Collins Street Visual Merchandising Presentation August 2009 The Retail  Doctor Group
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Collins Street Visual Merchandising Presentation August 2009 The Retail Doctor Group

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The Retail Doctor Group

The Retail Doctor Group
How to implement effective visual merchandising.
August 2009

A presentation for Collins Street Precinct

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    Collins Street Visual Merchandising Presentation August 2009 The Retail  Doctor Group Collins Street Visual Merchandising Presentation August 2009 The Retail Doctor Group Presentation Transcript

    • How to build powerful visual merchandising that lead to greater sales, customer visits and profits VISUAL MERCHANDISING The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • LEARNING OUTCOMES Learning Outcomes  Learning Outcome 1 Understanding visual merchandising, why we do it?  Learning Outcome 2 Understanding floor lay-out and the various merchandise components and their placement.  Learning Outcome 3 Working with colour  Learning Outcome 4 Merchandising Principles  Learning Outcome 5 Displays and Ideas © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • ENVIRONMENT ELEMENTS THAT COMPOSE THE STORE Visual Communications Store Planning Retail Identity Space Allocation Graphics Layout POS Signage Circulation Store Image OMPOSE And Productivity Store Design Exterior Design Merchandising Ambiance Fixture Selection Lighting Merchandise Presentation Visual Merchandising 3
    • DELIVER POINT OF DIFFERENCE SEAMLESSLY Deliver Point of Difference Seamlessly  Store design and format  Appealing and relevant  Visual merchandising  Your story by categories  Line of sight  Impact  What do you want me to buy?  Take the customer on a journey  Multi channel (web site) © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • WHAT IS VISUAL MERCHANDISING What is Visual Merchandising What is Visual Merchandising? It is the presentation of a store and it’s merchandise in order to sell the goods and services of the store. “IT IS THEIR SILENT SALESPERSON” © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    •  To create Interest  To attract customers  Ease of selection for the customer  Promote stock  Maximise sales  Creates a desire to buy  Create store ambience  Project a store image  Win confidence, to give the customer faith in the store and product  Assist in add-on sales  Monitor stock levels  Shows how product is used  Communicates to the customer © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    •  Visual merchandising is at the heart of retail design-the fine art of persuasion.  This includes windows and displays but also takes in the entire in-store environment.  It may even go further into the realms of graphics, audio-visual media, point of sale material, all the way to the store as the total embodiment of the brand - the 3D brand © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • FLOOR LAYOUT Floor Layout When deciding on product placement and presentation, retailers need to identify areas that will maximise sales for the store. This is done by assessing the traffic flow where people walk the most and where they walk the least. Hot Spots : Entrance and payment areas receive the most traffic - product at eye level. Warm spots : Secondary traffic areas, just beyond hotspots - product just above or below eye level. Cold Spots: Generally in far corners of stores - low customer traffic – product in very high or very low sight lines. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • FLOOR LAYOUT Floor Layout The merchandise in most stores can be broken down into the following components. Each component can be strategically placed to enhance sales  Best sellers:  Speciality goods  High profit items  Seasonal lines  Basic stock  Advertised lines  Problem stock  Others  Impulse lines © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • PRODUCT Product BEST SELLERS:  In the best position possible to give the greatest opportunity to sell  prime position within it’s classification HIGH PROFIT ITEMS  Position within their classification  Know what they are (all staff)  Position close to best sellers (consider supermarkets - generic products are positioned close to leading sellers) BASIC STOCK  Position within their classification  Prime position  Readily available position  Never hidden © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • PRODUCT Product PROBLEM STOCK  Never give problem stock your best selling positions. Prime space is for money making stock  Problem stock should be identified quickly and dealt with quickly also. IMPULSE LINES  Easily accessible and in high traffic area i.e. P.O.S. Entrance or in major traffic aisle. Rapid turnover SPECIALITY GOODS  More complex product requires more explanation in selling features and benefits  Positioned away from main traffic area SEASONAL LINES  Relate to merchandise affected by the season  Usually given a high traffic area as limited time to sell © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • PRODUCT Product ADVERTISED LINES  With related classifications  Highlighted  If to draw attention to other merchandise then it should be visible but not on best aisle or fixture. Opportunity for additional sales OTHER FACTORS  There are no hard and fast rules in merchandising only helpful guidelines.  Practical factors can change positioning of items such as  Size of product  Security  Constraints with fixtures and available space  Take a critical look at your store and analyse the positioning of YOUR stock!!!!!!!!! © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • DOMINANT DISPLAYS Dominant Displays Dominance:  Attractive displays have a centre of attention or dominance to which the viewer's eye is drawn and held.  Without a dominant display feature, the shopper's eye will be attracted elsewhere and the merchandise message will not communicate effectively.  A display element (e.g. red) or display component (e.g. merchandise) is made dominant by subordinating all other elements and components.  Dominance within a display allows the retailer to emphasis a single promotional message or focus on a direct purchase incentive. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • PROPORTION OF DISPLAYS Proportion of Displays Proportion is the effective arrangement of parts of displays in terms of the display elements:  Colour - the extent of darker colour to lighter.  Line - the layout of small object to large objects. Texture - the area of differing surfaces.  Shape - the number of round object to square objects . Space - the amount of open space to closed space © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • GROUPING THE DISPLAY ARRANGEMENT Grouping the Display Arrangement  Grouping Display arrangement is organising display merchandise into interesting, pleasing and stimulating patterns.  Haphazard arrangement of merchandise can substantially reduce a display's effectiveness.  Selection displays are simple arranged in some well-organised fashion, but special merchandise is frequently presented in one of four definite A arrangement patterns:  The pyramid,  The zigzag,  The step or  The fan arrangement © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • A BALANCED DISPLAY A Balanced Display Balance:  To be an attractive and comfortable experience, a retail display should exhibit a sense of equilibrium or balance between all elements and components of the display.  A balanced display is one in which each part of the display has equal visual weight.  Balance can be achieved in either a formal or informal sense.  Forma/balance is created when both sides of a display are exactly alike in terms of type, size, color, shape and placement of merchandise  Each side is a mirror image of the other side. Such displays are usually found to be a more "comfortable" visual experience. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • DOCTOR’S PRESCRIPTION Doctor’s Prescription  Less is more  Apples with Apples  Visual cues  Change your displays  Consider lighting  Focus your display © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • CUSTOMER NAVIGATION Customer Navigation © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
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    • Working with Colour The reason why colour is so important is that people like colour. It appeals to their emotions and contributes to a more attractive environment. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • LIGHTING Lighting © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • THE 3 SECOND TEST
    • G ISIN AND RCH ME UAL VIS •Suggestion positioning. Once the customer has already purchased one item, it’s easier to sell an additional item. Thus apparel retailers strategically place impulse buys like hair bows and costume jewelry by the cashier the same way supermarket checkouts display candy and magazines. 27
    • SPACE PRIME Focus Wall The prime real estate in your store is the 20-foot semicircle F F just inside the o o front door. c c u u s s You are here
    • COLOUR IN MERCHANDISING Colour in Merchandising  Causes people to buy on impulse  Improves the appearance of merchandise  Provides variety, contrast and harmonising colours that will create interest  Has immediate and emotional impact. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • WORKING WITH COLOUR Working with Colour  Can enhance the appearance of specific products  Help to create sales  Improve profitability  Very importantly it creates an atmosphere which appeals to customers. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • WORKING WITH COLOUR Working with Colour  The eye tends to concentrate automatically on the biggest object in the field of view. Therefore you need to think about your prime positions, hot spots, and hotspot display areas in relation to the colour available to you with your product.  Colour schemes should not be out of date. The majority of people ( the mass market) are motivated by inner compulsions rather than rational thought, and therefore they react to trends and seek the same as everybody else.  Therefore you need to be aware of trend colours and look to see what other retailers are doing and read magazines so as to present your product in a manner that the mass market relates too. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • WORKING WITH COLOUR Working with Colour Colour Blocking Colour Blocking has always been Left to Right, Light to Dark when working with a multitude of different colours. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • WORKING WITH COLOUR Working with Colour In the modern era retailers are looking to keep their store environment varied. Hence why we frequently merchandise our stores and colour gives us that ability along with displays to offer that change in environment so customers think there is always something new and exciting going on. Colour has that ability to provide that stimulus. © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • MERCHANDISING PRINCIPLES Merchandising Principles Merchandise Principles for Arranging Stock  Consider your stock  Space  Sizing of stock  Ease of selection for customer  Security  New deliveries  Lighting  Promotional activities RINCIPLES  Use of colour  Is all merchandise represented  Theme  Strength and weaknesses of last merchandising  Balanced  Flow of colour  Categories  Flow of product and it’s adjacencies  Brands  How store is performing  Prices  Quality of product  Store layout  Lifestyle  Hot Spots ~ Cold Spots  OH&S  Prime visual space  Signage  Fixtures © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • VERTICAL COLOR BLOCKING
    • VISUAL MERCHANDISING Visual Merchandising Visual Merchandising  Apples with apples  Don’t be all things to all people  Don’t clutter  Do keep it simple  Change it regularly  Link the activity inside your store © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • MERCHANDISING PRINCIPLES Merchandising Principles Merchandise Principles for Arranging Stock  An effective visual merchandiser has “ AN EYE FOR DETAIL”  Look at your work through the eyes of a customer to analyse how effective the product is presented.  Am I using that silent salesperson to it’s best advantage? © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • VISUAL MERCHANDISING Visual Merchandising Strong statement Symmetry of layout © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • WHERE ARE SALES COMING FROM? Where Are Sales Coming From?  Store layout  Merchandise assortment - hot Spots  Area of the store  Stock aging / profile  Mix © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • AS AY PL DE IS © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • S A E D Y A L P S I © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    •  Think of new ways to place stock together to maybe extend the use of colour, or just two colours placed in a display hotspot to attract attention.  Observe current trends by walking around various shopping centres see what colours make an impact, look at other peoples displays. It’s a great way to stimulate your own ideas.  With the information presented to you, write down any new ideas you have on your store layout drawing and note any display ideas that have come to mind. It is best to have these ideas on paper so as to refer to them when you next go back to your store! © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • STORE DESIGN AND FORMAT Store Design and Format Why is this important?  Appealing  Lighting  Layout  Ease of line of sight  Impactful  What do you want me to buy?  Taking the customer on a journey © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • STORE LAYOUT AND DESIGN STRATEGY ESIGN © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • STORE LAYOUT Store Layout Floor Layout  When deciding on product placement - identify areas that will maximise sales.  Assess traffic flow - where people walk most and where they walk least.  Therefore - identify, hot, warm and cold spots © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • MERCHANDISING PRESENTATION Merchandising Presentation BEST SELLERS  In the best position possible to give the greatest opportunity to sell  Prime position within its classification HIGH PROFIT ITEMS  Position within their classification  Know what they are (all staff)  Position close to best sellers (consider supermarkets - generic products are positioned close to leading sellers) © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • 2. THE UNIQUE BRANDED DIFFERENCE Merchandising Presentation Why is it important?  80% of purchases are impulse  Customers make the final decision to buy in the ‘last 3 feet’  Store layout and presentation can make a ± to your business of 40%!  Customers shop horizontally not vertically! © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd
    • For more information and to see how The Retail Doctor can help you become ‘Fit for Business’ please connect with us. Facebook: www.facebook.com/retaildoctor Twitter: www.twitter.com/retaildoctor LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/brianwalkerretaildoctor Alternatively, you can contact us on the details below: THE RETAIL DOCTOR® GROUP PTY LTD Mailing Address PO Box 209 Milsons Point NSW 2061 Phone | +61 (0)2 9460 2882 Fax | +61 (0)2 9460 3883 E-mail | businessfitness@retaildoctor.com.au Web: | www.retaildoctor.com.au © Copyright 2009. The Retail Doctor® Group Pty Ltd