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Peer instruction online

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Peer instruction online Peer instruction online Presentation Transcript

  • Peer Instruction OnlineExamples and Benefits
    The intention of these slides is to show how you could transfer the peer instruction, or “clickers” technique, to an asynchronous online learning environment.
    Click on this icon in the lower right-hand corner to expand the presentation window.
  • Online Prompt
    Create a question to be discussed in an online threaded discussion.
    Students are surveyed on their response to the question individually, before they participate in the discussion.
    Students are challenged to debate and defend their answers, and to suggest improvements in the threaded discussion
    After the peer discussion, students are surveyed on their response to the question again.
  • Online Discussion: Students make a case for their choice
    In the discussion, students are expected to debate and defend their answers, and to suggest improvements.
    The criteria for the discussion might require them to provide evidence, cite sources consider ethical implications and consequences and to examine real world examples.
  • Online Prompt & 2nd Survey
    Students respond to the survey a second time. Pre and post assessment data and discussion transcripts can then be used for grading and additional purposes such as refinement of course materials or increased emphasis on concepts where needed.
  • Example Online Prompts & survey questions
    “Graduating is good for your health,” according to a headline in the Boston Globe (3 April 1998). The article noted “According to the Center for Disease Control, college graduates feel better emotionally and physically than do high school dropouts.” Do you think the headline is justified based on this statement?
     
    1. Yes, as long as the data was from random samples of college graduates and high school dropouts.
    2. Yes, because this must have been an observational study. As long as it was a well-designed study, the headline is justified.
    3. No, because the headline implies a cause and effect relationship, which is not justified based on an observational study.
    4. No, because this study must have been an experiment and we can’t draw cause and effect conclusions from an experiment.
    Roxy Peck's collection of classroom voting questions for statisticsis part of the sets of questions that accompany the texts: Statistics: The Exploration and Analysis of Data, Roxy Peck and Jay Devore, 6th edition, Brooks/Cole engage Learning 2008
  • More Example Prompts
    The following questions have been adapted from
    Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching
    http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • OtherSample Prompts
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 32http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • Genetics course
    A series of questions can reveal that although students understand partsof a topic they still have misunderstandings about it.
    Sister Chromatids Homologous Chromosomes
    1. Do they have the same set of genes? 3. Do they have the same set of genes?
    A. Yes 100% A. Yes 46%
    B. No B. No 54%
    2. Do they have the same alleles?
    A. Yes 100%
    B. No
    4. You grow sweet peas. One of your clients wants purple sweet peas for her wedding. Which
    two sweet peas should you cross in order to maximize the number of purple sweet peas in
    the next generation?
    A. Purple CcPp x Purple CcPp
    B. White CCpp x White ccPP
    C. Purple CcPp x White ccPP
    D. Purple CcPp x White CCpp
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 29http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • Physics course
    1. You have a ring with a hole in it and a cylindrical plug that is exactly the same size when
    both are at room temperature. If you heat the ring, the plug will
    A. Fit through the hole more easily
    B. Be exactly the same size as before
    C. No longer fit through the hole
    This question can be followed by a demonstration involving actual ring that youheat, if you choose.
    2. When you close the switch, bulb # 2 will
    A. Get brighter
    B. Get dimmer
    C. Stay the same brightness
    D. Go out entirely
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 31http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • Environmental Science Course
    This question was presented After students had completed and had returned to them
    a graded homework assignment in which they were asked to plot
    and interpret hydrologic data.
    Question: Who knows more about a set of data?
    Answer choices (results prior to discussion):
    (a) the person collects it (~10%),
    (b) the person who plots it (~90%)
    This question was used as spring board into talking about the HW assignment.
    During the discussion students greatly changed their original opinion about who knew
    more about the data. That discussion then acted as segue into the next lecture topic on
    using hydrologic data to predict flooding.
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 29http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • Benefits
    Promotes understanding of the reasons why an answer choice is correct. If discussion
    focuses upon the thinking associated with right and wrong options, then students will
    learn both about the reasoning underlying the correct answer, and what is wrong with
    incorrect reasoning. (It is important to make sure this happens – correct reasoning for an
    answer is NOT typically obvious to students, even for many questions that nearly all of
    them answer correctly.). Finally, this helps students recognize that understanding rather
    than merely getting a correct answer is what is important in the course.
    Observing student survey responses and discussions allows you to better understand and address their thinking.
    Students have more time to think about thequestions on their own, and then discuss with their peers.
    The surveys provide is a way to collect a response from every student for which they are individually accountable. This allows rapid reliable feedback to both you and the students.
    Allows you to give feedback to the students on their thinking that is both timely and
    specific, the two elements that research has shown are essential for pedagogically useful
    feedback;
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 19http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • Benefits
    An overwhelming body of research indicates that this practice will increase student engagement, improve learning and retention.
    Actively engages students in thinking about and discussing the concept/skill/idea;
    ii. Improves both their understanding and their ability to communicate technical ideas;
    iii. Gives students an opportunity to explain and defend their reasoning, and analyze others’ reasoning (to engage in scientific argument);
    iv. Gives you a chance to hear what students are thinking (listen in on group discussions); v. Gives students a chance to voice their questions and hear those of others (realize they are
    not alone in struggling to master the material);vi. Allows students to get help from others to clear up items of confusion; for example,
    misunderstanding of a technical term that they may have but others around them do not;vii. Builds collegial intellectual atmosphere among students (which promotes learning);viii. Helps students learn technical terminology by using it in discussion.Allows you and students to hear students’ reasoning for various answers;Gives students the chance to hear and respond to each others ideas;
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 19http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • Benefits
    Engage students in active learning:
    • Apply ideas/skills/problem solving.
    • Predict outcomes;
    • Reason in new contexts;
    • Draw connections between ideas.
    2. Promote student-student discussion
    • Create a collaborative spirit for supporting learning;
    • Practice justifying a position/responding to arguments;
    • Practice monitoring their own thinking;
    • Aid their learning of technical terminology by using it in discussion.
    3. Provide feedback to the instructor about students understanding.
    4. Provide feedback to the students about their own understanding, both through their
    seeing the histogram of responses and in follow up discussion by instructor.
    5. Use as formative assessment to guide teaching (measure what students are thinking
    and then address it): e.g. probe prior knowledge, probe current thinking, uncover student
    misconceptions.
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 19http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf
  • Benefits for Students
    a. promotes their ability to communicate their ideas.
    b. strengthens theirability to debate and defend their answers, and to suggest improvements.
    c. promotes peer discussion that is balanced, with ideas put forth evenly from both partners.
    d. promotes a safe environment for them to answer what they honestly think, rather than answering what they think the instructor wants.
    e. gives themfeedback on how well they understand a topic.
    f. gives the instructor feedback on what needs to be taught better, or expanded upon.
    g. encourages them to mentally engage with the concepts so that the lecture is not just passive listening and note taking.
    Source: Clicker Resource Guide: An Instructors Guide to the Effective Use of Personal Response Systems (Clickers) in Teaching, pg. 14http://www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/Clicker_guide_CWSEI_CU-SEI.pdf