendiary or racist? your vision of laid-back Lo- that might be deemed prejudicial" Did they threaten violence or pro- tuslanders. or that are likely to cause "wide- mote hatred? spread offence." We can't have controversy, can Not at all. The ad the B.C. Teach- we? Why, that would make people There are bound to be others will- ers57; Federation wanted to run think! It might even convince them ing to push the bounds of tolerance addressed concerns about the edu- to get socially and politically in- in the name of free expression. So cation system. The proposed bus volved in their communities. what? We're supposed to be a ma- ad said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 ture democracy. We should behave schools closed. Our students. Your It took a Supreme Court judgment like one and stop acting like scared kids. Worth speaking out for." last week to knock some sense into chickens.
  • Timmins Daily Press July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A4 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Sudbury Star July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A10 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Stratford Beacon Herald July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 5 No more bus fuss over political ads BY MINDELLE JACOBS, The Canadian Federation of Stu- the B.C. transit authorities. Ban- SUN MEDIA dents wanted to buy bus ads as ning political ads on public buses well to encourage more young is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of people to vote. One of their ads high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme showed an image of a crowd at a Court of Canada ruling to uphold concert. The text read: "Register 'It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? now. Learn the issues. Vote May tisement on the side of a bus that 17, 2005." constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch LEGITIMATE TOPICS come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Neither ad would have sparked Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. riots in the streets. Both issues are legitimate topics for public discus- This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- sion. The education system is un- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- der strain and fewer people are likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- bothering to vote. and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it But the B.C. transit authorities on. The freedom to express all kinds were apparently frightened that of views; within reason; consti- permitting political advertising REASONABLE RULES tutes the lifeblood of a healthy would trigger some kind of social country. In open societies, it' s a cataclysm. Fortunately, our major transit right we're supposed to cherish. In agencies - such as those in To- totalitarian states, it's a right peo- "No advertisement will be ac- ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary ple fight and die for. cepted which advocates or opposes and Winnipeg - typically have any ideology or political philoso- reasonable ad rules, generally In B.C., the transit authorities fig- phy, point of view or action ...," based on the Canadian Code of ured too much politics was bad for the policy states. Advertising Standards. democracy. During the 2005 pro- vincial election campaign, B.C. Also banned are ads that are In addition, Edmonton Transit Transit and TransLink refused to 'likely' to cause offence or create stipulates that ads be of "a moral run political ads. controversy. Yikes! Sounds more and reputable character." And the like North Korea than Canada. City of Ottawa bans ads that "con- Were the ads incendiary or racist? Sort of puts a different spin on vey a negative religious message Did they threaten violence or pro- your vision of laid-back Lo- that might be deemed prejudicial" mote hatred? tuslanders. or that are likely to cause "wide- spread offence." Not at all. The ad the B.C. Teach- We can't have controversy, can ers57; Federation wanted to run we? Why, that would make people There are bound to be others will- addressed concerns about the edu- think! It might even convince them ing to push the bounds of tolerance cation system. The proposed bus to get socially and politically in- in the name of free expression. So ad said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 volved in their communities. what? We're supposed to be a ma- schools closed. Our students. Your ture democracy. We should behave kids. Worth speaking out for." It took a Supreme Court judgment like one and stop acting like scared last week to knock some sense into chickens.
  • The Standard July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A8 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Sault Star July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A8 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Sarnia Observer July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A4 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Portage Daily Graphic July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION Manitoba: EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 4 No more bus fuss over political ads BY MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Peterborough Examiner July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A4 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Pembroke Observer July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A5 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps?Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies--such as those in Toronto, country. would trigger some kind of social Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and cataclysm. Winnipeg -- typically have reason- In open societies, it's a right we're able ad rules, generally based on supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- the Canadian Code of Advertising states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Owen Sound Sun Times July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A4 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS kids. Worth speaking out for." last week to knock some sense into the B. C. transit authorities. Ban- How did we become a nation of The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses wimps? Why did it take a Supreme dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the Court of Canada ruling to uphold well to encourage more young high court declared. our right to freedom of expression? people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- Somewhere along the way, we One of their ads showed an image tisement on the side of a bus that evolved into a people who blanch of a crowd at a concert. The text constitutes political speech might at controversy, tiptoe around poli- read: "Register now. Learn the create a safety risk or an unwel- tics and religion and can't bear the issues. Vote May 17, 2005." come environment for transit us- thought of being offended. ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice Neither ad would have sparked Marie Deschamps. Democracy is supposed to be elas- riots in the streets. Both issues are tic enough to embrace disagree- legitimate topics for public discus- This will probably open the door ment, debate and the clash of ide- sion. The education system is un- to all sorts of other ads from the ologies. der strain and fewer people are likes of, say, anti-abortion activists bothering to vote. and atheists to Bible-thumpers and The freedom to express all kinds the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it of views -- within reason -- consti- But the B. C. transit authorities on. tutes the lifeblood of a healthy were apparently frightened that country. permitting political advertising Fortunately, our major transit would trigger some kind of social agencies -- such as those in To- In open societies, it's a right we're cataclysm. ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary supposed to cherish. In totalitarian and Winnipeg -- typically have states, it's a right people fight and "No advertisement will be ac- reasonable ad rules, generally die for. cepted which advocates or opposes based on the Canadian Code of any ideology or political philoso- Advertising Standards. In B. C., the transit authorities phy, point of view or action . . . " figured too much politics was bad the policy states. In addition, Edmonton Transit for democracy. stipulates that ads be of "a moral Also banned are ads that are and reputable character." During the 2005 provincial elec- "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads tion campaign, B. C. Transit and controversy. that "convey a negative religious TransLink refused to run political message that might be deemed ads. Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." Were the ads incendiary or racist? different spin on your vision of Did they threaten violence or pro- laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- mote hatred? ing to push the bounds of tolerance We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- we? Why, that would make people what? ers' Federation wanted to run ad- think! It might even convince them dressed concerns about the educa- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature tion system. The proposed bus ad volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens.
  • The Ottawa Sun July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 15 Fuss on the bus? Ads about education too hot for B.C. authorities BY MINDELLE JACOBS, to run addressed concerns about tuslanders. SUN MEDIA the education system. The pro- posed bus ad said: "2,500 fewer We can't have controversy, can How did we become a nation of teachers. 113 schools closed. Our we? Why, that would make peo- wimps? Why did it take a Su- students. Your kids. Worth ple think! It might even convince preme Court of Canada ruling to speaking out for." them to get socially and politi- uphold our right to freedom of cally involved in their communi- expression? The Canadian Federation of Stu- ties. dents wanted to buy bus ads as Somewhere along the way, we well to encourage more young It took a Supreme Court judg- evolved into a people who people to vote. One of their ads ment last week to knock some blanch at controversy, tiptoe showed an image of a crowd at a sense into the B.C. transit around politics and religion and concert. The text read: "Register authorities. Banning political ads can't bear the thought of being now. Learn the issues. Vote May on public buses is a violation of offended. 17, 2005." free speech, the high court de- clared. Democracy is supposed to be LEGITIMATE TOPICS elastic enough to embrace dis- 'It is difficult to see how an ad- agreement, debate and the clash Neither ad would have sparked vertisement on the side of a bus of ideologies. riots in the streets. Both issues that constitutes political speech are legitimate topics for public might create a safety risk or an The freedom to express all kinds discussion. The education system unwelcome environment for of views; within reason; consti- is under strain and fewer people transit users," wrote Supreme tutes the lifeblood of a healthy are bothering to vote. Court Justice Marie Deschamps. country. In open societies, it' s a right we're supposed to cherish. But the B.C. transit authorities This will probably open the door In totalitarian states, it's a right were apparently frightened that to all sorts of other ads from the people fight and die for. permitting political advertising likes of, say, anti-abortion activ- would trigger some kind of so- ists and atheists to Bible- In B.C., the transit authorities cial cataclysm. thumpers and the enviro crowd. figured too much politics was Good. Bring it on. bad for democracy. During the "No advertisement will be ac- 2005 provincial election cam- cepted which advocates or op- REASONABLE RULES paign, B.C. Transit and poses any ideology or political TransLink refused to run politi- philosophy, point of view or ac- Fortunately, our major transit cal ads. tion ...," the policy states. agencies - such as those in To- ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Cal- Were the ads incendiary or rac- Also banned are ads that are gary and Winnipeg - typically ist? Did they threaten violence or 'likely' to cause offence or create have reasonable ad rules, gener- promote hatred? controversy. Yikes! Sounds more ally based on the Canadian Code like North Korea than Canada. of Advertising Standards. Not at all. The ad the B.C. Sort of puts a different spin on Teachers57; Federation wanted your vision of laid-back Lo- In addition, Edmonton Transit
  • stipulates that ads be of "a moral and reputable character." And the City of Ottawa bans ads that "convey a negative religious message that might be deemed prejudicial" or that are likely to cause "widespread offence." There are bound to be others willing to push the bounds of tolerance in the name of free expression. So what? We're sup- posed to be a mature democracy. We should behave like one and stop acting like scared chickens.
  • Orillia Packet & Times July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A6 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • North Bay Nugget July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A6 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: Register now. Learn the is- come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- sues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian No advertisement will be accepted based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and which advocates or opposes any Advertising Standards. die for. ideology or political philosophy, point of view or action . . . the In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities policy states. stipulates that ads be of a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: 2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Niagara Falls Review July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A4 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • London Free Press July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A6 No more bus fuss over political ads put to rest BY MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B.C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B.C., the transit authorities fig- the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral ured too much politics was bad for and reputable character." democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B.C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B.C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B.C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Kingston Whig-Standard July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 4 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Fort McMurray Today July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 4 Education ads too hot for B.C. transit BY MINDELLE JACOBS, The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses SUN MEDIA dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the well to encourage more young high court declared. How did we become a nation of people to vote. One of their ads wimps? Why did it take a Supreme showed an image of a crowd at a "It is difficult to see how an adver- Court of Canada ruling to uphold concert. The text read: "Register tisement on the side of a bus that our right to freedom of expression? now. Learn the issues. Vote May constitutes political speech might 17, 2005." create a safety risk or an unwel- Somewhere along the way, we come environment for transit us- evolved into a people who blanch Neither ad would have sparked ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice at controversy, tiptoe around poli- riots in the streets. Both issues are Marie Deschamps. tics and religion and can't bear the legitimate topics for public discus- thought of being offended. sion. The education system is un- This will probably open the door der strain and fewer people are to all sorts of other ads from the Democracy is supposed to be elas- bothering to vote. likes of, say, anti-abortion activists tic enough to embrace disagree- and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ment, debate and the clash of ide- But the B.C. transit authorities the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it ologies. were apparently frightened that on. permitting political advertising The freedom to express all kinds would trigger some kind of social Fortunately, our major transit of views; within reason; consti- cataclysm. agencies -- such as those in To- tutes the lifeblood of a healthy ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary country. In open societies, it's a "No advertisement will be ac- and Winnipeg -- typically have right we're supposed to cherish. In cepted which advocates or opposes reasonable ad rules, generally totalitarian states, it's a right peo- any ideology or political philoso- based on the Canadian Code of ple fight and die for. phy, point of view or action ...," Advertising Standards. the policy states. In B.C., the transit authorities fig- In addition, Edmonton Transit ured too much politics was bad for Also banned are ads that are stipulates that ads be of "a moral democracy. During the 2005 pro- 'likely' to cause offence or create and reputable character." And the vincial election campaign, B.C. controversy. City of Ottawa bans ads that "con- Transit and TransLink refused to vey a negative religious message run political ads. Yikes! Sounds more like North that might be deemed prejudicial" Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a or that are likely to cause "wide- Were the ads incendiary or racist? different spin on your vision of spread offence." Did they threaten violence or pro- laid-back Lotuslanders. mote hatred? There are bound to be others will- We can't have controversy, can ing to push the bounds of tolerance Not at all. The ad the B.C. Teach- we? Why, that would make people in the name of free expression. So ers' Federation wanted to run ad- think! It might even convince them what? dressed concerns about the educa- to get socially and politically in- tion system. The proposed bus ad volved in their communities. We're supposed to be a mature said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 democracy. We should behave like schools closed. Our students. Your It took a Supreme Court judgment one and stop acting like scared kids. Worth speaking out for." last week to knock some sense into chickens. the B.C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Edmonton Sun July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 15 Fuss on the bus? Ads about education too hot for B.C. authorities BY MINDELLE JACOBS, the education system. The pro- We can't have controversy, can SUN MEDIA posed bus ad said: "2,500 fewer we? Why, that would make peo- teachers. 113 schools closed. Our ple think! It might even convince How did we become a nation of students. Your kids. Worth them to get socially and politi- wimps? Why did it take a Su- speaking out for." cally involved in their communi- preme Court of Canada ruling to ties. uphold our right to freedom of The Canadian Federation of Stu- expression? dents wanted to buy bus ads as It took a Supreme Court judg- well to encourage more young ment last week to knock some Somewhere along the way, we people to vote. One of their ads sense into the B.C. transit evolved into a people who showed an image of a crowd at a authorities. Banning political ads blanch at controversy, tiptoe concert. The text read: "Register on public buses is a violation of around politics and religion and now. Learn the issues. Vote May free speech, the high court de- can't bear the thought of being 17, 2005." clared. offended. LEGITIMATE TOPICS 'It is difficult to see how an ad- Democracy is supposed to be vertisement on the side of a bus elastic enough to embrace dis- Neither ad would have sparked that constitutes political speech agreement, debate and the clash riots in the streets. Both issues might create a safety risk or an of ideologies. are legitimate topics for public unwelcome environment for discussion. The education system transit users," wrote Supreme The freedom to express all kinds is under strain and fewer people Court Justice Marie Deschamps. of views; within reason; consti- are bothering to vote. tutes the lifeblood of a healthy This will probably open the door country. In open societies, it' s a But the B.C. transit authorities to all sorts of other ads from the right we're supposed to cherish. were apparently frightened that likes of, say, anti-abortion activ- In totalitarian states, it's a right permitting political advertising ists and atheists to Bible- people fight and die for. would trigger some kind of so- thumpers and the enviro crowd. cial cataclysm. Good. Bring it on. In B.C., the transit authorities figured too much politics was "No advertisement will be ac- REASONABLE RULES bad for democracy. During the cepted which advocates or op- 2005 provincial election cam- poses any ideology or political Fortunately, our major transit paign, B.C. Transit and philosophy, point of view or ac- agencies - such as those in To- TransLink refused to run politi- tion ...," the policy states. ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Cal- cal ads. gary and Winnipeg - typically Also banned are ads that are have reasonable ad rules, gener- Were the ads incendiary or rac- 'likely' to cause offence or create ally based on the Canadian Code ist? Did they threaten violence or controversy. Yikes! Sounds more of Advertising Standards. promote hatred? like North Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a different spin on In addition, Edmonton Transit Not at all. The ad the B.C. your vision of laid-back Lo- stipulates that ads be of "a moral Teachers57; Federation wanted tuslanders. and reputable character." And the to run addressed concerns about City of Ottawa bans ads that
  • "convey a negative religious message that might be deemed prejudicial" or that are likely to cause "widespread offence." There are bound to be others willing to push the bounds of tolerance in the name of free expression. So what? We're sup- posed to be a mature democracy. We should behave like one and stop acting like scared chickens.
  • Daily Miner and News July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 4 No more bus fuss over political ads BY MINDELLE JACOBS kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban- The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young high court declared. Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. our right to freedom of expression? "It is difficult to see how an adver- One of their ads showed an image tisement on the side of a bus that Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text constitutes political speech might evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the create a safety risk or an unwel- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." come environment for transit us- tics and religion and can't bear the ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked Marie Deschamps. riots in the streets. Both issues are Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- This will probably open the door tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- to all sorts of other ads from the ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ologies. bothering to vote. and atheists to Bible-thumpers and the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities on. of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising Fortunately, our major transit country. would trigger some kind of social agencies -- such as those in To- cataclysm. ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary In open societies, it's a right we're and Winnipeg -- typically have supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- reasonable ad rules, generally states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes based on the Canadian Code of die for. any ideology or political philoso- Advertising Standards. phy, point of view or action . . . " In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. In addition, Edmonton Transit figured too much politics was bad stipulates that ads be of "a moral for democracy. Also banned are ads that are and reputable character." "likely" to cause offence or create During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. And the City of Ottawa bans ads tion campaign, B. C. Transit and that "convey a negative religious TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North message that might be deemed ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a prejudicial" or that are likely to different spin on your vision of cause "widespread offence." Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. Did they threaten violence or pro- There are bound to be others will- mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can ing to push the bounds of tolerance we? Why, that would make people in the name of free expression. So Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them what? ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. We're supposed to be a mature tion system. The proposed bus ad democracy. We should behave like said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into chickens.
  • The Daily Herald-Tribune July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION Grande Prairie: EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 6 No more bus fuss over political ads BY MINDELLE JACOBS, the B.C. transit authorities. Ban- SUN MEDIA The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of well to encourage more young high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme people to vote. One of their ads Court of Canada ruling to uphold showed an image of a crowd at a 'It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? concert. The text read: "Register tisement on the side of a bus that now. Learn the issues. Vote May constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we 17, 2005." create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- Neither ad would have sparked ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the riots in the streets. Both issues are Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. legitimate topics for public discus- sion. The education system is un- This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- der strain and fewer people are to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- bothering to vote. likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. But the B.C. transit authorities the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it were apparently frightened that on. The freedom to express all kinds permitting political advertising of views; within reason; consti- would trigger some kind of social Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy cataclysm. agencies - such as those in To- country. In open societies, it' s a ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary right we're supposed to cherish. In "No advertisement will be ac- and Winnipeg - typically have totalitarian states, it's a right peo- cepted which advocates or opposes reasonable ad rules, generally ple fight and die for. any ideology or political philoso- based on the Canadian Code of phy, point of view or action ...," Advertising Standards. In B.C., the transit authorities fig- the policy states. ured too much politics was bad for In addition, Edmonton Transit democracy. During the 2005 pro- Also banned are ads that are stipulates that ads be of "a moral vincial election campaign, B.C. 'likely' to cause offence or create and reputable character." And the Transit and TransLink refused to controversy. Yikes! Sounds more City of Ottawa bans ads that "con- run political ads. like North Korea than Canada. vey a negative religious message Sort of puts a different spin on that might be deemed prejudicial" Were the ads incendiary or racist? your vision of laid-back Lo- or that are likely to cause "wide- Did they threaten violence or pro- tuslanders. spread offence." mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can There are bound to be others will- Not at all. The ad the B.C. Teach- we? Why, that would make people ing to push the bounds of tolerance ers57; Federation wanted to run think! It might even convince them in the name of free expression. So addressed concerns about the edu- to get socially and politically in- what? We're supposed to be a ma- cation system. The proposed bus volved in their communities. ture democracy. We should behave ad said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 like one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. kids. Worth speaking out for." last week to knock some sense into
  • Cornwall Standard Freeholder July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 5 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS Not at all. The ad the B. C. Yikes! Sounds more like North How did we become a nation of Teachers' Federation wanted to Korea than Canada. Sort of puts wimps?Why did it take a Su- run addressed concerns about the a different spin on your vision of preme Court of Canada ruling to education system. The proposed laid-back Lotuslanders. uphold our right to freedom of bus ad said: "2,500 fewer teach- expression? ers. 113 schools closed. Our stu- We can't have controversy, can dents. Your kids. Worth speak- we? Why, that would make peo- Somewhere along the way, we ing out for." ple think! It might even convince evolved into a people who them to get socially and politi- blanch at controversy, tiptoe The Canadian Federation of Stu- cally involved in their communi- around politics and religion and dents wanted to buy bus ads as ties. can't bear the thought of being well to encourage more young offended. people to vote. It took a Supreme Court judg- ment last week to knock some Democracy is supposed to be One of their ads showed an im- sense into the B. C. transit elastic enough to embrace dis- age of a crowd at a concert. The authorities. Banning political ads agreement, debate and the clash text read: "Register now. Learn on public buses is a violation of of ideologies. the issues. Vote May 17, 2005." free speech, the high court de- clared. The freedom to express all kinds Neither ad would have sparked of views -- within reason -- con- riots in the streets. Both issues "It is difficult to see how an ad- stitutes the lifeblood of a healthy are legitimate topics for public vertisement on the side of a bus country. discussion. The education system that constitutes political speech is under strain and fewer people might create a safety risk or an In open societies, it's a right are bothering to vote. unwelcome environment for we're supposed to cherish. In transit users," wrote Supreme totalitarian states, it's a right peo- But the B. C. transit authorities Court Justice Marie Deschamps. ple fight and die for. were apparently frightened that permitting political advertising This will probably open the door In B. C., the transit authorities would trigger some kind of so- to all sorts of other ads from the figured too much politics was cial cataclysm. likes of, say, anti-abortion activ- bad for democracy. ists and atheists to Bible- "No advertisement will be ac- thumpers and the enviro crowd. During the 2005 provincial elec- cepted which advocates or op- Good. Bring it on. tion campaign, B. C. Transit and poses any ideology or political TransLink refused to run politi- philosophy, point of view or ac- Fortunately, our major transit cal ads. tion . . . " the policy states. agencies--such as those in To- ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Cal- Were the ads incendiary or rac- Also banned are ads that are gary and Winnipeg -- typically ist? Did they threaten violence or "likely" to cause offence or cre- have reasonable ad rules, gener- promote hatred? ate controversy. ally based on the Canadian Code
  • of Advertising Standards. that "convey a negative religious tolerance in the name of free message that might be deemed expression. So what? In addition, Edmonton Transit prejudicial" or that are likely to stipulates that ads be of "a moral cause "widespread offence." We're supposed to be a mature and reputable character." democracy. We should behave There are bound to be others like one and stop acting like And the City of Ottawa bans ads willing to push the bounds of scared chickens.
  • Chatham Daily News July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A7 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban- The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young high court declared. Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. our right to freedom of expression? "It is difficult to see how an adver- One of their ads showed an image tisement on the side of a bus that Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text constitutes political speech might evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the create a safety risk or an unwel- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." come environment for transit us- tics and religion and can't bear the ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked Marie Deschamps. riots in the streets. Both issues are Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- This will probably open the door tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- to all sorts of other ads from the ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ologies. bothering to vote. and atheists to Bible-thumpers and the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities on. of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising Fortunately, our major transit country. would trigger some kind of social agencies -- such as those in To- cataclysm. ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary In open societies, it's a right we're and Winnipeg -- typically have supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- reasonable ad rules, generally states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes based on the Canadian Code of die for. any ideology or political philoso- Advertising Standards. phy, point of view or action . . . " In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. In addition, Edmonton Transit figured too much politics was bad stipulates that ads be of "a moral for democracy. Also banned are ads that are and reputable character." "likely" to cause offence or create During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. And the City of Ottawa bans ads tion campaign, B. C. Transit and that "convey a negative religious TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North message that might be deemed ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a prejudicial" or that are likely to different spin on your vision of cause "widespread offence." Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. Did they threaten violence or pro- There are bound to be others will- mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can ing to push the bounds of tolerance we? Why, that would make people in the name of free expression. So Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them what? ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. We're supposed to be a mature tion system. The proposed bus ad democracy. We should behave like said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into chickens.
  • Calgary Sun July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 15 Fuss on the bus? Ads about education too hot for B.C. authorities BY MINDELLE JACOBS, Teachers57; Federation Also banned are ads that are SUN MEDIA wanted to run addressed con- 'likely' to cause offence or cerns about the education create controversy. Yikes! How did we become a nation system. The proposed bus ad Sounds more like North Ko- of wimps? Why did it take a said: "2,500 fewer teachers. rea than Canada. Sort of puts Supreme Court of Canada 113 schools closed. Our stu- a different spin on your vi- ruling to uphold our right to dents. Your kids. Worth sion of laid-back Lotusland- freedom of expression? speaking out for." ers. Somewhere along the way, The Canadian Federation of We can't have controversy, we evolved into a people who Students wanted to buy bus can we? Why, that would blanch at controversy, tiptoe ads as well to encourage make people think! It might around politics and religion more young people to vote. even convince them to get and can't bear the thought of One of their ads showed an socially and politically in- being offended. image of a crowd at a con- volved in their communities. cert. The text read: "Register Democracy is supposed to be now. Learn the issues. Vote It took a Supreme Court elastic enough to embrace May 17, 2005." judgment last week to knock disagreement, debate and the some sense into the B.C. clash of ideologies. LEGITIMATE TOPICS transit authorities. Banning political ads on public buses The freedom to express all Neither ad would have is a violation of free speech, kinds of views; within rea- sparked riots in the streets. the high court declared. son; constitutes the lifeblood Both issues are legitimate of a healthy country. In open topics for public discussion. 'It is difficult to see how an societies, it' s a right we're The education system is un- advertisement on the side of a supposed to cherish. In totali- der strain and fewer people bus that constitutes political tarian states, it's a right peo- are bothering to vote. speech might create a safety ple fight and die for. risk or an unwelcome envi- But the B.C. transit authori- ronment for transit users," In B.C., the transit authorities ties were apparently fright- wrote Supreme Court Justice figured too much politics was ened that permitting political Marie Deschamps. bad for democracy. During advertising would trigger the 2005 provincial election some kind of social cata- This will probably open the campaign, B.C. Transit and clysm. door to all sorts of other ads TransLink refused to run from the likes of, say, anti- political ads. "No advertisement will be abortion activists and atheists accepted which advocates or to Bible-thumpers and the Were the ads incendiary or opposes any ideology or po- enviro crowd. Good. Bring it racist? Did they threaten vio- litical philosophy, point of on. lence or promote hatred? view or action ...," the policy states. REASONABLE RULES Not at all. The ad the B.C.
  • Fortunately, our major transit agencies - such as those in Toronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary and Winnipeg - typi- cally have reasonable ad rules, generally based on the Canadian Code of Advertis- ing Standards. In addition, Edmonton Tran- sit stipulates that ads be of "a moral and reputable charac- ter." And the City of Ottawa bans ads that "convey a nega- tive religious message that might be deemed prejudicial" or that are likely to cause "widespread offence." There are bound to be others willing to push the bounds of tolerance in the name of free expression. So what? We're supposed to be a mature de- mocracy. We should behave like one and stop acting like scared chickens. mindy.jacobs@sunmedia.ca
  • The Brockville Recorder and Times July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
FINAL EDITION EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A5 No more bus fuss over political ads BY MINDELLE JACOBS, students. Your kids. Worth ment last week to knock some SUN MEDIA speaking out for." sense into the B.C. transit authorities. Banning political ads How did we become a nation of The Canadian Federation of Stu- on public buses is a violation of wimps? Why did it take a Su- dents wanted to buy bus ads as free speech, the high court de- preme Court of Canada ruling to well to encourage more young clared. uphold our right to freedom of people to vote. One of their ads expression? showed an image of a crowd at a 'It is difficult to see how an ad- concert. The text read: "Register vertisement on the side of a bus Somewhere along the way, we now. Learn the issues. Vote May that constitutes political speech evolved into a people who 17, 2005." might create a safety risk or an blanch at controversy, tiptoe unwelcome environment for around politics and religion and Neither ad would have sparked transit users," wrote Supreme can't bear the thought of being riots in the streets. Both issues Court Justice Marie Deschamps. offended. are legitimate topics for public discussion. The education system This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be is under strain and fewer people to all sorts of other ads from the elastic enough to embrace dis- are bothering to vote. likes of, say, anti-abortion activ- agreement, debate and the clash ists and atheists to Bible- of ideologies. But the B.C. transit authorities thumpers and the enviro crowd. were apparently frightened that Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds permitting political advertising of views; within reason; consti- would trigger some kind of so- Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy cial cataclysm. agencies - such as those in To- country. In open societies, it' s a ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Cal- right we're supposed to cherish. "No advertisement will be ac- gary and Winnipeg - typically In totalitarian states, it's a right cepted which advocates or op- have reasonable ad rules, gener- people fight and die for. poses any ideology or political ally based on the Canadian Code philosophy, point of view or ac- of Advertising Standards. In B.C., the transit authorities tion ...," the policy states. figured too much politics was In addition, Edmonton Transit bad for democracy. During the Also banned are ads that are stipulates that ads be of "a moral 2005 provincial election cam- 'likely' to cause offence or create and reputable character." And the paign, B.C. Transit and controversy. Yikes! Sounds more City of Ottawa bans ads that TransLink refused to run politi- like North Korea than Canada. "convey a negative religious cal ads. Sort of puts a different spin on message that might be deemed your vision of laid-back Lo- prejudicial" or that are likely to Were the ads incendiary or rac- tuslanders. cause "widespread offence." ist? Did they threaten violence or promote hatred? We can't have controversy, can There are bound to be others we? Why, that would make peo- willing to push the bounds of Not at all. The ad the B.C. ple think! It might even convince tolerance in the name of free Teachers57; Federation wanted them to get socially and politi- expression. So what? We're sup- to run addressed concerns about cally involved in their communi- posed to be a mature democracy. the education system. The pro- ties. We should behave like one and posed bus ad said: "2,500 fewer stop acting like scared chickens. teachers. 113 schools closed. Our It took a Supreme Court judg-
  • Brantford Expositor July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A9 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban- The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young high court declared. Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. our right to freedom of expression? "It is difficult to see how an adver- One of their ads showed an image tisement on the side of a bus that Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text constitutes political speech might evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the create a safety risk or an unwel- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." come environment for transit us- tics and religion and can't bear the ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked Marie Deschamps. riots in the streets. Both issues are Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- This will probably open the door tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- to all sorts of other ads from the ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ologies. bothering to vote. and atheists to Bible-thumpers and the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities on. of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising Fortunately, our major transit country. would trigger some kind of social agencies -- such as those in To- cataclysm. ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary In open societies, it's a right we're and Winnipeg -- typically have supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- reasonable ad rules, generally states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes based on the Canadian Code of die for. any ideology or political philoso- Advertising Standards. phy, point of view or action . . . " In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. In addition, Edmonton Transit figured too much politics was bad stipulates that ads be of "a moral for democracy. Also banned are ads that are and reputable character." "likely" to cause offence or create During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. And the City of Ottawa bans ads tion campaign, B. C. Transit and that "convey a negative religious TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North message that might be deemed ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a prejudicial" or that are likely to different spin on your vision of cause "widespread offence." Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. Did they threaten violence or pro- There are bound to be others will- mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can ing to push the bounds of tolerance we? Why, that would make people in the name of free expression. So Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them what? ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. We're supposed to be a mature tion system. The proposed bus ad democracy. We should behave like said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into chickens.
  • Belleville Intelligencer July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. 6 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS ning political ads on public buses The Canadian Federation of Stu- is a violation of free speech, the How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as high court declared. wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. "It is difficult to see how an adver- our right to freedom of expression? tisement on the side of a bus that One of their ads showed an image constitutes political speech might Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text create a safety risk or an unwel- evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the come environment for transit us- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice tics and religion and can't bear the Marie Deschamps. thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked riots in the streets. Both issues are This will probably open the door Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- to all sorts of other ads from the tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are and atheists to Bible-thumpers and ologies. bothering to vote. the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it on. The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that Fortunately, our major transit tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising agencies -- such as those in To- country. would trigger some kind of social ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary cataclysm. and Winnipeg -- typically have In open societies, it's a right we're reasonable ad rules, generally supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- based on the Canadian Code of states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes Advertising Standards. die for. any ideology or political philoso- phy, point of view or action . . . " In addition, Edmonton Transit In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. stipulates that ads be of "a moral figured too much politics was bad and reputable character." for democracy. Also banned are ads that are "likely" to cause offence or create And the City of Ottawa bans ads During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. that "convey a negative religious tion campaign, B. C. Transit and message that might be deemed TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North prejudicial" or that are likely to ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a cause "widespread offence." different spin on your vision of Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. There are bound to be others will- Did they threaten violence or pro- ing to push the bounds of tolerance mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can in the name of free expression. So we? Why, that would make people what? Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- We're supposed to be a mature dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. democracy. We should behave like tion system. The proposed bus ad one and stop acting like scared said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment chickens. schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban-
  • Barrie Examiner July 14, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A4 No more bus fuss over political ads MINDELLE JACOBS kids. Worth speaking out for." the B. C. transit authorities. Ban- The Canadian Federation of Stu- ning political ads on public buses How did we become a nation of dents wanted to buy bus ads as is a violation of free speech, the wimps? Why did it take a Supreme well to encourage more young high court declared. Court of Canada ruling to uphold people to vote. our right to freedom of expression? "It is difficult to see how an adver- One of their ads showed an image tisement on the side of a bus that Somewhere along the way, we of a crowd at a concert. The text constitutes political speech might evolved into a people who blanch read: "Register now. Learn the create a safety risk or an unwel- at controversy, tiptoe around poli- issues. Vote May 17, 2005." come environment for transit us- tics and religion and can't bear the ers," wrote Supreme Court Justice thought of being offended. Neither ad would have sparked Marie Deschamps. riots in the streets. Both issues are Democracy is supposed to be elas- legitimate topics for public discus- This will probably open the door tic enough to embrace disagree- sion. The education system is un- to all sorts of other ads from the ment, debate and the clash of ide- der strain and fewer people are likes of, say, anti-abortion activists ologies. bothering to vote. and atheists to Bible-thumpers and the enviro crowd. Good. Bring it The freedom to express all kinds But the B. C. transit authorities on. of views -- within reason -- consti- were apparently frightened that tutes the lifeblood of a healthy permitting political advertising Fortunately, our major transit country. would trigger some kind of social agencies -- such as those in To- cataclysm. ronto, Ottawa, Edmonton, Calgary In open societies, it's a right we're and Winnipeg -- typically have supposed to cherish. In totalitarian "No advertisement will be ac- reasonable ad rules, generally states, it's a right people fight and cepted which advocates or opposes based on the Canadian Code of die for. any ideology or political philoso- Advertising Standards. phy, point of view or action . . . " In B. C., the transit authorities the policy states. In addition, Edmonton Transit figured too much politics was bad stipulates that ads be of "a moral for democracy. Also banned are ads that are and reputable character." "likely" to cause offence or create During the 2005 provincial elec- controversy. And the City of Ottawa bans ads tion campaign, B. C. Transit and that "convey a negative religious TransLink refused to run political Yikes! Sounds more like North message that might be deemed ads. Korea than Canada. Sort of puts a prejudicial" or that are likely to different spin on your vision of cause "widespread offence." Were the ads incendiary or racist? laid-back Lotuslanders. Did they threaten violence or pro- There are bound to be others will- mote hatred? We can't have controversy, can ing to push the bounds of tolerance we? Why, that would make people in the name of free expression. So Not at all. The ad the B. C. Teach- think! It might even convince them what? ers' Federation wanted to run ad- to get socially and politically in- dressed concerns about the educa- volved in their communities. We're supposed to be a mature tion system. The proposed bus ad democracy. We should behave like said: "2,500 fewer teachers. 113 It took a Supreme Court judgment one and stop acting like scared schools closed. Our students. Your last week to knock some sense into chickens.
  • The Standard July 15, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A1 Ministry 'asleep at the switch': watchdog TIFFANY MAYER , to par, but I was unemployed and STANDARD STAFF All the while, the ministry re- I was more concerned about get- peatedly urged Ballegeer to reg- ting my licence so I can get out An unregistered private career ister Bestech in accordance with in the field and start working." college that ran a campus in St. the Private Career Colleges Act, Catharines bilked students out of setting deadlines that were never Abernethy, whose tuition was thousands of dollars and became met. Yet it supported the school covered by the Ontario Skills an "unmitigated disaster" after by spending more than $60,000 Development Program, passed the government failed to crack to send seven mature students for his gas-fitter test. Red flags went down on the "unscrupulous" op- retraining there. up soon after when he said Bal- eration, Ontario's Ombudsman legeer offered him a job teaching says. Marin said in his report that Bal- and running the St. Catharines legeer "could not see the logic" campus. In a special report released Tues- in following the rules when there day, Andre Marin said Bestech were other unregistered private "I thought, 'That's kind of unethi- Academy and its president, June colleges that students could at- cal. I just got my licence myself Ballegeer, flouted the law and tend. and you want me to teach these preyed on innocent students be- guys,' " Abernethy, 43, said. cause of the Ministry of Train- Ballegeer could not be reached "The only thing she cared about ing, Colleges and Universities' for comment Tuesday. was getting tuition off people. "inattention, indifference and The whole school was a joke." dereliction." A woman contacted by The Standard identified herself as a Abernethy said he quit after three "It was the perfect storm between cousin, but said she didn't know weeks. There were two students a greedy, unscrupulous entrepre- Ballegeer's whereabouts, nor had enrolled in the course at the time. neur to make a quick buck and she been in contact with her re- an incompetent government cently. According to the ministry's regulator," Marin said. "They count, 174 students attended were asleep at the switch. They St. Catharines resident Todd Ab- Bestech Academy. spent over two years giving her ernethy enrolled in a course at phoney deadlines, huffing and Bestech's Stoney Creek campus The last contact Abernethy said puffing, making empty threats in January 2008 after he was laid he had with Ballegeer was a year and her answer was, 'Why should off from his job at a Hamilton ago, when he contacted police I follow the law when no one steel plant. for help collecting on overdue else is following it?' The word on pay. the street was the ministry was a Abernethy said most of his les- joke. She just played them to the sons were taught by unqualified In what Marin called a "bizarre end." instructors who had just com- post-script," Ballegeer was hired pleted the same course at by the ministry as a program co- Bestech illegally ran unaccred- Bestech and had no hands-on ordinator in a service delivery ited gas technician training experience. Classes were spent support branch in November -- courses out of 320 Vansickle Rd. doing old gas fitter tests. days after the ministry issued a and in Stoney Creek from 2006 restraining order against her to until 2008 before abruptly shut- "It was like feeding cattle stop operations at Bestech. ting its doors last fall, leaving through a cattle ranch," Aber- students in the lurch. nethy said. "I just felt it wasn't up She was fired in January after the
  • ministry's compliance unit re- Marin's report came after 27 for- tion of Students-Ontario, whose ceived a tip about who was in its mer students complained about chairwoman called the whole midst. the quality of training and incident "offensive." worries about getting tuition re- Minister of Training, Colleges funded by a bankrupt Ballegeer. Shelley Melanson said the fed- and Universities John Milloy eration opposes private career said the Bestech fiasco occurred The report included 11 recom- colleges for the reasons in in the midst of the ministry try- mendations to the ministry. It has Marin's report. ing to strengthen private college taken Marin up on 10 of his rec- legislation. ommendations, forgoing estab- Students who lost tuition should lishing a program that could help get that money back from the He said Marin's findings confirm Bestech students recuperate lost ministry, which didn't do its job, the ministry was on the right tuition. she said. track. "At the end, we cannot see using Milloy said this issue should "It also gives us some very good taxpayer money to backstop the send a message to anyone inter- advice to make (the rules) even activities of a company that was ested in attending a private col- tougher," Milloy said. operating illegally," Milloy said. lege to make sure it is registered. Still, he admitted dealing with He added there are legal avenues The ministry has made its web- Bestech "took too long" and pay- students can take, but wouldn't site more user friendly to help, ing for students to attend was elaborate. he said. "unacceptable." That irks the Canadian Federa-
  • Welland Tribune July 16, 2009 Thursday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A5 Ministry 'asleep at the switch': watchdog TIFFANY MAYER, students in the lurch. All the to par, but I was unemployed and SUN MEDIA while, the ministry repeatedly I was more concerned about get- ST. CATHARINES urged Ballegeer to register ting my licence so I can get out Bestech in accordance with the in the field and start working." An unregistered private career Private Career Colleges Act, college that ran a campus in St. setting deadlines that were never Abernethy, whose tuition was Catharines bilked students out of met. Yet it supported the school covered by the Ontario Skills thousands of dollars and became by spending more than $60,000 Development Program, passed an "unmitigated disaster" after to send seven mature students for his gas-fitter test. Red flags went the government failed to crack- retraining there. up soon after when he said Bal- down on the "unscrupulous" op- legeer offered him a job teaching eration, Ontario's Ombudsman Marin said in his report that Bal- and running the St. Catharines says. legeer "could not see the logic" campus. in following the rules when there In a special report released Tues- were other unregistered private "I thought, 'That's kind of unethi- day, Andre Marin said Bestech colleges that students could at- cal. I just got my licence myself Academy and its president, June tend. and you want me to teach these Ballegeer, flouted the law and guys,' " Abernethy, 43, said. preyed on innocent students be- Ballegeer could not be reached "The only thing she cared about cause of the Ministry of Train- for comment Tuesday. was getting tuition off people. ing, Colleges and Universities' The whole school was a joke." "inattention, indifference and A woman contacted by Sun Me- dereliction." dia's St. Catharines Standard Abernethy said he quit after three identified herself as a cousin, but weeks. There were two students "It was the perfect storm between said she didn't know Ballegeer's enrolled in the course at the time. a greedy, unscrupulous entrepre- whereabouts, nor had she been in neur to make a quick buck and contact with her recently. According to the ministry's an incompetent government count, 174 students attended regulator," Marin said. "They St. Catharines resident Todd Ab- Bestech Academy. were asleep at the switch. They ernethy enrolled in a course at spent over two years giving her Bestech's Stoney Creek campus The last contact Abernethy said phony deadlines, huffing and in January 2008 after he was laid he had with Ballegeer was a year puffing, making empty threats off from his job at a Hamilton ago, when he contacted police and her answer was, 'Why should steel plant. for help collecting on overdue I follow the law when no one pay. else is following it?' The word on Abernethy said most of his les- the street was the ministry was a sons were taught by unqualifi ed In what Marin called a "bizarre joke. She just played them to the instructors who had just com- post-script," Ballegeer was hired end." pleted the same course at by the ministry as a program co- Bestech and had no hands-on ordinator in a service delivery Bestech illegally ran unaccred- experience. Classes were spent support branch in November -- ited gas technician training doing old gas fitter tests. days after the ministry issued a courses out of 320 Vansickle Rd. restraining order against her to and in Stoney Creek from 2006 "It was like feeding cattle stop operations at Bestech. until 2008 before abruptly shut- through a cattle ranch," Aber- ting its doors last fall, leaving nethy said. "I just felt it wasn't up She was fired in January after the
  • ministry's compliance unit re- Marin's report came after 27 for- tion of Students-Ontario, whose ceived a tip about who was in its mer students complained about chairwoman called the whole midst. the quality of training and incident "offensive." worries about getting tuition re- Minister of Training, Colleges funded by a bankrupt Ballegeer. Shelley Melanson said the fed- and Universities John Milloy eration opposes private career said the Bestech fiasco occurred The report included 11 recom- colleges for the reasons in in the midst of the ministry try- mendations to the ministry. It has Marin's report. ing to strengthen private college taken Marin up on 10 of his rec- legislation. ommendations, forgoing estab- Students who lost tuition should lishing a program that could help get that money back from the He said Marin's findings confirm Bestech students recuperate lost ministry, which didn't do its job, the ministry was on the right tuition. she said. track. "At the end, we cannot see using Milloy said this issue should "It also gives us some very good taxpayer money to backstop the send a message to anyone inter- advice to make (the rules) even activities of a company that was ested in attending a private col- tougher," Milloy said. operating illegally," Milloy said. lege to make sure it is registered. Still, he admitted dealing with He added there are legal avenues The ministry has made its web- Bestech "took too long" and pay- students can take, but wouldn't site more user friendly to help, ing for students to attend was elaborate. he said. "unacceptable." That irks the Canadian Federa-
  • The Hamilton Spectator July 16, 2009 Thursday 
Final Edition BUSINESS; Pg. A11 Students 'hung out to dry' in college scam Steve Arnold, Sylvia Morrison, who signed the were locked. The Hamilton Spectator tuition cheque to Bestech, said "It's just like she (Ballegeer) "I don't understand how the gov- It was supposed to be their son's stole the money off us. These ernment let this keep going on," key to a better future. government people just didn't do he said. "How they let the school their jobs." keep taking money off people." Instead, a Hamilton family has only bitterness and a double feel- The Morrisons are among the Like many students who turn to ing of betrayal from their in- victims of what Ontario Om- private career colleges, Neiser volvement with an illegal private budsman André Marin termed wanted a quick training program career college and Ontario's Min- the "abjectly inept" performance -- in 18 months he could com- istry of Training. of provincial civil servants who plete two certificates, compared created an "unmitigated disaster" to two years or more for one at a John and Sylvia Morrison bor- by failing to properly oversee community college like Mo- rowed $5,000 from their Visa private colleges like Bestech. hawk. card in order to send their son to The school operated from cam- Bestech Academy to learn gas puses in Stoney Creek and St. "I wanted it to improve myself, and oil burner technology. It was Catharines for two years before to get a better wage," he said. a trade they hoped would give shutting down in 2008. "Schools like this can be cheaper him a shot at a better life. What and quicker than Mohawk." they got was a school that closed Marin scourged Ministry of without providing the training. A Training officials for failing to Training Minister John Milloy second betrayal was delivered enforce their own regulations by said after Marin's report that Tuesday when the provincial getting Bestech to either register bilked students should sue government flatly refused to or close down. At the same time Bestech and Ballegeer in small compensate them for that loss, one branch of the ministry was claims court. Neiser did just that even though Ontario public ser- "persuading" the school to regis- and obtained a judgement, but vants knew the school was illegal ter, another was funding students with both school and owner in and failed to shut it down. to attend its illegal program and bankruptcy there's little chance a third hired Ballegeer as a pro- he'll ever collect anything. "I think what they've done is gram coordinator after Bestech pretty rotten. We really should collapsed into bankruptcy. "Now I'm out three grand," he be compensated in some way," said. "Maybe we're lucky there John Morrison said. "This $5,000 Marin's scathing report included weren't more people ripped off, was supposed to enable my son 11 recommendations, including a but the government should have to get into a trade, but this call to compensate victims of the stopped them. They should make woman came along and just took school. The provincial govern- this up to us." it all." ment accepted only 10 of his proposals, rejecting the compen- Frank Faiazza shares that opin- "This woman" is June Ballegeer, sation clause. ion. He's out the $3,000 he put the owner of Bestech. Since the up for his son Phil to study at school collapsed she has van- Kris Neiser, of Waterdown, lost Bestech. He's especially bitter ished from the scene leaving a $3,000 to Bestech -- he com- the government won't compen- score of creditors and hundreds pleted one program and signed sate him for its failure to do its of angry students in her wake. up for another "but then one day job and protect students. we showed up and the doors
  • "That's just the way they are," he by the Canadian Federation of Hamilton's Liaison College, a said. "That's what you have to Students. President Shelly private college training chefs and expect from them. It all seems Melanson said in an interview other kitchen workers, says the like a lost cause now. It's done that with two-thirds of all new Bestech scandal has been a black and she got away with it." jobs requiring some form of eye for her entire industry. post-secondary education, the Marin's report also tells the sto- government has a major respon- "This has to stop," she said. ries of William Roberts, 57, who sibility to oversee the system and paid $1,750 in tuition to Bestech protect students from operations "You shouldn't even be able to and complained when he learned like Bestech. teach basket weaving without it wasn't accredited by the Tech- being a registered school." nical Standards and Safety Better yet, she added, rather than Authority. He received a partial spending public money to send Like Bestech's burned students, refund, but Ballegeer's cheque students to private schools, the Mallette believes provincial offi- bounced. government should increase cials failed to provide proper funding to the network of univer- protection and the victims should Mike Heywood, 31, gave up a sities and community colleges. be compensated. part-time job to attend Bestech, paying $2,578 in tuition for a "The legislation we have just "They should have been staying course that had only two students isn't being used to regulate this on top of this. It makes the rest and photocopies instead of text- sector," she said. "These students of us look like charlatans," she books. His classes were repeat- are the innocent bystanders in said. "There are so many good edly cancelled without explana- this problem. They've been left career colleges out there, doing a tion before the school closed its hung out to dry. This is a tough good job of educating and get- doors for good, just weeks later. economy to lose that kind of ting these kids jobs." tuition money." The calls of Bestech victims for sarnold@thespec.com compensation have been joined Murline Mallette, co-owner of 905-526-3496
  • The Toronto Star July 18, 2009 Saturday PERSONAL SPACE; Pg. CL08 Students on hunt for bargain housing Bad economy may mean housing budgets become tighter when it's time to move off campus Jennifer Brown, "There are only so many areas of to 18.1 per cent, the highest Special to The Star the city that I can afford to live since June 1998. in. If I were to move I'd have to Caitlin Smith would like to live consider getting a Metropass and When you consider, too, that in a nicer neighbourhood, but as that's another expense," she says. Ontario has the second-highest a student, her tight budget dic- tuition fees for undergrads at an tates she can only afford to Living on campus or in student- average of $4,724 (Nova Scotia share a two-bedroom apartment designated housing isn't the an- has the highest at $5,932) and in St. James Town. The largest swer either, she says. the highest fees for postgrad highrise community in Toronto, studies - on average about St. James Town was built in the She looked into student housing $8,797 - the pressure on stu- 1960s and considered one of the and it was $800 for a one- dents to find affordable housing poorest in the city. bedroom unit. intensifies. The 21-year-old Ryerson Uni- And this fall it's likely there will The challenge becomes greater versity student is in her fourth be more students like Smith as the rental market in cities like year of school and supports her- looking for cheaper accommoda- Toronto has become tighter self with two part-time jobs. At tion given the state of the econ- during the downturn as fewer one point last year, the journal- omy. people choose to jump into the ism student was juggling three real estate market. jobs to help cover her expenses. "Student unemployment is the highest it's been in 11 years," The recession has actually made Her rent for the two-bedroom says Shelley Melanson, chair of Toronto a less expensive city to unit is $535 a month, which the Canadian Federation of Stu- rent than Vancouver or Calgary, includes hydro and water. She dents, Ontario. but vacancy remains low at pays her Internet and cable bill about 2 per cent compared to separately and has a cellphone. Data from Statistics Canada re- 3.2 per cent in 2007. The unit does not have air con- leased July 10 indicates there ditioning. were 43,000 fewer jobs for stu- According to research from dents aged 20 to 24 in June 2009 Canada Mortgage and Housing "In first year I lived with family compared to last year. This Corp., in October 2008 the av- in Oakville, but the commute in pushed that group's unemploy- erage two-bedroom private was long and expensive," she ment rate up 4.8 percentage apartment in Toronto rented for says. points to 14 per cent, the highest $1,095, less than in Calgary June unemployment rate for that ($1,148) and Vancouver This is her third year living in age group of students since 1997. ($1,124). the apartment building in St. James Town in the Bloor and The labour market for 17- to 19- "Certainly, the cost of living in Sherbourne area. It is a 15- to year-old students is also proving a big city is also going to be 20-minute walk to the Ryerson to be challenging, as employment higher, which exacerbates the campus and she shares the was down by 50,000 jobs be- problem," says Melanson. apartment with a roommate who tween June 2008 and 2009. This is also a Ryerson student. brings their unemployment rate She also points out that for
  • those attending large city cam- apartment building. and for the most part students puses in Toronto, such as the "We get a real cross-section of are good tenants," he says. University of Toronto, housing the whole rental industry and had in the areas surrounding the our best month ever in June," Tips to consider when looking school is considered some of the says Brown. "I think people who for an apartment off campus: most desired real estate in the have been trying to sell their city and therefore often out of homes recognize the market is Consider distance to school and reach for the budget of a stu- depressed and then try to rent commute time as well as cost. If dent. their homes." your program requires that you be on campus long hours you Most universities offer first-year Some schools also have their may want to consider the pros students on-campus housing, own unique site, such as Simon and cons of being closer to the but after that they are typically Fraser University and Carleton school. on their own. University. Make a budget and stick to it - And with less on-campus hous- Often, universities will issue don't rent a space that is more ing being built that means 75 to calls out to their community ask- than you can afford just because 80 per cent of students end up ing for student housing listings. you fall in love with it - you looking for off-campus housing, also have to eat! says Richard Brown, president The homes4students.ca website of ECOM Media Group Inc. provides students with a means Interview prospective room- The company, based in to search not only for rental va- mates to make sure you will be Kelowna, B.C., administers cancies, but look for roommates able to live together. rental property listing websites or student tenants - someone who such as homes4students.ca, a is looking to add a renter to their Check school housing offices registry for student housing household. for listings and information listings that is part of the Cana- about neighbourhoods if you dian Federation of Students Brown recommends students don't know the city well. website (cfs-fcee.ca). consider pairing up with a roommate or two but suggests Try bargaining. Landlords may The site, which offers about the best way is to find a room- be willing to budge on the rent 7,000 off-campus housing list- mate first before finding the ac- if they are keen to rent to a good ings from private landlords in commodation. That way they can tenant. the GTA, gives students the both search and come to a mutual ability to search by school and agreement on where to live. Be sure to ask about subletting geographic area, and provides rules - if you aren't going to be landlords the ability to list their To landlords, he says they around in the summer you may properties. Students can find shouldn't be afraid to rent to stu- be on the hook for the months everything from a room in a dents. "Their parents are proba- of the lease when you're not in private home to a unit in a large bly helping in paying the rent school.
  • The Vancouver Sun July 23, 2009 Thursday 
Final Edition WESTCOAST NEWS; Pg. A4 Province slashes wide range of post-secondary funding $16-million cut from student aid budget, but no announcement Darah Hansen, an eye to "make sure we can further $1.4 million by abolish- Vancouver Sun protect and fund core services." ing the debt forgiveness program for 400 students who can't make Hundreds of post-secondary stu- The $116-million student aid monthly payments. dents looking for financial help budget was cut to $100 million. this fall have been turned away As well, the province will end a by the province following a $16- At the same time, the govern- pilot program, worth $4.7 mil- million cut to the student-aid ment expects the number of stu- lion, for loan-reduction assis- budget, The Vancouver Sun has dents receiving aid to rise from tance to students filling high- learned. 53,000 in 2008 to 75,000 this demand occupations, including year. residential care aides and home Nursing, health care and home- support workers. support-worker programs are Margaret Dhillon of the BC among those affected by the cuts, Nurses Union called funding cuts Disabled students were also hit. which were approved in June. to the Nurses Education Bursary Those who were eligible for loan "shortsighted and "counter- forgiveness will now be required There was no public announce- intuitive." to apply for extended interest ment. Students were notified by relief on their debt. The disabled letter or phone call. "I don't know why they would benefits program, which aided even consider cutting that in a about 350 students per year, was The Premier's Excellence Award, profession that is in such an to end July 31, and will not be which distributes $15,000 schol- acute shortage," Dhillon said. renewed. arships to top high school stu- dents, was eliminated. Last year, the $2.66-million bur- In its place, the government has sary program aided 630 nursing budgeted $1.7 million for upfront Students who can't afford to re- students. This year, only $1 mil- funding of $1,000 to about 2,000 pay their student debt, or who are lion is available. disabled students. disabled and can't work, will no longer be eligible to have their Dhillon worried the cuts may "Overall, we are continuing to loans forgiven. keep some students from going try to make post-secondary edu- back to school. She said some cation as affordable and accessi- It's all part of the government's students were likely counting on ble to British Columbian stu- bid to reduce costs by at least the money, and "this will now dents as we can," Stilwell said. $1.9 billion over three years, interrupt or end their education $589 million of it this fiscal year. dreams or goals." Shamus Reid of the Canadian Federation of Students said the To that end, the government "had The provincial Health Care Bur- cuts couldn't come at a worse to make some difficult deci- sary and the Premier's Excel- time for students. sions," Advanced Education lence Award program -- worth Minister Moira Stilwell said. about $1.4 million and $240,000, "To be cutting student aid when respectively -- are no longer students need to be paying for Stilwell said the cuts followed a available. ever-increasing tuition fees, and comprehensive review of her when workers need retraining to ministry's grants program with The government aims to save a get back to the workforce, is just
  • really bad timing." Reid also questioned the gov- ernment's communication strat- egy for the cuts. "It sound like it's been pretty secretive so far," he said. NDP MLA Spencer Herbert agreed, calling it "pretty sneaky." Stilwell said there was no effort to cover up the funding cuts. "It is July and people are turning their minds towards going back to school, and so we're working to get this information out," she said. dahansen@ vancouversun.com
  • Kingston Whig-Standard July 24, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 8 Change in the air for political campaigns MICHAEL WOODS by a party or candidate, so as to Canada. avoid any impression that the A Supreme Court ruling permit- City is supporting any particular "I wouldn't particularly use it in a ting political advertising on the party, candidate or point of situation like Peter's, because sides of transit vehicles might view," the policy states. you would generally use that change the way political cam- where you want someone to get paigns are conducted. Paul MacLatchy, director of name recognition very quickly," communications for the City of he said. "I don't think you would The court ruled 8-0 that two B. Kingston, which is responsible use it for policy initiatives, or in C. companies, the Greater for advertisements on Kingston the case of someone well- Vancouver Transportation Transit buses, said the ruling established." Authority and British Columbia might inspire additional bus ad- Transit, were wrong to reject vertising. Brian Abrams, the Conservative political advertisements from the Party's first-time candidate in last Canadian Federation of Students "If the Supreme Court of Can- October's federal election, used and the British Columbia ada, through their ruling, publi- billboard advertisements before Teachers Union in 2004. cizes the ability to advertise on the election was called. buses and political parties be- The transit companies argued come aware of that opportunity, "Billboards may be more effec- that banning the advertisements maybe we'll see some in the next tive because they're up higher ensured a "safer and welcoming federal or provincial elections," and not going to get defaced," environment" for riders and driv- he said. Clements said. ers. Their corporate policy banned ads "likely to cause of- "We recognize that political can- Election advertising comes down fence to any person or group of didates have a right to advertise." to effective use of funds, persons or create controversy." Clements said. MacLatchy said he doesn't recall Madam Justice Marie candidates using advertising "You've only got five weeks, and Deschamps wrote for the Su- space on buses. there's a limit on how much you preme Court that "It is difficult can spend," he said. "You always to see how an advertisement on One potential deterrent is the ask where's the best spot to put the side of a bus that constitutes cost. To advertise on the side of your money ... $2,800 (is) more political speech might create a a Kingston bus for four weeks than your whole lawn sign safety risk or an unwelcoming costs about $2,800. Advertise- budget." environment for transit users." ments on the back cost about $2,300 for four weeks. All that aside, Clements said the Kingston Transit allows political Supreme Court's ruling may advertising on the side of its "It's not one of the cheaper kinds cause political campaigns and buses as long as it's indicated (of advertising)," MacLatchy organizations to take a second who funded the ad. That rule said. look at bus ads. applies for all the city's corporate advertisers. John Clements, who has man- "You always have to ask the aged political campaigns for both question: What is the most effec- "All political and other non- John Gerretsen and Peter Mil- tive way of getting your message commercial expressive advertis- liken, said he's never seen buses across?" ing will indicate that it is paid for used for partisan political ads in
  • Hoi Kong, a professor of consti- "One of the things the court has litical expression," he said. tutional law at Queen's Univer- said in several places is a blanket sity, said the ruling is a broad prohibition is really hard to up- "That naturally led the court to reading of the public forum doc- hold. In this case, there was a where it went." trine of freedom of expression. blanket prohibition around po-
  • CBC News July 26, 2009 Sunday Copyright rules must protect innovation, groups say CBC News ness and health-care applications are ripping off music," said Ste- that deliver content to a variety phen Waddell, national executive Technology that brings music, of platforms and devices. director for ACTRA. He added movies and other content to a that ultimately, like many other range of new devices improves "The fact that more and more groups, all ACTRA wants is a Canadians' lives, and copyright Canadians are using these things balance between consumer rights laws must protect that kind of means that they care a lot more and the right of creators to be innovation and growth, say those about them. They're finding it compensated for their work. speaking out on changes to Can- extremely convenient and they're ada's copyright laws. saying, 'Don't take this away But consumers, including stu- from me.'" dents and educators, argue that "That's why it becomes all the digital locks may skew that bal- more important to set rules and Not surprisingly, digital locks - ance in favour of creators by also make it clear what uses are software or firmware that re- interfering with many legal re- permitted so that there's no cloud stricts the use of music and search and educational activities, hanging over these things," said movie files on different operat- including the ability to archive Bernard Courtois, president of ing systems and devices in an materials, change their file for- the Information Technology As- effort to protect copyright and mat, view files on different de- sociation of Canada. prevent illegal distribution - have vices or lend them out from been one of the most heated top- libraries, including materials in Within days, government consul- ics of discussion on the online the public domain - a position tations that began July 20 - the consultation forum. held by the Canadian Federation first such consultations since of Students. 2001 - had already generated A controversial blanket ban on hundreds of comments on a pub- breaking such locks was in- Frustration has also been ex- lic online forum, ranging from cluded in Bill C-61, the previous pressed by users of the Linux discussions about the concept of copyright bill introduced without operating system, who may need "fair use" to the role of digital consultation by the Conservative decryption software in order to locks that limit the use of con- government in 2008, which later view a DVD they have pur- sumer purchases ranging from died in the House when an elec- chased if it includes a digital cellphones to DVDs. tion was called that fall. lock that only allows to be viewed in Windows, said Ian Courtois said things have Locks prevent piracy: ACTRA Ward, who is on the board of the changed a lot since the last con- Ottawa Canada Linux Users sultation, a time when there was Groups such as the Alliance of Group. "considerable doubt" that money Canadian Cinema, Television could be made off content sold and Radio Artists say digital "People are upset that they would on the internet. locks or digital rights manage- have to pay again to use some- ment (DRM) are an "important thing that they've already paid "That is now clearly established - issue in terms of preventing pi- for," he said. that there's a lot of money there racy." for them down the line if we all ITAC, whose members include work together and make sure that "As rights holders, our members, creators of content such as soft- customers get value," he said, of course, want to be compen- ware, agrees with ACTRA that a citing the recent availability of sated for the use of their material copyright law needs to make sure video, social networking, busi- and that can't happen if people innovation isn't discouraged by a
  • lack of protection from theft. ting researchers prove they were doing research after the fact if a University of Ottawa law Prof. But Courtois said businesses also rights holder complains. Michael Geist said the past dec- benefit when consumers can get ade has proven that DRM has value out of their purchase by David Robinson, a spokesman been "largely a failure." It has being able to use it on multiple for the Canadian Association of found little consumer acceptance devices and platforms. University Teachers, said his and done little to discourage file group is also concerned that a sharing in the U.S., where there "Experience has shown - genera- ban on breaking digital locks is a longstanding ban on break- tion after generation - that the would hurt research and educa- ing all digital locks, he said. more value people get, the more tion. the market will grow," he said, No legal requirement for ban: adding that online businesses "There's all kinds of ways, I prof want to make sure copyright law think, in which a more restrictive does not impede that. copyright framework could actu- On his blog, Geist argued against ally hinder the kind of innovation a similar ban in Canada, saying Customers should also be able to that we're trying to stimulate," he there are many legitimate rea- tinker with locks on software and said, citing the mixing and re- sons to circumvent a digital lock mobile devices to make sure they mastering that many musical and there is no international legal are compatible with other soft- artists are now engaged in, as requirement to institute such a ware or operate with multiple well as new business models ban. The blog entry is posted on networks. they are developing that involve the new website he launched free content. Thursday called Speakouton- Lock-breaking ban could hurt copyright.ca to encourage public research: ITAC All this is especially important participation in the government given that virtually every politi- copyright consultations. Bill C-61's proposed restrictions cian has been trumpeting the on breaking digital locks would emergence of a knowledge-based Ultimately, Courtois said, strik- have hurt innovation in other economy, Robinson said. ing the right balance is not a ways, Courtois said. question of looking at a ban and "I think there's a real battle tak- exceptions. He advocates a dif- Canada has a strong cryptogra- ing place about the future shape ferent approach. phy and security services indus- of the knowledge economy or try, he said, but its research whether or not we're going to "You establish the general prin- would have been hampered by a have equitable access or whether ciple that you can't steal," he requirement to seek permission it's going to be on a pay-per ba- said. "Then you look at what from the rights holder before sis, where [those] who can afford rights you have to give to con- breaking digital locks - some- to can access the information sumers so they get the real value thing that type of research does- â[#x20ac]¦ and those who can't that they've paid for." n't lend itself to. He favours let- will be left out."
  • Canwest News Service July 31, 2009 Friday St. John's Telegram N.L eliminates interest on student loans. ST. JOHN'S - As of midnight Friday, Newfound- a government news release. land and Labrador will eliminate interest on its portion of students loans. Students won't have to apply, fill out forms or call anyone to have the interest removed from ``This is groundbreaking,'' said Education Minis- their accounts. ter Darin King. However, monthly payments they now make will The elimination of the interest was announced in remain the same - the loan will just be paid off this year's budget and will cost the province more quickly - unless people call the bank which about $5 million. holds their loan to arrange lower payments. The measure will help students and graduates ``This initiative . . . will help ease the burden of deal with the mounting debt load of a post sec- student loans for thousands of graduates and ondary education. former students,'' said Daniel Smith, Newfound- land and Labrador chairman of the Canadian ``The elimination of interest is automatic,'' states Federation of Students.
  • Ottawa Citizen August 7, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A7 Include fair dealing Megan Nicholson, The Ottawa Citizen Re: Copyright changes will be too late for school year, July 31. The debate about changes to the Copyright Act is often depicted as one that pits the recording indus- try against members of the public who engage in activities such as file sharing. This news article on the impact of copyright on the university commu- nity was a welcome expansion of the discourse on what is at stake as the government drafts new legis- lation. Graduate students occupy a unique position in the debate on copyright reform as we are users, creators and owners of copyrighted material. In particular, graduate students are calling for the inclusion of a more flexible and inclusive definition of "fair dealing" in the Copyright Act which should enshrine a Supreme Court ruling that explicitly recognized the need for a balance between the rights of owners and users. This general approach would mean that compli- cated exceptions for educational institutions would be unnecessary. Students, as well as others in the Canadian public, are better served by a fair and balanced Copyright Act that encourages a robust information commons -- a place where information and knowledge exist as our shared heritage. Megan Nicholson, Toronto Chair, National Graduate Caucus, Canadian Federation of Students
  • CBC News August 7, 2009 Friday Canada lost 45,000 more jobs in July CBC News bringing total losses in province las Porter. since October to 68,000. The pro- Canada's jobless rate remained vincial unemployment rate last "If there is any positive spin here steady at 8.6 per cent in July, even month was nine per cent, the high- for the broader economy, it’s that as the country lost about 45,000 est since January 2004. the job losses were almost entirely jobs, Statistics Canada said Friday. concentrated among summer stu- Saskatchewan lost 5,000 jobs as dents (though try telling your teen- The unemployment rate remained the jobless rate there increased to ager that’s good news). Still, the unchanged from June as people 4.7 per cent. underlying picture still looks quite gave up looking for work and soft, and there’s little sign here that dropped out of the labour market. After seeing job gains in June, the economy is quickly turning the Newfoundland and Labrador lost corner," he wrote in a commen- Economists had been forecasting 2,800 jobs in July. That drove the tary. the country would lose between province's jobless rate up 1.5 per- 20,000 and 30,000 jobs for the centage points, to 17.1 per cent. Porter did add that some aspects of month and that the unemployment the economy are improving, in- rate would bump up to 8.8 per Unemployment rate may climb for cluding home sales, auto sales and cent. a time overall financial conditions. Self-employment continued to rise Since the peak in October 2008, Tough market for students last month, adding 35,000 jobs. employment across the country has Since October, self-employment dropped 414,000, predominantly The summer job market for full- has gone up by 70,000. among youths, with 205,000 lost, time students age 15 to 24 contin- and men aged 25 to 54, with ued to be very weak. July's unem- Employment fell by 22,000 in 201,000 jobs disappearing. ployment rate for students climbed accommodation and food services to 20.9 per cent is the highest July in July, while retail and wholesale Economists pointed out that the unemployment rate on record since trade was up by 24,000. Construc- jobs market will most likely re- comparable data became available tion sector employment decreased main weak, even though signs are in 1977. by 18,000 in July, bringing total pointing toward economic recov- losses since October to 120,000, ery now. The student jobless rate last month while employment in manufactur- was 7.1 percentage points above ing was little changed. Since Oc- "Even though the Canadian econ- what it was in July 2008. tober 2008, manufacturing em- omy is likely to resume positive ployment has dropped by 218,000, growth sometime in the third quar- "Students who have been unable to or 11.1 per cent. ter, we are likely to continue to see find work this summer will be the unemployment rate climb for forced to take on more debt and While most of July's employment up to six months after the reces- may be unable to afford to return losses were in Quebec, there were sion has come to a close," said TD to school this fall," said Katherine also losses in Saskatchewan, as Bank economist Diana Petramala. Giroux-Bougard, the national well as in Newfoundland and Lab- chairperson of the Canadian Fed- rador. Employment was little "No one said it was going to be a eration of Students. "Summer jobs changed in all other provinces. smooth recovery, and especially are not a luxury; they pay the not for employment," said BMO bills." Quebec lost 37,000 jobs in July, Capital Markets economist Doug-
  • CBC News August 7, 2009 Friday Student unemployment hits all-time high CBC News year-over-year employment de- tised five job openings and got cline for any July since 1982. more than a thousand applica- Clancy Snook knows first-hand tions," CFS national chair Kath- the frustration of trying to find The miserable summer job mar- erine Giroux-Bougard said in an work during the worst summer ket comes as the Canadian econ- interview. for student employment in more omy is poised to return to growth than 30 years. after stalling in recession. But "Many students will face diffi- jobless figures tend to lag eco- cult choices," she said. "Either The 20-year-old interior design nomic recovery, so students hop- take on more debt or some may student at Toronto's Ryerson ing for a quick hiring rebound have to make the decision not to University sent out 50 resumes may be disappointed. attend school this year." this year in a fruitless search for summer employment. "First comes growth, and then Economists say fewer jobs for comes the hiring," said TD Bank students may also result in more "There were just no jobs any- economist Diana Petramala. parents having to make up the where being offered," Snook told "Employment not only tends to funding gap, further worsening CBC News. lag economic growth during re- the economic recovery as the coveries, it tends to recover at a parents' spending plans are put "Ideally, I wouldn't work through much slower pace," she wrote in on hold to keep their children in the school year because school a report. school. commitments are intense," she said. "But at this point, I would For students, the lag has been 'Employers are still hiring' have to because I've been unem- especially painful, as they strug- ployed for four months." gle to earn enough to pay the Nancy Shafer of Youth Em- coming year's tuition bill. ployment Services, a jobs coun- Snook has plenty of company in selling centre for young people, the jobless camp this year. The Student leaders call for govern- said now's not the time for stu- summer of 2009 is on track to be ment action dents to give up searching for the bleakest in a generation for work. the country's students. Student leaders called on gov- ernments to boost financial aid "Employers are still hiring," she Statistics Canada reported Friday and reduce tuition fees, which told CBC News. "It's taking [em- that student unemployment hit now average almost $5,000 a ployers] longer to make their 20.9 per cent in July, the highest year for university undergrads decisions, but they're still hiring jobless rate since the agency be- and are poised to rise further in and it's up to the young job gan collecting comparable data at least six provinces come Sep- seeker to put everything they've in 1977. tember. got into that job search," she said. That jobless rate represented an The terrible student employment increase of 7.1 percentage points numbers came as no surprise to Shafer listed the environmental, from July 2008. In the past year, the Canadian Federation of Stu- health-care, financial and not- student employment has fallen dents, where student leaders have for-profit sectors as areas that by 152,000 as the recession hits been hearing jobless horror sto- hold the most promise for stu- young people particularly hard. ries for months. "We know of dent job seekers. The July job- StatsCan says that's the fastest one student union which adver- less stats showed why students
  • were faring so poorly in this unemployment rates during and 1982, 1993 and again in 1997. summer job market. The hospi- immediately following reces- Statistics Canada said the reces- tality, recreation and construc- sions usually tend to rise dra- sion of the early 1990s had a tion industries, all major em- matically and often take years to lasting effect on the job market ployers of students, shed 50,000 subside. Student jobless rates for young people. positions in the month. Student topped 19 per cent in the Julys of
  • Canwest News Service August 7, 2009 Friday John Morrissy and Tiffany Crawford Student unemployment climbs to highest level since record-keeping began. OTTAWA - Joblessness among positions. This summer, she said, nomic recovery.'' students has climbed to what may has been the worst and she can't be the highest level ever in Canada find any job to pay the rent. So, Friday's jobs release showed that as the unemployment rate resumed she's packing up her bags this after a temporary lull in April, its upward climb in July, casting month and heading back to Re- May and June - in which only 45,000 people out of work. gina. 13,000 jobs were lost - July's 45,000 jobs lost were much Not since Statistics Canada began Doug Porter, deputy chief worse than the 15,000 econo- keeping such records in 1977 has economist for BMO Capital mists had expected. this number has reached such a Markets, remarked: ``This is peak, leaving one out of every five definitely an extraordinarily se- Porter said the turn was not en- students, or 20.9 per cent of the vere recession for young people tirely a surprise. ``I actually total, out of work. and students in particular.'' believe the second quarter num- bers were giving a false sense of Observers say this could send rip- In fact, numbers released Friday security, and frankly when it ples through the economy, as stu- show that virtually half of the was reported there were job dents grapple with high levels of 414,000 people thrown out of gains in April very few believed debt and are held back from join- work since the downturn began it.'' ing the workforce, forming fami- close to a year ago were young lies, buying homes and getting on people, aged 15 to 24. In July ``So the fact that we've had an- with their lives. alone, employment among young other fairly serious job decline people fell by 38,000. should not come as total shock . Beyond the numbers, the voices of . . but it does cast a cloud on this temporarily lost generation are ``In many ways, I can't imagine a whether the economy has begun tinged with anger and disappoint- worse environment for student to recover just yet.'' ment. employment than we saw this year. Tourism is about as weak Numbers out of the U.S., mean- ``It's really hard to survive, you as it can get . . . and of course the while, indicate our largest trad- know, I'm 23 and I have a degree tourism sector is a big employer ing partner is firmly on track to a and it's so frustrating that I can't of students,'' Porter said. second-half recovery, as the even get a minimum wage paying pace of job losses slowed more job and I have to call my parents ``Then there's the fact that in any than expected, Porter said. and be all like `Oh, I can't afford downturn firms are quickest to my rent this month,' '' said Concor- let the least experienced go or Payrolls fell by 247,000 after a dia University graduate Brittany not hire, and of course student loss of 443,000 in June, the La- Anderson. employment suffers in that envi- bor Department said Friday in ronment.'' Washington and the jobless rate Anderson, 23, graduated in 2007 fell for the first time in more with bachelor's degree in political But Ottawa is partly to blame, than a year, to 9.4 per cent from science but couldn't find a career- too, said Katherine Giroux- 9.5 per cent. related job, so she returned to Bougard, the chairwoman of the school to begin a second degree. Canadian Federation of Students. In Canada, the jobless rate re- mained at an 11-year high of 8.6 She has worked odd jobs in Mont- ``By not moving to reduce stu- per cent. real in the service industry or re- dents' debt the government has tail, but says there are no career ignored an essential part of eco- Canwest News Service
  • globeandmail.com August 7, 2009 Friday BUSINESS Youth bear brunt of job losses VIRGINIA GALT Katherine Giroux-Bougard, national chairperson of This has been the worst summer for student job- the Canadian Federation of Students, said the re- seekers in more than 30 years, Statistics Canada cord student unemployment rate will exact a terri- said Friday. ble toll on students at a time when tuition fees are rising. July's student unemployment rate climbed to 20.9 per cent, a 7.1 percentage point increase from July, "Students who have been unable to find work this 2008, Statscan said. "This was the highest July un- summer will be forced to take on more debt and employment rate for these students since compara- may be unable to afford to return to school this ble data became available in 1977," Statscan re- fall," Ms. Giroux-Bougard said in a statement. ported. "Summer jobs are not a luxury; they pay the bills." The July unemployment survey found the two sec- tors that traditionally hire students in the summer - From May to August, Stastcan collects labour mar- hospitality and construction - were particularly hard ket information about young people, aged 15 to 24, hit. who were attending school full-time in March and intend to return to school in the fall. The published Although total employment declined by 45,000 in estimates are not seasonally adjusted. Therefore, July, with losses in both full-time and part-time comparisons can only be made on a year-over-year work, the unemployment rate remained unchanged basis, the agency said. at 8.7 per cent. Ms. Giroux-Bougard noted that tuition fees are the "No one said it was going to be a smooth recovery, single largest expense for most university and col- especially not for employment," Bank of Montreal lege students, with average domestic tuition fees of economist Douglas Porter said in a research note. almost $5,000 a year. Students in six provinces will face tuition fee increases of between two and eight "If there is any positive spin here for the broader per cent this year, she said. economy, it's that the job losses were almost en- tirely concentrated among summer students (though Share your stories with reporter mailto: try telling your teenager that's good news)." vgalt@globeandmail.com
  • Windsor Star August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition BUSINESS; Pg. A12 Student unemployment soars One in five without a job nationwide John Morrissy afford my rent this month,'" said and Tiffany Crawford, Concordia University graduate "In many ways, I can't imagine a Financial Post Brittany Anderson. worse environment for student OTTAWA employment than we saw this Anderson, 23, graduated in 2007 year. Tourism is about as weak Joblessness among students has with a bachelor's degree in po- as it can get ... and of course the climbed to what may be the litical science but couldn't find a tourism sector is a big employer highest level ever in Canada as career-related job, so she re- of students," Porter said. the unemployment rate resumed turned to school to begin a sec- its upward climb in July, casting ond degree. But Ottawa is partly to blame, 45,000 people out of work. too, said Katherine Giroux- She has worked odd jobs in Bougard, the chairwoman of the Not since Statistics Canada be- Montreal in the service industry Canadian Federation of Students. gan keeping such records in 1977 or retail, but says there are no has this number has reached such career positions. This summer, "By not moving to reduce stu- a peak, leaving one out of every she said, has been the worst and dents' debt the government has five students, or 20.9 per cent of she can't find any job to pay the ignored an essential part of eco- the total, out of work. rent. So, she's packing up her nomic recovery." bags this month and heading Observers say this could send back to Regina. Friday's jobs release showed that ripples through the economy, as after a temporary lull in April, students grapple with high levels Doug Porter, deputy chief May and June -- in which only of debt and are held back from economist for BMO Capital 13,000 jobs were lost -- July's joining the workforce, forming Markets, remarked: "This is 45,000 jobs lost were much families, buying homes and get- definitely an extraordinarily se- worse than the 15,000 econo- ting on with their lives. vere recession for young people mists had expected. and students in particular." Beyond the numbers, the voices Porter said the turn was not en- of this temporarily lost genera- In fact, numbers released Friday tirely a surprise. tion are tinged with anger and show that virtually half of the disappointment. 414,000 people thrown out of "I actually believe the second work since the downturn began quarter numbers were giving a "It's really hard to survive, you close to a year ago were young false sense of security, and know, I'm 23 and I have a degree people, aged 15 to 24. frankly when it was reported and it's so frustrating that I can't there were job gains in April even get a minimum wage pay- In July alone, employment very few believed it." ing job and I have to call my among young people fell by parents and be all like 'Oh, I can't 38,000.
  • National Post's Financial Post & FP Investing August 8, 2009 Saturday 
National Edition FINANCIAL POST; Pg. FP1 Young and out of work 21% student rate Eric Lam, July rate since Statscan started Prospects for Ms. Hoang and the Financial Post tracking the data in 1977. hundreds of thousands of other youth looking for meaningful Andrea Hoang, fresh out of uni- Ms. Hoang's summer started work this summer have been versity, has no idea if she is ever ominously. While she smiled and horrendous as the job market has going to find work. And consid- posed for pictures at her June shrivelled due to economic tur- ering the July employment data graduation, only one thought ran moil, strikes and other factors. released yesterday from Statistics through her mind: "What am I Canada, she has good reason to going to do tomorrow?" she said. Kul Bhatia, an economics pro- worry. The Ryerson journalism graduate fessor at the University of West- completed a month-long intern- ern Ontario, is sympathetic but "I don't think people care about ship at a major cable news chan- said youth are simply not the young people. Young people are nel, then went to Quebec to learn priority right now. really undervalued," Ms. Hoang French. But she did not earn a said. cent from any of these stints. "It's like fighting fires -- you worry about some things later. In July, the Canadian economy Now back in Toronto, she has With massive layoffs and huge lost 45,000 jobs, about three joined the growing army of un- changes in the industrial land- times the drop expected by employed or underemployed scape, these things have to be economists. One of the hardest- young Canadians. The effects dealt with first. You can't blame hit groups is students. The stu- may show up in more than the them," he said. "Given all the dent unemployment rate is ap- job numbers. features of the current recession, proaching a dismal 21% com- it's difficult to make the case the pared with the overall national "I feel I've done enough unpaid priorities are wrong. rate of 8.6%. work. I can't afford to intern any- more," she said. "A lot of people Mr. Bhatia said the recession has Since the employment peak of have a defeated attitude. It's hard been disruptive for students, but October 2008, some 205,000 when you're poor and bored -- "on a relative scale" their prob- youths aged 15-24 have lost their you don't feel like a valuable lems are not as drastic. For in- jobs, almost half of the 414,000 member of society." stance, someone with a mortgage total jobs lost in that time. and mouths to feed needs far Ms. Hoang, 22, owes more than more urgent attention than stu- Statscan differentiates between $20,000 in student loans from dents who would only be incon- youth and students. The overall her four years of university, and venienced by having to return to unemployment rate for youth, interest has been piling up since school another year or lose a ages 15-24, is at 16.2%, the she finished classes at the end of summer of income. highest in more than a decade. April. "I'm worried about the interest ... I haven't really looked "It's a question of where you are The rate for students, who are into it yet. I figure when they in your life cycle. Most young returning to full-time school in want to reach me they will." people are just starting their ca- the fall, is 20.9%, the highest reers, so while there's no doubt
  • there are adverse effects, they're And students are facing higher problem for students: competi- not as long lasting," he said. "In levels of debt than ever before. tion from their parents' genera- 10 or 15 years, if you did a sur- Federal student loans crossed the tion. vey, you'd be hard-pressed to $13-billion threshold in January, find somebody who only wanted and Ms. Giroux-Bougard esti- "Students are at the bottom of the to do one line of work but be- mates the number climbs by food chain, and there are people cause of the recession [is doing about $1.2-million a day. This willing to take jobs they wouldn't something else]." does not include loans from pro- have last year," she said. vincial governments or other Instead, career paths will be dic- facilities. Ms. Hoang used to think getting tated by the labour market, a university degree should get which will expect people to have The real problem is the spiral someone a decent job, but not multiple skills, he said. effect this summer can have on anymore. She has thought about the following years, she said. A going back to school to ride out However, Mr. Bhatia would whole generation of young Ca- the recession, but is pessimistic likely have a hard time convinc- nadians will delay major life about that as well. ing Katherine Giroux-Bougard, decisions such as moving away national chairperson of the Ca- from home, buying a car or "A lot of people are doing mas- nadian Federation of Students, of house, even starting families. ter's programs, teaching abroad, his point of view. doing a fifth year. What about in "With higher debt loads, students two years, when all of those peo- "Even when the economy is are less likely to work for not- ple come out? Won't I have to good, it's still a challenge for for-profits or volunteer in the compete with all of those people students to find employment," community," she added. too?" she said. "What if waiting she said. "We've seen enrolment around [for a recovery] doesn't numbers up for graduate pro- Grace Rivers, director of corpo- help either?" grams, but unfortunately that rate relations at Addeco Em- means additional debt." ployment Services, sees another
  • Nanaimo Daily News August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition OURS & YOURS; Pg. A10 Student funding cuts need second thought The Daily News also gave students valuable work experience -- especially if the jobs Unfortunately, governments look Governments that cut funding pro- were in the students' chosen fields. at everything through the prism of grams that help students find work the immediate cost of a specific are being penny wise but pound And students weren't forced to rely program. It's time they started to foolish. on student loans to pay for their realize that some investments earn educations. dividends by the money that flows Especially as those governments through the economy after students are likely to recoup that funding. What both the federal and provin- graduate. cial governments fail to realize is British Columbia's Student Sum- that by helping students work Education is seen through the all- mer Works program used to subsi- through the summer they are mak- seeing economic lens; how much it dize employers by paying a portion ing an investment that will come costs governments. However, gov- of wages paid to full-time post- back to them in much more money ernments also gain by having a secondary students in this prov- than what they are paying out. well educated labour force that can ince. The federal government also contribute more to society in taxes. used to have similar programs. The Canadian Federation of Stu- dents estimates that someone who Getting a post secondary education B.C. chopped funding Student graduates with a post-secondary is expensive and not having pro- Summer Works shortly after the degree will, on average, pay more grams to help students get work Liberals were elected in 2001 and than $100,000 in taxes than those during the summer months is mak- despite a fairly robust economy who join the workforce immedi- ing that education even more ex- until last fall, the province has ately following high school. That's pensive as students must rely on never restored it. because they will, on average, earn loans. much more money than those who The program matched the wages don't have a post-secondary educa- Only a very lucky few have par- employers paid full-time students. tion. Investing in student jobs does ents wealthy enough to afford to Now that the economy has soured not give governments an immedi- pay for their post secondary educa- and we are mired in a recession, ate bang for the bucks they con- tion. Even the four in five students the provincial government seems tribute but they pay dividends in fortunate enough to find a summer to expect the private sector to pro- the future. job this year will probably need to vide students jobs with no help use their earnings to minimize the from provincial coffers. Helping employers by subsidizing amount they will need to borrow the wages they pay for students is through the student loan program. Funding for many student em- a win-win all around. ployment programs have been Most students would prefer to slashed during recent years and the The students gain much-needed work and gain some experience result, as reported Friday by Statis- experience and lessen their reli- rather than being saddled with a tics Canada, is a 21% unemploy- ance on student loans, employers debt load it is going to take them ment rate for students, the highest can utilize the labour of a young years to dig themselves out from it has been since StatsCan started enthusiastic worker and not pay under once they do enter the reporting jobless rates in 1977. them as much as regular staff and workforce. the government will recoup the Not only did these programs give cost of the program because the It's time for governments to re- employers the opportunity to bring students will be able to finish their think its shortsightedness and re- in students during the summer to post secondary educations and the fund student employment pro- help them during when other staff majority of them will eventually grams. We will all benefit once may have been on vacation, they land in high tax brackets. they do.
  • Nanaimo Daily News August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition British Columbia: NEWS; Pg. A1 Student jobless rate at all-time high Debt loads likely to grow for those attending college Walter Cordery, from ideal before B.C. elected the millions of dollars out of the sys- Daily News Liberal government in 2001, but tem in this province that used to with a file from canwest news B.C. used to fund a program called help students find work." Student Summer Works that Successive provincial and federal matched what employers paid stu- Statistics Canada reports 45,000 governments' slashing of programs dents. jobs were lost across the nation in designed to help students find July, partly because fewer people work during the summer is to "The Liberals cancelled that during were looking for work. blame for the highest rate of stu- their first year in office and the dent unemployment in Canada's federal government has also been British Columbia lost 11,500 jobs history, says Steve Beasley, the cutting funding to programs that between June and July. executive director of the student used to help students by giving union at Vancouver Island Univer- their employers some matching Nanaimo's unemployment rate sity, Local 61 of the Canadian funds," Beasley said. rose slightly in July to 7.7%, up Federation of Students. 1.2% from the previous month, Statistics Canada's latest unem- according figures released on Fri- The national unemployment rate ployment report reveals that nearly day from Statistics Canada for students was 21% for July, half of the 414,000 people thrown Statistics Canada reported on Fri- out of work since the recession The city's unemployment rate is day. began last fall were young people, inching closer to the provincial between the ages of 15 and 24. average of 7.8% last month. The Not since Statistics Canada began provincial rate fell from 8.1% in keeping such records in 1977 has In July alone, youth employment June. this number been so high, leaving across the country fell by 38,000. one in five students out of work. The number of people who could "In many ways, I can't imagine a not find work in the city during This is going to force more stu- worse environment for student July jumped to 4,300 from 3,600. dents to go deeper into debt to pay employment than we saw this year. for their post-secondary educations Tourism is about as weak as it can British Columbia is now slightly since they will have to rely on get . . . and of course the tourism under the 8.6% national unem- student loans. sector is a big employer of stu- ployment rate for July. dents," said Douglas Porter, deputy Beasley said that it is not uncom- chief economist for BMO Capital B.C. Finance Minister Colin Han- mon for students to graduate ow- Markets. sen said the figures show a declin- ing $30,000 to $40,000. ing jobless rate and things will "This is definitely an extraordinar- improve once the federal and pro- "Both the federal and provincial ily severe recession for young vincial sales taxes are harmonized governments have cut back on people and students in particular." in July. funding student employment pro- grams and that has just created a With funding that used to help "By shifting to the HST model, it vicious circle," said Beasley. employers hire students slashed, takes the roughly $1.9 billion of Beasley said he can understand embedded provincial sales tax "If students can't find work, they why, in this economic climate, costs out of the cost of producing must go deeper into debt." students can't find work. goods and services in the province. That will make us much more Post-secondary funding was far "They (governments) have taken competitive," Hansen said.
  • The Leader-Post August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition Saskatchewan: BUSINESS & AGRICULTURE; Pg.E1 20.9% of students out of work John Morrissy, school to begin a second degree. and Tiffany Crawford, She has worked odd jobs in Mont- "By not moving to reduce students' Financial Post real in the service industry or re- debt the government has ignored Canwest News Service tail, but says there are no career an essential part of economic re- OTTAWA positions. This summer, she said, covery." has been the worst and she can't Joblessness among students has find any job to pay the rent. So, Friday's jobs release showed that climbed to what may be the high- she's packing up her bags this after a temporary lull in April, est level ever in Canada as the month and heading back to Re- May and June -- in which only country, overall, lost about 45,000 gina. 13,000 jobs were lost -- July's jobs last month. 45,000 jobs lost were much worse Doug Porter, deputy chief econo- than the 15,000 economists had Not since Statistics Canada began mist for BMO Capital Markets, expected. keeping such records in 1977 has remarked: "This is definitely an joblessness among students extraordinarily severe recession for Porter said the turn was not en- reached such a peak, leaving one young people and students in par- tirely a surprise. "I actually believe out of every five students, or 20.9 ticular." the second-quarter numbers were per cent of the total, out of work. giving a false sense of security, In fact, numbers released Friday and frankly when it was reported Observers say this could send rip- show that virtually half of the there were job gains in April very ples through the economy, as stu- 414,000 people thrown out of few believed it." dents grapple with high levels of work since the downturn began debt and are held back from join- close to a year ago were young "So the fact that we've had another ing the workforce, forming fami- people, aged 15 to 24. In July fairly serious job decline should lies, buying homes and getting on alone, employment among young not come as total shock ... but it with their lives. people fell by 38,000. does cast a cloud on whether the economy has begun to recover just Beyond the numbers, the voices of "In many ways, I can't imagine a yet." this temporarily lost generation are worse environment for student tinged with anger and disappoint- employment than we saw this year. Numbers out of the U.S., mean- ment. Tourism is about as weak as it can while, indicate our largest trading get ... and of course the tourism partner is firmly on track to a sec- "It's really hard to survive, you sector is a big employer of stu- ond-half recovery, as the pace of know, I'm 23 and I have a degree dents," Porter said. job losses slowed more than ex- and it's so frustrating that I can't pected, Porter said. even get a minimum wage paying "Then there's the fact that in any job and I have to call my parents downturn firms are quickest to let Payrolls fell by 247,000 after a and be all like 'Oh, I can't afford the least experienced go or not loss of 443,000 in June, the Labor my rent this month,' " said Con- hire, and of course student em- Department said Friday in Wash- cordia University graduate Brit- ployment suffers in that environ- ington and the jobless rate fell for tany Anderson. ment." the first time in more than a year, to 9.4 per cent from 9.5 per cent. Anderson, 23, graduated in 2007 But Ottawa is partly to blame, too, with bachelor's degree in political said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, In Canada, the jobless rate re- science but couldn't find a career- the chairwoman of the Canadian mained at an 11-year high of 8.6 related job, so she returned to Federation of Students. per cent.
  • The Hamilton Spectator August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition BUSINESS; Pg. T07 Students hit hard by unemployment Some put post-secondary dreams on hold Steve Arnold, Her worry over money is a during the summer months have The Hamilton Spectator common feeling among Cana- been part of a successful strategy dian students -- one that's getting to help interest and engage stu- Christina Sguazzin is one of the more intense following a Statis- dents in the steel industry for the lucky ones and she knows it. tics Canada report yesterday long term, while helping to fund showing unemployment in the their education. Our hope is that She has a summer job. student-heavy 15-24 age group we will be able to increase this rose 43 per cent. Among students support when business condi- The Cathedral High student, go- specifically, the Canadian Fed- tions improve." ing into Grade 12 in September, eration of Students estimates has managed to land summer unemployment rose 21 per cent - The City of Hamilton, another jobs for each of the last two - a number that raises real fear major source of summer jobs, years as she, and thousands of about the ability of 152,000 stu- held its hiring steady for the other students, anxiously save dents to stay in school. year, taking on 593 students, money for the post-secondary although some job terms aren't as education they've been told will In the Youth segment StatsCan long as they once were. shape their future. reported an unemployment rate of 16.2 per cent, up from 15.9 Diana Belaisis, manager of em- Even though Sguazzin is saving, per cent in June. ployment services, said those are and has been promised her par- "rough estimates" and "in some ents will support her dreams of There was a day, not that long programs we might have shaved studying psychology at McMas- ago, when Hamilton students a week or two off the term and if ter University, she still worries hoping for a better future could someone leaves we may not re- about how she's going to pay for pay for their dreams with the place them." all of the education she'll need to proceeds of summer jobs in be a first-rate criminologist. places like Stelco, Dofasco and Angela Eckhart, co-ordinator of the other industrial plants that Employment Hamilton's youth "I should have enough for the gave the Steel City its nickname. employment service, said young undergraduate degree, but after people looking for jobs are fac- that it's a little frightening," she Those days are gone -- Arcelor- ing increasing competition in a said. "Sometimes it's scary think- Mittal Dofasco announced in crowded market. It's also a mar- ing about the amounts of money November 2007 it wouldn't hire ket where they're at a consider- you have to spend to do this. any students for the 2008 sum- able disadvantage because of mer, a ban that continued this their lack of experience and "Landing a summer job was year. skills. really important, it's definitely for the money," she added. "I In an e-mail exchange, Arcelor- "Because of the economic cli- don't know how some kids do it." Mittal Dofasco spokesman An- mate we're in there's a lot more drew Sloan said the company competition faced by young peo- Last summer Sguazzin worked "has historically taken on sum- ple," she said. "They just can't as a cashier and this year she's mer students, as one of the many compete with the level of skill doing general office work for ways the company tries to help and experience of some of the Employment Hamilton's summer support our community. ... For people out there." jobs program. us, students hired specifically
  • This year Employment Hamilton agency can offer a wage subsidy dents looking for summer jobs was able to place 754 students in of up to $2 an hour to qualified was up 30 per cent. summer jobs -- that's more than employers. last year but doing it required a "A lot of employers were telling budget boost from the provincial Before that increase was given, us they just weren't able to take government to allow the agency Eckhart said, many employers on staff this year," she added. to subsidize wages for more stu- were cancelling their plans to "The subsidy made the differ- dents. take students, or taking fewer ence for them to hire." than in previous years. At the Under a provincial program the same time the number of stu-
  • The Hamilton Spectator August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition LOCAL; Pg. A01 Student jobless numbers 'scary' Steve Arnold, to afford to return to school this fall," said Kather- The Hamilton Spectator ine Giroux-Bougard, national chair of the Canadian Federation of Students. Unemployment is soaring among Canada's stu- dents, raising fears about their ability to stay in "These are very scary numbers," she added. "Sum- school. mer jobs are not a luxury; they pay the bills." The latest Labour Force Survey numbers from Sta- With students graduating from undergraduate pro- tistics Canada show unemployment in the student- grams with debt of up to $30,000, the issue is be- heavy 15-24 age group rose 43 per cent between coming critical for an economy shifting to a knowl- July this year and the same month last year. That edge base. In Hamilton, where companies such as meant 152,000 students couldn't find summer jobs. ArcelorMittal Dofasco have cancelled summer jobs programs that once employed 75 students, it's espe- That's the highest July unemployment rate for that cially hard. age group reported since 1977. "Ontario has certainly been one of the hardest hit Nationally, the agency reported the unemployment areas," Giroux-Bougard said. "Both unemployment rate was 8.6 per cent after the country shed 45,000 and tuition fees have been rising there for years." jobs. In Hamilton, the jobless rate rose to 8.2 per cent from 7.1 in June. sarnold@thespec.com 905-526-3496 "Students ... unable to find work this summer will be forced to take on more debt and may be unable
  • The Gazette August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition EDUCATION 2009; SPECIAL SECTION; Pg. H8 N.L. scraps interest on student loans St. John's Telegram "The elimination of interest is automatic," accord- ing to a government news release. ST. JOHN'S - As of midnight Friday, Newfound- land and Labrador will eliminate interest on its por- Students won't have to apply, fill out forms or call tion of students loans. anyone to have the interest removed from their ac- counts. "This is groundbreaking," Education Minister Darin King said. However, monthly payments they now make will remain the same - the loan will just be paid off The elimination of the interest was announced in more quickly - unless people call the bank that this year's budget and will cost the province about holds their loan to arrange lower payments. $5 million. "This initiative ... will help ease the burden of stu- The measure will help students and graduates deal dent loans for thousands of graduates and former with the mounting debt load of a post-secondary students," said Daniel Smith, N.L. chairman of the education. Canadian Federation of Students.
  • The Gazette August 8, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition BUSINESS; Pg. C2 Job losses slam students Highest level since records kept Unemployment rate churns higher JOHN MORRISSY Anderson, 23, graduated in 2007 too, said Katherine Giroux- AND TIFFANY CRAWFORD, with bachelor's degree in politi- Bougard, the chairwoman of the Canwest News Service cal science but couldn't find a Canadian Federation of Students. OTTAWA career-related job, so she re- turned to school to begin a sec- "By not moving to reduce stu- Joblessness among students has ond degree. dents' debt the government has climbed to what may be the ignored an essential part of eco- highest level ever in Canada as She has worked odd jobs in nomic recovery." the unemployment rate resumed Montreal in the service industry its upward climb in July, casting or retail, but says there are no Yesterday's jobs data showed 45,000 people out of work. career positions. This summer, that after a temporary lull in she said, has been the worst and April, May and June - in which Not since Statistics Canada be- she can't find any job to pay the only 13,000 jobs were lost - gan keeping such records in 1977 rent. So, she's packing up her July's 45,000 jobs lost were has this number reached such a bags and heading back to Re- much worse than the 15,000 peak, leaving one out of every gina. economists had expected. five students, or 20.9 per cent of the total, out of work. Doug Porter, deputy chief Porter said the turn was not en- economist for BMO Capital tirely a surprise. "I actually be- Observers say this could send Markets, remarked: "This is lieve the second quarter numbers ripples through the economy, as definitely an extraordinarily se- were giving a false sense of secu- students grapple with high levels vere recession for young people rity, and frankly when it was of debt and are held back from and students in particular." reported there were job gains in joining the workforce, forming April very few believed it." families, buying homes and get- In fact, numbers released yester- ting on with their lives. day show that virtually half of Numbers out of the U.S. indicate the 414,000 people thrown out of our largest trading partner is Beyond the numbers, the voices work since the downturn began firmly on track to a second-half of this temporarily lost genera- close to a year ago were young recovery, as the pace of job tion are tinged with anger and people, age 15 to 24. In July losses slowed more than ex- disappointment. alone, employment among young pected, Porter said. Payrolls fell people fell by 38,000. by 247,000 after a loss of "It's really hard to survive, you 443,000 in June, the Labour De- know, I'm 23 and I have a degree "In many ways, I can't imagine a partment said yesterday in Wash- and it's so frustrating that I can't worse environment for student ington and the jobless rate fell even get a minimum wage pay- employment than we saw this for the first time in more than a ing job and I have to call my year. Tourism is about as weak year, to 9.4 per cent from 9.5 per parents and be all like: 'Oh, I as it can get ... and of course the cent. can't afford my rent this month,' tourism sector is a big employer " said Concordia University of students," Porter said. In Canada, the jobless rate re- graduate Brittany Anderson. mained at an 11-year high of 8.6 But Ottawa is partly to blame, per cent.
  • Windsor Star August 14, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A3 Student loan demand soars 'Feeding frenzy' predicted Frances Willick, She said she usually works 40 to from last year across the prov- The Windsor Star 50 hours per week in the sum- ince. mer, but this year she only had Dwindling bank account bal- about 10 hours of work each "Probably this year we've seen ances and looming tuition pay- week. an increase as a result of the re- ments are sending students at the cession," said Patrick O'Gorman. University of Windsor to their "It will not pay the bills," she "More people will go to a post- financial assistance office in said. "This summer has been secondary education or stay there droves. really rough." longer because the job market isn't as good. But also ... we don't The number of applicants for Quinn said stiffer competition see as many general labour jobs student loans has increased 30 for summer employment is driv- as we saw in the past. It tends to per cent compared to last year, ing more students to seek loans. be more specialized and that re- said Aase Houser, the director of "A lot of the people who were quires some sort of post- student awards and financial aid laid off are doing any kind of secondary education." at the U of W. "We expect to be job, taking jobs that we would very busy this year (with) lots of usually take. Obviously, I really Despite the increased competi- competition for very little sympathize, but now we don't tion for student loans, there is money. It will be a bit of a feed- have those jobs. It's a domino good news at the U of W. Houser ing frenzy." effect." said the average loan amount has increased because of new grant From the beginning of June until An increase in enrolment at the programs. the end of July, the department university could account for at received 4,200 applications for least part of the rise in applica- But Quinn, a member of the stu- assistance -- that's about 900 tions for financial assistance. The dent group Drop Fees for Pov- more than were received during total enrolment in undergraduate erty, said student loans often the same period last year. programs has increased by a don't cover all expenses. She is couple hundred compared to this expecting to receive about "I think it's just a reflection of time last year, said Gregory Mar- $11,500 in assistance this year, the economy and the fact that cotte, director of registrarial but said her tuition is more than families have suffered a loss of services at the U of W. $6,000 alone, and she also has to income," Houser said. "It's more pay for books, a bus pass and difficult for students to come by But the search for student loans rent. "Plus, I usually like to eat," jobs themselves." goes beyond Windsor. A she said. "It's still going to be spokesman for the Ontario Min- tough, even with financial assis- Lauren Quinn, a 23-year-old who istry of Training, Colleges and tance." just graduated from the U of W, Universities said applications for will be returning to campus this the Ontario Student Assistance fall to pursue a teaching degree. Program are up eight per cent
  • CBC News August 18, 2009 Tuesday Students increasingly worried about finances: survey CBC News The survey is the latest sign that students will likely face a tight year for finances. The July unemploy- Half of Canadian post-secondary students expect ment figures revealed that the jobless rate for stu- their money will run out before the end of the com- dents climbed to 20.9 per cent last month -- a ing school year, according to a new survey on stu- record high. dent finances. Student leaders have called on governments to An Ipsos Reid poll commissioned by RBC also boost financial aid and reduce tuition fees, which found that about one-third of respondents were now average almost $5,000 a year for university worried that their spending money would be gone undergraduates and are poised to rise further in at by Christmas. least six provinces come September. So it was not surprising that two-thirds of students Two online scholarship search services returning to campus said they were planning to be Studentawards.com and ScholarshipsCanada.com more cautious in their spending. say they've noticed 10 to 15 per cent jumps in registrations and web traffic as students scramble Almost four in five respondents were planning to for other funding sources for their education. work part-time while attending college or univer- sity. Almost half said they needed to work to pay The Canadian Federation of Students says the aver- the bills. age student debt load at graduation is $25,000. "Working to make ends meet is an additional chal- The Ipsos Reid survey of 1,200 students was car- lenge for students, with at least three-quarters con- ried out online between June 9 and June 17. The cerned that working will affect their grades and results are considered accurate to within 2.8 per- two-thirds believing that worrying about money centage points, 19 times out of 20. will have a negative impact on their studies," said Kavita Joshi, director of student banking at RBC.
  • Canwest News Service August 18, 2009 Tuesday Amy Minsky Economic woes follow students to campus Kate Spurr, a student going showed 79 per cent of stu- best they can under the cir- into her second year of law dents plan to work part- time cumstances. school, didn't get a break this while in school, using the year. Almost immediately money to pay bills. "I feel they've tried really after she put down her pencil hard to find work over the on her last exam in the Spurr said she's going to con- summer, and now a lot of spring, she started working at centrate on her classes at the them are going to have to rely a full-time job. But still, she's University of Calgary. on Canadian student loans in worried she won't be able to a way they didn't have to stretch her earnings through "It will be tight,'' she said. "I previously,'' she said. to the end of the academic have to budget myself until year. April. Then I hope to get a The hike in tuition rates big tax return and my bills. across six provinces will If she were the type to take Then, back to work.'' compound the problem, she solace in numbers, she'd be said. happy knowing she's not Though Spurr said she's op- alone. timistic she'll find employ- "I think we're going to see an ment again next summer, increase in the number of Half of all Canadian post- she's aware it might be diffi- students who need to borrow, secondary students said they cult. and an increase in the amount expect their bank accounts to they have to borrow,'' she run dry before the end of the Employment among students said, adding this will all lead school year, according to an this summer was down al- to an increase in debt upon RBC/ Ipsos Reid opinion poll most 11 per cent compared to graduation. on student finances. last year, according to a Sta- tistics Canada report released Kavita Joshi, director of stu- "It's tough,'' she said. "A lot earlier this month. It was the dent banking at RBC, ac- of the money I made over the fastest year-over-year rate of knowledged the difficulties summer went to my Visa, for decline for a month of July of budgeting when jobs are expenses from last year.'' since 1982, the release said. sparse and funds are low. Whatever's left after her debt Katherine Giroux-Bougard, Spurr said she cuts back on is paid will be spread over national chairwoman of the expenses by going out less, seven months of school and Canadian Federation of Stu- making meals at home and living expenses, she said. dents, the country's largest planning - actions Joshi said student lobby group, said she can help all students. The poll, released Tuesday, feels students are doing the
  • The Vancouver Sun August 19, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition CANADA & WORLD; Pg. B2 Post-secondary students face a cash crunch Half say they expect their bank accounts to run dry before the end of the school year Amy Minsky, doing the best they can under the Canwest News Service The poll, released Tuesday, circumstances. showed 79 per cent of students Kate Spurr, a student going into plan to work part-time while in "I feel they've tried really hard to her second year of law school, school, using the money to pay find work over the summer, and didn't get a break this year. Al- bills. now a lot of them are going to most immediately after she put have to rely on Canadian student down her pencil on her last exam Spurr said she's going to concen- loans in a way they didn't have to in the spring, she started working trate on her classes at the Uni- previously," she said. at a full-time job. But still, she's versity of Calgary. "It will be worried she won't be able to tight," she said. "I have to budget The hike in tuition rates across stretch her earnings through to myself until April. Then I hope six provinces will compound the the end of the academic year. to get a big tax return and my problem she said. bills. Then, back to work." If she were the type to take sol- "I think we're going to see an ace in numbers, she'd be happy Though Spurr said she's optimis- increase in the number of stu- knowing she's not alone. tic she'll find employment again dents who need to borrow, and next summer, she's aware it an increase in the amount they Half of all Canadian post- might be difficult. have to borrow," she said, adding secondary students said they this will all lead to an increase in expect their bank accounts to run Employment among students this debt upon graduation. dry before the end of the school summer was down almost 11 per year, according to an RBC/Ipsos cent compared to last year, ac- Kavita Joshi, director of student Reid opinion poll on student fi- cording to a Statistics Canada banking at RBC, acknowledged nances. report released earlier this the difficulties of budgeting month. It was the fastest year- when jobs are sparse and funds "It's tough," she said. "A lot of over-year rate of decline for a are low. the money I made over the sum- month of July since 1982, the mer went to my Visa, for ex- release said. Spurr said she cuts back on ex- penses from last year." penses by going out less, making Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- meals at home and planning -- Whatever's left after her debt is tional chairwoman of the Cana- actions Joshi said can help all paid will be spread over seven dian Federation of Students, the students. months of school and living ex- country's largest student lobby penses, she said. group, said she feels students are
  • Nanaimo Daily News August 19, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NATION & WORLD; Pg. A9 Economic woes follow students to campus Amy Minsky, leased earlier this month. It was Canwest News Service Whatever's left after her debt is the fastest year-over-year rate of paid will be spread over seven decline for a month of July since Kate Spurr, a student going into months of school and living ex- 1982, the release said. her second year of law school, penses, she said. didn't get a break this year. Al- Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- most immediately after she put The poll, released Tuesday, tional chairwoman of the Cana- down her pencil on her last exam showed 79% of students plan to dian Federation of Students, the in the spring, she started working work part-time while in school, country's largest student lobby at a full-time job. But still, she's using the money to pay bills. group, said she feels students are worried she won't be able to doing the best they can under the stretch her earnings through to Spurr said she's going to concen- circumstances. the end of the academic year. trate on her classes at the Uni- versity of Calgary. "I feel they've tried really hard to If she were the type to take sol- find work over the summer, and ace in numbers, she'd be happy "It will be tight," she said. "I now a lot of them are going to knowing she's not alone. have to budget myself until have to rely on Canadian student April. Then I hope to get a big loans in a way they didn't have to Half of all Canadian post- tax return and my bills. Then, previously," she said. secondary students said they back to work." expect their bank accounts to run The hike in tuition rates across dry before the end of the school Though Spurr said she's optimis- six provinces will compound the year, according to an RBC/Ipsos tic she'll find employment again problem, she said. Reid opinion poll on student fi- next summer, she's aware it nances. might be difficult. "I think we're going to see an increase in the number of stu- "It's tough," she said. "A lot of Employment among students this dents who need to borrow, and the money I made over the sum- summer was down almost 11% an increase in the amount they mer went to my Visa, for ex- compared to last year, according have to borrow," she said. penses from last year." to a Statistics Canada report re-
  • The Leader-Post August 19, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. D12 Tough times for students Amy Minsky, group, said she feels students are Canwest News Service The poll, released Tuesday, doing the best they can under the showed 79 per cent of students circumstances. Kate Spurr, a student going into plan to work part-time while in her second year of law school, school, using the money to pay "I feel they've tried really hard to didn't get a break this year. Al- bills. find work over the summer, and most immediately after she put now a lot of them are going to down her pencil on her last exam Spurr said she's going to concen- have to rely on Canadian student in the spring, she started working trate on her classes at the Uni- loans in a way they didn't have to at a full-time job. But still, she's versity of Calgary. previously," she said. worried she won't be able to stretch her earnings through to "It will be tight," she said. "I The hike in tuition rates across the end of the academic year. have to budget myself until six provinces will compound the April. Then I hope to get a big problem, she said. If she were the type to take sol- tax return and my bills. Then, ace in numbers, she'd be happy back to work." "I think we're going to see an knowing she's not alone. increase in the number of stu- Though Spurr said she's optimis- dents who need to borrow, and Half of all Canadian post- tic she'll find employment again an increase in the amount they secondary students said they next summer, she's aware it have to borrow," she said, adding expect their bank accounts to run might be difficult. this will all lead to an increase in dry before the end of the school debt upon graduation. year, according to an RBC/Ipsos Employment among students this Reid opinion poll on student fi- summer was down almost 11 per Kavita Joshi, director of student nances. cent compared to last year, ac- banking at RBC, acknowledged cording to a Statistics Canada the difficulties of budgeting "It's tough," she said. report released earlier this when jobs are sparse and funds month. It was the fastest year- are low. "A lot of the money I made over over-year rate of decline for a the summer went to my Visa, for month of July since 1982, the Spurr said she cuts back on ex- expenses from last year." release said. penses by going out less, making meals at home and planning -- Whatever's left after her debt is Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- actions Joshi said can help all paid will be spread over seven tional chairwoman of the Cana- students. months of school and living ex- dian Federation of Students, the penses, she said. country's largest student lobby
  • The Gazette August 19, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A12 Students feeling pinch AMY MINSKY, Whatever is left after her debt is paid will be spread Canwest News Service over seven months of school and living expenses, she said. Kate Spurr, a student going into her second year of law school, didn't get a break this year. Almost im- The poll, released yesterday, showed 79 per cent of mediately after she put down her pencil on her last students plan to work part time while in school, exam in the spring, she started working at a full- using the money to pay bills. time job. But still, she's worried she won't be able to stretch her earnings through to the end of the Employment among students this summer was academic year. down almost 11 per cent compared to last year, according to a Statistics Canada report released this If she were the type to take solace in numbers, she'd month. It was the fastest year-over-year rate of de- be happy knowing she's not alone. cline for a month of July since 1982. Half of all Canadian post-secondary students said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, national chairwoman of they expect their bank accounts to run dry before the Canadian Federation of Students, the country's the end of the school year, according to an largest student lobby group, said she feels students RBC/Ipsos Reid opinion poll on student finances. are doing the best they can under the circumstances. "It's tough," she said. "A lot of the money I made "I feel they've tried really hard to find work over over the summer went to my Visa (credit card), for the summer, and now a lot of them are going to expenses from last year." have to rely on Canadian student loans in a way they didn't have to previously," she said.
  • London Free Press August 22, 2009 Saturday 
FINAL EDITION CITY & REGION; Pg. A4 Money woes big concern for returning students EDUCATION: Post-secondary students cite a lack of summer work for financial problems BY JOE MATYAS a 7.1% increase from the same universities. At UWO, OSAP month a year ago and the highest applications are up 10% over last Many Canadian college and uni- student unemployment rate in 30 year and Fanshawe OSAP appli- versity students will return to years. cations are up 11%. school next month worried about how they'll make ends meet this In London, where 34,000 stu- Although student enrolment is year, a spokesperson for the Ca- dents attend the University of also up, "it isn't driving the in- nadian Federation of Students Western Ontario and 13,000 at- crease in applications for assis- said yesterday. tend Fanshawe College, the im- tance," said Glen Tigert, associ- pact of tighter money could be ate registrar at Western. And students who attend the felt in local businesses. University of Western Ontario "Every student's situation is dif- and Fanshawe College will be "We certainly rely a lot on stu- ferent, but it would certainly be among the legions reeling from a dents," said Kelly Luiting, day reasonable to believe that the lack of summer jobs, high tuition manager at Carey's bar and grill state of the economy, particularly fees and accumulating debt, said on Oxford St. across from Fan- as it relates to students, has had Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- shawe College. "We have a regu- something to do with the in- tional chairperson of the federa- lar clientele all year round, but crease in applications," he said. tion. things certainly do pick up in September when the majority of Cathie Auger, vice-president of "This is more than an individual students are on campus. And student support at Fanshawe, problem for students. It also has we're busy until the spring, said "I believe that hypothesis is broader repercussions for local thanks to our Fanshawe custom- probably correct. There have economies where students pay ers." been job losses in this commu- for accommodation, groceries nity." and all the other things they need Business is already picking up at to live and go to school," she Carey's and "we're looking for- London, with the highest urban said. ward to having the students unemployment rate in the prov- back," Luiting said. ince -- 10.9% -- has been part of It's looking as if students will the down economy. have less money to spend this One fallout of the bleak job pic- fall and certainly less discretion- ture has been greater numbers of Aside from government student ary income, she said. students applying for loans, said aid programs, Fanshawe distrib- Giroux-Bougard, adding that uted about $3.7 million to about "Students are in dire circum- means more student debt in the 3,400 students last year in the stances," she said. "They're fac- long run. form of bursaries, scholarships, ing the highest unemployment awards and work study funding, numbers on record and many are Across the province, Ontario Auger said. worried about not being able to Student Assistant Program appli- make it past Christmas." cations are up 15% over last At Western, about $27 million in year, said Tanya Blazina, senior undergraduate student aid was In July, Statistics Canada pegged media relations officer for the disbursed from the university's the jobless student rate at 20.9%, ministry of training, colleges and funds, Tigert said. That included
  • $4.5 million in admission schol- The $25,000 debt calculation is arships and $13 million in needs- The average Ontario student is for government student assis- based bursaries and work study about $25,000 in debt and pays tance and doesn't include money programs, he said. about $5,000 a year for tuition students may have borrowed for undergraduate courses and a from other sources, she said. Tigert and Auger said demand lot more for graduate studies or for aid provided by their respec- to attend law, medical or busi- Joe Matyas is a Free Press re- tive educational institutions is ness schools, Giroux-Bougard porter. joe.matyas@sunmedia.ca up, along with OSAP applica- said. tions.
  • The Toronto Sun August 24, 2009 Monday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 6 High cost of higher education Lack of summer jobs, rise in already lofty tuition fees forcing university students to sink deeper into debt BY SHARON LEM, loans. OSAP applications have SUN MEDIA surged 5.7% for colleges and Student debt across the country 4.6% for universities this year. has surpassed $12 billion. Nineteen-year-old Rodney Di- verlus was desperate to take "I feel angry and frustrated. Meanwhile, Ontario ranks dead whatever hours he could pick up Summer is a time to make last in per capita funding for in part-time and casual work. money for school and now I'm post-secondary education, tuition going to be saddled with even fees continue to rise and students Cassandra Thompson, 19, mar- more OSAP to pay back when I increasingly are hit by additional, keted herself as a maid, while graduate," said the second-year ancillary fees for libraries, in- Vashti Boateng, 22, juggled Ryerson University dance stu- formation technology and labs. three part-time positions to earn dent. as much as she could. "The simple cost of going to "What pisses me off more is that school keeps going up and it's so Struggling to cope in a lousy not only was I not able to find unfair that getting your degree student job market, they are three full-time work this summer, but has become so expensive. of thousands of undergraduate tuition fees also went up $500, so students who couldn't find full- it's a double whammy," Diverlus "(Premier) Dalton McGuinty time work this summer but had said, adding he'll need to secure a needs to make post-secondary to line up this week to pay part-time job during the school education more affordable and mounting tuition fees to register year. accessible as a basic right," said for the fall semester. Boateng, a University of Toronto With the sagging economy and fourth-year political science and Ontario's university tuition fees the worst job market students equity major who has worked are the second highest in the have seen in 32 years, Thompson since she was 14. country -- almost $1,000 over the was willing to get her hands national average. dirty. McGuinty has preached the need for the province to shift to a And fees for professional pro- "No one was hiring. I couldn't "knowledge-based economy" grams such as medicine are the get a job anywhere, so I decided since before he was elected pre- highest in Canada, averaging to work as a self-employed maid. mier. $9,000 per year. I'm relying on help from close friends and family and if I keep Sandy Hudson, president of the This combination of high fees my grades above 80 again, I'll University of Toronto's students and the worst job market in the receive a $1,000 scholarship, so union, says in the last seven country for student employment that will help a bit," said Thomp- years that shift has been under- in decades has hit students hard. son, a second-year sociology way. student at Ryerson. 'ANGRY AND FRUSTRATED' Hudson argues that approxi- Boateng said she took the three mately 70% of newly listed jobs Diverlus, 19, is already $10,000 part-time jobs this summer to in Canada require some form of in the hole with student Ontario avoid adding to her $10,000 debt post-secondary education, in- Student Assistance Program in school loans. creasing the necessity for a de-
  • gree in today's competitive job The recession has also contrib- caused tuition fees to skyrocket. market. uted to more students applying for loans. DECLINE IN FUNDING "With the student unemployment rate at 21%, a huge number of The take-up rate of student loans School budgets have also been students will not be able to ac- at U of T is 12% higher for this eroded by the global recession. cess education if they can't get coming fall than last year and the According to the Council of On- jobs to pay for tuition," she said. rate of student loans at Ryerson tario Universities, the stock mar- is 10% higher over last year. ket meltdown will hammer en- "On a pretty regular basis, we are dowment revenues by $180 mil- hearing about students in the "Obviously when student unem- lion and lead to sky-high sol- awkward financial position of ployment is high, it will have an vency payments to maintain being unable to maintain a job or impact on the take up rates of schools' pension funds. find employment and this is dis- student loans," Shelley Melan- turbing for most students," Hud- son, chairman of the Canadian Years of funding neglect on top son said. Federation of Students Ontario, of current troubles has put On- said. tario is in last place in Canada Student unemployment rates for per capita funding for post- spiked to 20.9% for July --the "It's important to recognize the secondary education and second worst since 1977, when Statistics government has the ability to last based on per student fund- Canada started monitoring it. change public policy and change ing, according to the Canadian the cost of our education. In Federation of Students. Comparitively, in July 2008 the 2010, it will be the expiration of student unemplyebnt rate was a four year tuition fee framework Melanson says there's been a 13.8%. that saw tuition fees increase steady decline of provincial and from 20 to 36% over the four federal funding for post- Meanwhile, July's overall na- years," Melanson said. secondary education over the last tional average unemployment two decades, which has results in rate sat an 11-year high of 8.6%. Ballooning student debt, at $12 higher tuition fees and users fees. billion and increasing by more "Youth workers have less senior- than $1.5 million each day, is In the early 1990s, user fees ac- ity and have less experience, so further compounding difficulties counted for an average of 21% of they faced the brunt of the reces- students face. an institution's operating budget, sion, with 205,000 student jobs but today user fees cover almost lost in Canada since October In Ontario, student debt has risen 50% of the institutions's budget. 2008," Sal Guatieri, senior 300% -- to $28,000 from $8,000 enomonist with BMO Capital in 1991. "One of Dalton McGuinty's elec- Markets, said, adding 84,000 of tion promises was to invest new the 205,000 were in Ontario "I'd like to tell Dalton McGuinty money into education. Well, the alone. that the best way to improve the $6.2 billion he's investing in economy is to invest in education post-secondary education isn't Over the next three years the by increasing access to post- going very far because of the University of Toronto will also secondary education and reduce cuts in the 1990s. The new be hitting up students with a new tuition fees to ensure easy access money wasn't enough to keep policy in which students pay a for students to learn," Melanson pace with the enrolment expan- flat fee for tuition, regardless of said. "It's a question of investing sion we saw," Melanson said. whether they take three courses with more public funding and or six. making it a priority. "We're seeing many institutions with tremendous shortfalls and It's expected to generate around "We've seen government after not enough money in the system. $10 million annually in net reve- government not make education nues for U of T. a priority," she said, adding for- "Using public funding to lower mer premier Mike Harris tuition fees will make post- "It's just another cash grab," chopped education funding by secondary education more acces- Hudson said. $400 million a year while he was sible for all students, rather than in office, which eventually hiking tuition fees," Melanson
  • said. but I'm very, very proud of the - Manitoba: $3,276 progress which has been made," - Newfoundland: $2,632 Minister of Training, Colleges he said. - Quebec: $2,167 and Universities John Milloy - Canada average: $4,724 said his government's five-year --- investment of $6.2 billion to ONTARIO FEES support the post-secondary sector UNIVERSITY FEES -- called the Reaching Higher Sample undergrad programs plan -- is working. Across Canada comparison - Dentistry: $12,906 "(It) is the biggest investment in Ontario university tuition fees - Medicine: $10,392 over 40 years and half a billion are the second highest in the - Law: $7,720 of it was targeted to student aid," country. Here's a look at average - Engineering: $5,310 Milloy said. undergrad fees for 2008-09: - Computer science $4,947 - Business: $4,828 Milloy said the tuition fee frame- AVERAGE FEES - Humanities: $4,478 work, which ends in 2010, - Social sciences: $4,318 worked by capping tuition fees at - Nova Scotia: $5,952 - Nursing: $4,298 4.5% in its first year and 4% in - Ontario: $5,643 - Education: $3,666 the three years following. - New Brunswick: $5,590 - Alberta: $5,361 Source: Statistics Canada "We realize people are struggling - British Columbia: $5,040 everywhere ... I'm always the - Saskatchewan: $5,010 first to ask if we could do more, - P.E.I. $4,530
  • BioScience September 1, 2009 Pg. 648(1) Vol. 59 No. 8 ISSN: 0006-3568 Debate over science funding heats up in Canada Washington Watch Sponberg, Adrienne search. warm to science, the unmistak- Froelich able message from Finance John Stool, professor at Minister Jim Flaherty is that Two years ago, the Canadian Queen's University and Canada science is unimportant in Can- government launched a new Research Chair in Environ- ada's economy." Several grass- strategy to improve the coun- mental Change, says that the roots efforts protesting the try's scientific competitiveness funds supplied by those agen- government's policies have by, among other things, promot- cies--for NSERC discovery emerged as well, including an ing partnerships with industry grants, for example--offer the open letter to the government, and improving scientific infra- governmentthe "most bang for "Don't Leave Canada Behind," structure. In June, the govern- the buck." While directed fund- which has gathered more than ment trumpeted its success in ing certainly has its place in 2000 signatures, and "Protect Mobilizing Science and Tech- government-funded science, Science Funding in Canada," a nology to Canada's Advantage: funding programs that allow 3400-member Facebook group. Progress Report 2009. But how- scientists' research to progress ever pleased the government freely are more in line with But not everyone thinks there may be with its progress, re- how science actually works, he is cause for complaint. In an searchers are becoming increas- says. "Of the 10 papers I am opinion piece in the National ingly vocal in their dissent, ar- most proud of, I don't think I Post, Michael Bliss, professor guing thatthe government's pol- anticipated a single one of them emeritus at the University of icy is missing the mark and in the grant I wrote funding Toronto, says that many of the threatening the future of the that work." community's complaintsare country's scientific enterprise. unfounded, and scientists risk Since the budget cuts were further backlash if they con- The progress report touts the announced, the outcry against tinueto bite the hand that feeds country's largest-ever invest- the government's policies has them. "The danger is that poli- ment inscience and technology, become more vehement. Aca- ticians, instead of caving in, including $4.5 billion for infra- demic groups such as the Ca- will respond by washing their structure through the Canada nadian Association of Univer- hands of Canada's science Foundation for Innovation sity Teachers (CAUT) have community." (CFI). So why are researchers voiced concerns over the fund- upset? A primary concern is that ing cuts, noting that "labs and The budget may not have the greater support for infra- research stations may be better drawn as much criticism had it structure displaces funds for the equipped but are forced to cut not been for the inevitable researchers who use the equip- back or close because they do comparisons with Canada's ment. In Canada's Budget 2009, not have sufficient funding for southern neighbor. During the funding was cut by 5 percent for staff and operational costs." Bush administration, Canadi- the country's three granting The editors of the CMAI (Ca- ans prided themselves on hav- agencies: the National Science nadian Medical Association ing the more comparatively and Engineering Research Journal) criticized the Canadian favorable environment for sci- Council (NSERC), the Social economic stimulus plan ence. Indeed, between 2002 Sciences and Humanities Re- (Budget 2009) in an edito- and 2007, the number of uni- search Council, and the Cana- rial:"In saying yes to deficits versity professors and assis- dian Institutes of Health Re- and stimulus, yet being luke- tants who moved from the
  • United States to work in Canada for the United States. In an have been successful in re- increased by 27 percent, re- April 2009 poll commissioned cruiting talent from abroad. ported Elizabeth Church and by the CAUT and the Canadian Daniel LeBlanc in Canada's Federation of Students, two- Rather, Smol says, the biggest Globe andMail (27 January thirds of Canadians surveyed problem Canadian scientists 2009). But with the election of admitted apprehension about face isthat "science has never President Barack Obama, the Canada's ability to attract and been able to capture the imagi- tables have turned. In his inau- retain researchers, given reduc- nation of politicians." Until gural address, Obama vowed tions in research funding. that happens, the debate over to"restore science to its rightful Canada's science policies will place," and he swiftly set about But Smol is unsure whether a most likely rage on. instituting a string of new poli- "brain drain" should be a major cies favorable to science, in- concern: "Researchers are mo- doi:10.1525/bio.2009.59.8.5 cluding a massive infusion of bile people by nature," he says, funds to federal science agen- and there hasalways been Adrienne Froelich Sponberg cies through the economic movement between the two (sponberg@aslo.org) is the stimulus package. countries. Additionally, pro- director of public affairs and grams such as the Canada Re- coeditor of the Limnology and The turnabout with regard to search Chairs and the CFI-- Oceanography Bulletin for the funding raises concerns that top both of which receive new American Society Canadian researchers will leave funding under the 2009 budget of Limnology and Oceanography.
  • The Toronto Star September 5, 2009 Saturday GTA; Pg. GT02 No jobs mean big loans for students OSAP applications jump 5% as young people struggle to pay tuition Noor Javed, hate to think about it, but I might at the end," said Katherine Toronto Star have to borrow from them." Giroux-Bougard, head of the Canadian Federation of Students, Siva Vimal spent his entire sum- He isn't the only one returning to which has been fielding calls mer trying to get a head start. school empty-handed. from concerned students all summer. Determined to pay his own tui- According to Statistics Canada, tion at York University, like he unemployment for students be- "Or some students are making had in previous years, the third- tween the ages of 15 and 24 was drastic decisions of not attending year political science student at 16.4 per cent in August, the university to save money, or re- began applying for jobs early in worst rate on record. turning to live at home." the summer. The rest of the summer wasn't Realizing the potential effect of He filled out application after any better. The unemployment the economy on students, Ryer- application for a job as a waiter rate for the summer was at 19.2 son University said it will hire or bus boy, work he found easily per cent, with most of the young more students as teaching and last year. But he never heard people working only 23.4 hours research assistants and for other back. Even the Tim Hortons in per week. part-time positions, and offer his neighbourhood didn't reply. more bursaries, scholarships and The concerns can be seen on awards. Eventually, Vimal's uncle gave campuses across the city. him a few hours of work a week It's little comfort to Vimal, who at his restaurant so the 20-year- The University of Toronto has will borrow more than $5,000 to old could pay his bills. seen a 12 per cent increase in pay for his full course load next financial aid applications for the year - on top of the $11,000 he Vimal starts school next week year, according to its financial already owes. The thought of the with almost no savings, a huge aid office. Ryerson University hefty debt load, and increasing loan on his shoulders, and con- has seen applications jump 10 tuition costs, has started to put a cerns about how he will be able per cent. And applications to the damper on his future education to get through the year. Ontario Student Assistance Pro- plans. gram were about 5 per cent "There is no way I can pay for higher for colleges and universi- "My dream is to do international tuition this year," Vimal said. ties for next year. law, but at the moment it is feel- ing more and more unrealistic," "My parents both work in facto- "This means so many more stu- he said. ries, and I hate asking them for dents are having to borrow money. Usually I help them pay money just to get through school, the bills," he said. "This year, I which means a higher debt load
  • Canwest News Service September 8, 2009 Tuesday John Morrissy Back-to-school season "won't go down in the record books'' OTTAWA - Back-to-school Canadians spent at the beginning rapidly advancing technology shopping will be less than stel- of the 1990s. and generally declining prices. lar this year as Canadians' pur- chasing power is squeezed by "It goes to show that Canadians do - Canwest News Service recession-related job losses and put a greater propensity in spend- this year's shortage of summer ing on education even if the times AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD employment for students, says are not the best,'' said Gampel. EXPENDITURES ON EDU- Scotia Economics. CATION (2007): Part of the reason is that they sim- "This back-to-school buying ply have to. Canada $1,017 season will not go in the record Newfoundland and Labrador books,'' said Aron Gampel, dep- Tuition fees, which now account $579 uty chief economist. "Although for 73 per cent of all education Prince Edward Island $797 the recession's grip may be less- spending, have soared as govern- Nova Scotia $1,055 ening, the confidence- ments cut back on post-secondary New Brunswick $1,005 dampening drag of the sharp funding. Undergraduate fees have Quebec $633 and deep contraction in overall climbed from an average of Ontario $1,220 activity over the past year is still $1,164 a year at the beginning of Manitoba $869 working its way through the the 1990s to $4,724 today, double Saskatchewan $804 economy. the rate of inflation, according to Alberta $1,176 Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- British Columbia $1,215 "Canadians households are tional chairwoman of the Cana- likely to remain cautious spend- dian Federation of Students. AVERAGE UNDER- ers until the recovery broadens, GRADUATE TUITION improving business confidence But the recession-reduced job FEES; FULL-TIME (2008- triggers a revival in job hiring, market is also playing a role, as 09): and debt burdens become more are demands for higher skill sets, manageable.'' both of which are keeping stu- Canada $4,724 dents in school longer, Gampel Newfoundland and Labrador Nevertheless, education-related said. $2,632 spending remains a bright spot Prince Edward Island $4,530 in recent years, the report states. Spending this year could well be Nova Scotia $5,932 While growth in overall spend- described as "back-to-basics,'' New Brunswick $5,590 ing by Canadians has fallen to concentrated on apparel and foot- Quebec $2,167 zero in the first half of 2009, wear, and traditional school sup- Ontario $5,643 spending on education and cul- plies. Book buying may lag along Manitoba $3,276 tural services has climbed 5.9 with discretionary purchases of Saskatchewan $5,015 per cent. education-related rouses and serv- Alberta $5,361 ices, according to Scotia's outlook. British Columbia $5,040 As well, in the second quarter, spending on education remained One exception may be electronic SOURCE: Statistics Canada at a record 1. 5 per cent of total and computer-related equipment, expenditures, twice as much as whose sales may be enhanced by
  • The Star Phoenix September 9, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition BUSINESS; Pg. C7 Sask. tuition higher than average Cassandra Kyle, she said, paying a little extra in pany based in his home country The StarPhoenix tuition fees is a worthwhile ex- of Saudi Arabia. The student has with files from Canwest News pense. heard complaints from friends, Service however, that tuition fees in Sas- "It kind of sucks (paying more katchewan -- especially for in- When Kyra Johnston left her than the national average), but in ternational students -- are hard to home in Windsor, Ont., to attend the long run you are getting a cover. the University of Saskatchewan, better education," Haller said. "I she didn't know she would be believe this is one of the better Still, he believes if the quality of paying more than the national schools . . . so it's worth it." education at the university is average in annual tuition fees for high, then paying a little extra to her education. Tuition fees, which account for attend class is worthwhile. 73 per cent of all education Figures released Tuesday in a spending, have soared as gov- "As long as the quality of educa- Scotia Economics report on ernments cut back on post- tion is high, maybe the price is back-to-school spending show secondary funding. reasonable," Alotaibi said. students in Saskatchewan spend $5,015 annually on undergradu- Undergraduate fees have climbed ckyle@ ate tuition fees, a figure higher from an average of $1,164 a year sp.canwest.com than the national average of at the beginning of the 1990s to $4,724. $4,724 today, double the rate of AVERAGE UNDERGRAD inflation, said Katherine Giroux- TUITION FEES, FULL-TIME However, Johnston, 18, who is Bougard, national chair of the (2008-09) enrolled in the college of agricul- Canadian Federation of Students. ture and bioresources, doesn't - Canada $4,724 mind paying a little extra if it But the recession-reduced job - Nfld. and Labrador $2,632 means receiving a better educa- market is also playing a role, as - Prince Edward Island $4,530 tion. are demands for higher skill sets, - Nova Scotia $5,932 both of which are keeping stu- - New Brunswick $5,590 "I just hope it pays off, I guess. I dents in school longer, said Aron - Quebec $2,167 heard it was a very good school," Gampel, Scotia Economics dep- - Ontario $5,643 Johnston said Tuesday. uty chief economist. - Manitoba $3,276 - Saskatchewan $5,015 Her friend Sagan Haller, an 18- Majed Alotaibi, meanwhile, isn't - Alberta $5,361 year-old arts and science student, concerned about his own tuition - British Columbia $5,040 agrees. If the quality of the edu- fees at the U of S. The 21-year- Source: Statistics Canada cation post-secondary students in old engineering student is on a Saskatchewan receive is higher, scholarship sponsored by a com-
  • The Leader-Post September 9, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition BUSINESS & AGRICULTURE; Pg. D1 Sask. students paying more Cassandra Kyle, "I just hope it pays off, I guess. I Bougard, national chair of the Saskatchewan News heard it was a very good school," Canadian Federation of Students. Network Johnston said Tuesday. With files from Canwest But the recession-reduced job News Service Her friend Sagan Haller, an 18- market is also playing a role, as SASKATOON year-old arts and science student, are demands for higher skill sets, agrees. If the quality of the edu- both of which are keeping stu- When Kyra Johnston left her cation post-secondary students in dents in school longer. home in Windsor, Ont., to attend Saskatchewan receive is higher, the University of Saskatchewan, she said, paying a little extra in Majed Alotaibi, meanwhile, isn't she didn't know she would be tuition fees is a worthwhile ex- concerned about his own tuition paying more than the national pense. fees at the U of S. The 21-year- average in annual tuition fees for old engineering student is on a her education. "It kind of sucks (paying more scholarship sponsored by a com- than the national average), but in pany based in his home country Figures released Tuesday in a the long run you are getting a of Saudi Arabia. Scotia Economics report on better education," Haller said. "I back-to-school spending show believe this is one of the better The student has heard complaints students in Saskatchewan spend schools ... so it's worth it." from friends, however, that tui- $5,015 annually on undergradu- tion fees in Saskatchewan -- es- ate tuition fees, a figure higher Tuition fees, which account for pecially for international students than the national average of 73 per cent of all education -- are hard to cover. $4,724. spending, have soared as gov- ernments cut back on post- Still, he believes if the quality of However, Johnston, 18, who is secondary funding. education at the university is enrolled in the college of agricul- high, then paying a little extra to ture and bioresources, doesn't Undergraduate fees have climbed attend class is worthwhile. mind paying a little extra if it from an average of $1,164 a year means receiving a better educa- at the beginning of the 1990s to "As long as the quality of educa- tion. $4,724 today, double the rate of tion is high, maybe the price is inflation, said Katherine Giroux- reasonable," Alotaibi said.
  • The Gazette September 9, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition BUSINESS; Pg. B4 Retail less than stellar this year Spending concentrated on apparel, footwear and supplies JOHN MORRISSY, Nevertheless, education-related Undergraduate fees have climbed Canwest News Service spending remains a bright spot in from an average of $1,164 a year OTTAWA recent years, the report states. at the beginning of the 1990s to $4,724 today, double the rate of Back-to-school shopping will be While growth in overall spend- inflation, according to Katherine less than stellar this year as Ca- ing by Canadians has fallen to Giroux-Bougard, national chair- nadians' purchasing power is zero in the first half of 2009, woman of the Canadian Federa- squeezed by recession-related spending on education and cul- tion of Students. job losses and this year's short- tural services has climbed 5.9 per age of summer employment for cent. But the recession-reduced job students, Scotia Economics says. market is also playing a role, as As well, in the second quarter, are demands for higher skill sets, "This back-to-school buying spending on education remained both of which are keeping stu- season will not go in the record at a record 1.5 per cent of total dents in school longer, Gampel books," said Aron Gampel, dep- expenditures, twice as much as said. uty chief economist. Canadians spent at the beginning of the 1990s. Spending this year could well be "Although the recession's grip described as "back-to-basics," may be lessening, the confi- "It goes to show that Canadians concentrated on apparel and dence-dampening drag of the do put a greater propensity in footwear, and traditional school sharp and deep contraction in spending on education even if supplies. Book buying may lag overall activity over the past year the times are not the best," Gam- along with discretionary pur- is still working its way through pel said. chases of education-related the economy. rouses and services, according to Part of the reason is that they Scotia's outlook. "Canadians households are likely simply have to. to remain cautious spenders until One exception may be electronic the recovery broadens, improv- Tuition fees, which now account and computer-related equipment, ing business confidence triggers for 73 per cent of all education whose sales may be enhanced by a revival in job hiring, and debt spending, have soared as gov- rapidly advancing technology burdens become more manage- ernments cut back on post- and generally declining prices. able." secondary funding.
  • Edmonton Journal September 9, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition BUSINESS; Pg. F3 Recession curbs school spending John Morrissy, able." Financial Post; Canwest News Service Nevertheless, education-related spending remains a OTTAWA bright spot in recent years, the report states. While growth in overall spending by Canadians has fallen Back-to-school shopping will be less than stellar to zero in the first half of 2009, spending on educa- this year as Canadians'purchasing power is tion and cultural services has climbed 5.9 per cent. squeezed by recession-related job losses and a As well, in the second quarter, spending on educa- shortage of summer employment for students, says tion remained at a record 1.5 per cent of total ex- Scotia Economics. penditures, twice as much as Canadians spent at the beginning of the 1990s. "This back-to-school buying season will not go in the record books," said Aron Gampel, deputy chief "It goes to show that Canadians do put a greater economist. "Although the recession's grip may be propensity in spending on education even if the lessening, the confidence-dampening drag of the times are not the best," said Gampel. sharp and deep contraction in overall activity over the past year is still working its way through the That's partly because they have to. Tuition fees, economy. which account for 73 per cent of education spend- ing, have soared as governments cut funding. Un- "Canadians households are likely to remain cau- dergraduate fees have climbed to an average of tious spenders until the recovery broadens, improv- $4,724 a year from $1,164 in the early 1990s, says ing business confidence triggers a revival in job the Canadian Federation of Students. hiring, and debt burdens become more manage-
  • Ottawa Citizen September 10, 2009 Thursday 
Final Edition CITY; Pg. C3 Age restriction on student transit pass nixed by council Patrick Dare, tion was "bordering on discrimi- days are older, but that they have The Ottawa Citizen nation" and council needed to fix the same tight budgets as young it. students. Ottawa city council unanimously voted to reverse its policy on age Bay Councillor Alex Cullen said She said a great number of stu- limits for student transit passes the age policy was based on an dents weren't aware of the age- on Wednesday. outdated understanding of the limit policy until recently and student population. He said stu- became very upset when they did With council chamber packed dents, especially those pursuing hear about it. with university and college stu- post-graduate degrees such as dents, councillors decided to end PhDs, are often older than 27, All 24 council members voted to a policy that limits student bus don't generate much income and reverse the policy. passes to people aged 27 and often carry considerable debt. younger. The Canadian Federation of Stu- Orléans Councillor Bob Monette dents estimates there are 70,000 Councillors said the age restric- said there were many people college and university students in tion was part of a hasty budget going back to school after losing the Ottawa region. Lifting the decision reached in December their jobs, and that the least the age restriction is expected to cost when they voted for the policy city could do was to treat all stu- the city $220,000. 19-5. dents the same way, giving them a small break on transit. Full-time students 28 and older Rideau-Vanier Councillor may buy the student passes im- Georges Bédard, whose ward Mary Renaud, a 31-year-old stu- mediately. As well, they can get includes the University of Ot- dent at Carleton University, said a partial refund at OC Transpo tawa, said council's budget deci- the $250 older students would ticket offices, either this month sion was "a huge mistake" based save each year could be used to or next month, for the full-price on incorrect information about pay for books or phone bills. adult passes they bought. Those what other Canadian cities do. students should bring proof of Gloucester-Southgate Councillor She said many new students at full-time enrolment in a college Diane Deans said the age restric- colleges and universities these or university.
  • Marketwire September 10, 2009 Thursday TORONTO, ONTARIO; Sep 10, 2009 Money Tool for School Helps Take Pain Away From Po t s - Secondary Gain;
 Calculator helps students across the cou y r t n to manage tuition costs and expenses An innovative online tool de- standing of what the total stu- signed to help students estimate According to the Canadian Fed- dent debt level might be and the cost and payment options eration of Students, the average offers suggestions on how to for post-secondary education debt load for undergraduate uni- pay it back - before it becomes has been launched by the Inves- versity students in 2006, among an issue. Confronting debt is tor Education Fund those who had debt (59%), was the first step to putting plans in (www.investorED.ca). The new $24,047. Student loans owed to place to address it." University Cost and Debt Cal- the federal government increases culator by $1.2 million each day and more With the addition of the Uni- (http://www.investored.ca/tools- than 350,000 students required versity Cost and Debt Calcula- and-calculators/university-cost- assistance with post-secondary tor, the Investor Education and-debt-calculator/university- education costs in the last school Fund is helping to fill the gap cost-and-debt-calculator.html) year alone. in financial literacy education approximates the annual total in Canada by focusing on the tuition costs for universities In additional to tuition fees, the personal financial needs of across Canada and helps stu- University Cost and Debt Calcula- today's youth. The University dents plan for the long-term tor approximates costs associated Cost and Debt Calculator implications of debt. with room and board, books, en- complements a variety of other tertainment, transportation and tools available that include the "Tuition fees are just the tip of more. The tool also provides an Funny Money high school as- the iceberg when it comes to the idea of what it takes to pay for this sembly program, and a new full cost of higher education," education whether through part online cartoon series that in- says Tom Hamza, president of time employment, bursaries or troduces youth to the chal- Investor Education Fund. "The scholarships, or cutting back on lenges of money management. University Cost and Debt Cal- budgets. It provides tuition costs Investor Education Fund is culator helps students and par- for universities across Canada. also conducting research to ents better understand the finan- better understand the level of cial commitment and resources "Students are finishing university financial skill of high school needed to cover those costs, and with overwhelming debts," adds students and their opinions on start to develop a plan to deal Hamza. "This tool gives students financial education. with this commitment." and parents a high-level under-
  • Canadian Corporate Newswire September 10, 2009 Thursday Money Tool for School Helps Take Pain Away From Post-Secondary Gain Calculator helps students across the country to manage tuition costs and expenses In additional to tuition fees, the University Cost and Debt Calculator approximates costs associ- TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwire - Sept. ated with room and board, books, entertainment, 10, 2009) - An innovative online tool designed to transportation and more. The tool also provides help students estimate the cost and payment op- an idea of what it takes to pay for this education tions for post-secondary education has been whether through part time employment, bursaries launched by the Investor Education Fund or scholarships, or cutting back on budgets. It (www.investorED.ca). The new University Cost provides tuition costs for universities across Can- and Debt Calculator ada. (http://www.investored.ca/tools-and- calculators/university-cost-and-debt-cal cula- "Students are finishing university with tor/university-cost-and-debt-calculator.html) overwhelming debts," adds Hamza. "This tool approximates the annual total tuition costs for gives students and parents a high-level universities across Canada and helps students understanding of what the total student debt level plan for the long-term implications of debt. might be and offers suggestions on how to pay it back - before it becomes an issue. Confronting "Tuition fees are just the tip of the iceberg when debt is the first step to putting plans in place to it comes to the full cost of higher education," address it." says Tom Hamza, president of Investor Educa- With the addition of the University Cost and tion Fund. "The University Cost and Debt Calcu- Debt Calculator, the Investor Education Fund is lator helps students and parents better understand helping to fill the gap in financial literacy educa- the financial commitment and resources needed tion in Canada by focusing on the personal fi- to cover those costs, and start to develop a plan nancial needs of today's youth. The University to deal with this commitment." Cost and Debt Calculator complements a variety of other tools available that include the Funny According to the Canadian Federation of Stu- Money high school assembly program, and a dents, the average debt load for undergraduate new online cartoon series that introduces youth university students in 2006, among those who to the challenges of money management. Inves- had debt (59%), was $24,047. Student loans tor Education Fund is also conducting research owed to the federal government increases by to better understand the level of financial skill of $1.2 million each day and more than 350,000 high school students and their opinions on finan- students required assistance with post-secondary cial education. education costs in the last school year alone.
  • Canwest News Service September 11, 2009 Friday Tiffany Crawford Copyright consultations wrap up Sunday OTTAWA - Canadians who last year, members of the want to weigh in on Canada's Giroux-Bougard said students entertainment industry lauded copyright laws - on topics complained to the federation it for cracking down on file- ranging from file-sharing to after the legislation was first swapping, while critics ar- using published work on the introduced last year. It died gued the laws would prevent Internet - have until Sunday when a federal election was Canadians from sharing their to submit their ideas, as the called. music or video files online federal government is set this with friends or family. fall to re-introduce amend- "There is concern after the ments to the Copyright Act. last bill that it was similar to In July, the federal govern- the copyright legislation in ment announced it would The Canadian Federation of the States,'' said Giroux- begin nationwide consulta- Students on Friday submitted Bougard. "There, professors tions with Canadians to get its concerns about maintain- and students have to pay for feedback on copyright laws. ing free access to the copy- material online and it can get righted works of others on really expensive. And there is The consultations are running the Internet. the general fear of being pun- until Sept. 13 and include a ished if the owner of the ma- number of different avenues "Students need legislation terial deems it was used in- for Canadians to participate, that protects the works they appropriately when the stu- including an online discus- create, guarantees access to dent thinks it was appropri- sion forum as well as a sub- information and is flexible ate.'' mission centre for posting enough for the rapidly chang- detailed submissions. ing digital environment,'' said The federation made six rec- Katherine Giroux-Bougard, ommendations to the Copy- A number of round tables chairwoman of the Canadian right Policy Branch, includ- were also held across Canada Federation of Students. ing making sure there is fair to canvass the views of ex- access to copyrighted mate- perts and organizations on the She said while the proposed rial on the Internet. kinds of amendments needed. legislation may have some effect on commercial piracy, Industry Minister Tony Canadians who want to par- it can also restrict such lawful Clement plans to table a new ticipate in the copyright con- activity as fair dealing, or the bill this fall after the series of sultations can visit ability to use archived works consultations with Canadians www.copyrightconsultation.c to create something new, wraps up. a until Sunday. such as a research paper or art project. When the bill was proposed
  • Edmonton Journal September 12, 2009 Saturday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A11 Copyright law deadline Sunday Canadians urged to give input before amendments made Tiffany Crawford, ability to use archived works to create something Canwest News Service new, such as a research paper or art project. OTTAWA Industry Minister Tony Clement plans to table a Canadians who want to weigh in on Canada's copy- new bill this fall after the series of consultations right laws--on topics ranging from file-sharing to with Canadians wraps up. using published work on the Internet --have until Sunday to submit their ideas, as the federal gov- When the bill was proposed last year, members of ernment is set this fall to re-introduce amendments the entertainment industry lauded it for cracking to the Copyright Act. down on file-swapping, while critics argued the laws would prevent Canadians from sharing their The Canadian Federation of Students on Friday music or video files online with friends or family. submitted its concerns about maintaining free ac- cess to the copyrighted works of others on the In- In July, the federal government announced it would ternet. begin nationwide consultations with Canadians to get feedback on copyright laws. "Students need legislation that protects the works they create, guarantees access to information and is The consultations are running until Sept. 13 and flexible enough for the rapidly changing digital include a number of different avenues for Canadi- environment," said Katherine Giroux-Bougard, ans to participate, including an online discussion chairwoman of the Canadian Federation of Stu- forum, as well as a submission centre for posting dents. detailed submissions. She said while the proposed legislation may have Canadians who want to participate in the consulta- some effect on commercial piracy, it can also re- tions can visit www.copyrightconsultation.ca. strict such lawful activity as fair dealing, or the
  • Broadcast News September 12, 2009 Saturday WESTERN GENERAL NEWS Tuition-Fees KAMLOOPS, B.C. - The chairman of the B.C. porate taxes should help subsidize public education, branch of the Canadian Federation of students says not the other way around. he's alarmed by new figures released by the provin- cial government regarding tuition fees. The figures come from the government's three-year financial plan, which Reid says project annual in- Shamus Reid says the figures show that in 2011, flationary increases to tuition fees while corporate the B.C. government will collect $1.11 billion in income taxes remain stable. tuition-fee revenue, compared with $1.04 billion in corporate income taxes. Reid says it's another indication of how public serv- ices are being transformed into essentially user-pay Reid calls the figures astounding and believes cor- systems.
  • The Vancouver Province September 16, 2009 Wednesday 
Final C Edition NEWS; Pg. A10 University prez fired after one year But dismissed leader will get $263,750 in severance, sabbatical Suzanne Fournier, finishing four-year undergradu- communication" at the Univer- The Province ate degrees with an average of sity of Calgary, who was hired as $32,000 in accumulated debt and TRU president in September The president of Thompson Riv- student loans. 2008 after an extensive search. ers University has been fired after just one year in the job -- Martha Piper, president of the "We felt a lack of confidence in but will get a contractual "golden University of B.C. from 1997 to her leadership skills and in her parachute" that will pay her al- 2006, earned $350,000 per year judgment," said Olynyk. most $40,000 more next year plus incentives of up to $50,000 than if she'd stayed on as presi- per year, but earned widespread Olynyk denied that Scherf's out- dent. criticism for her "golden para- going personality had anything chute," a $700,000 farewell to do with her dismissal. "It was- Dr. Kathleen Scherf, an uncon- package. n't her style, it was substance," ventional administrator known to he insisted. "We knew she had an sport coloured streaks in her hair And last year an investigation by exuberant style, very different and address students as "dudes," the Hamilton Spectator showed from the previous president." will pocket $263,750 next year -- that 17 Ontario university presi- $168,750 in severance pay and dents picked up an average Roger Barnsley, the TRU presi- another $95,000 on a paid sab- minimum payout of $500,000 at dent Scherf replaced, will return batical -- which tops the the end of their terms, for a com- to his old job until another presi- $225,000 annual salary she got bined total of almost $8 million. dent is found. as president. Ron Olynyk, a Kamloops ac- Scherf said she was "surprised" Canadian Federation of Students countant who is chairman of by her firing, in a statement she chairman Shamus Reid slammed TRU's board of governors, con- faxed Tuesday to a Kamloops the "golden parachute" given firmed that Scherf has been newspaper, but added she ac- Scherf "at a time when students "dismissed" and will receive nine cepts that the TRU board "has are paying ever-higher tuition months' salary as severance pay, the right to terminate without just fees and B.C. has frozen funding even though she was only presi- cause." to universities for the next three dent for a year. years. Scherf, who didn't return calls Olynyk said Scherf is then enti- from The Province, said the fax "Students are paying more and tled to a year's paid sabbatical at will stand as her only public getting less. A freeze in funding $95,000 in "transition" to a new comment. in the face of rising costs means tenured job. severe cutbacks," he said. She cited her "successes" as "I can't comment on whether it's president, including a "sweeping "We're seeing right across the a good use of education dollars, restructuring and alignment pro- country a substantial increase in but we have to honour her con- ject," a record-breaking United the compensation and severance tract," said Olynyk. Way campaign and a "342-per- packages for top-tier university cent increase in fundraising ac- executives," said Reid, who Olynyk refused to give any rea- tivities" from the previous year. notes Statistics Canada has re- sons for the dismissal of Scherf, ported that Canadian students are a former dean of "culture and
  • The Muse September 14, 2009 Thursday Slim pickings: Students face off-campus, on-campus housing shortage by Kerri Breen here.” He even knows of some students who are staying in hotels and tents while looking for a Students are struggling to find places to stay as suitable place. On campus, the waitlist to get into the city endures a housing shortage and Paton student housing has 200 students. Harvey, who is College deals with a long waiting list. Andrew a member of the Affordable Housing Coalition, Harvey, who works for MUN’s Off-Campus points to the city’s expanding population and Housing office, says this is probably the worst increasing house prices as partial causes of the housing shortage since the great fire of 1892 shortage. He says while there have been plenty destroyed much of the city. In April, St. John’s of new housing developments in recent years, housing vacancy rate was 2.2 per cent. Harvey condos, subdivision sprawl, and a gentrified says anything below three per cent is considered downtown aren’t of use to students. “They don’t a shortage. He estimates the percentage to be always have the option of moving out in South- much lower than it was now. “If I had to guess it lands or Mount Pearl,” he said. Daniel Smith, would be under one per cent for sure,” he said. N.L. chairperson for the Canadian Federation of His office helps students find appropriate rental Students, calls the shortage a major concern for housing off campus. Its website has apartment students and their families. He says the social listings. All of the places listed are visited by safety net must be enhanced as the province Off-Campus Housing to make sure they meet faces prosperity and challenges associated with basic standards. The office is hosting an off that growth. “We’ve seen housing and apartment campus housing fair on Sept. 10 at the Landing rental prices skyrocket in urban areas over the to connect students with potential landlords and past three years,” said Smith. “It’s critical that as to teach students their rights under the province’s our economy grows, we develop legislation and Residential Tenancies Act. With students return- policies designed to ensure that nobody gets left ing to campus, this is normally Harvey’s busiest behind. Affordable student and public housing time of year, but this year is a little different. strategies need to be prioritized before the prob- “This is the third fall now that I’ve been doing lem gets completely out of control.” this job and it’s absolutely the worst I’ve seen
  • The Vancouver Province September 16, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A3 Nine months severance plus a year of paid sabbatical Dr. Kathleen Scherf on job a year Suzanne Fournier, Martha Piper, president of the her leadership skills and in her The Province University of B.C. from 1997 to judgement," said Olynyk. 2006, earned $350,000 per year The president of Thompson Rivers plus incentives of up to $50,000 Olynyk denied that Scherf's outgo- University has been fired after just per year, but earned widespread ing personality had anything to do one year in the job -- but will get a criticism for her "golden para- with her dismissal. contractual "golden parachute" that chute," a $700,000 farewell pack- will pay her almost $40,000 more age. "It wasn't her style, it was sub- next year than if she'd stayed on as stance," he insisted. "We knew she president. And last year, an investigation by had an exuberant style, very dif- the Hamilton Spectator showed ferent from the previous presi- Dr. Kathleen Scherf, an unconven- that 17 Ontario university presi- dent." tional administrator known to sport dents picked up an average mini- coloured streaks in her hair and mum payout of $500,000 at the Roger Barnsley, the TRU president address students as "dudes," will end of their terms, for a combined Scherf replaced, will return to his pocket $263,750 next year -- total of almost $8 million. old job until another president is $168,750 in severance pay and found. another $95,000 on a paid sabbati- Ron Olynyk, a Kamloops account- cal -- which tops the $225,000 ant who is chair of TRU's board of Scherf said she was "surprised" by annual salary she got as president. governors, confirmed that Scherf her firing, in a statement she faxed has been "dismissed" and will re- yesterday to a Kamloops newspa- Canadian Federation of Students ceive nine months' salary as sever- per, but added she accepts that the chair Shamus Reid slammed the ance pay, even though she was TRU board "has the right to termi- "golden parachute" given Scherf only president for a year. nate without just cause." "at a time when students are pay- ing ever-higher tuition fees and Olynyk said Scherf is then entitled Scherf, who did not return calls B.C. has frozen funding to univer- to a year's paid sabbatical at from The Province, said the fax sities for the next three years. $95,000 in "transition" to a new will stand as her only public com- tenured job. ment. "Students are paying more and getting less. A freeze in funding in "I can't comment on whether it's a She cited her "successes" as presi- the face of rising costs means se- good use of education dollars, but dent, including a "sweeping re- vere cutbacks," he said. we have to honour her contract," structuring and alignment project," said Olynyk. a record-breaking United Way "We're seeing right across the campaign and a "342-per-cent country a substantial increase in Olynyk refused to give any reasons increase in fundraising activities" the compensation and severance for the dismissal of Scherf, a for- from the previous year. packages for top-tier university mer dean of "culture and commu- executives," said Reid, who notes nication" at the University of Cal- The restructuring affected some Statistics Canada has reported that gary, who was hired as TRU presi- administration jobs but didn't re- Canadian students are finishing dent in September 2008 after an sult in any program cuts. four-year undergraduate degrees extensive search. with an average of $32,000 in ac- sfournier@theprovince.com cumulated debt and student loans. "We felt a lack of confidence in
  • CBC News September 17, 2009 Thursday New CMHR head takes heat over human rights record Vote years ago comes back to haunt him rights are the rights that are protected by the Ca- Just two days after being publicly appointed the nadian Charter for Human Rights," Crowe said. first CEO of the Canadian Museum for Human In a statement Thursday, Ottawa's heritage de- Rights, Stuart Murray is coming under fire from partment — the agency that hired Murray — said Winnipeg's gay community for his record on the 54-year-old was appointed to head up the same-sex issues. CMHR based on his competence and qualifica- The criticism is based on the former Tory tions. leader's vote against a government bill allowing The department also said Murray has a proven same-sex adoption in the Manitoba legislature in track record and credentials that speak for them- 2002. selves. Jonny Sopotiuk, Manitoba chair of the Canadian Along with his six-year stint as Progressive Con- Federation of Students and a gay man, said servative leader from 2000-to 2006, Murray's Thursday he'd expect the head of a human rights resumé includes experience as a high-level organization to have a spotless record when it player in a number of philanthropic and com- comes to advocating for equality and fundamen- mercial interests, including his most recent job as tal freedoms for all people. CEO of the St. Boniface Hospital and Research "The CEO of a human rights museum should Foundation. have a very strong record working on human However, nothing in his resumé suggests he has rights issues. They should be a community advo- prior experience working for a human-rights cate. They should have experience working on agency. human rights issues," Sopotiuk said. Sopotiuk said he's concerned the gay community Murray said at the time his vote didn't represent will be marginalized by the CMHR. his personal views, and that he was voting along "There's gay people in countries across the world with his party and the views of his constituents. that are being executed. They're being stoned to Roewan Crowe, professor of women's and gen- death. They're being hanged," Sopotiuk said. der studies at the University of Winnipeg, told Currently under construction, the CMHR is CBC News same-sex rights are the same as hu- slated to open in 2012 at the Forks Market in man rights. She rejected Murray's explanation. Winnipeg. Jonny Sopotiuk questions the appointment of Stuart CBC spoke with Stuart Murray Thursday, he Murray as CEO of the Canadian Museum for Human said he is committed to reflecting human rights Rights. "It's not a good enough excuse for me. What I issues that affect the gay community in the mu- would like from Mr. Murray is for him to make a seum and wants to meet with people in the public declaration saying that for him, human community to talk about it.
  • Winnipeg Free Press September 18, 2009 Friday Same sex lobby meeting with Human Rights Museum CEO Murray's stand on gay rights raises concerns all the issues that are part of what is going to Linda Nguyen, Canwest News Service make the museum so special," he said. "It's about A national gay and lesbian advocacy group said advancing human rights, so my commitment is to Friday it will meet with former Manitoba Tory work with them, absolutely, 100 per cent." leader Stuart Murray, pictured, to talk about his Murray was the Progressive Conservative leader recent appointment as CEO of the Canadian Mu- in Manitoba from 2001 to 2006, and has run his seum for Human Rights. In 2002, as Conserva- own business, fundraised for a health facility and tive Leader, Murray voted down an NDP bill chaired a number of arts and sports initiatives. allowing for same-sex couples the right to adopt "I'm passionate about this province, I'm passion- despite claims in the media that he was going to ate about this project and I'm as deeply as pas- vote for the bill. sionate recognizing that there will be some who A national gay and lesbian advocacy group said will have questions," he said. "I believe very Friday it will meet with former Manitoba Tory strongly that I've been put in this job for the right leader Stuart Murray to talk about his recent ap- reasons." pointment as CEO of the Canadian Museum for But Jonny Sopotiuk, a gay man and the Mani- Human Rights. toba chairperson for the Canadian Federation of "When we heard about Stuart Murray's appoint- Students, said he hopes Murray will continue ment, we were taken aback," said Helen Ken- reaching out to the gay and lesbian community. nedy, a spokeswoman for Equality for Gays and "I think it's so important to educate society and Lesbians Everywhere. "It is discouraging on one our youth about some of the atrocities that hu- hand and encouraging on the other hand. We're mankind has created and faced," he said. "I think cautiously optimistic that we will be included." it's important we have the opportunity to have In 2002, as Conservative Leader, Murray voted these decisions and a national museum must in- down an NDP bill allowing for same-sex couples clude all groups, all communities, including the right to adopt despite claims in the media that ours, who have faced these human rights he was going to vote for the bill. abuses." He said Friday that at the time, he was following The museum's mission is to "enhance the public's the wishes of his caucus and his constituents. understanding of human rights, promote respect "The fact of life is that history is history. I'm not for others, and encourage reflection and dialogue a history revisionist," said Murray. "There was a on various human rights issues." discussion . . . that was the sense of how to deal The late Israel Asper first raised the idea of a with things at the time. My personal feelings human rights museum in Winnipeg more than may have been different." five years ago, shortly before he died. His daugh- He said he was looking forward to meeting with ter, Gail Asper, picked up the torch. the gay and lesbian community. Construction is under way on the Winnipeg- "When you deal with the issue of human rights, based museum — a Crown corporation — slated there's challenges, there's triumphs, there's all of to open in 2012. It will be Canada's fifth national the weaving together of all the complexities of museum.
  • The Gazette September 27, 2009 Sunday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A1 Hydro hike, CEGEP tuition fees on the table Liberal proposal Measures part of plan to balance budget by 2014 KEVIN DOUGHERTY troducing tolls on Quebec high- higher user fees. AND JASON MAGDER, ways and creating a new Caisse- The Gazette Santé fund to pay for health care. "I think we have to have the DRUMMONDVILLE courage to hold the debate," While the resolutions did not spell Bachand said. Delegates to a weekend meeting out timetables and the amounts of the ruling Quebec Liberal Quebecers can expect to pay, Uni- However, hiking hydro fees Party approved a proposal to versité de Sherbrooke economist will disproportionally hurt the raise electricity rates gradually Luc Godbout, speaking at the Lib- poorest segment of the popula- to market levels and another to eral meeting, projected that a 10- tion, said Richard Dagenais, an introduce "modest" tuition fees per-cent hike in hydro rates would analyst and economist with the for CEGEPs. net the government an extra $1.1 Quebec City-based Associa- billion a year and estimated the tion coopérative d'économie Quebec now boasts hydro rates Caisse-Santé would cost Quebec familiale. among the lowest in North taxpayers $600 million more a America, at 6.8 cents a kilowatt- year. He explained that people with hour, compared with 11.17 low incomes pay more out of cents in Toronto and 21.27 "It is doable," Godbout said, calling their incomes for electricity cents in New York. on the government as well to set a because they are the most reli- 2.8-per-cent cap on its spending ant on electricity for home And CEGEPs, unique to the increases. heating. province, are tuition-free. Sev- eral delegates objected that Quebec foresees a $3.9-billion defi- "The poorest people pay about CEGEPs should continue to be cit this fiscal year, rising to a 10 per cent of their incomes free, suggesting the "modest" $10.2-billion shortfall in 2013- toward electricity, while the start could soon lead to more 2014, when Charest has promised a richer part of the population substantial fees. return to balanced budgets. pays only about one per cent," Dagenais said. "Taking money The measures were part of a Godbout noted that spending in from the little guy will mean package of proposals backed by Quebec has been rising on average asking those who were hurt Finance Minister Raymond by 4.7 per cent in recent years, and worst to pay twice for the eco- Bachand that will define the said the 3.2-per-cent spending cap, nomic crisis." As for the pro- position of the government in a proposed by former finance minis- posal to hike CEGEP fees, the debate Premier Jean Charest has ter Monique Jérôme-Forget in her Canadian Federation of Stu- proposed on balancing Quebec's March budget, is too low. dents says that's a move that budget by 2013-2014. will actually hurt the economy. He said a 2.8-per-cent limit would Other resolutions, calling for an give the government $950 million "At a time when both Quebec increase in the excise tax on more a year, but it would mean and Canada are talking about alcohol and a new excise tax on service cuts. competing in a knowledge- junk food, will be considered based economy, measures such today. Bachand told about 500 delegates as increasing tuition fees are and observers to the weekend meet- counterproductive toward that Delegates will also vote on rein- ing they had to come to grips with goal," said Katherine Giroux-
  • Bougard, the national chairper- age financial services companies to Outside the convention centre, son for the federation. establish in Montreal. motorcycle owners demon- strated against plans by the Giroux-Bougard added that the But they balked at cutting aid to Société de l'assurance automo- CEGEP system does a good job CRIQ, the Centre de recherche bile du Québec to boost their of making post-secondary edu- industrielle du Québec, arguing that insurance premiums. cation accessible to practically CRIQ research and development anyone who qualifies. "But this benefits small Quebec businesses Delegates to the meeting also proposal adds financial barriers that lack the resources to do major chose Marc Tanquay as party at a time when post-secondary R&D themselves. president over Karine Joizel. education is basically required The position was vacated after for the work force." Delegates A proposal to outsource the man- Jean D'Amour was elected to also approved a resolution call- agement of government pensions the National Assembly in a ing for an end to subsidies for and other services was also de- June by-election. Montreal's International Finan- feated. cial Centre, created to encour-
  • The Uniter September 30, 2009 Wednesday Fair dealing or no fair dealing Copyright debate centres around for fair dealing are adequate pro- The consultations were due to what actually counts as in- tections for our business and the largely negative reaction to fringement others.” Bill C-61, tabled in Parliament The problem is copyright means last fall. The bill was controver- Ethan Cabel and Mathew Rygiel virtually nothing in a digitized sial because it allowed certain world where the spread of infor- leniency for downloaders, but Changes to Canada’s copyright mation is more fluid and copy- imposed harsh fines for the cir- law could make it harder for stu- right holders require protection cumvention of a digital lock. dents to share information. from that world, said Wood. Many manufacturers place digi- (Photo: Crystal Staryk) Another voice emerging from the tal locks on copyright items. The consultations is calling for bill was criticized for favouring As consultations on updated broadening fair dealing to in- copyright owners by granting copyright law end, the future of clude more provisions regarding them immunity to implement consumer access to movies, mu- digitization. such locks. sic, television and other media is “Unlike the U.S., which treats A distinction could be made be- now in the hands of the federal some of these activities as fair tween circumvention that in- government. use, we do not have the same fringes copyright and non- Sept. 13 marked the end of [copyright] coverage in Canada,” infringing circumvention. For nearly two months of nation- said Michael Geist, a copyright example, an infringing circum- wide consultations on how to law expert at the University of vention would be to pick a digi- update Canada’s copyright law. Ottawa. “It can change by adding tal lock with the intention to burn The key issue is whether Canada some flexibility to fair dealing.” and sell 1,000 copies of a CD. should broaden “fair dealing,” The law does not clearly spell Non-infringing circumvention the provisions that exempt cer- out what is and isn’t legal. There would be for research or study tain acts from copyright viola- are no provisions regarding for- purposes, said Geist. tion. mat shifting – the transfer of There are currently no such dis- Many are arguing for broadening copyright material from one tinctions in copyright law and no fair dealing to protect researchers software format to another – provisions covering circumven- and students from severe copy- which is a popular aspect of stu- tion, so the legality is up in the right charges. Others see copy- dent research. air. right as a necessity that shouldn’t “[People] have to have the ability “Everything from buying a CD be changed. as users and students to make and burning it onto your iPod or “We don’t advocate for the copies to distribute, whether it’s downloading something off the broadening of fair dealing, pe- for research or private study, Internet and sending it to your riod,” said Carolyn Wood, ex- news reporting or archiving,” friends, having a back-up file on ecutive director of the Associa- said Sid Rashid, a Winnipeg rep- your computer at home – that tion of Canadian Publishers. “We resentative from the Canadian would be copyright infringement think that the parameters in place Federation of Students. [under C-61],” said Rashid
  • University Affairs October 2009 Pg. 27 Vol. 50 No. 8 ISSN: 0041-9257 New financial assistance measures to help cash-strapped students Taylor-Vaisey, Nick amount that she says is "basically arship Foundation, the precursor unheard of." to the new grant program, is Canada Student Loans Program winding down this year. There expects to dole out over $500 "Unfortunately, there is no quick are transition grants available for million in new grants fix for students. I think students Millennium scholars that will are doing their best to find sum- allow those students to "continue As the student unemployment mer work, but they're often the to receive the same level of grant rate rises in Canada, so too does most vulnerable in the job mar- funding for the remainder of the number of student loan appli- ket," she said. their current postsecondary pro- cations. Some students didn't gram," said Ms. Glover. even wait until they were en- Barbara Glover, director of the rolled in the fall semester to ask Canada Student Loans Program, The Canadian Federation of Stu- for financial help. said she understands that some dents said more could be done to students are worried about their help students fund their educa- "They can't even make rent for financial situation. However, tion, but they also applauded the the May to August period, so improvements in federal finan- new grants as a step in the right they are knocking on our door" cial assistance will help those direction. before the start of the fall term, struggling to pay for their educa- said Shelley Clayton, director of tion, she said. Ms. Glover responded that the financial aid at the University of CSLP is just one of several re- New Brunswick and a past presi- Among the new measures is a sources for Canadian students. dent of the Canadian Association national system of grants for "The array of programs and sup- of Student Financial Aid Admin- students that will serve low- and port that exist in Canada does a istrators. middle-income families, part- very good job of removing fi- time students, students with de- nancial barriers to access... and Ms. Clayton; who has worked in pendants, and students with per- the enhancements that are in student financial aid circles for manent disabilities. Ms. Glover place go a long way to remove 11 years, said this has been an said that she expects 245,000 financial barriers for students in unusual summer for UNB. She grants to be disbursed - about Canada," she said, while conced- said that although student de- 100,000 more than the previous ing that financial barriers do still mand for financial assistance has grant system - totaling more than discourage some potential stu- grown this year, the school's $500 million. dents. ability to provide bursaries has not. And because the summer job She stressed that there is no cap On Aug. 1, a number of changes market has dried up for many on the number of grants that will were made to federal loans - a students, they are forced to incur be approved, and every student new repayment assistance plan debt by taking out student loans. who qualifies for the Canada took effect that mandates that Student Grant Program will re- borrowers will never pay more Illustrating the tough times, Ca- ceive non-repayable assistance of than 20 percent of their family nadian Federation of Students up to $250 per month. She also income. Although repayment national chairperson Katherine emphasized that when students amounts are calculated based on Giroux-Bougard noted that at apply for loans, they are auto- the previous year's income, bor- Ryerson University, the student matically assessed for their eligi- rowers can be re-assessed if that union advertised five full-time bility to receive a grant. income changes. summer positions and received over 1,000 applications - an The Canada Millennium Schol- "[Students] should know that
  • there is a lot of flexibility to re- Mme Clayton, qui travaille dans environ 100 000 de plus que pré- spond to changing circum- le milieu de l'aide financière aux cédemment, pour une valeur to- stances," Ms. Glover said. étudiants depuis 11 ans, soutient tale de plus de 500 millions de que, cet été, la situation a été dollars. Last year, there was an increase inhabituelle à l'Université. Elle of four percent in student-loan précise que, malgré le fait que le Elle souligne qu'un nombre il- applications, which Ms. Glover nombre de demandes d'aide fi- limité de bourses seront approu- attributed largely to the deterio- nancière a augmenté cette année, vées; chaque étudiant admissible rating economy. Numbers for la capacité de l'établissement au PCPE recevra une aide non this year won't be available until d'offrir des bourses n'a pas aug- remboursable pouvant atteindre November. menté. Comme de nombreux 250 dollars par mois. Elle signale étudiants n'ont pas réussi à ob- aussi que chaque étudiant qui More information about the new tenir un emploi d'été, ils sont présente une demande de prêt measures introduced by the Can- forcés de s'endetter en deman- fait l'objet d'une évaluation pour ada Student Loans Program can dant un prêt d'études. établir s'il peut recevoir une be found at canlearn.ca. bourse. Pour illustrer combien les temps Ryerson University is increasing sont durs, Katherine Giroux- La Fondation canathenne des its financial assistance to help Bougard, présidente de la bourses d'études du millénaire, students cope with effects of the Fédération canathenne des étudi- précurseur du nouveau pro- recession. This summer, Ryer- antes et étudiants, explique que gramme de bourses, sera dissoute son's student council received l'association étudiante de l'Uni- cette année. Des bourses de tran- 1,000 applications for five tem- versité Ryerson a reçu plus de 1 sition seront offertes aux titu- porary jobs. 000 candidatures pour cinq laires d'une bourse de la Fonda- postes d'été à temps plein, une tion, qui " continueront de re- De nouvelles mesures pour les première selon elle : " Il n'existe cevoir le même niveau de fi- étudiants à court d'argent malheureusement pas de solution nancement jusqu'à la fin de leur miracle pour les étudiants. Je programme d'études postsecon- Le Programme canathen de prêts crois qu'ils font de leur mieux daires". aux étudiants prévoit accorder pour trouver un emploi d'été, plus de 500 millions de dollars mais ils sont souvent les tra- La Fédération canathenne des supplémentaires sous forme de vailleurs les plus vul-nérables du étudiantes et étudiants estiment bourses marché du travail." qu'on peut faire plus pour aider les étudiants à payer leurs études, par Nick Taylor-Vaisey Barbara Glover, directrice du mais ils voient d'un bon ceil les Programme canathen de prêts nouvelles bourses, qui constitu- À mesure que le taux de aux étudiants (PCPE), dit com- ent pour eux un pas dans la chômage augmente chez les étu- prendre les inquiétudes de cer- bonne direction. diants canathens, les demandes tains étudiants devant leur situa- de prêt se multiplient. Certains tion financière. Elle affirme Mme Glover répond que le d'entre eux n'ont même pas at- toutefois que les mesures PCPE n'est que l'une des res- tendu d'être inscrits pour fédérales d'aide financière aux sources offertes aux étudiants l'automne avant de demander de étudiants ont été bonifiées pour canathens. " L'éventail des pro- l'aide financière. aider ceux qui ont du mal à payer grammes et des mesures de leurs études. soutien accessibles au Canada "Ils n'arrivent pas à payer leur réussit très bien à aplanir les ob- loyer de mai à août. Alors ils Parmi celles-ci, il existe un stacles [...], et les améliorations cognent à notre porte avant le système pancanathen de bourses apportées font beaucoup à ce début du trimestre d'automne", d'études destinées aux familles à chapitre", fait-elle valoir. explique Shelley Clayton, direc- faible revenu ou à revenu moyen, trice de l'aide financière à l'Uni- aux étudiants à temps partiel, aux Le 1^sup er^ août, un certain versité du Nouveau-Brunswick et étudiants avec personnes à nombre de changements ont été ancienne présidente de l'Associa- charge et aux étudiants atteints apportés aux prêts fédéraux aux tion canathenne des responsables d'une incapacité permanente. étudiants, dont un nouveau ré- de l'aide financière aux étudiants. Mme Glover prévoit que 245 000 gime d'aide au remboursement bourses seront distribuées, soit qui prévoit que les emprunteurs
  • n'auront jamais à débourser une l'évolution de leur situation", d'information sur les nouvelles somme supérieure à 20 pour cent rappelle Mme Glover. mesures mises en place par le du revenu familial. Le rem- Programme canathen de prêts boursement est calculé en fonc- L'année dernière, les demandes aux étudiants, veuillez visiter le tion du revenu de l'année pré- de prêt ont augmenté de quatre cibletudes.ca. cédente, mais l'emprunteur peut pour cent, un phénomène que faire l'objet d'une révaluation si Mme Glover associe largement à "Les étudiants doivent savoir son revenu change. la détérioration de l'économie. qu'ils bénéficient d'un système Nous ne connaîtrons les données très souple qui tient compte de "Les étudiants doivent savoir de cette année qu'en novembre. l'évolution de leur situation." qu'ils bénéficient d'un système très souple qui tient compte de Pour obtenir un complément
  • Nouvelles Télé-Radio 4 octobre 2009 dimanche Des cérémonies ont eu lieu au pays pour honorer les autochtones disparues CP times et présumées victimes du tueur en série Rob- ert Pickton. Une des organisatrices de l'événement, HALIFAX - Des dizaines de cérémonies sacrées Gladys Radek, a affirmé qu'il était temps d'attirer ont eu lieu simultanément dans plusieurs villes du l'attention sur les femmes et non plus sur les procès pays, dont Montréal et Chibougameau, pour rendre et les meurtriers. hommage aux femmes autochtones disparues et assassinées. A Halifax, environ 60 personnes se sont réunies en cercle dans un centre de l'amitié Mi'kmaq et ont Cet événement vise à attirer l'attention sur ce que pratiqué un rituel de purification. Elles ont exhorté les organisateurs qualifient de "tragédie nationale". les représentants gouvernementaux et de la justice à Nommé les "vigiles Soeurs par l'esprit", il était or- résoudre les cas des femmes autochtones disparues ganisé pour la quatrième année consécutive par ou assassinées. l'Association des femmes autochtones du Canada (AFAC). L'organisatrice, Alana Lee, a affirmé que son groupe réclamait un plan d'action national qui re- Une vigile nationale a également eu lieu à Ottawa connaît la violence à laquelle font face les femmes et des cérémonies similaires se sont tenues dans autochtones "parce qu'elles sont autochtones". toutes les provinces canadiennes. Plusieurs organ- Selon elle, cela représente un problème trop impor- ismes, dont Amnistie internationale et la Fédération tant pour qu'il soit ignoré. canadienne des étudiantes et étudiants, y ont par- ticipé. L'AFAC affirme avoir recensé, au cours des trois dernières décennies, 520 dossiers de femmes as- A Vancouver, les organisateurs de la vigile ont sassinées ou disparues. érigé un immense panneau sur lequel ils ont affiché les photos d'une dizaine de victimes, dont des vic-
  • La Presse Canadienne 4 octobre 2009 dimanche CP Des cérémonies ont eu lieu au pays pour honorer les autochtones disparues HALIFAX - Des dizaines de organismes, dont Amnistie tion. Elles ont exhorté les cérémonies sacrées ont eu internationale et la Fédération représentants gouvernemen- lieu simultanément dans plu- canadienne des étudiantes et taux et de la justice à résou- sieurs villes du pays, dont étudiants, y ont participé. dre les cas des femmes Montréal et Chibougameau, autochtones disparues ou pour rendre hommage aux A Vancouver, les organi- assassinées. femmes autochtones dispa- sateurs de la vigile ont érigé rues et assassinées. un immense panneau sur le- L'organisatrice, Alana Lee, a quel ils ont affiché les photos affirmé que son groupe ré- Cet événement vise à attirer d'une dizaine de victimes, clamait un plan d'action na- l'attention sur ce que les or- dont des victimes et tional qui reconnaît la vio- ganisateurs qualifient de présumées victimes du tueur lence à laquelle font face les "tragédie nationale". Nommé en série Robert Pickton. Une femmes autochtones "parce les "vigiles Soeurs par des organisatrices de l'évé- qu'elles sont autochtones". l'esprit", il était organisé pour nement, Gladys Radek, a Selon elle, cela représente un la quatrième année consécu- affirmé qu'il était temps d'at- problème trop important pour tive par l'Association des tirer l'attention sur les qu'il soit ignoré. femmes autochtones du Can- femmes et non plus sur les ada (AFAC). procès et les meurtriers. L'AFAC affirme avoir re- censé, au cours des trois Une vigile nationale a égale- A Halifax, environ 60 per- dernières décennies, 520 dos- ment eu lieu à Ottawa et des sonnes se sont réunies en siers de femmes assassinées cérémonies similaires se sont cercle dans un centre de ou disparues. tenues dans toutes les prov- l'amitié Mi'kmaq et ont inces canadiennes. Plusieurs pratiqué un rituel de purifica-
  • Nouvelles Télé-Radio 5 octobre 2009 lundi Voici le bulletin de cinq heures CP réitérant sa confiance envers son chef. Des dizaines de cérémonies ((CONGRES-LIBERAUX)) sacrées ont eu lieu simul- ((AMIANTE- tanément hier dans plusieurs Michael Ignatieff entend nom- GOUVERNEMENT)) villes du pays, dont Montréal et mer un nouveau député pour Chibougameau, pour rendre combler le poste de lieutenant Devant la pression croissante des hommage aux femmes autoch- québécois laissé vacant par la scientifiques, le gouvernement tones disparues et assassinées. démission de Denis Coderre dans du Québec examinerait la possi- les prochains jours. bilité de revoir sa position dans Cet événement vise à attirer l'at- le dossier de l'amiante, d'ici la fin tention sur ce que les organi- Le chef libéral n'a pas encore de l'année, affirme La Presse sateurs qualifient de "tragédie révélé qui serait ce nouveau dans son édition d'aujourd'hui. nationale". Il était organisé pour représentant du chef dans la la quatrième année consécutive province, mais il a laissé enten- Les nombreux rapports négatifs par l'Association des femmes dre en marge du congrès de l'aile de l'Institut national de santé autochtones du Canada (AFAC). québécoise dans la Vieille capi- publique du Québec (INSPQ), la tale, hier, que ce lieutenant aurait lettre ouverte signée par une Une vigile nationale a également probablement moins de pouvoirs douzaine d'experts ainsi que la eu lieu à Ottawa, tandis que des qu'a pu en avoir M. Coderre. volte-face récente du Parti libéral cérémonies similaires se sont du Canada inciteraient en effet le tenues dans toutes les provinces Le nom qui circule pour remplir gouvernement Charest à réexam- canadiennes. Plusieurs organis- ces nouvelles fonctions est celui iner sa politique d'utilisation ac- mes, dont Amnistie internation- de l'ancien astronaute Marc crue de l'amiante chrysotile. ale et la Fédération canadienne Garneau, mais des députés tels des étudiantes et étudiants, y ont Pablo Rodriguez ou Alexandra Au cours du dernier mois, l'As- participé. Mendes pourraient aussi prendre sociation canadienne médicale le relais. s'est prononcée à 95 pour cent L'AFAC affirme avoir recensé, contre l'exportation et la produc- au cours des trois dernières En soirée, à l'émission de varié- tion d'amiante. décennies, 520 dossiers de tés "Tout le monde en parle", femmes assassinées ou Denis Coderre a expliqué qu'il ne ((AUTOCHTONES- disparues. regrettait pas sa décision, tout en DISPARUES))
  • Ryerson Free Press October 8, 2009, Wednesday Eliminating Racism at Ryerson “We’re going to hear about Galabuzi was another panel- felt when a professor’s ac- personal reflections filled list is the internal chair of tions towards a particular with pain, frustration and Ryerson’s own Anti-Racism student are clearly racially emotion,” said Ryerson Stu- Taskforce, an initiative that motivated. She talked about dents’ Union’s (RSU) vice- intends to produce a report the difficult process students president of education Liana that compiles the experiences must go through when trying Salvador to a room of some of racialised Ryerson stu- to raise issues with Discrimi- 70 students. Salvador set the dents, faculty and staff. nation and Harassment Pre- tone for Ryerson’s Taskforce vention Services and how on Campus Racism hearing The event was advertised by reporting racism that was and foreshadowed much of students’ unions but, accord- witnessed, rather than experi- the deputations made by stu- ing to Salvador, the event enced, is normally met with dents present. “These inci- advertisement was refused to inaction. dents are not unique to Ryer- be sent via Campus News so son” she said. that more students could at- The hearing was held in a tend. confidential and safe space, Hosted on a Thursday after- allowing for students to feel noon in Oakham House’s President of the Continuing comfortable to share their Thomas Lounge, the event Education Student Associa- experiences. was advertised as a way for tion of Ryerson (CESAR) students to share stories and Mohammad Ali Aumeer Many students identified that ideas for how to address ra- shared his own experiences much of the uncomfortable cism on campus. It was part of racism and how it affected climate felt by racialized stu- of a provincial campaign him as a student. “I lived in a dents comes from the fact launched by the Canadian small town, north of the city. that the student diversity at Federation of Students to I was violently jumped, Ryerson is not reflected in identify how racism affects called the n-word… that’s curriculum, or the teaching or students while studying at how life was in a small administrative staff of the college or university. town.” Aumeer reminded the university. room of the need for anti- The Taskforce is comprised racist work on campus to be For Jermaine Bagnall, presi- of nine people with varying inclusive of racialised stu- dent of the Ryerson Students’ experiences in anti-racism dents who grew up outside of Union, he was shocked that activism. For the Ryerson the diversity of Toronto as all the filmmakers who were hearing, two members of the they often experience racism not white were lumped into a Taskforce were on the panel: differently than students from section of his course that was Hildah Otieno, former On- the Greater Toronto Area. titled “New Voices” which tario National Executive Rep- was taught only once during resentative of the Canadian Many of the students who the semester. Federation of Students and a spoke at the hearing had Ryerson student, and Frances similar stories and offered a “Why aren’t these directors Henry, professor emeritus at combination of examples of grouped with other directors York University and aca- acute and systemic inci- of the same documentary film demic who has studied ra- dences of racism. One stu- genre?” asked Bagnall, who cism extensively. Ryerson dent talked about the help- is a Master’s student in the professor Grace-Edward lessness and frustration that is relatively new Documentary
  • Media program. “Why are we how to be fair and light of Many students complained of othering everyone?… When skin,” he professed to the unequal access to education, you’re only one of two Black panel. As a Black man in a exacerbated by high tuition people in the class, it’s just program where the number of fees. Several students pointed not cool, and nothing in the non-White students can be to increasing tuition fees and program has really changed,” counted on one hand, he student debt as a factor that he said. struggles with learning his- forced them to drop to part tory of dance that is inspired time or work more hours in a For Rodney Diverlus, RSU from classical European part-time job to be able to equity commissioner and dance and not reflective of survive. Dance student, he has experi- his own history. enced racism in his program One deputation was made and in his home, at Pitman The Taskforce on Campus that pointed to how racism Hall. “It’s one thing to face Racism has been holding and academic misconduct racism all day and go home. hearings since February 2009 charges are entwined. She It’s another to face it all the and organisers have said that said that racialised students time, like when you live on they hope to release the find- are overrepresented in cases campus,” he said. He added ings of the Taskforce in late of academic misconduct, and that he has seen a definite 2009. The Ryerson Taskforce often face panels of White increase in racist incidents in has a similar timeline, and is professors where they must residence. “Residence is planning to host several more argue their innocence. Num- mostly first-years and people events to engage students, bers that were tracked by coming from everywhere faculty and staff. Both have RSU of students in the nurs- [including] areas where it’s an online option for students ing department who were common to say racist slurs to make anonymous submis- charged under the Academic because they’re not taught sions if they’re unable to at- Code of Conduct. “Of the 42 that [it’s wrong]. tend a hearing. students charged from Janu- “These are just small exam- ary to November, 2008, 34 Aside from overt examples of ples of what happens in the were visible minority women racism, Diverlus has also real world,” said one student. and three were visible minor- experienced first-hand how Indeed, throughout the hear- ity men,” the woman said. racism is manifest in curric- ing, it was clear that existing ula and professors’ attitudes. inequalities in society are According to the definition Diverlus is taught that ballet either replicated within the provided by the Ontario Hu- dancers must be “fair and university or exacerbated by man Rights Commission, this light of skin,” and was once racist structures. is proof of systemic discrimi- told he was “too urban” in an nation, the woman said. evaluation. “I don’t know
  • Waterloo Region Record October 14, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL; Pg. A8 Students need aid Requests soar for student financial aid - Oct. 6 impact on grades because students have less time to focus on school. Students in university need financial aid now more than ever. Given the current economic recession Research shows that student debt has a serious im- and rising tuition costs, people may not be able to pact on academic success. A Canadian Federation afford to attend university without amassing sub- of Students study determined that as student debt stantial debt. rose from $1,000 to $10,000, the program comple- tion rate for students with loans decreased from 59 I'm a Grade 10 student at St. Mary's High School, per cent to just eight per cent. and in two years I will be applying to several uni- versities. Competition for grants and loans will be Reducing tuition fees and student debt should be stiff. The Oct. 6 article says applicants for grants our governments' top priority. I challenge my fel- and loans over the last year for University of Wa- low students to write local MPs and MPPs to voice terloo has risen 17 per cent, a concern for those of their opinion. us hoping to attend university in the coming years. Kelsey McCarthy If they don't get the financial aid they need, stu- Kitchener dents have to take jobs, but working part-time can
  • The Muse October 15, 2009 Thursday Bring on the debt October 15, 2009 by Cody sity at the higher end of the won in some provinces are Boyko and The Brock Press Canadian scale. under attack by those who (Brock University) would have students shoulder “During these hard times, more of the funding burden.” ST. CATHARINES, Ont. students and their families are (CUP) – As student unem- looking to the government for British Columbia deregulated ployment rates soar, univer- leadership,” said Giroux- tuition fees when the Gordon sity students are being forced Bougard. “Canada’s long- Campbell government into more debt to pay for the term financial health requires stepped in 2002, which has schooling they will inevitably a national strategy for post- resulted in hikes of up to 100 need. secondary education.” per cent. Both Ontario and Nova Scotia’s tuition deregu- “Students are stuck between a The CFS wants to see the lation also resulted in hikes. rock and a hard place,” said federal government introduce Katherine Giroux-Bougard, a Post-Secondary Education Rob Lanteigne, Brock Uni- the national chairperson of Act, mirroring the Canada versity Student Union vice- the Canadian Federation of Health Act, to govern tuition president of university af- Students (CFS). fees and the funding given to fairs, explains that the gov- the provinces for colleges and ernment could help students “With record high tuition fees universities. carry the financial burdens of and mortgage-sized debt post-secondary education in loads, students are deeply “This legislation should in- more ways than just remov- concerned about their future,” crease accountability and ing debt. said Giroux-Bougard. help establish long-term post- secondary education objec- “We would like the govern- She says that students carry a tives including reducing tui- ment to provide greater assis- debt load of an average of tion fees and increasing ac- tance to help students by in- $25,000 for a four year un- cessibility,” said Giroux- creasing the amount of aid dergraduate degree. Bougard. available,” he said. “This could take many forms, from Many Canadian university Giroux-Bougard doesn’t sug- increased targeted grants, to students are concerned, as gest that the government sub- one-time assistance meas- costs rose for incoming stu- sidize schooling as some ures, increasing loan maxi- dents at many schools this European countries have, but mums and more.” year. At Brock University, rather more regulation for the the average tuition costs are schools and what they do In addition to rising tuition now $5,000 for a regular with the money that they are fees, according to a recent eight-month term. For total provided with. poll by Stats Canada, univer- fees, Brock is rounding out at sity students experienced about $5,700 for the full time The CFS website states that their highest unemployment eight-month undergraduate “the hard-fought freezes and rate since 1977, at 16.4 per year, which puts the univer- reductions that have been cent. “With such a dismal summer job market, students
  • have not earned enough According to Lanteigne, the Lanteigne believes “it’s time money to pay their bills, program assumes that every for the government to take much less afford the rising student will be able to con- responsibility and provide costs of education,” said Lan- tribute $2,710 of their sum- greater assistance to help teigne. mer earnings towards their students endure the economic in-school expenses. “It does downturn.” Although there are places for so whether or not a student students to access funds, the actually had a job at all, or One of Lanteigne’s new stu- stresses involved can be quite whether the job also incurred dent-aimed initiatives is lob- tenuous as it forces students related expenses,” he said. bying to have OSAP remove to scrimp for every penny. OSAP then subtracts this “the required summer income One of these sources is On- amount of assumed contribu- contribution, [and by doing tario Student Assistance Pro- tion from a student's funding so] students would see their gram (OSAP), which was estimate. loan award increased by utilized by 226,476 students $2,710 if they were not em- last year. ployed over the summer.”
  • The Toronto Star October 17, 2009 Saturday CAREERS; Pg. B09 Decisions, decisions Young workers face a dilemma when it comes to setting out their strate- gic career plans Janis Foord Kirk, fcee.ca/studentdebt/index.html) which he operates alongside his Special to the Star records the relentless growth of current job. student debt in this country, Neil Fenton graduated from Ry- which now totals more than $13 In other ways, Fenton has been erson University last spring into billion. less strategic. He turned down a one of the toughest job markets job in his employer's graphic young people have faced in more Average debt per graduate varies design department, for example, than a decade. by province, but tends to be because it offered fewer hours, around $25,000: a burden that less pay and was, in his view, He opted for certainty rather than forces many to base early career "extremely basic." Yet the job risk, accepting a customer serv- decisions on salary rather than would have provided career- ice job with the company he had genuine interest and reject ca- related experience, helped build worked for part-time and during reer-related internships, volun- his portfolio and network of con- summers while in school. "I like teer work or lower paying jobs. tacts and allowed additional time to play it safe," says Fenton, 24. to develop his small business. Putting career aspirations on Playing it safe in the current job hold in a tight economic climate Strategic career planning, in market is probably a good idea, is prudent if you have a strategic other words, sometimes flies in says Nancy Schaefer, president plan to calculate and execute the face of traditional wisdom. of Youth Employment Services tactical moves over time to move The job paying the highest sal- (YES) in Toronto. toward your real dreams and ary, for example, is not always goals. the best move. "Twenty per cent of young peo- ple don't have a job now. And Clearly articulated goals are the "Without experience, it's not the economy has not recovered. bedrock of any strategic career realistic to start at a higher sal- We don't expect the employment plan. Once defined, every career ary. Be willing to sacrifice and rate to decline or new opportuni- decision you make can be as- compromise," advises Schaefer. ties to show up until 2011." sessed against these goals to en- "Act smart. Build your skills and sure that, in some way, it furthers portfolio. Reduce your student Fenton's secure employment has them. loan payments. Take a lower begun to chafe, however. "I am salary ... Learn how to survive on at a crossroad right now," he Fenton has a bachelor's degree in less. You can't have it all at once, says. "I make an okay entry-level fine arts/photography and wants but if you work hard and give it salary, but the work's not related to do "something in graphic de- time, you can have it both ways." at all to what I want to do ... The sign or web design that incorpo- only thing that keeps me going is rates my photography. I'd like to Youth Employment Services has it's helping me pay off my stu- be involved in sports content and free programs: www.yes.on.ca dent loans." media." Janis Foord Kirk: An electronic counter on the Ca- He has already made a strategic janis @survivability.net nadian Federation of Students move, setting up a small graphic website (www.cfs- design and web design business
  • The Canadian Press October 20, 2009 Tuesday CP Students: Ontario has highest post-secondary tuition fees in Canada TORONTO - The Canadian Federation of Stu- education. dents says Premier Dalton McGuinty should not be pleased to see Ontario taking the lead in one Melanson says McGuinty's track record on tui- category - the highest university tuition fees in tion fees is shameful, and notes that more than the country. A 2009 Statistics Canada report 80,000 students have signed postcards since the shows Ontario has surpassed Nova Scotia for the start of the school year to tell him just that. highest fees in Canada, with university tuition averaging $5,951 per student. College and university students from across On- tario will rally outside the legislature Nov. 5 to The report found undergraduate fees in Ontario protest high tuition fees. surpassed the national average by more than $1,000, while graduate tuition fees exceeded the ''Today, Ontario's students pay the highest fees in national average by $2,600. Canada, while studying in the largest classes,'' Melanson said in a release. Shelley Melanson of the students' federation says Nova Scotia put the brakes on fee increases and ''There is no question that Ontario's students are reduced tuitions while Ontario has continued to losing out.'' ''rocket ahead'' with tuition hikes. Universities in Ontario saw the largest increase Ontario students paid the fourth highest fees in in tuition in Canada, forcing more students to the country when McGuinty cancelled a tuition take on significant debt just to stay in school, fee freeze in 2006. said Dan Moulton of the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance. Since then, tuitions in the province increased between 20 and 36 per cent, which the students' ''We should be number one in quality, accessibil- federation says makes Ontario the most expen- ity, and affordability, not setting new records for sive place in Canada to get a post-secondary highest tuition,'' said Moulton.
  • Broadcast News October 20, 2009 Tuesday QUEBEC-ONTARIO REGIONAL NEWS Tuition-Increases TORONTO - The Canadian Federation of Stu- Shelley Melanson of the students' federation says dents says Premier Dalton McGuinty should not Nova Scotia put the brakes on fee increases and be pleased to see Ontario taking the lead in one reduced tuitions while Ontario has continued to category - the highest university tuition fees in ''rocket ahead'' with tuition hikes. the country. A 2009 Statistics Canada report shows Ontario has surpassed Nova Scotia for the Ontario students paid the fourth highest fees in highest fees in Canada, with university tuition the country when McGuinty cancelled a tuition averaging $5,951 per student. fee freeze in 2006. The report found undergraduate fees in Ontario Since then, tuitions in the province increased surpassed the national average by more than between 20 and 36 per cent, which the students' $1,000, while graduate tuition fees exceeded the federation says makes Ontario the most expen- national average by $2,600. sive place in Canada to get a post-secondary education.
  • Alberni Valley Times October 20, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition LOCAL; Pg. A3 NIC Students fight education 'debt sentence' Skyrocketing tuition fees, combined with lack of jobs putting post- secondary education out of reach or requiring massive loans Shayne Morrow, "When I started at NIC, tuition Alberni Valley Times "This is my second year at NIC. accounted for about 10% of the So far I've gone without taking total cost. Now it's about 30%," The B.C. chapter of the Canadian out a student loan, but my first Bowen said. Federation of Students is calling year I was upgrading," Fred said, on the province to ease the fi- adding that she is now a full-time It must be noted that Bowen is nancial burden on students. student taking college level not some greybeard bemoaning courses. "I am going to apply for the good old days. He's talking Fighting under the slogan "Edu- a student loan this week." about the last decade. And yes, cation shouldn't be a debt sen- back in the day, the province tence," CFS-B.C. is calling for a When Fred takes out that first used to provide student grants. reduction in tuition fees and the loan, she'll be paying the prime That was a welcome supplement elimination of interest on student borrowing rate plus three and a for those entering post-secondary loans, as well as increased core half per cent, Bowen said. That education. education funding and restora- really jacks up the total amount tion of the student grant pro- of money paid out over the term Students facing student loan gram. of the loan. debt, family or friends of same - in other words, just about every- On Monday at North Island Col- "We'd like to see it where student body - are invited to log onto lege, the Student Union orga- loans are at the rates govern- www.debtsentence.ca to check nizer James Bowen manned an ments borrow at," Bowen said. out how much those student information booth with a peti- loans are going to cost under the tion. Business was pretty brisk. Samara Marshall said she's been current policies. avoiding student loans, although "People are always receptive: she does have some student debt. "We think it will be enough to students, faculty and staff. They encourage people to speak up," can connect on the topic of stu- "I've been working to pay for my Bowen said. dent debt," Bowen said. classes. I didn't want to get into student loans for my first year," "Most of the students I talk to she said. "I'm just hoping to get have significant student debt. lots of work in December so I Even though the fees at NIC are can pay for my tuition in Janu- about as low as you'll find any- ary." where, over half of our students are accessing some form of stu- Bowen said one of the culprits in dent loan." the escalation of student debt has been the ratcheting-down of core Most students have to make a education funding. While gov- choice about whether they're ernment still pays the lion's share going to get into debt, and they of the cost for each individual, try to put it off as long as possi- that portion has still declined ble. Samantha Fred is just reach- significantly. ing that point.
  • Winnipeg Free Press October 21, 2009 Wednesday Pg. A.4 ISSN: 0828-1785 Student leader 'shocked' by tuition hike Minister says Manitoba fees are third lowest in country Rabson, Mia lower than most other provinces to freeze as they struggled to balance begin with. budgets without raising tuition and OTTAWA -- Manitoba universi- welcome the fee hike but said it ties were allowed to hike tuition She noted a 4.3 per cent increase would still not be enough to fund this fall for the first time in a dec- in Manitoba resulted in an actual budget shortfalls. ade and student leaders say new dollar increase of $139 per student statistics show they are making up on average. In neighbouring Sas- Last week, University of Manitoba for lost time. katchewan, the percentage increase president David Barnard said the was 3.4 per cent but the actual school was facing a $36.9-million According to data Statistics Can- dollar increase was $174. budget deficit for 2010-11. ada released Tuesday, Manitoba students saw an average increase "The actual cost to the student in Tory education critic Gerald in undergraduate tuition of 4.3 per Manitoba was still less," she noted. Hawranik said the tuition freeze cent for 2009/10, second only to "I want to assure you this province was "good politics but bad policy" Ontario's hike of five per cent. is committed to affordable, acces- and resulted in major deficiencies sible, quality education and we in the province's schools. Graduate student tuition went up always have been." an average of 4.5 per cent in Mani- He said the province needs to not toba, the third highest increase By dollar figure, Manitoba ranked only continue to allow tuition to behind British Columbia (5.9 per seventh in terms of the tuition in- rise at an appropriate rate, but to cent) and Ontario (4.7 per cent). crease by province. Newfoundland fund universities properly overall. and New Brunswick both had zero "Students are shocked," said change, and Nova Scotia tuition McGifford said no decision has Johnny Sopotiuk, Manitoba chair- actually dropped by $181, or -3.1 been made about what will happen man of the Canadian Federation of per cent. to tuition for 2010-11. Students. Until this fall, students in Mani- AVERAGE UNDERGRADUATE He said the report should compel toba had benefitted from a gov- TUITION new Premier Greg Selinger to ernment-mandated tuition freeze make reinstating the tuition freeze that kept students paying the same Average undergraduate tuition, by a priority. amount to attend university or province ($ increase over 2008/09, college in the province as they had percentage increase) "This would be a perfect opportu- since 1999. Newfoundland $2,619 ($0, 0) nity for our new premier," said Quebec $2,272 ($92, 4.2) Mani- Sopotiuk. But last spring, following a gov- toba $3,377 ($139, 4.3) ernment report recommending an PEI $4,710 ($180, 4.0) But Manitoba Advanced Education end to the decade-long freeze, British Columbia $4,840 ($94, 2.0) Minister Diane McGifford said the McGifford announced universities Saskatchewan $5,238 ($174, 3.4) numbers actually show Manitoba would be allowed to raise tuition New Brunswick $5,479 ($0, 0) students continue to pay the third up to 4.5 per cent per course. Col- Alberta $5,520 ($212, 4.0) lowest average tuition rates in the leges could hike tuition by $100. Nova Scotia $5,696 (-$181, -3.1) country. Plus, she noted, the per- Ontario $5,951 ($284, 5.0) centage increase is misleading Schools in Manitoba had long de- because our tuition is so much manded the province end the
  • Guelph Mercury October 20, 2009 Tuesday 
Final Edition Pg. 01 Students complain Ontario has highest post-secondary tuition fees in Canada TORONTO - The Canadian Federation of Stu- education. dents says Premier Dalton McGuinty should not be pleased to see Ontario taking the lead in one Melanson says McGuinty's track record on tui- category - the highest university tuition fees in tion fees is shameful, and notes that more than the country. A 2009 Statistics Canada report 80,000 students have signed postcards since the shows Ontario has surpassed Nova Scotia for the start of the school year to tell him just that. highest fees in Canada, with university tuition averaging $5,951 per student. College and university students from across On- tario will rally outside the legislature Nov. 5 to The report found undergraduate fees in Ontario protest high tuition fees. surpassed the national average by more than $1,000, while graduate tuition fees exceeded the "Today, Ontario's students pay the highest fees national average by $2,600. in Canada, while studying in the largest classes," Melanson said in a release. Shelley Melanson of the students' federation says Nova Scotia put the brakes on fee increases and "There is no question that Ontario's students are reduced tuitions while Ontario has continued to losing out." "rocket ahead" with tuition hikes. Universities in Ontario saw the largest increase Ontario students paid the fourth highest fees in in tuition in Canada, forcing more students to the country when McGuinty cancelled a tuition take on significant debt just to stay in school, fee freeze in 2006. said Dan Moulton of the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance. Since then, tuitions in the province increased between 20 and 36 per cent, which the students' "We should be number one in quality, accessibil- federation says makes Ontario the most expen- ity, and affordability, not setting new records for sive place in Canada to get a post-secondary highest tuition," said Moulton.
  • Waterloo Region Record October 21, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A4 High fees irk students The Canadian Press freeze in 2006. TORONTO Since then, tuition in the province increased be- The Canadian Federation of Students says Premier tween 20 and 36 per cent, which the students' fed- Dalton McGuinty should not be pleased to see On- eration says makes Ontario the most expensive tario taking the lead in one category - the highest province in Canada to get a post-secondary educa- university tuition fees in the country. A 2009 Statis- tion. tics Canada report shows Ontario has surpassed Nova Scotia for the highest fees in Canada, with Melanson says McGuinty's track record on tuition university tuition averaging $5,951 per student. fees is shameful, and notes that more than 80,000 students have signed postcards since the start of the The report found undergraduate fees in Ontario school year to tell him just that. surpassed the national average by more than $1,000, while graduate tuition fees exceeded the College and university students from across Ontario national average by $2,600. will rally outside the legislature Nov. 5 to protest high tuition fees. Shelley Melanson of the students' federation says Nova Scotia put the brakes on fee increases and "Today, Ontario's students pay the highest fees in reduced tuitions while Ontario has continued to Canada, while studying in the largest classes," "rocket ahead" with tuition hikes. Melanson said in a release. Ontario students paid the fourth highest fees in the "There is no question that Ontario's students are country when McGuinty cancelled a tuition fee losing out."
  • Times Colonist October 21, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition CAPITAL & VAN. ISL.; Pg. A5 Tuition up 2%, adding to students' 'debt sentence' Jeff Bell, Reid said the federation's B.C. dergraduate tuition in B.C. re- Times Colonist arm, which represents more than mains one of the most affordable 150,000 students across the prov- in the country. It's ranked at No. Pursuing a university or college ince, is launching a campaign 5." degree in B.C. is turning into a called Education Shouldn't Be A "debt sentence," says the B.C. Debt Sentence. The group wants Tracy Ho, a fourth-year business chairman of the Canadian Fed- to spur the government to take student at the University of Vic- eration of Students. action on reducing student debt toria and former president of the in time for the next provincial UVic Students' Society, said she Shamus Reid said at a news con- budget, five months from now. has accumulated a debt of ference in downtown Victoria $20,000 and is worried about her yesterday that a combination of The campaign lays out four ma- ability to pay it off after gradua- dropping financial aid and rising jor recommendations: tion. "In many ways, I am the tuition is making post-secondary average student in B.C.'s post- education less accessible in the - Progressive reduction of tuition secondary education system," province. The student group pegs fees to 2001 levels. said Ho, 25. " I come from a the average student debt after a middle-income family, and I four-year post-secondary degree - Re-establishment of a provin- came to university through the at $27,000. "In the last couple of cial grants program. college-transfer system." years, we've really started to see substantial increases in our stu- - Elimination of interest on stu- She said financial considerations dent debt," Reid said. dent loans. and other factors have meant that her degree is taking seven years Yesterday's session coincided - Restoration of per-student to complete, rather than the usual with release of a Statistics Can- funding to 2001 levels. four. ada survey showing tuition in B.C. was up two per cent over Minister of Advanced Education Using the "debt calculator" on last year. Ontario had the highest Moira Stilwell countered that for the federation's website at tuition jump at five per cent, every dollar a student pays in debtsentence.ca, Ho worked out while Nova Scotia's dropped for tuition, the taxpayer pays $2. The that her ultimate debt will be the second year in a row. system has to balance what is a about $40,000, including five per fair investment for an individual, cent interest on student-loan re- Reid said the increase comes at a recognizing the benefits of edu- payments. This year's expenses tough time, with youth unem- cation, with what's fair for the include $3,500 for tuition, ployment skyrocketing and taxpaying public, she said. $1,500 for books and supplies, B.C.'s minimum wage becoming $3,000 a year for transportation the lowest in the country. Funding has gone up every year and $500 a month for living ex- since 2002, Stilwell said, and penses, though she lives at home. He said this province's tuition tuition increases for public post- increase over the past eight years secondary schools have been Ho said if the government im- has been the steepest in the coun- capped at two per cent. plements the federation's rec- try at more than 100 per cent -- ommendations, her debtload at from about $2,500 to $5,000 a Stilwell called the StatsCan sur- graduation would drop to about year on average. vey "good news." "What it $26,000. showed is that the average un-
  • Nanaimo Daily News October 21, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A3 Tuition hikes limit access Students hit by rising costs of school Price of studying at VIU has gone up 300% since '01: Student Robert Barron, cost for students attending post- to help students financially by The Daily News secondary institutions but noted increasing scholarships that are that enrolment at VIU has in- offered and creating more em- Steep tuition increases at Van- creased 8% since last year. ployment opportunities for stu- couver Island University are lim- dents on campus. iting access to post-secondary "There's always costs associated education, according to Steve with going to school but post- "We recognize the financial chal- Beasley, the school's student secondary education is a good lenges and struggles many of our union executive officer. investment that typically results students face and we're trying to in dramatically increased earning help them as much as we can," Beasley said tuition at VIU has potential for graduates, so most he said. jumped about 300% since 2001 are prepared to sacrifice to (from $1,200 to $3,800 this year achieve that," Jacklin said. TUITION COSTS for a full-time undergraduate student) after a six-year tuition Beasley said the cost of educa- THE AVERAGE TUITION AT freeze was lifted by the Liberal tion is increasingly placed on POST-SECONDARY INSTI- government. students "with each successive TUTIONS ACROSS CANADA: generation." According to a report by Statis- Canada $4,917 tics Canada, full-time students in He said in 1982, 80% of VIU's undergraduate programs faced a annual budget was covered with Nfld & Labrador $2,619 3.6% increase in tuition fees this provincial funding but that has year from last year. dropped to less than 50% and P.E.I. $4,710 universities and colleges are Undergraduate students on Ca- forced to increasingly turn to Nova Scotia $5,696 nadian campuses paid an average their students to cover the short- of $4,917 in tuition fees this fall. "Now, only those who are New Brunswick $5,479 year, compared with $4,747 the willing to pile up astronomical year before. debt loads are prepared to go to Quebec $2,272 post-secondary institutions, or Beasley said the "sharp increase" those who come from families Ontario $5,951 to students' costs is making post- with high incomes," Beasley secondary education less acces- said. Manitoba $3,377 sible for many in B.C. and some VIU students will take part in a "We're already beginning to see Saskatchewan $5,238 provincial campaign, launched in fewer students who come from Victoria Monday by the B.C. lower- and middle-class families Alberta $5,520 branch of the Canadian Federa- on our campuses and that will tion of Students, to reduce stu- have huge implications for our B.C. $4,840 dent debt. society and economy in coming years." Statistics Canada VIU registrar Fred Jacklin ac- knowledged there is an increased Jacklin said VIU is doing its best
  • Guelph Mercury October 21, 2009 Wednesday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A5 Tuition fees raise Ontario students' ire The Canadian Press Since then, tuition in the province increased be- TORONTO tween 20 and 36 per cent, which the students' fed- eration says makes Ontario the most expensive The Canadian Federation of Students says that place in Canada to get a post-secondary education. Premier Dalton McGuinty should not be pleased to see that Ontario has taken the lead in one category - Melanson says that McGuinty's track record on the highest university tuition fees in Canada. tuition fees is shameful, and notes that more than 80,000 students have signed postcards since the A 2009 Statistics Canada report shows that Ontario start of the school year to tell him just that. has surpassed Nova Scotia for the highest fees in Canada, with university tuition averaging $5,951 College and university students from across Ontario per student. will rally outside the legislature on Nov. 5 to pro- test the province's high tuition fees. The report found that undergraduate fees in Ontario surpassed the national average by more than "Today, Ontario's students pay the highest fees in $1,000, while graduate tuition fees exceeded the Canada, while studying in the largest classes," national average by $2,600. Melanson said. Shelley Melanson of the students' federation says "There is no question that Ontario's students are that Nova Scotia has put the brakes on fee increases losing out." and reduced tuition fees while Ontario has contin- ued to "rocket ahead" with tuition hikes. "We should be No. 1 in quality, accessibility, and affordability, not setting new records for the highest Ontario students paid the fourth highest fees in the tuition," said Dan Moulton of the Ontario Under- country when McGuinty decided to cancel a tuition graduate Student Alliance. fee freeze in 2006.
  • The Globe and Mail October 21, 2009 Wednesd NATIONAL NEWS; POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION; Pg. A10 Gap in tuition fees is growing StatsCan finds Undergrads in Ontario pay an average of $6,000 a year, twice what is charged in Nfld., Quebec students group seeks federal transfers ELIZABETH CHURCH in Newfoundland. Quebec has fordability. "We want to make EDUCATION REPORTER long had a two-tier tuition sys- sure there are not financial barri- tem, with lower rates for provin- ers to students entering pro- Tuition fees in Ontario are now cial residents. grams," he said. the highest in the country, with undergraduates paying just shy "Increasingly access is not so Ontario has one of the most gen- of $6,000 a year on average, much about ability as it is geog- erous student aid systems in the more than double the cost for raphy," said Katherine Giroux- country, he said, including a cap students who study in the most Bougard, national chairperson on annual debt levels, and its affordable jurisdictions - New- for the Canadian Federation of students have the lowest loan foundland and Quebec. Students. The group is calling for default rate. a national plan for postsecondary The growing gap in tuition costs education that includes federal This is the last year for Ontario's across the country is reflected in transfers earmarked specifically five-year Reaching Higher plan, new numbers from Statistics for higher education. which followed the recommen- Canada. While the average in- dations of a report by former crease for tuition this school year This year's fee increases come at premier Bob Rae. The province was the same as last, at 3.6 per a time when the Ontario gov- has established a special team to cent, that national number masks ernment is working on a new design a plan for the next five a disparity among provinces in plan for postsecondary educa- years. "Obviously we are looking their approaches to fees for post- tion, including new regulations at how tuition fits into our over- secondary education. for tuition to replace the rules all postsecondary education strat- that expire this year. While it is egy," Mr. Milloy said. At one end is Ontario, home to facing pressure from some uni- the largest proportion of Cana- versity leaders to raise the cap on Alex Usher, a Toronto-based dian undergraduates and univer- tuition increases, student groups higher education consultant, said sities, where tuition increases want fees cut, or at the very least given the current state of provin- have been capped at 5 per cent in pegged to inflation. cial budgets, it is unlikely that recent years. At the same time, governments will be able to in- other provinces have frozen fees The debate over tuition also crease spending on postsecon- or allowed them to rise more comes on the heels of a dismal dary education. Against this gradually. summer for student employment backdrop, he predicted more and when many schools are al- tuition increases are likely in the Nova Scotia, traditionally the ready facing budget shortfalls. coming years. "Somebody has to province with the highest tuition pay for it. The question is how levels, cut fees this year for its John Milloy, Ontario's Minister much comes from the public residents, in part in response to of Training, Colleges and Uni- purse," he said. public pressure and students who versities said yesterday any deci- were leaving the province for sion on tuition will look at the New numbers on tuition costs less costly undergraduate degrees broader issues of access and af- also were released yesterday in
  • the United States. Average tui- the non-profit group that owns state to state, with students in tion at four-year public colleges the SAT exams. At private col- jurisdictions such as California increased 6.5 per cent to $7,020 leges, average tuition rose 4.4 facing double-digit increases and (U.S.), according to an annual per cent to $26,273. Tuition in- others seeing no rise in costs. report from the College Board, creases varied drastically from
  • The Times & Transcript October 22, 2009 Thursday NEWS;NEWS; Pg. A9 Students want continued tuition freeze End of restrictions in other provinces has led to large increases GREG WESTON only province to see a decrease. fourth-highest tuition rates in TIMES & TRANSCRIPT Canada when it instituted a two- STAFF In Manitoba and Saskatchewan, year freeze. Since lifted, fees where fees were unfrozen this have increased by at least 4.5 per While university tuition levels year, tuition increased by 4.3 and cent each year, meaning it now remained the same in New 3.4 per cent, respectively. costs more than $1,000 a year Brunswick this year because of a more to go to university in that government-mandated freeze, While O'Kane says the govern- province than it did four years student groups say that lifting ment has taken many steps to ago. That increase outpaces the that cap will lead to huge fee help its students, such as the tui- national average by about five increases, as it has elsewhere in tion rebate and loan repayment per cent. Canada. assistance programs, he says that progress could be undone if fees Donald Arseneault, New Bruns- "All of New Brunswick has been are unfrozen next year. wick's minister of post-secondary under a tuition freeze, so our education, training and labour, numbers did not change," says To that end, the student union says the province's universities Jon O'Kane, president of the submitted a pre-budget plan to won't need to boost tuition rates University of New Brunswick the province that proposed a if the freeze is lifted, since the Fredericton Student Union. "It's fully funded tuition freeze for government increased its funding interesting to see a situation that four years. during the past two years. we may be in shortly; in prov- inces where a tuition freeze ex- "If we see the tuition freeze lifted "The first year of the tuition isted and was lifted, there were when the Dec. 1 budget is an- freeze, we put in $5.25 million. dramatic jumps in tuition." nounced, what's going to happen This past budget we put $6 mil- is the universities are going to lion for the second year of the The average tuition cost for a need to compensate for the year tuition freeze. There wouldn't be full-time undergraduate student where they didn't get an increase. a sharp increase in the tuition, in in New Brunswick for the 2009- the sense that they've been 10 academic year was $5,479, "We should, unfortunately, see a funded throughout the last two according to numbers released dramatic rise in tuition unless the years," he says. by Statistics Canada this week. provincial government puts in After being frozen for the second place some policies to protect the David Stewart, vice-president of consecutive year, the province students' costs." administration at Mount Allison dropped from the third to the University, agrees provincial fourth-most expensive in Can- Such funding was provided in funding during the freeze hasn't ada, behind Ontario, Nova Scotia the Saskatchewan budget in negatively affected the school's and Alberta. March. After a five- year freeze bottom line or its ability to de- ended, the provincial govern- liver a quality education. With an average tuition cost of ment increased funding to post- $5,951, five per cent higher than secondary institutions by $23.5 "They gave us what would have last year, Ontario became the million dollars in an effort to been the equivalent for us of a most expensive province in prevent large tuition hikes. five per cent tuition fee increase which to go to university this the year before this and a 4.4 per year, surpassing Nova Scotia, the In 2004, Ontario had only the cent increase for this year, so we
  • were compensated," he says, costs more predictable and af- has not yet decided whether the although he adds the province fordable. tuition freeze will be extended. did freeze the university's annual grant. She says maintaining the tuition "We're going through the budget freeze would be the province's process, so there's all sorts of But Katherine Giroux-Bougard best option to help more NBers things that can happen. We'll of the Canadian Federation of attain higher education. have an answer for that, at the Students says frozen fees are very latest, Dec. 1. " important to making education Arseneault says the government
  • Times Journal October 22, 2009 Thursday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 19 National Briefs TORONTO -- The Canadian Federation of age by $2,600. Students says Premier Dalton McGuinty should not be pleased to see Ontario taking the lead in Ontario students paid the fourth highest fees in one category -- the highest university tuition fees the country when McGuinty cancelled a tuition in the country. A 2009 Statistics Canada report fee freeze in 2006. shows Ontario has surpassed Nova Scotia for the highest fees in Canada, with university tuition Since then, tuitions in the province increased averaging $5,951 per student. The report found between 20 and 36 per cent, which the students' undergraduate fees in Ontario surpassed the na- federation says makes Ontario the most expen- tional average by more than $1,000, while sive place in Canada to get a post-secondary graduate tuition fees exceeded the national aver- education.
  • Kingston Whig-Standard October 22, 2009 Thursday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 11 Food bank use 'through the roof' MICHAEL PURVIS, more than $1,000, while graduate tuition fees ex- SUN MEDIA ceeded the national average by $2,600. Starving students at Algoma University in Sault Ontario students were paying the fourth-highest Ste. Marie are using the food bank as Ontario's tui- fees in the country when McGuinty cancelled a tion rates have become the highest in the country, tuition fee freeze in 2006. says the president of the school's student union. Since then, tuitions in the province increased be- The Canadian Federation of Students gave Premier tween 20 and 36%, which, the CFS says, makes Dalton McGuinty a dressing down this week, point- Ontario the most expensive place in Canada to get a ing to a 2009 Statistics Canada report that shows post-secondary education. Ontario has surpassed Nova Scotia in having the highest fees in Canada, with university tuition aver- Students taking a full course load at Algoma Uni- aging $5,951 per student. versity pay $5,316.20 a year in tuition, including fees. That's below the provincial average, but up Students in Sault Ste. Marie are feeling the pinch, from $4,185 in 2005. with student food bank usage "through the roof " this year, said Vanessa Gastaldo, president of the "Next week we have a whole week of events lead- Algoma University Student Union. ing up to our Day of Action, which is Nov. 5," said Gastaldo, whose union is a member of the CFS. "The food bank on campus has essentially lost its stigma and has become a normal part of our com- Last year, students delivered petitions to MPP munity," said Gastaldo. David Orazietti's constituency office. This year, the rally will be held on the university grounds, with The Statistics Canada report found undergraduate music and food. fees in Ontario surpassed the national average by
  • Daily Miner and News October 22, 2009 Thursday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. A5 National Briefs ONTARIO TOPS LIST The report found undergraduate Ontario students paid the fourth TORONTO -- The Canadian fees in Ontario surpassed the highest fees in the country when Federation of Students says Pre- national average by more than McGuinty cancelled a tuition fee mier Dalton McGuinty should $1,000, while graduate tuition freeze in 2006. not be pleased to see Ontario fees exceeded the national aver- taking the lead in one category -- age by $2,600. Since then, tuitions in the prov- the highest university tuition fees ince increased between 20 and in the country. A 2009 Statistics Shelley Melanson of the stu- 36 per cent, which the students' Canada report shows Ontario has dents' federation says Nova Sco- federation says makes Ontario surpassed Nova Scotia for the tia put the brakes on fee in- the most expensive place in Can- highest fees in Canada, with uni- creases and reduced tuitions ada to get a post-secondary edu- versity tuition averaging $5,951 while Ontario has continued to cation. per student. ''rocket ahead'' with tuition hikes.
  • Sault Star October 23, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A3 Students using food banks to get by MICHAEL PURVIS, become a normal part of our Day of Action, which is Nov. 5," THE SAULT STAR community," said Gastaldo. said Gastaldo, whose union is a member of the CFS. Starving students at Algoma The Statistics Canada report University are learning to love found undergraduate fees in On- Last year, students delivered the food bank as Ontario's tuition tario surpassed the national aver- petitions to MPP David rates have become the highest in age by more than $1,000, while Orazietti's constituency office. the country, says the president of graduate tuition fees exceeded This year, the rally will be held the school's student union. the national average of $2,600. on the university grounds, with music and food. The Canadian Federation of Stu- Ontario students paid the fourth dents gave Premier Dalton highest fees in the country when "The road that we're on, tuition McGuinty a dressing down this McGuinty cancelled a tuition fee fees will be inaccessible for a week, pointing to a 2009 Statis- freeze in 2006. good portion of the population in tics Canada report that shows the future," said Gastaldo. Ontario has surpassed Nova Sco- Since then, tuitions in the prov- tia for the highest fees in Canada, ince increased between 20 and Next week's events will raise with university tuition averaging 36 per cent, which the CFS says money for the community food $5,951 per student. makes Ontario the most expen- bank, and the on-campus food sive place in Canada to get a bank. Students in Sault Ste. Marie are post-secondary education. feeling the pinch, with student "Logistically, students in Sault food bank usage "through the Students taking a full course load Ste. Marie have problem enough roof," this year, said Vanessa at Algoma U. pay $5,316.20 a getting to a grocery store, and Gastaldo, president of the Al- year in tuition, including fees. now it is even heightened be- goma University Student Union. That's below the provincial aver- cause students are making deci- age, but up from $4,185 in 2005. sions between buying a textbook "The food bank on campus has "Next week we have a whole and buying food," said Gastaldo. essentially lost its stigma and has week of events leading up to our
  • Northern News October 23, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A3 News Briefs Town supports anti-poverty day record job losses, soaring per- The Canadian Federation of Stu- sonal debt and undue economic dents-Ontario has declared Nov. KIRKLAND LAKE -Kirkland hardship on families across On- 5, 2009 a province-wide day of Lake council has declared Nov. tario and more particularly ones action during which thousands of 5, as Action Day supporting the in Northern Ontario. students, community members Greater Sudbury Coalition for a and labour organizations will be Poverty-Free Ontario, which is The organizers point out that the walking the streets. comprised of four student unions current recession has resulted in at Laurentian University in con- record job losses, soaring per- The Greater Sudbury Coalition junction with the Canadian Fed- sonal debt and undue economic for a Poverty-Free Ontario is eration of Students- Ontario. hardship on families across On- focusing its efforts in Northeast- tario and more particularly ones ern Ontario. The organizers point out that the in Northern Ontario. current recession has resulted in
  • The Canadian Press October 25, 2009 Sunday SUNNY FREEMAN, CP University enrolment up during economic downturn, as grads return to school TORONTO - Despite the already underfunded univer- shaky job market for univer- sities, which, they say, de- The increase of graduate stu- sity grads during the reces- grades the quality of educa- dents during the recession sion, or because of it, new tion for students who con- contributes to an increase in enrolment figures show about tinue to pay sky high tuition the number of students turn- 38,000 more students en- fees. ing to loans. rolled in Canadian universi- ties this fall over last. James Turk, executive direc- Giroux-Bougard said student tor of Canadian Association debts can have negative re- About 870,000 full-time stu- of University Teachers says percussions on the economy dents enrolled this year, an while the government recog- because students in debt are increase of 29,000 under- nizes that education is key to less likely to graduate, and to graduates and 9,000 graduate economic recovery, it is not start a family, and purchase students from last year, ac- placing enough emphasis on homes and cars. cording to figures released by funding. the Association of Universi- ''When we're looking at re- ties and Colleges of Canada. To reach the funding level building our economy, at seen in the 1980s, when there getting out of this recession Herb O'Heron, a senior ad- were fewer university stu- high debt loads are going to viser at the AUCC, says it's dents, the government would make that more difficult,'' she the biggest increase in enrol- need to increase funding by said. ment since 2003 and the re- $4.2 billion a year, Turk said. cession is driving demand for James Cote, a professor of spots. Meanwhile, as enrolment sociology at the University of increases, universities cram Western Ontario who studies ''Part of it is the recognition students into the seats and academia said the increase in of the value of a degree,'' he aisles of already packed lec- graduate students can also be said. ''Even in the midst of a ture halls, which degrades the attributed to government recession, the jobs for univer- quality of education students pressure on universities to sity graduates continue to receive for their money. increase enrolment in grad rise.'' programs by 50 per cent. The AUCC found the biggest Students and professors say spike, 7.1 per cent, in enrol- Turk added that expanding they are encouraged by the ment at the graduate level, graduate enrolment is one display of faith in higher compared to 4.1 per cent at way universities attempt to education, but remain skepti- the undergraduate level. recoup funding because gov- cal about whether universities ernment funding is higher for can deliver what they prom- Katherine Giroux-Bougard, graduate students than under- ise. national chairperson of the grads. Canadian Federation of Stu- The spike in enrolment is dents says many disillusioned Number crunching by the occurring as cash-strapped job seekers return to school AUCC indicated that ''in the governments make cuts to and take on bigger debt loads. last 12 months there have
  • been more than 60,000 new fastest growing occupations ket that higher credentials are jobs for university graduates, require the most education-- necessary. while there were 390,000 such as healthcare, science fewer for jobs for those with- and engineering. ''I think the reason that em- out higher education.'' ployers are able to get em- Terry Power, president of ployees with these credentials Cote said the dismal job mar- employment firm Randstad is because of the bad job ket feeds credentialism, Canada says fields that re- market.'' meaning employers can push quire higher education have up the credentials necessary seen better employment op- Now they can require a MA for students to get a foothold portunities through the down- when 20 years ago a BA in the job market. turn. would do, but it's not clear how necessary those degrees ''The MA now replaces the He said the unemployment are, he said. honours BA in many fields,'' rate in professional sectors, he said. ''A lot of people get especially information tech- ''We have this curious phe- the BA to get themselves in nology, engineering and nomenon going on where you the running, but then they highly specialized fields run need more credentials to be find that they need more,'' he at about half the rate of the able to get jobs but the qual- said. general unemployment rate. ity of the jobs and the amount you use your education in the O'Heron attributed this phe- But Turk says there's no evi- job may actually be diminish- nomenon to the fact that the dence in the general job mar- ing.''
  • Waterloo Region Record October 26, 2009 Monday 
Final Edition CLASSIFIED; Pg. B6 University enrolment rises during economic downturn By Sunny Freeman, are encouraged by the display of eration of Students, says many The Canadian Press faith in higher education, but disillusioned job seekers return TORONTO remain skeptical about whether to school and take on bigger debt universities can deliver what loads. Despite the shaky job market for they promise. university graduates during the The increase in graduate students recession, or because of it, new The spike in enrolment is occur- during the recession contributes enrolment figures show about ring as cash-strapped govern- to an increase in the number of 38,000 more students enrolled in ments make cuts to already un- students turning to loans. Canadian universities this fall derfunded universities, which, over last. they say, degrades the quality of Giroux-Bougard said student education for students who con- debts can have negative reper- About 870,000 full-time students tinue to pay sky high tuition fees. cussions on the economy be- enrolled this year, an increase of cause students in debt are less 29,000 undergraduates and 9,000 James Turk, executive director of likely to graduate, and to start a graduate students from last year, Canadian Association of Univer- family, and purchase homes and according to figures released by sity Teachers, says while the cars. the Association of Universities government recognizes that edu- and Colleges of Canada. cation is key to economic recov- "When we're looking at rebuild- ery, it is not placing enough em- ing our economy, at getting out The association found the big- phasis on funding. of this recession, high debt loads gest spike, 7.1 per cent, in en- are going to make that more dif- rolment at the graduate level, To reach the funding level seen ficult," she said. compared to 4.1 per cent at the in the 1980s, when there were undergraduate level. fewer university students, the James Cote, a professor of soci- government would need to in- ology at the University of West- Herb O'Heron, a senior adviser at crease funding by $4.2 billion a ern Ontario who studies acade- the association, says it's the big- year, Turk said. mia, said the increase in graduate gest increase in enrolment since students can also be attributed to 2003 and the recession is driving Meanwhile, as enrolment in- government pressure on universi- demand for spots. creases, universities cram stu- ties to increase enrolment in dents into the seats and aisles of graduate programs by 50 per "Part of it is the recognition of already packed lecture halls, cent. Turk added that expanding the value of a degree," he said. which degrades the quality of graduate enrolment is one way "Even in the midst of a recession, education students receive for universities try to recoup funding the jobs for university graduates their money. because government funding is continue to rise." higher for graduate students. Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- Students and professors say they tional chair of the Canadian Fed-
  • The Times & Transcript October 26, 2009 Monday NEWS; Pg. C3 University enrolment up during economic downturn Data suggests grads are returning to school Despite the shaky job market for Canadian Association of Univer- likely to graduate, and to start a university grads during the re- sity Teachers says while the gov- family, and purchase homes and cession, or because of it, new ernment recognizes that educa- cars. enrolment figures show about tion is key to economic recovery, 38,000 more students enrolled in it is not placing enough emphasis "When we're looking at rebuild- Canadian universities this fall on funding. ing our economy, at getting out over last. of this recession high debt loads To reach the funding level seen are going to make that more dif- About 870,000 full-time students in the 1980s, when there were ficult," she said. enrolled this year, an increase of fewer university students, the 29,000 undergraduates and 9,000 government would need to in- James Cote, a professor of soci- graduate students from last year, crease funding by $4.2 billion a ology at the University of West- according to figures released by year, Turk said. ern Ontario who studies acade- the Association of Universities mia said the increase in graduate and Colleges of Canada. Meanwhile, as enrolment in- students can also be attributed to creases, universities cram stu- government pressure on universi- Herb O'Heron, a senior adviser at dents into the seats and aisles of ties to increase enrolment in grad the AUCC, says it's the biggest already packed lecture halls, programs by 50 per cent. increase in enrolment since 2003 which degrades the quality of and the recession is driving de- education students receive for Turk added that expanding mand for spots. their money. graduate enrolment is one way universities attempt to recoup "Part of it is the recognition of The AUCC found the biggest funding because government the value of a degree," he said. spike, 7.1 per cent, in enrolment funding is higher for graduate "Even in the midst of a recession, at the graduate level, compared students than undergrads. the jobs for university graduates to 4.1 per cent at the undergradu- continue to rise." ate level. Number crunching by the AUCC indicated that "in the last 12 Students and professors say they Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- months there have been more are encouraged by the display of tional chairperson of the Cana- than 60,000 new jobs for univer- faith in higher education, but dian Federation of Students says sity graduates, while there were remain skeptical about whether many disillusioned job seekers 390,000 fewer for jobs for those universities can deliver what return to school and take on big- without higher education." they promise. ger debt loads. Cote said the dismal job market The spike in enrolment is occur- The increase of graduate students feeds credentialism, meaning ring as cash-strapped govern- during the recession contributes employers can push up the cre- ments make cuts to already un- to an increase in the number of dentials necessary for students to derfunded universities, which, students turning to loans. get a foothold in the job market. they say, degrades the quality of education for students who con- Giroux-Bougard said student "The MA now replaces the hon- tinue to pay sky high tuition fees. debts can have negative reper- ours BA in many fields," he said. cussions on the economy be- "A lot of people get the BA to James Turk, executive director of cause students in debt are less get themselves in the running,
  • but then they find that they need He said the unemployment rate of the bad job market." more," he said. in professional sectors, espe- cially information technology, Now they can require a MA O'Heron attributed this phe- engineering and highly special- when 20 years ago a BA would nomenon to the fact that the fast- ized fields run at about half the do, but it's not clear how neces- est growing occupations require rate of the general unemploy- sary those degrees are, he said. the most education -- such as ment rate. health care, science and engi- "We have this curious phenome- neering. But Turk says there's no evi- non going on where you need dence in the general job market more credentials to be able to get Terry Power, president of em- that higher credentials are neces- jobs but the quality of the jobs ployment firm Randstad Canada sary. and the amount you use your says fields that require higher education in the job may actually education have seen better em- "I think the reason that employ- be diminishing." ployment opportunities through ers are able to get employees the downturn. with these credentials is because
  • Guelph Mercury October 26, 2009 Monday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL; Pg. A10 Tuition fees in Ontario have climbed far too high Shayne Sangster to decide how to prioritize those funds. Post- secondary education has not been one of those pri- On Nov.5, 1605, Guy Fawkes was arrested for try- orities. Tuition fees have been climbing 2.5 times ing to blow up the English Parliament. He was will- the inflation rate. In fact, Ontario has highest tuition ing to go to great lengths to fight for a minority of in the country. Many politicians feel they are not English, whose rights were being eliminated by the answerable to or have to address the concerns and legislators in Westminster. This Nov. 5, the Cana- issues of a cohort that has a low voter turnout. The dian Federation of Students are looking to ignite the student population traditionally feels disenfran- minds of Canadians in a stance for a society that chised and removed from the political process. has lower tuition and no poverty. It is time to be the change you wish to see in the The cycle of poverty has many points of interven- world. Let the public officials know that mortgag- tion and post-secondary education is just one of ing the future by cutting social programs is unac- those intervention points. Post-secondary funding ceptable. So, on Nov. 5, join us in solidarity and has seen drastic cuts since the 1990s, when the fed- send a message to the legislators that education is a eral government made cuts to social programs in an right, not a privilege and that poverty has no place attempt to save money and bring Canada out of in a nation as rich as Canada. debt. Education is a provincial matter, and in the case of post-secondary funding it has been cut by Shayne Sangster many provincial governments from coast to coast. Drop Fees/ Poverty Free Ontario campaign Guelph Every year the provinces receive transfer payments as a block payment. Then, it is up to the provinces
  • The Daily Gleaner October 26, 2009 Monday NEWS; Pg. A6 University enrolment up during economic downturn SUNNY FREEMAN likely to graduate, and to start a The Canadian Press James Turk, executive director of family, and purchase homes and Canadian Association of Univer- cars. Despite the shaky job market for sity Teachers says while the gov- university grads during the re- ernment recognizes that educa- "When we're looking at rebuild- cession, or because of it, new tion is key to economic recovery, ing our economy, at getting out enrolment figures show about it is not placing enough emphasis of this recession high debt loads 38,000 more students enrolled in on funding. are going to make that more dif- Canadian universities this fall ficult," she said. over last. To reach the funding level seen in the 1980s, when there were James Cote, a professor of soci- About 870,000 full-time students fewer university students, the ology at the University of West- enrolled this year, an increase of government would need to in- ern Ontario who studies acade- 29,000 undergraduates and 9,000 crease funding by $4.2 billion a mia said the increase in graduate graduate students from last year, year, Turk said. students can also be attributed to according to figures released by government pressure on universi- the Association of Universities Meanwhile, as enrolment in- ties to increase enrolment in grad and Colleges of Canada. creases, universities cram stu- programs by 50 per cent. dents into the seats and aisles of Herb O'Heron, a senior adviser at already packed lecture halls, Turk added that expanding the AUCC, says it's the biggest which degrades the quality of graduate enrolment is one way increase in enrolment since 2003 education students receive for universities attempt to recoup and the recession is driving de- their money. funding because government mand for spots. funding is higher for graduate The AUCC found the biggest students than undergrads. "Part of it is the recognition of spike, 7.1 per cent, in enrolment the value of a degree," he said. at the graduate level, compared Number crunching by the AUCC to 4.1 per cent at the undergradu- indicated that "in the last 12 "Even in the midst of a recession, ate level. months there have been more the jobs for university graduates than 60,000 new jobs for univer- continue to rise." Katherine Giroux-Bougard, na- sity graduates, while there were tional chairperson of the Cana- 390,000 fewer for jobs for those Students and professors say they dian Federation of Students says without higher education." are encouraged by the display of many disillusioned job seekers faith in higher education, but return to school and take on big- Cote said the dismal job market remain skeptical about whether ger debt loads. feeds credentialism, meaning universities can deliver what employers can push up the cre- they promise. The increase of graduate students dentials necessary for students to during the recession contributes get a foothold in the job market. The spike in enrolment is occur- to an increase in the number of ring as cash-strapped govern- students turning to loans. "The MA now replaces the hon- ments make cuts to already un- ours BA in many fields," he said. derfunded universities, which, Giroux-Bougard said student "A lot of people get the BA to they say, degrades the quality of debts can have negative reper- get themselves in the running, education for students who con- cussions on the economy be- but then they find that they need tinue to pay sky high tuition fees. cause students in debt are less more," he said.
  • O'Heron attributed this phe- He said the unemployment rate with these credentials is because nomenon to the fact that the fast- in professional sectors, espe- of the bad job market." est growing occupations require cially information technology, the most education--such as engineering and highly special- Now they can require a MA healthcare, science and engineer- ized fields run at about half the when 20 years ago a BA would ing. rate of the general unemploy- do, but it's not clear how neces- ment rate. sary those degrees are, he said. Terry Power, president of em- ployment firm Randstad Canada But Turk says there's no evi- "We have this curious phenome- says fields that require higher dence in the general job market non going on where you need education have seen better em- that higher credentials are neces- more credentials to be able to get ployment opportunities through sary. jobs but the quality of the jobs the downturn. and the amount you use your "I think the reason that employ- education in the job may actually ers are able to get employees be diminishing."
  • The Excalibur October 28, 2009, Wednesday Minister defends record high tuition fees John Milloy, Ontario minister of training, col- Shelley Melanson, the Chairperson for the Ca- leges and universities, has responded to the Sta- nadian Federation of Students-Ontario, re- tistics Canada report marking Ontario as the sponded to Milloy’s statement that, although province with Canada’s highest tuition fees. $6.2-billion is welcome money, it was not enough to cover the increase in enrolment On- Although Ontario’s tuition is the most expensive tario has seen in recent times. of all Canadian provinces, Milloy does not agree with claims that Ontario’s record so far has been “In terms of addressing access, I think it’s in- a bad one. When asked what the new high fees credibly ridiculous to suggest that, just by simply title said about the creating grants, you somehow seal the door and McGuinty government’s record, Milloy de- ensure that access is protected, because what fended it. you’ve done, in fact, is you’ve increased tuition fees.” “When you ask about the record of our govern- ment, the Reaching Higher plan is a $6.2-billion Not only did Melanson disagree with Milloy’s plan over five years. One and a half billion of it statements on grants, but she also did not accept was directly for student aid.” capped loans as an indicator of the government’s Milloy told Excalibur following question period work. Milloy pointed out that there were in the Ontario Legislature Oct. 21. 100,000 more students in Ontario colleges and “We reintroduced up-front grants; we increased universities. Melanson chalked up the increase to the availability of grants to middle income fami- demographics. lies. “It’s important to recognize that we have the Loans are capped here in the province of On- baby boom echo going through the system, and tario, so, in my mind, our record in terms of ac- so there is a natural bulge that’s going to be put cessibility has been a great one.” through the system [because] there are people of a certain age who are eligible to go to school,” This year marks the end of the existing frame- said Melanson. work for tuition feepricing, meaning government officials will be evaluating the system currently “The question is, who is going and how many in place and reworking it where it’s felt to be more people would be going if the financial bur- necessary. den wasn’t what it is?”
  • The Toronto Star October 31, 2009 Saturday OPINION; Pg. IN07 Still living with mistakes of the Harris government Ontario post-secondary educa- versities, but fails to acknowl- provinces like Quebec and New- tion history revisited, Opinion, edge that under his reign tuition foundland and Labrador, which Oct. 28 fees increased by 60 per cent and have determined that a well- student debt ballooned while funded, high-quality post- This opinion piece by Mike Har- professor-to-student ratios fell to secondary education system is ris shows how wrong the former last place in Canada. the best way to stimulate the premier's approach was and is. economy. The last thing Ontario needs is to In order for us to transform On- repeat the mistakes of the Harris tario's economy, Dalton Shelley Melanson, government. The former premier McGuinty should not refer to the Chairperson, Canadian Federa- boasts about cutting $400 million Conservative playbook, but tion of Students - Ontario annually from colleges and uni- rather follow in the footsteps of
  • Nelson Daily News November 2, 2009 Monday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. 1 March of the undebt Selkirk students spread message about debt through Nelson's downtown Nelson Daily News awareness to the debt plight of try, to $27,000 in 2009 -- near students and call on the pro- the highest in the country. "I live in my car and stay on a vincial and federal govern- friend's couch because I can't ments to take action to reduce "There are two core reasons afford to drive to school or pay the debt. student debts have escalated I rent in Nelson," says Selkirk the last eight years," Mungall College aesthetics student, "We would like to see tuition wrote. "First, tuition has in- Vivian Durham. fees rapidly put down to 2001 creased from the second- levels, which would eliminate lowest in Canada to in 2001, to "I live off food banks, soup a massive funding gap for stu- 10 per cent higher than the kitchens and my grandma's dents and would vastly reduce national average today. pension." student debt and accessibility issues," Crispin said. "When the BC Liberals de- Durham was just one of a regulated tuition in 2002, while group of Selkirk College stu- But he said their ultimate goal, also cutting operational fund- dents who dressed up as zom- and that of the Canadian Fed- ing to post-secondary schools, bies and marched through eration of students, is to see the schools had no choice but downtown Nelson on Friday to tuition fees eliminated alto- to increase tuition fees. So up protest their mounting student gether. they went . . . " debt and inability to afford the necessities of life. For its part, the provincial gov- Governments already heavily ernment says, since 2001 it has subsidize post-secondary edu- Leah Pettit was another. invested $17.9 billion in a cation, and when asked why, in post-secondary education sys- these tough economic times, "I live in subsidized housing tem that they claim has the governments should put more and I can't afford to pay my fifth-lowest tuition fees in the money into colleges and uni- rent because my student loan country, with an average tui- versities, Crispin said it will wasn't enough," said Pettit, a tion of $4,700 for undergradu- actually stimulate the econ- student of digital arts and de- ate university students. omy. sign at Nelson's 10th Street campus. The government says that's a "One of the large reasons we 53 per cent funding increase may be in a recession is be- "I need to find a place to live since 2001. And since 2005, cause we refuse to train our with my cat before the end of tuition fee increases have been own people and give them next week." limited to two per cent each access to education," Crispin year. said. "When you have a reces- Total student loan debt in Can- sion, it's one of the best times ada topped $13 billion earlier In her recent Nelson Daily to get people into schools and this year, and according to the News column (Tales from the remove barriers. Selkirk College Students' Un- Student Debt Crypt, Fri. Oct. ion, that debt load is continu- 30), Nelson-Creston MLA, "(Governments) are spending ally deepening. Michelle Mungall said the money on the Olympics and average student debt for a four- the war in Afghanistan. So SCSU external director, Zach- year program in the province there's also a lot of wasted ary Crispin said their zombie has increased from $18,500 in money that could go to pay for march was meant to draw 2001 -- the lowest in the coun- things like proper education."
  • The Manitoban November 2, 2009 Monday Time to act! Manitoba’s poverty crisis Chris Webb and Jonny Sopotiuk the NDP leadership race. With Thankfully, Manitobans 125,000 Manitobans living in overwhelmingly support such an In Winnipeg’s downtown core poverty and 56 per cent of initiative. Eighty per cent of the poor, sick and homeless are Aboriginal children under six Manitobans want the provincial selling their prescription living in poverty, the time has government to implement a medications to pay for the come for the province to adopt a strategy to reduce poverty by 25 necessities of life. A CBC concrete poverty alleviation per cent over the next five years, investigation reports the trade in strategy. It's up to all of us to according to a Canadian Centre meds has flourished in the area hold the premier to his word. for Policy Alternatives around Winnipeg’s homeless commissioned poll. A goal- shelters. Meanwhile, poverty Provincial unemployment now oriented, sustained fight against rates in Manitoba have stands at 5.2 per cent (Aboriginal poverty is about more than skyrocketed, with an 83 per cent unemployment is nearly triple extending a helping hand. jump in food bank use by those this at 15.4 per cent) with more Despite the rhetoric of economic on Employment Insurance and layoffs and labour concessions recovery, Canada’s GDP growth waitlists for public housing well on the horizon. Poverty has rate is on the decline at -3.23 per beyond available capacity. condemned thousands of cent. Manitobans are not immune Manitobans to a sustained state As a former inner-city activist, to this economic turbulence, of crisis, made worse by the Premier Greg Selinger is well which is why an increase in the current economic downturn. aware of the problems faced by minimum wage, more and better Despite the new minimum wage low-income Manitobans. He social housing, universal of $9, when adjusted for knows that one in five children childcare access and more funds inflation, wages have fallen in Winnipeg live below the and lower fees for education and relatively steadily since 1970. A poverty line. He knows that training will help strengthen our single parent with one child now Aboriginal poverty sits at 29 per local economy. has to work 49 hours a week to cent. He also knows we have the just reach the poverty line, Study after study links poverty to resources to radically reduce according to a report by the poorer health, higher poverty. Canadian Centre for Policy incarceration rates and more Ontario, Nova Scotia, Quebec Alternatives. Since 2004, Quebec demand on social and and Newfoundland have all has invested $3.3 billion in community services. For many passed anti-poverty legislation poverty reduction, including young people, education is a way that implements changes and sets increasing the minimum wage, out of this cycle of poverty. measurable and achievable goals. upgrading public housing, a From kindergarten to post- In spite of its social democratic work premium for low-income secondary, well-funded, public roots, the NDP's “All Aboard” earners and an Employment Pact education is essential in anti-poverty plan, released last aimed at integrating youth into combating poverty. Manitoba’s spring, does not include a the labour market. These child care system desperately comprehensive poverty- measures have resulted in a 14.2 needs more funding, lower user reduction plan, hard targets, per cent drop in the number of fees, and an injection of capital. timelines or indicators of families receiving last-resort Following Ontario's example of success. “I’m completely fine financial assistance. A sustained expanding full-day learning to 4- with having a separate piece of fight against poverty is about 5 year-olds, for example, could legislation for poverty more than helping those in need. make a huge difference for low- reduction,” Selinger said during It’s about building a just society. and middle-income families.
  • Average student debt in Come voice your support for the Manitoba sits around $19,000. campaign on Thursday, Despite this, tuition fees rose by November 5 — rally on campus 4.3 per cent this year, the at 11:30 a.m., rally at the second-highest fee increase in Legislature at 1 p.m.. the country. The largest barrier Jonny Sopotiuk is the Chairper- facing prospective post- son of the Target Poverty Cam- secondary students (especially paign, and Chris Webb is a pub- those from low-income families) lishing assistant at Canadian Di- is cost: keeping student debt low mension and continuing to support Aboriginal and low-income students will help build pathways out of poverty and debt for thousands of Manitobans. As finance minister, Greg Selinger presided over tax cuts for businesses and high-income earners that have deprived the province of more than $1 billion in revenue that could be used to improve public housing, childcare and employment insurance, to properly fund schools and universities and to implement liveable wage legislation. The Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives reports that the income levels of poor Manitobans could be brought up to the poverty line for a cost of under $516 million a year (or just 1.1 per cent of Manitoba’s annual GDP). Tax cuts for the wealthy have hurt low-income Manitobans, and done nothing to address the decay of social services, low incomes, and fragile employment numbers. The Canadian Federation of Students, in conjunction with Make Poverty History Manitoba, calls on the province to take concrete action to cut poverty rates by 25 per cent over the next five years. Our Target Poverty campaign is aimed at mobilising and educating all Manitobans on the dire problems caused by poverty, and some of the solutions that are within reach. If you’d like more information on the campaign, visit our website at targetpoverty.ca .
  • The Ottawa Sun November 4, 2009 Wednesday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 3 Bus riders take a hike Seniors and students take biggest hit in transit department's proposed fare increases BY AEDAN HELMER facing the highest student unem- 2010 increase, but it is the final AND JON WILLING, ployment rate of the last 30 instalment of the city's three-year SUN MEDIA years," said Shelley Melanson, plan to raise fares by 30%. With chairwoman of the Ontario chap- the increases, fare revenues are Students and seniors, two groups ter of the Canadian Federation of expected to cover half the cost of that rely heavily on transit, will Students. the transit system, while property be among the hardest hit when taxes pay for the rest. OC Transpo's fare hike take ef- "I'm not sure where the City of fect in July 2010. Ottawa is thinking these students Several budget pressures in 2010 are going to come up with the have been identified, including If city council approves the tran- cash." contract settlements, fuel prices sit department's budget, the price and maintenance. of every type of fare will rise. Melanson said the disproportion- ate fare hike for students is Officials also plan to continue But while the average fare in- "counter-intuitive" to council's tweaking some routes to make crease is projected at 7.5%, stu- recent reversal of an age limit the trips more consistent and dents would pay 12.3% more for policy for student passes. direct. Most schedule changes their monthly passes, while sen- would be introduced next Sep- iors are being tagged for an extra And for many students, seniors tember. 13.4%. and working poor, transit is "the only option they have," said Transit officials predict there Monthly senior passes would Melanson. will be more than 101 million increase to $36 from $31.75, and passengers in 2010, an increase students can expect to pay Yvette Fournier, 73, a member of of over 20 million from 2009, $73.25, up from the current the Ottawa Seniors Action Net- when the transit strike wiped out $65.25, for their monthly ticket work, said the effect could be the first two full months of the to ride. "devastating" on the senior popu- calendar year. lation. An adult cash fare for a single AEDAN.HELMER@ bus trip would increase to $3.25 "This is a population of people SUNMEDIA.CA from $3, and an O-Train trip on fixed incomes. This is a con- would jump to $2.75 from $2.50. stant struggle anyway. So how do we deal with this? How do we 'TERRIBLE' get around? Some of these sen- iors have no other possibilities," The proposed fare hikes are, pre- said Fournier. dictably, not sitting well with students and seniors. "You look at what happened with the (transit) strike, and now we're "I think it's a terrible and ill- just pulling our lives back to- informed decision, seeing as stu- gether and then they pull this. dents in the province are already What is it with this city?" saddled with the highest debt load in the country, and we're Council has yet to approve the
  • Winnipeg Free Press November 5, 2009 ThursdayPg. A.13 ISSN: 0828-1785 Funding education Letters of the Day Re: Need to fund education is underrated, by Tom agement, to lament the decline in public funding for Ford (Nov. 2.) education is a sure-fire sign that business is worried -- take note Mr. Jerema. Hidden in Jerema's article Ford's article does a superb job of highlighting the is the argument that workers should remain unedu- chronic federal underfunding of our universities cated, docile and underpaid. Yet "growing the uni- and colleges. But, perhaps more importantly, he versity" isn't only about funding of the English de- acknowledges that it's more than one's wallet size grees or politics degrees that Jerema seems to de- that should determine access to and success in post- test. secondary education and the world of work. Far from a bleeding-heart approach, the acknowledge- Providing opportunities to those burdened with ment that steps must be taken to ensure that women economic hardships or disabilities is about building can access adequate daycare, and that aboriginal a just society and a robust economy. Jerema's fum- children -- 56 per cent of whom live in poverty in bling only drives the point home: well-funded, ac- Winnipeg -- receive a high standard of education cessible education for all should be a human and from kindergarten to post-secondary, is realistic and economic priority. profoundly humanist. JONNY SOPOTIUK Carson Jerema's take on education funding, on the Manitoba Chairperson other hand, shows signs of reckless delusion. For Canadian Federation of Students Roger Martin, dean of the Rotman School of Man-
  • The Uniter November 5, 2009 Thursday Annual day of action broadens scope to include poverty Tuition fees won’t be kept out of government will see that people “It’s better to have a focus [on the campaign, organizer assures do care about poverty in Mani- tuition fees] because it is more students toba – especially students,” she likely we can actually change said. something,” said Amy Groening, Courtney Schwegel, Campus a third-year U of W English stu- Beat Reporter Diane McGifford, minister of dent. “Tuition fees can help to advanced education and literacy, alleviate poverty, so it is con- Manitoba university students will said that extending the focus of nected ... but poverty is such a embark today (Thursday, Nov. 5) the campaign beyond tuition fees huge and daunting topic.” on the annual march to the Leg- to include poverty was a wise Fees are still a component of the islature for the Day of Action decision. campaign, however. organized by the Canadian Fed- eration of Students (CFS). While “I think it is great,” she said. “I "Tuition fees are definitely an past campaigns have mostly fo- have actually said to many stu- important issue to students ... and cused on dropping post- dents that it is important to it is not going to be left out of the secondary tuition fees, this year’s broaden your scope.” campaign," said Maddock. campaign is taking a different The Day of Action begins with a approach. UWSA vice-president internal pancake breakfast at 9 a.m. fol- Courtney Maddock hopes "Tar- lowed by a free pizza lunch in The Target Poverty campaign get Poverty" will show that stu- the quad at 11:30 a.m. At 12:30 calls for the Manitoba govern- dents care about poverty. Photo: p.m., students will begin march- ment to implement an effective Cindy Titus ing to the legislative grounds. plan to reduce poverty by 25 per The rally begins at 1:00 p.m. To cent by 2015, and ultimately to While the campaign is undoubt- learn more, visit create a poverty-free Manitoba. edly broader this year, Maddock www.targetpoverty.ca. Access to basic necessities, ade- said the issues are relevant to quate health care and housing, students. MANITOBA POVERTY improvements to social assis- STATISTICS tance and unemployment insur- "Poverty ... is an issue that many What the Target Poverty cam- ance and access to education and students deal with,” she said, paign wants to change: childcare are all central to the adding that many students in - One in five Winnipeg campaign. Manitoba are living near the pov- children live in poverty erty line. - 42,000 Manitobans use Courtney Maddock, University food banks monthly of Winnipeg Students’ Associa- But with Manitoba tuition fees - 125,000 Manitobans live tion vice-president internal and seeing the second-highest na- below the poverty line treasurer for CFS Local 8, said tional increase this year and with - 29 per cent of Manitoba’s the campaign will force govern- the recent lifting of the tuition aboriginal population lives in ment to confront these issues. freeze, some students feel that poverty. “We are hoping that through this calling for lower tuition fees campaign and through student should be emphasized. Source: www.targetpoverty.ca and community activism that the
  • The Uniter November 5, 2009 Thursday Toward a poverty-free Manitoba Reducing poverty by 25 per cent is strengthen the local economy and prospective post-secondary possible, necessary improve the health and well-being students is cost. Keeping student of individuals and families. debt low and supporting aboriginal Chris Webb and Jonny Sopotiuk and low-income students will help Fortunately, the support for such Each month over 704,000 hungry build pathways out of poverty and measures is clear: 80 per cent of Canadians use a food bank. In debt for thousands of Manitobans. Manitobans want the provincial Manitoba, nearly half of food bank The income levels of poor government to implement a users are children. Manitobans could be brought up to strategy to reduce poverty by 25 the poverty line for a cost of under According to Manitoba Premier per cent over the next five years, $516 million a year (or roughly Greg Selinger, “Manitoba’s according to a poll commissioned one per cent of Manitoba’s annual economy has been growing above by the Canadian Centre for Policy GDP). the Canadian average for the last Alternatives. four years, so we bring a lot of Tax cuts for businesses and high- Poverty has condemned thousands strengths to the table.” Why then income earners have deprived the of Manitobans to a sustained state do one in five children in province of more than $1 billion in of crisis, made worse by the Winnipeg live below the poverty revenue that could be used to current economic downturn. line? If Manitoba has the resources improve public housing, fund Despite the new minimum wage of to target poverty, why are we schools and universities and $9, when adjusted for inflation, failing to act? increase wages. Tax cuts for the wages have fallen relatively wealthy do nothing to address the The pressing fact is that Winnipeg steadily since 1970. A single decay of social services, low has the third highest child poverty parent with one child now has to incomes and fragile employment rate in Canada, with nearly 56 per work 49 hours a week to reach the numbers. These are just a few cent of aboriginal children under poverty line. It’s time for policy areas that illustrate how the age of six living in poverty. Manitoba to build a just society by reducing poverty by 25 per cent There’s no denying that we are leading the fight against poverty. over the next five years is not only plagued by an endemic poverty necessary but possible. Part of the fight against poverty is crisis that demands systematic and ensuring high-quality public comprehensive change. Reducing poverty is not only a education from early childhood realistic goal, but will also help In spite of its social democratic through to post-secondary. Manitoba’s economy weather the roots, the NDP’s “All Aboard” Following Ontario’s example of recession without condemning anti-poverty plan, released last expanding full-day learning to four thousands to poverty. spring, has so far ignored calls for and five year-olds, for example, a comprehensive poverty- could make a huge difference for Jonny Sopotiuk is chairperson of reduction plan, which includes low- and middle-income families. the Canadian Federation of hard targets, timelines and Students’ Target Poverty On the other end of the education indicators of success. The time has Campaign. Chris Webb is the spectrum, access to post-secondary come for Manitoba to adopt a publishing assistant for Canadian education is key. Seventy per cent concrete poverty alleviation Dimension magazine. If you’d like of jobs in Manitoba require post- strategy. more information on the campaign, secondary education and average visit http://www.targetpoverty.ca. An increase in the minimum wage, student debt sits at $19,000. The CFS National Day of Action more and better social housing, Despite this, tuition fees rose by is scheduled for Thursday, Nov. 5. universal childcare access and over four per cent this year, the Rally on campus at 12 p.m. lower fees, along with more funds second highest fee increase in the for education and training, will country. Studies have proven that the largest barrier facing
  • La Presse Canadienne 5 novembre 2009 jeudi Une vaste manifestation se tient à Ottawa pour la réduction des frais de scolarité CP tion étudiante de l'Université d'Ottawa (FEUO), NOUVELLES GÉNÉRALES-QUÉBEC Roxanne Dubois. OTTAWA - Plusieurs centaines d'étudiants des Parallèlement, à Queen's Park, les étudiants on- collèges et universités d'Ottawa ont manifesté dans tariens ont livré au cours des derniers jours une les rues de la ville, jeudi, afin d'exiger du gou- pétition comptant, disent-ils, plus de 50 000 noms vernement de Dalton McGuinty la diminution des et demandant au gouvernement de réduire les frais frais de scolarité. de scolarité. "Nous sommes les numéros un, en Ontario! Les "C'est le moment pour notre premier ministre d'in- numéros un de quoi? Numéros un pour l'augmenta- vestir dans le bien-être économique de l'Ontario. tion des frais de scolarité", a lancé l'un des nom- C'est le moment de baisser les frais de scolarité, a breux orateurs qui se sont succédé, jeudi, lors d'un déclaré la présidente de la Fédération canadienne rassemblement tenu devant le monument des droits des étudiantes et étudiants-Ontario, Shelley Melan- de la personne, sur la rue Elgin. son. Il faut que l'éducation soit abordable si on veut que l'Ontario puisse faire concurrence dans une Des données publiées en octobre par Statistique économie canadienne qui est fondée sur les con- Canada démontrent que le montant en dollars des naissances." frais de scolarité a augmenté davantage en Ontario qu'ailleurs au Canada, au cours des dernières an- A l'Université d'Ottawa, un étudiant de premier nées. Les droits de scolarité pour des études de cycle paie généralement entre 5330 $ et 6570 $ par premier cycle ont grimpé et se situent maintenant an en frais de scolarité. A cela s'ajoute des frais au deuxième rang national, tout juste derrière la relatifs à l'achat de livres, qui peuvent facilement Nouvelle-Ecosse. atteindre 1000$. "En ces temps de difficultés économiques, nous Ancien président de la FEUO, le recteur de l'Uni- aspirons tous à un Ontario sans pauvreté. Et on ne versité, Allan Rock est resté silencieux, jeudi. L'in- peut y parvenir si on continue à exiger des étudiants stitution avait cependant consenti à offrir un "armi- qu'ils paient autant pour l'éducation. Le poids sur stice" aux personnes qui s'absentaient de leurs cours nos épaules est rendu beaucoup trop lourd", a fait pour aller manifester, et ce même si un examen valoir la vice-présidente aux finances de la Fédéra- devait être administré.
  • The Canadian Press November 5, 2009 Thursday CP Students call for end to poverty in rallies in 13 Ontario cities TORONTO - Protesting students forced road The federation says record-high student unem- closures and brought traffic to a crawl as they ployment coupled with record-high tuition fees marched in downtown Toronto during a ''Day of have placed students in a particularly precarious Action'' held in 13 Ontario cities to demand an position. end to poverty in the province. Students are also calling for Employment Insur- The students gathered at the University of To- ance and social assistance reform, a livable ronto and wound their way to the Ontario legisla- minimum wage, good jobs for all and reduced ture on Thursday afternoon. In Ottawa, students tuition. marched to the Human Rights Monument. Rallies were also scheduled in Sudbury, Thunder The Canadian Federation of Students is calling Bay, Mississauga, Guelph, London, Sault Ste. on Premier Dalton McGuinty to invest more in Marie, Peterborough, Scarborough, St. Catheri- social services and equity measures. nes, Kingston and Windsor.
  • The Canadian Press November 5, 2009 Thursday CP BC-Poverty-March TORONTO - Up to five-thousand students are ployment, coupled with record-high tuition fees expected to converge at Queen's Park this after- make it tough for students. noon, in a stand against poverty. The march is expected to clog traffic in some of Co-ordinated by the Canadian Federation of Stu- the downtown core. dents, chairwoman Shelley Melanson expects a vocal turnout. The students are slated to be at Queen's Park by 4 p-m. The rally comes as record-high student unem-
  • Broadcast News November 5, 2009 ThursdayQUEBEC-ONTARIO REGIONAL NEWS Students call for end to poverty in rallies in 13 Ontario cities TORONTO - Protesting students forced road clo- ployment coupled with record-high tuition fees sures and brought traffic to a crawl as they marched have placed students in a particularly precarious in downtown Toronto during a ''Day of Action'' position. held in 13 Ontario cities to demand an end to pov- erty in the province. Students are also calling for Employment Insurance and social assistance reform, a livable minimum The students gathered at the University of Toronto wage, good jobs for all and reduced tuition. and wound their way to the Ontario legislature on Thursday afternoon. In Ottawa, students marched to Rallies were also scheduled in Sudbury, Thunder the Human Rights Monument. Bay, Mississauga, Guelph, London, Sault Ste. Marie, Peterborough, Scarborough, St. Catherines, The Canadian Federation of Students is calling on Kingston and Windsor. Premier Dalton McGuinty to invest more in social services and equity measures. (The Canadian Press) The federation says record-high student unem-
  • Broadcast News November 5, 2009 ThursdayQUEBEC-ONTARIO REGIONAL NEWS Ontario Update larly precarious position. (Ont-Students-Protest) The Canadian Federation of Stu- dents is calling on Premier Students are also calling for Em- Protesting students have taken to Dalton McGuinty to invest more ployment Insurance and social the streets in downtown Toronto, in social services and equity assistance reform, a livable on their way to a rally that's part measures. minimum wage, good jobs for all of a ''Day of Action'' taking place and reduced tuition. in 13 Ontario cities. The federation says record-high student unemployment coupled (The Canadian Press) They are demanding an end to with record-high tuition fees poverty in the province. have placed students in a particu-
  • Broadcast News November 5, 2009 ThursdayQUEBEC-ONTARIO REGIONAL NEWS Poverty-March tough for students. TORONTO - Up to five-thousand students are ex- pected to converge at Queen's Park this afternoon, The march is expected to clog traffic in some of the in a stand against poverty. downtown core. Co-ordinated by the Canadian Federation of Stu- The students are slated to be at Queen's Park by 4 dents, chairwoman Shelley Melanson expects a p-m. vocal turnout. (AM640) The rally comes as record-high student unemploy- ment, coupled with record-high tuition fees make it (The Canadian Press)
  • Le Réveil November 2009 Journée d'action - le 5 novembre
  • Le Réveil (continuation) November 2009 Journée d'action - le 5 novembre
  • Winnipeg Free Press November 6, 2009 Friday Pg. A.10 ISSN: 0828-1785 Students demand war against poverty Owen, Bruce whether the strategy is working. Manitoba's poverty reduction plan was released last May. It includes They came chanting and blowing horns and bang- plans to increase housing, education and training ing on drums to the steps of the Manitoba legisla- and daycare for kids of low-income parents. It also tive building Thursday to demand an end to pov- came with a funding commitment $212 million erty. over the next few years. The 300 students from three Winnipeg universities Addressing the crowd, Family Services Minister marched with aboriginal groups, unions and social Gord Mackintosh said the province has reduced by groups as part of co-ordinated events in Brandon half the number of children living in poverty since and Ontario organized by the Canadian Federation the NDP came to power, but that more has to be of Students (CFS). Shouting and waving placards, done. The province has also increased the hourly they called on the province to reduce poverty by 25 minimum wage each year since 1999. per cent over five years. But the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives- Co-organizer Jonny Sopotiuk, CFS chairperson and Manitoba said Manitoba should adopt a living wage student at the University of Manitoba, said the NDP policy. The CCPA said the policy would see em- has not done enough to tackle poverty issues de- ployers pay wages sufficient enough to provide the spite its decade in power. basics to families with children. Sopotiuk said the province's All Aboard anti- bruce.owen@freepress.mb.ca poverty strategy doesn't include targets or indica- tors of success, something essential to gauge
  • Brandon Sun November 6, 2009 Friday Tackling poverty should be gov’t priority, BU students say Allison Dowd poverty levels by 25 per cent across this province is a good over five years. place to start.” Brandon University students In hosting its own rally of about A press release issued by the yesterday joined their peers from 150 people in the Wheat City Canadian Federation of Students the University of Manitoba, Uni- yesterday, the Brandon Univer- Manitoba office states that versity of Winnipeg and Collège sity Students’ Union called the 125,000 Manitobans are cur- universitaire de Saint-Boniface province’s newly created De- rently living below the low- in calling on the province to un- partment of Housing and Com- income cutoff line. dertake an ambitious reduction in munity Development a positive “This is students looking and the level of poverty across Mani- sign that “could go a long way saying (to others), ‘What kind of toba. (File photo) towards making the province’s province do you want to in- All Aboard anti-poverty strategy herit?” Montague said. Universities across the province more meaningful.” “We don’t want a province are calling on Manitoba’s new According to figures provided by where over 10 per cent of our premier to undertake an ambi- BUSU president Stephen Monta- population live in poverty. We tious reduction in the level of gue, 56 per cent of First Nations want a province that really re- poverty across the province. youth under the age of six and 29 flects the strong economic posi- Students from the University of per cent of aboriginal people tion our government claims to be Manitoba, the University of province-wide are living in pov- in.” Winnipeg and Collège universi- erty. An anti-poverty postcard cam- taire de Saint-Boniface flooded “When lower income families paign is currently being circu- the steps of the legislature in can’t find accessible, affordable lated around the BU campus be- Winnipeg during a province- housing, that’s forcing a lot of fore being sent to the Manitoba wide Target Poverty Day of Ac- people to sacrifice too much of legislature to join other postcards tion yesterday, asking Greg Sel- the incomes they do have on from across the province. inger’s NDP government to housing. commit to reducing provincial “Looking at the housing issues
  • Sudbury Star November 6, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition NEWS; Pg. A3 Students press for tuition freeze, cuts HAROLD CARMICHAEL, THE SUDBURY STAR Bourque said the time to lobby government is now because the Ontario government is set to made Ontario is now No. 1. long-term decisions on post-secondary funding in its next budget. No. 1, that is, when it comes to the average cost of $5,435.09 for one year's undergraduate tuition at an "The next provincial budget is where we see where Ontario university. they are going to go with tuition fees," she said. "We are basically asking for governments to look at The Greater Sudbury "Day of Action to Drop Fees" tuition fees," explained Christine Bourque, a Cana- saw students in the four Laurentian student unions dian Federation of Students field worker based in hold a fall carnival in the Student Centre, motions Greater Sudbury, in an interview Thursday. presented to the Laurentian senate calling for the endorsing and provision of academic amnesty to "We are asking that they freeze and reduce tuition students, and then a march to Tom Davies Square, fees, which are now averaging $5435.09. Ontario is where a rally was held late in the afternoon. now the highest in the country. We always used to be behind Nova Scotia, but it's now Ontario." More than 100 students and supporters participated in the march, which covered Ramsey Lake Road, Students in more than eight Ontario cities including Paris Street and the downtown core. Greater Sudbury, Thunder Bay, Toronto and Ot- tawa, held protests Thursday calling on the federal The student campaign is also calling for a "living and provincial governments to take action on tui- wage" for all Ontarians and multi-year funding for tion fees, which they say are putting higher educa- poverty-reduction strategies. tion further out of reach of youth.
  • Sudbury Star November 6, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition EDITORIAL/OPINION; Pg. A11 University education almost out of reach With Sudbury boasting the third worst unemploy- Universities across the province are already report- ment rate in the country, it comes as no surprise ing record numbers of financial aid applications. At that Greater Sudbury council was the first munici- the same time, Laurentian University had to slash pal council in the province to endorse the Canadian its bursaries by $300,000 for this year and levy a Federation of Students Ontario campaign to "Drop tax on donations to subsidize its operations budget Fees for a Poverty-Free Ontario." due to chronic underfunding. With more and more applicants for less and less bursary money, students Sadly, the statistics reported do not include more simply cannot afford to go to school anymore with- than 3,000 United Steelworkers Local 6500 mem- out incurring mortgage-sized loans. bers on strike, nor does it take it to account the dis- proportionate unemployment among young people, A student's geographic distance from a university is aboriginals, racialized people and other marginal- also directly related to the probability they will at- ized groups, where these numbers can be twice as tend a university. In the North, distance is a real high. barrier to education. In May, the Ontario govern- ment announced it was eliminating the Distance With an estimated 70% of new jobs requiring some Education Grant. This is why it comes as no sur- form of post-secondary education, and with Ontario prise that many Northern communities, like Mark- boasting the second-highest university tuition fees stay-Warren, St Charles and Northeastern Mani- in the country -- which have increased annually toulin and the Islands and most recently Hearst, between 4.5% and 8% -- it also comes as no sur- have also endorsed the campaign to "Drop Fees for prise that Ontario has gone from a have to a have- a Poverty-Free Ontario." not province by putting post-secondary education out of reach for many. Only by increasing access to the great social equal- izer, education, to all can the cycle of poverty be A student's family income is directly related to the broken and can Ontario return to productivity and probability they will attend a post-secondary insti- prosperity. tution. I am deeply concerned what this means for young people who are graduating from high school Rafiq Rahemtulla, during the worst recession since the Great Depres- Vice President Local 110, sion. Laurentian University Graduate Canadian Federation of Students' Association
  • The Ottawa Sun November 6, 2009 Friday 
FINAL EDITION NEWS; Pg. 16 Students rally for tuition drop BY KENNETH JACKSON, year," said fourth-year U of O student Mike Fancie, SUN MEDIA referring to when the province lifted a tuition freeze. Several hundred students marched through down- town yesterday to demand the province cut the cost "The fact that now, after three years, we see exactly of post-secondary education what the consequences are. We have the highest fees and lowest per student funding in the country. It's hard to say if Premier Dalton McGuinty took It creates barriers to education." notice, but they at least caught the eye of people out having a cigarette and motorists stuck in traffic. Statistics Canada revealed in October that students in Ontario pay the highest tuition fees in the coun- The students made their way from the University of try, an average of more than $5,951 per year for an Ottawa and ended at the Human Right's Monument undergraduate arts program and $8,642 for graduate on Elgin St. students. Students want tuition fees lowered and poverty- "I'm currently $45,000 in debt or a bit more and ... related issues addressed, including social assistance my parents are trying to pay that back," said Ki- reform and a livable minimum wage. They want the malee Phillip, a second-year master's student at government to do more to help students and the Carleton University. poor who can't afford university. "It's taking a toll on my family, it's taking a toll on "I've been taking part in these demonstrations ever my stress level. We're not a wealthy family." since they started increasing tuition fees in my first
  • Guelph Mercury November 6, 2009 Friday 
Final Edition LOCAL; Pg. A4 Students protest high tuition fees Thana Dharmarajah, Gordon Street to St. George's Square waving signs Mercury Staff that read "End Poverty" and "Drop Fees" and chant- GUELPH ing as they mourned the rising tuition fees. Several of the students' faces, including Correale, were Leandra Correale expects to graduate with a debt of painted as zombies. $38,000. She said they were mourning the death of afford- The 23-year-old biological science student has able education. worked nearly every summer while attending the University of Guelph, but it hasn't helped very Correale said at the very least, they want to see a much. tuition freeze. "You can tangibly see that it's not paying for a bet- Lea Gallaugher, a 24-year-old international devel- ter education," Correale said, about the high tuition opment major said she's concerned about graduat- fees she's paying while watching cuts to programs. ing into an uncertain economy with nearly $30,000 of debt. Ontario's university tuition fees are the second highest in the country, nearly $1,000 over the na- "I don't come from a situation where my parents tional average. will be able to help me from my debt," she said. "Whether or not you are economically vulnerable, Correale was among nearly 50 others marching everyone should have access to education." downtown Thursday calling for a reduction of tui- tion fees as part of the Day of Action for a poverty- Eduardo Huesca, 24, said despite him coughing up free Ontario. The event was co-ordinated by the a high tuition, he's watching as the university makes Canadian Federation of Students and other organi- cuts to programs and offer more online courses. zations such as the Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation and the Canadian Union of Gallaugher said she's taking a distance-education Public Employees. course and is paying $75 more, compared to those students attending classes. The students marched from the university, down
  • The Excalibur November 11, 2009, Wednesday GTA Students Battle Weather For Lower Fees As several thousand angry As it turned out, at least a and community groups in order protesters marched down handful of the protesters were to gain backing in their attempt Wellesley St. in downtown pretty upset with the Liberal to achieve a poverty-free On- Toronto en route to Queen’s government’s record on post- tario. Park, the clouds darkened to secondary education. give the loud, chanting stu- At a press conference held at dents a cold blast of winter. CFS-O Chair Shelley Melan- Queen’s Park prior to the rally, The students, there as part of son was one of those protest- Sid Ryan, president of the Ca- the Nov. 5 “Day of Action,” ers. “I am one angry woman nadian Union of Public Em- were hoping the government right now!” Melanson pro- ployees (CUPE), had some response to their demands for claimed to a cheering crowd advice for the provincial gov- lower tuition fees wouldn’t be from atop a platform on a ernment. as cold as the weather that day. transport truck rig in front of Queen’s Park. “As an economic stimulus, The event, one of 13 drop fees Later, Melanson described the investing money in the public rallies across the province or- nature of the CFS-O’s meeting sector is a far more efficient ganized by the Canadian Fed- with Milloy to lobby for lower way of putting money into the eration of Students-Ontario tuition fees. pockets of workers, getting (CFS-O), brought university “I would say that the minister people back to work and also and college students from is receptive. He spent most of helping us get out of this reces- across the GTA together in the time listening and not a lot sion,” he said. order to make clear their mes- of time talking,” she said. sage that Ontario tuition fees Krisna Saravanamuttu, York are putting them in the poor Hamid Osman, the Ontario Federation of Students presi- house. representative on the CFS ex- dent, was also on hand to lead Ontario currently boasts the ecutive, said the protesters are the enthusiastic group of York highest tuition fees in the calling on the government to students. country. reduce tuition fees to the level they were at in 2003 and then “York University students are Following question period in freeze them. They’re also ask- not the only ones going the Ontario Legislature, John ing for progressive gradual through high tuition fees in all Milloy, the minister of train- reductions following the of Canada; it’s students in ing, colleges and universities, freeze, he said. every part of Ontario,” he downplayed the significance of said. the students protesting at the Several hundred students from rally. York alone were downtown to York students expressed their show their outrage with high reasons for attending the rally. “I’m not sure how angry they fees. They boarded busses after “If they would drop [tuition] are with me,” he said, going on a rally in Vari Hall and headed fees because of this rally it to describe a recent meeting he to the University of Toronto would be awesome,” said Sa- had with members of CFS-O to to meet up with other students doon Butt, a second-year phi- hear their concerns. He said he from the GTA. Many students losophy student. is always willing to meet with held signs that read “drop fees” students and that the govern- on one side, and “reduce pov- “Education should be a right. It ment was doing its part to keep erty” on the other. shouldn’t be a privilege to only education accessible through those who can afford it,” said scholarship and bursary pro- This year’s rally worked in Maham Mahmood, a first-year grams. conjunction with local unions Schulich student.
  • The Ontarion November 12, 2009, Thursday Zombies on Gordon Street? We've just been officially granted the title of cuts to other social sectors like childcare for ex- paying the highest tuition in the country." Mo- ample or healthcare." mina Mir CSA External Commissioner As for the rally itself, Mir said that its strength On Thursday Nov. 6, students left from the Uni- was in the diversity of people who came to show versity of Guelph and descended upon the down- their support be they current university students town core, some dressed as zombies, demanding or those soon to be. not human flesh, but lowered tuition fees. These University of Guelph students, as well as "It was completely run by students so …you can prospective university students still in high actually put a face to an issue, you can localize school, painted their faces to resemble the un- it," said Mir. dead and walked in this supernatural procession "The point of the campaign is not just to lobby to rally for reduced tuition costs on The Day of for current students but to lobby for students Action, a Canadian Federation of Students cam- coming in later who will be worse off than us. paign. They're going to be effected even more so by According to CSA External Commissioner, these policies that will be put in." Momina Mir, the demonstration was in response to news that students are finding truly frighten- And why zombies? ing. "We wanted to mark the death of affordable edu- "We've just been officially granted the title of cation now that we pay the highest tuition in the paying the highest tuition in the country. That country," said Mir. "That was the theme behind effects a lot of students, undergraduate students [dressing up like zombies] so we also had tomb- that obviously have to take out loans to go to stones and if you read the messages on the tomb- school at Guelph, or their parents take out loans stones it was that people died because of high so that they can send their children to Guelph," tuition and we don't want education to be a death said Mir. sentence." Mir explained that the timing of the demonstra- Overall, Mir said she was pleased with the rally tion was crucial because the provincial govern- and emphasized that students can get involved ment will be reconsidering its funding priorities, with the price of their tuition in many ways even which could drastically affect the cost of educa- if they missed the opportunity to do it in cos- tion among other things. tume. "This is the ideal opportunity to put pressure on the government to listen to students concerns and "The Day of Action [was] just one channel out of keep that in mind when negotiating a new fund- many for students to voice their concerns," said ing framework," said Mir. "This campaign wasn't Mir. "The fact that we reached out to not only just talking about funding cuts to post-secondary current students but also to prospective students education, they were also talking about funding was a huge success."
  • The Manitoban November 12, 2009 Thursday Students rally to end poverty in Manitoba Sarah Petz this year by the CFS because “I came to the university of its immense effect on when [differential fees were] Hundreds of students from students and the community. just 90 per cent, but now it’s campuses across Winnipeg close to 320 per cent on top were out on the steps of the “We’ve seen hundreds of of what regular students pay. Manitoba Legislative thousands of Manitobans I think that’s completely Building on Nov. 4 [sic] to struggling through poverty. bogus because we rally for poverty reduction in It’s an issue that affects international students come the province. students and it’s something on a budget for four years of that our membership wanted The rally was part of the our lives, but then your to prioritize as a major focus Target Poverty campaign, a money has just gone up way this year,” said CFS- joint venture between the too much and you just can’t Manitoba chairperson Jonny Canadian Federation of afford it,” said Aisyah Sopotiuk. Students (CFS)–Manitoba Abdkahar, University of and Make Poverty History, to While accessible education Manitoba Students’ Union raise awareness and call on was a key part of the agenda, international students the provincial government to organizers of the rally wanted representative. reduce the rate of poverty in to raise awareness on a vast “That’s just not something Manitoba by 25 per cent over number of issues. that almost anyone can the next five years. “We’re talking about all the afford. Now I have to work The event was based on a issues that affect poverty, three jobs just to help pay report called “The View from affordable housing, to that off. It’s insane,” said From Here,” published by child care, to education, to Abdkahar. Make Poverty History different groups that are “If you work too much, your Manitoba and the Canadian effected — women and school gets affected — Centre for policy alternatives aboriginal people, people academically, you just can’t which explained this would living with disabilities that get A’s anymore — there’s be obtained over the next are more affected by poverty just no way.” five- years through education in our communities than and income security others,” said Sopotiuk. Jason Syvixay, University of assurance. Winnipeg Students’ “So it’s a broader campaign, Association president, “I believe that there are and we’re using this day to explained that racism was underlying causes to poverty build a broad coalition, also an issue that needed to in our province that need to through Make Poverty be addressed. be addressed, and our History, to tackle poverty in government has put forward a our communities.” “We live in the heart of the template of an action plan, downtown area. We interact Issues affecting international but I’m here to voice that it with people in our area all the students, including needs to be more concrete,” time. We’re rich in culture differential fees and language said Julia Rempel, a U of M and diversity but we’re also barriers, were also raised student, of her decision to bombarded with prejudice during speeches given from join the rally. and barriers.” international student Poverty reduction was chosen representatives. “It’s about trying to eliminate as one of the main campaigns those barriers and just giving
  • everyone the same Target Poverty campaign had “I think perhaps people are opportunity,” said Syvixay. been unclear and as such misguided and confused as to were not in support of the the real purpose of why Student representatives felt rally. they’re here,” said Hamm. the day was a success and would hopefully encourage Blake Hamm, president of Several MLAs came out to progress. the U of M Campus acknowledge and support the Conservatives expressed his students, including Manitoba “For all these students to concern that students Liberal Party Leader Jon come out here, take time out attending the rally were Gerrard. of their day on the steps of unaware of what they were the Legislature and to speak “I really welcome this student supporting. to our government and tell rally. I think it’s wonderful them that we want them to “Do these people know what that there are so many address poverty — [ . . . ] you they’re here for? Posters students concerned about can’t ask for more than that, around campus have talked poverty and about doing and that’s what influences about lowering tuition fees, something about poverty in government,” said UMSU yet I haven’t heard anything our province.” President Sid Rashid. spoken yet about tuition fees The rally ended peacefully here. [ . . . ] What is the Some students in attendance without any major security message? What is the felt the messaging from the issues. purpose of this? “
  • 24 Hours November 13, 2009 Friday 
TORONTO EDITION NEWS; Pg. 5 Red Rocket riders eye other options as part of boycott to protest fare hike BY 24 HOURS NEWS SERVICES gotten worse over time, and that some of them would rather abandon it entirely than pay more for You may notice there are fewer people on the it," Winchester said. streetcar, subway or bus with you Friday morning. Along with a boycott, on her blog ttcrid- That's because more than 6,100 people signed up on ers.blogspot.com Winchester says people may want Facebook to take part in the TTC Riders' Strike -- to call TTC to complain about fare hikes on Friday. dubbed by the event as "the easiest protest you've never attended." Angry riders have taken to blogs, Facebook and Twitter in recent days to discuss the fare hike this The boycott is a move to let TTC officials know week. people aren't happy about a fare hike, organizer Nicole Winchester told 24 hours. On the riders' strike event page, there are also links to a group called TTC (un)fare hike '09, a Twitter "There's a lot of support for the boycott, and I think account called ttcriders and a website called it comes primarily from frustration. The feeling weridettc.ca by the Canadian Federation of Stu- amongst those in support is that the service has only dents.