Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Never Just Right: Solving the Puzzle of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Never Just Right: Solving the Puzzle of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

412
views

Published on

Published in: Health & Medicine

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
412
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Never Just Right:  Solving the Puzzle of  Obsessive‐Compulsive  Disorder  Andrew Jacobs, Psy.D., C.Psych.  Psychologist, Anxiety Disorders Program  Jakov Shlik, MD, FRCPC  Psychiatrist and Clinical Director, Anxiety Disorders Program 
  • 2. Overview  •  OCD: Impact  •  What is OCD – and What Isn’t?  •  OCD Treatment  •  GePng Help in ORawa  •  Online Resources 
  • 3. Rates of OCD  •  ORawa Metro Area, 2011:  1,236,324 people  •  LifeZme prevalence of OCD: 2.3%  – 28,435 people in ORawa will have diagnosable  OCD in their lifeZme  •  One‐year prevalence of OCD: 1.2%   – 14,836 people in ORawa have diagnosable   OCD this year   Based on data from NaZonal Comorbidity Survey (Ruscio et al, 2010) and StaZsZcs Canada (2012) 
  • 4. OCD & Other Mental Health Concerns  •  Over the course of a lifeZme, individuals with OCD  oben experience the following:  –  Other anxiety disorders:  76%  –  Mood disorders: 63%  –  Substance use disorders: 39%  –  ANY disorder:  90%                 Ruscio, Stein, Chiu, & Kessler, 2010 
  • 5. What is OCD?  (and what isn’t…) 
  • 6. What are Obsessions?  •  Intrusive, recurring, persistent thoughts, mental images,  or urges that cause marked anxiety or distress  •  More than “excessive worry”  •  A person tries very hard to get rid of the   obesssion with another thought or behaviour  •  A person knows the obsession comes from his/her   own mind               Based on DSM‐IV‐TR (2000) 
  • 7. Some Common Obsessions  •  Excessive, intrusive thoughts about dirt, germs,  illness, or contaminaZon  •  Fears of having accidentally caused harm  •  Excessive doubZng of whether tasks were complete  or accurate  •  UpsePng, “nonsensical” need for specific order or  exactness  •  UpsePng aggressive, sexual, or religious thoughts  that are out of character 
  • 8. What Aren’t Obsessions?  •  InfatuaZon  •  Fantasies  •  Over‐thinking  •  UpsePng memories  •  Worrying  •  Intrusive thoughts* 
  • 9. Intrusive Thoughts are NORMAL  •  90% of people report experiencing intrusive thoughts  (Salkovskis, 1998)  •  It is not the intrusion that makes an obsession or  OCD; it is our anxiety, distress, and reacZon to it 
  • 10. So Why Not Just Stop   Thinking About It?  An Experiment 
  • 11. What are Compulsions?  •  RepeZZve behaviours or mental tasks a person must  perform according to very set rules and/or in  response to an obsession  •  Compulsions aim to bring down distress or prevent a  bad thing from happening, although they are either  very excessive or wouldn’t realisZcally work                                    Based on DSM‐IV‐TR (2000) 
  • 12. Some Common Compulsions  •  Checking doors, windows, locks,   appliances many Zmes  •  Washing and cleaning a great deal  •  CounZng objects, words, etc  •  Arranging and rearranging objects  •  Following very specific “rituals”  •  Looking for reassurance excessively 
  • 13. What Aren’t Compulsions?  •  Tidiness / orderliness  •  Habits  •  Impulses  •  AddicZons  •  SupersZZous behaviours (usually) 
  • 14. Avoidance  •  Triggers become linked with obsessions and are  avoided  –  Avoid due to fear of intrusive thoughts  –  Avoid to prevent need to do compulsions 
  • 15. The Cycle & Growth of OCD  •  Obsessions are never saZsfied  •  Compulsions are never complete  •  Avoidance expands 
  • 16. What Makes it a Disorder?  •  Impact  –  Very upsePng  –  Quality of life  –  Time‐consuming 
  • 17. Treatment of OCD  Exposure & Response PrevenZon (ERP)  MedicaZons 
  • 18. Exposure & Response PrevenZon  •  Behavioural change‐based therapy  •  Learning through new experiences  •  EssenZally a process of reversing what the OCD is  telling a person to think, feel, and do  –  IdenZfy OCD cycle in acZon  –  Face feared situaZons / triggers  –  Carry through without compulsions  –  Allow the anxiety to change and fade on its own 
  • 19. Exposure  •  Targets oben on a hierarchy of difficulty  •  Gradually confront avoided items, situaZons,   and thoughts  •  Stay in the situaZon  –  Anxiety gradually declines  •  Repeat 
  • 20. Response PrevenZon  •  Stop compulsive behaviour  –  Very challenging  –  Leads to high anxiety at first  •  Declines with Zme  •  Alternate: “ruin” compulsion  –  Example – touch something “contaminated”   aber washing hands 
  • 21. Gains from ERP  •  Learn new things  –  Feared outcome doesn’t happen  –  Ability to cope is beRer than expected  •  Fear and anxiety gradually decrease  •  Avoidance gradually decreases  •  Urge to do compulsions decreases  •  Thoughts become less upsePng 
  • 22. A Course of ERP  •  Typically 10‐20 sessions, 60‐120 minutes  •  Exposures are done both in session and on own  •  Client is never forced to do anything 
  • 23. ERP: The BoRom Line  •  Very challenging, but it works  –  Extremely well‐researched, established, and   effecZve treatment for OCD  –  ERP and similar therapies are effecZve for   approximately 2/3 to 3/4 of individuals 
  • 24. MedicaZons Used to Treat OCD  •  Used to treat OCD:  –  SSRIs / SNRIs – Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors  –  Tricyclic anZdepressants  •  To help treatment  –  Atypical anZpsychoZcs / mood stabilizers 
  • 25. GePng Help for OCD in ORawa 
  • 26. At The Royal  •  Physician referral to The Royal  •  Assessment by psychiatrist or psychologist  –  Treatment is done both through medicaZons and   through ERP  –  ERP is usually done in a group 
  • 27. In the Community  •  Look for therapists with the following:  –  Professionally qualified / licensed  –  OCD‐specific experience  –  Behavioural or cogniZve‐behavioural treatment approach  •  Unless the pracZZoner is a physician, his/her services  will likely not be covered by OHIP / RAMQ; however,  private insurance may assist 
  • 28. Online Resources  •  InternaZonal OCD FoundaZon   –  www.ocfoundaZon.org  •  Anxiety & Depression AssociaZon of America  –  www.adaa.org  •  Anxiety Disorders AssociaZon of Ontario  –  www.anxietydisordersontario.ca  •  The Royal  –  www.theroyal.ca