Using Haptic Studio to CreateCustom Haptic EffectsMay 3, 2012NASDAQ: IMMR      ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential
What you will learn in this course   Who should be taking this course?   What you should have installed before starting ...
Who should be taking this course? This course targets experienced Android developers who  have completed the course UHL: ...
What you should have installed beforestarting the classAs an experienced Android developer, you should attend class  with ...
What will be provided to you in classThis course focuses on developing and implementing custom haptic   effects. You will ...
Why custom haptic effects? Haptic Studio allows you to dramatically enhance the quality  of the mobile users communicatio...
Introduction to creating custom hapticeffects In this course you will be creating not only custom basis  effects, but als...
Introduction to creating custom hapticeffects Haptic Studio simplifies the manual creation of haptic effects  to complime...
Exploring the sample application In the following exercises, you will create custom haptic  effects and implement them in...
Exercise 1: Exploring the sampleapplicationIn this exercise you will: Explore the Airplane Crash sample application with ...
Understanding audio files Important that you be able to examine audio files and identify  key features The Y-axis repres...
Discussion: Identifying key features of anaudio file and developing a design strategy Keep effects as short as possible ...
Discussion: Identifying key features of anaudio file and developing a design strategy Let’s revisit the sound track from ...
Discussion: Identifying key features of anaudio file and developing a design strategy Better strategy would be to break i...
Creating basis effects to compliment thefeatures of audio files Basis effects can be used alone or combined to form more ...
Creating basis effects to compliment thefeatures of audio files When you add a Periodic or MagSweep effect to your projec...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineIn this exercise you will: Se...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineLaunching Haptic Studio Plug ...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineSelect and modify a basis effe...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Locate and select the file r...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Double click on the new runn...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Adjust the Magnitude paramet...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Adjust the Period parameter ...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Since this is a single-magni...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Your timeline should now loo...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Click on the New Timeline bu...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Click on the running_he obje...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Double click on the new dyin...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine   Double click on the dying_...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Play the timeline and experi...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineCombining multiple basis effec...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineExample of a single effect (si...
Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineYou can place an audio file on...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactIn this exercise you will: Select appropriate ...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Return to your Airplane Crash Haptic Studio p...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Estimated duration of initial impact: 279 ms ...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Click on the New MagSweep button on the toolb...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactYour settings should look something like this: ...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Click the New Periodic button on the toolbar ...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactYour settings should look something like this: ...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact   Double click on theimpact_tlto open the tim...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactYour settings should look something like this: ...
Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Play the timeline and experience the complex ...
Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into an application Media files are not embedded in Haptic Studio projects and...
Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into an applicationThis is a segment of the Java file produced:          ©2011 ...
Exercise 4: Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into the Airplane Crash applicationIn this exercise you will: Expo...
Exercise 4: Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into the Airplane Crash application Return to your Airplane Crash ...
Exercise 4: Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into the Airplane Crash applicationAdding custom haptic effects to ...
Playing custom effects To play a custom haptic effect, you must first create a Device  object    device = Device.newDevic...
Stopping custom effects To stop the play of custom haptic effects, you must use the  following code:   device.stopAllPlay...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationIn this exercise you will: Set up an Eclips...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationSet up an Eclipse project In Eclipse, selec...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the Universal Haptic Layer (UHL) package...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the jar file Right-click on the Airplan...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the Javadoc for the UHL Expand the UHL....
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the native library file Create a new fo...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdjust the application’s manifest file Open...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationDisabling automatic haptic feedback Add the...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the custom haptic effect you exported ea...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the custom haptic effect you exported ea...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the onCreate() method of your Activity ...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the Running() method within the Activit...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the listener for the media player, when...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the Dying() method within the Activity,...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the listener for the media player, when...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the override function onAnimationEnd() ...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the listener for the media player, when...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application Add import statements for the Device and I...
Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application Add code to close the device again in the ...
Appendix A: Development environmentsetupInstalling Android SDK on your PC If you haven’t already download and install the...
Appendix A: Development environmentsetupInstalling Haptic Studio on your PC Log on to your computer using an account with...
Appendix A: Development environmentsetupLinking your Android device to Haptic Studio On the handset, enable USB Debugging...
Appendix A: Development environmentsetupInstalling and configuring Haptic Bridge on your  Android device Go to  http://ma...
Appendix A: Development environmentsetup Launch the application Launch Haptic Studio   – If Studio is able to communicat...
Appendix B: Haptic Studio user interfaceHaptic Studio menu items File menu—open, save and close files, create new files, ...
Appendix B: Haptic Studio user interface Viewicon—shortcut to View menu operations Basis Effects icons—inserts new Perio...
Appendix C: Haptic Studio deviceconnection trouble shooting1.   Save your work2.   Close the Studio3.   Unplug your device...
Appendix C: Haptic Studio deviceconnection trouble shooting10. Next, keep the ―Services‖ control window open (in case you ...
Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksShifting All Timeline Elements – To shift all Timeline elements one way or the   ...
Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksTimelines vs. Non-Timeline Basis effects - It is good practice place   each of yo...
Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksSingle Effect Files vs. Multi-Effect Files - It is not necessary to create   a ne...
Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksSharp vs Strong Effect Styles – Although Haptic Studio offers three Style  modes ...
Additional Resources Android Developer  website: http://developer.android.com/index.html http://www.immersion.com/develo...
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Immr template studio courseware

  1. 1. Using Haptic Studio to CreateCustom Haptic EffectsMay 3, 2012NASDAQ: IMMR ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential
  2. 2. What you will learn in this course Who should be taking this course? What you should have installed before starting the class What will be provided to you in class Why custom haptic effects? Introduction to creating custom haptic effects Exploring the sample application Understanding audio files Creating basis effects to compliment the features of audio files Combining multiple basis effects to create a complex timeline effect Exporting haptic effects for implementation into an application Adding custom haptic effects to an Android application Haptic Studio tips and tricks ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 2
  3. 3. Who should be taking this course? This course targets experienced Android developers who have completed the course UHL: Adding haptic effects to your Android application. In order to implement custom effects created using Haptic Studio, developers should have practical experience with: Android architecture The life cycle of components Event handling Tween and frame-by-frame animation Debugging an application Deploying an application to a device ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 3
  4. 4. What you should have installed beforestarting the classAs an experienced Android developer, you should attend class with these items installed on your computer: Java SE Eclipse Android SDK Android Developer Tools – From within Eclipse’s ―Install new Software‖ option, point toHaptic Studio IMPORTANT NOTE: Before starting the class, you should ensure that Haptic Studio is able to see and communicate with your Android device via Haptic Bridge. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 4
  5. 5. What will be provided to you in classThis course focuses on developing and implementing custom haptic effects. You will be provided the code for a simple sample application as well as four audio files that you will use as part of the exercises: – AirplaneCrash_Starter.zip (Eclipse project) – AirplaneCrash_Starter.apk – AirplaneCrash_Solution.zip (Eclipse project) – airplane_snd.wav – running_snd.wav – dying_snd.wav – impact_snd.wav You are also provided a reference library of Haptic Studio effects that can be used as-is or modified for use in your future Haptic Studio effect design projects: Haptic_Studio_Reference_Library.ivs ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 5
  6. 6. Why custom haptic effects? Haptic Studio allows you to dramatically enhance the quality of the mobile users communications experience with custom haptic effects Go beyond the simple haptic effects Allows you to design effects that are perfectly tuned to compliment your project’s audio or visual elements ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 6
  7. 7. Introduction to creating custom hapticeffects In this course you will be creating not only custom basis effects, but also timeline effects Timeline effects combine basis effects along a timeline Haptic Studio allows you to create custom, timeline effects in one of two ways: – Manually - using the tools within Haptic Studio – Dynamically - using Haptic Studio’s MIDI conversion feature This course if focused on the manual creation of custom haptic effects ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 7
  8. 8. Introduction to creating custom hapticeffects Haptic Studio simplifies the manual creation of haptic effects to compliment media files by allowing you to import and reference a media file on the same timeline that you are using to create the effect Supported formats are: – AAC (.acc) – K3G (.k3g) – MPEG-4 Audio (.m4a) – MIDI (.mid) – MP3 (.mp3) – MPEG-4 Video (mp4) – SKM (.skm) – Wave (.wav) ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 8
  9. 9. Exploring the sample application In the following exercises, you will create custom haptic effects and implement them into a sample application that is based on the animation of an aircraft in flight You will be designing custom haptic effects that allow the user to feel the running engine and the impact of the crash. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 9
  10. 10. Exercise 1: Exploring the sampleapplicationIn this exercise you will: Explore the Airplane Crash sample application with and without haptic effects Install and run the Airplane Crash starterfile Install and run the Airplane Crash solution file ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 10
  11. 11. Understanding audio files Important that you be able to examine audio files and identify key features The Y-axis represents amplitude (volume) and the X-axis represents frequency (the number of cycles/vibrations per a specified amount of time) Higher frequency vibrations are sensed as higher pitched sounds and lower frequency vibrations are sensed as low pitch sounds Easy to shape haptic effects to match audio waveforms Haptic Studio allows you to view audio waveforms and haptic waveforms side-by-side ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 11
  12. 12. Discussion: Identifying key features of anaudio file and developing a design strategy Keep effects as short as possible Reduces the impact of drift—a phenomena that can cause long effects to become out of sync’ with audio or other media files that they accompany Consider all of the component parts (audio, animation, haptics, interactions, controls, etc.) in advance Then develop a haptic design strategy that will maximize the benefits of haptic feedback ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 12
  13. 13. Discussion: Identifying key features of anaudio file and developing a design strategy Let’s revisit the sound track from our sample application Airplane Crash Looking at the soundtrack waveform, you should be able to easily identify these key features: engine running, engine dying, silence and impact ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 13
  14. 14. Discussion: Identifying key features of anaudio file and developing a design strategy Better strategy would be to break it down into three separate haptic effects Elected to divide the soundtrack into three separate sound files—each representing a key feature Straight forward approach will allow our application to simply call the appropriate haptic effect as each individual sound file is played ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 14
  15. 15. Creating basis effects to compliment thefeatures of audio files Basis effects can be used alone or combined to form more complex, timeline effect There are three types of basis effects: – Periodic effects are cyclic or pulsing and played at a specific (though variable) frequency – MagSweep effects are constant as opposed to cyclic – WaveForm effects can capture a very high degree of detail from an audio file and require TouchSense 5000 for replay ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 15
  16. 16. Creating basis effects to compliment thefeatures of audio files When you add a Periodic or MagSweep effect to your project you will be able to control certain attributes In this course you will deal with: – Magnitude - the strength of the effect—like volume is to audio – Duration - the length of the effect—how long it will play – Attack Time - the amount of time to fade in an effect – Fade Time - the amount of time to fade out an effect When dealing with Periodic effects, you also have control over: – Period - the amount of time from cycle to cycle ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 16
  17. 17. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineIn this exercise you will: Select appropriate basis effects for each of the audio files Modify these effects to compliment the sound file Use a timeline to combine audio and haptic effects for testing ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 17
  18. 18. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineLaunching Haptic Studio Plug your Android device into your computer and launch Haptic Bridge – Do this BEFORE launching Haptic Studio. Launch Haptic Studio Select your device from the drop-down menu From the View menu, select Details ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 18
  19. 19. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineSelect and modify a basis effect to compliment the sound of the running engine You will adjust the parameters to create a strong, steady pulse with an abrupt start (attack) and stop (fade) Click on the New Timeline button on the toolbar: Place your cursor in the object name area and rename it torunning_tl Click on the New Multimedia button on the toolbar: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 19
  20. 20. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Locate and select the file running_snd.wav Click on the New Periodic buttonon the toolbar: Place your cursor in the object name area and rename the effect running_he ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 20
  21. 21. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Double click on the new running_he object to open the effect editor view: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 21
  22. 22. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Adjust the Magnitude parameter to the maximum level (10000) Set the Attack Time and Fade Time parameters both to 0 so that the effect will start and stop abruptly Use the Play button to sample the effect ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 22
  23. 23. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Adjust the Period parameter to 50 ms and play the effect again ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 23
  24. 24. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Since this is a single-magnitude effect (sudden start/stop) you can specify an infinite duration and control the start and stop at the application level Click on the Infinite button: Double click on the running_tlobject to open the timeline Drag an instance of the running_sndobject into the timeline Drag an instance of the running_he object into the timeline ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 24
  25. 25. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Your timeline should now look like this: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 25
  26. 26. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Click on the New Timeline button on the toolbar and name the new timeline object dying_tl Click on the New Multimedia button on the toolbar and select the file dying_snd.wav from your hard drive Double click on the dying_snd object to produce the Wave Form inspector: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 26
  27. 27. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Click on the running_he object in list view to highlight it: Select Copy (Ctrl+C) and then Paste > Effects and Referenced Effects (Ctrl+V) from the Edit menu Rename the new object dying_he ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 27
  28. 28. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Double click on the new dying object to open the effect editor and change the duration to 1620 ms Now adjust the Fade Time parameter to 1620ms so that it matches the duration-- producing a steady, fading, magnitude slope from beginning to end ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 28
  29. 29. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Double click on the dying_tlobject to open the timeline Drag the dying_sndobject into the timeline Drag thedying_he object into the timeline Because you specified the duration of the effect to match the duration of the sound file the two should match up perfectly on the timeline ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 29
  30. 30. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engine Play the timeline and experience the sound and haptic effect together Select Save > Save As and name your Haptic Studio project Airplane Crash ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 30
  31. 31. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineCombining multiple basis effects to create a complex timeline effect Complex haptic effects are created by arranging one or more basis effects (like building blocks) on a timeline In the case of complex effects, the application will call the timeline and not the individual effect A timeline can be simple—a single basis effect repeated to create some sort of rhythm for example, or complex—multiple basis effects that may overlap ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 31
  32. 32. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineExample of a single effect (simple) timelineExample of a multiple effect (complex) timeline ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 32
  33. 33. Exercise 2: Creating simple basis effects to matchthe sounds of the running and dying engineYou can place an audio file on the timeline as a development aidWhen a complex haptic effect timeline is exported, it is treated as a single effect. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 33
  34. 34. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactIn this exercise you will: Select appropriate basis effects for each part of the impact audio file Modify these effects to compliment the sound they will accompany Combine the basis effects on a timeline ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 34
  35. 35. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Return to your Airplane Crash Haptic Studio project. Add a new timeline object and rename it impact_tl Use the New Multimedia button to import the file impact_snd.wav Double click on the impact_snd object to display the audio waveform (Figure 22). Listen carefully as you play the file and notice that there are really two components to the sound. There is the initial impact followed by a fading aftershock. Notice that the entire duration is 2.332 seconds (2332 milliseconds) ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 35
  36. 36. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Estimated duration of initial impact: 279 ms (1/8th of the total) Estimate duration of aftershock: 2053 ms (7/8th of the total) ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 36
  37. 37. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Click on the New MagSweep button on the toolbar to insert a MagSweep object Rename the new object impact_a Double click on the impact_a object to open the effects editor and apply theses settings: – Magnitude: 10000 – Duration: 279 ms – Attack Time: 0 – Fade Time: 0 ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 37
  38. 38. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactYour settings should look something like this: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 38
  39. 39. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Click the New Periodic button on the toolbar to introduce a new Periodic object and rename it impact_b Double click the new impact_bobject to produce the object editor and apply these settings: – Magnitude: 10000 – Period: 70 ms (a slower, deeper, pulsing than the running engine) – Duration: 2053 ms (estimate determined earlier) – Attack Time: 0 – Fade Time: 2053 ms ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 39
  40. 40. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactYour settings should look something like this: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 40
  41. 41. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Double click on theimpact_tlto open the timeline Drag theimpact_sndobject into the timeline Drag the impact_a object into the timeline Drag the impact_b object into the timeline Select the impact_a object on the timeline – Slowly move your cursor over the right boundary until the 4-way arrow turns into a 2-way arrow Select impact_b effect to produce the 4-way arrow Use your cursor and the 2-way arrow to adjust the length of this effect to match the sound wave form (approximately 2113 ms) ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 41
  42. 42. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impactYour settings should look something like this: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 42
  43. 43. Exercise 3: Creating a complex, timelineeffect to match the sound of impact Play the timeline and experience the complex effect and sound playing together Select File > Save ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 43
  44. 44. Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into an application Media files are not embedded in Haptic Studio projects and data exported from Haptic Studio contains no information about media files—they are strictly for development purposes Effects and media files must be re-synchronized at the application level In the case of a complex effect that includes multiple basis effects, the timeline will be called and not the individual effects When you export from Haptic Studio for Android applications, you will either export as an IVT file, or as Java code If you are exporting Java code, omit the effect names if possible ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 44
  45. 45. Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into an applicationThis is a segment of the Java file produced: ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 45
  46. 46. Exercise 4: Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into the Airplane Crash applicationIn this exercise you will: Export your Haptic Studio created effects to a Java file ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 46
  47. 47. Exercise 4: Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into the Airplane Crash application Return to your Airplane Crash Haptic Studio project. Select File > Export > Java Code and save the file as AirplaneEffects.java to your hard drive. When asked about omitting effect names, say no ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 47
  48. 48. Exercise 4: Exporting haptic effects forimplementation into the Airplane Crash applicationAdding custom haptic effects to an Android application Adding a custom haptic effect is a multi-step process that includes: – Adding the UHL package, – Adding the native library file – Reading custom haptic effects information into a buffer – Playing the haptic effects on your target device ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 48
  49. 49. Playing custom effects To play a custom haptic effect, you must first create a Device object device = Device.newDevice(context); You also need to create an IVTBuffer object before playing the custom effects (IVT is the native file format for Haptic Studio) IVTBufferivt = new IVTBuffer(myeffects.ivt); Once these objects are created and initialized, you can play the actual effect by using the playIVTEffect() method device.playIVTEffect(ivt, myeffects.Periodic); ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 49
  50. 50. Stopping custom effects To stop the play of custom haptic effects, you must use the following code: device.stopAllPlayingEffects(); The Device must be closed after it has been used to play and stop the haptic effects. This ensures that there are no resource leaks in the application. device.close(); ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 50
  51. 51. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationIn this exercise you will: Set up an Eclipse project using the Airplane Crash starter file provided Add the custom haptic effects you have created to the sample application ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 51
  52. 52. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationSet up an Eclipse project In Eclipse, select File > Import > General > Existing Projects into Workspace Select Next and then choose the radio button for Select archive file Enter the path to the file AirplaneCrash_Starter.zipthat is provided with this course ClickFinish ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 52
  53. 53. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the Universal Haptic Layer (UHL) package Unzip the UHL package that you downloaded earlier. You will see three files: – UHL.jar – libEmmulatorJ.so – UHLdoc.zip Copy the UHL.jar and UHLdoc.zip files and paste them in the libs folder for the project. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 53
  54. 54. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the jar file Right-click on the AirplaneCrash_Starter project in the Eclipse Package Explorer and choose Build Path > Configure Build Path Select the Libraries tab and click on Add JARs Browse to the projects libs folder and select the UHL.jar file Notice the UHL.jar file added to the project ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 54
  55. 55. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the Javadoc for the UHL Expand the UHL.jar directory and select Javadoc location. Click Edit. In the Javadoc For ‘UHL.jar’ window, select the Javadoc in archive radio button. Select the Workspace file radio button. To set the Archive path, browse to your project and then the libs folder and select UHLdoc.zip. Click OK. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 55
  56. 56. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the native library file Create a new folder armeabi, inside the libsfolder in your project directory Copy the libImmEmulatorJ.so file from the UHL package and paste it into this new armeabifolder ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 56
  57. 57. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdjust the application’s manifest file Open AndroidManifest.xmlin the root directory of your Eclipse project Locate the tag <uses-sdkandroid:minSdkVersion=”3”/> and change the value of the minSdkVersionto 7. Your code should look like this: <uses-sdkandroid:minSdkVersion=”7”/> After the application tag block, add the following code for the VIBRATE permission: <uses-permission android:name="android.permission.VIBRATE" /> Save the file ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 57
  58. 58. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationDisabling automatic haptic feedback Add the following code to the layout file in your project to disable the haptic effects that are automatically applied to certain components in the Android user interface: <Button android:id="@+id/replayButton" android:layout_centerInParent="true" android:layout_height="wrap_content" android:layout_width="wrap_content" android:text="@string/replay" android:onClick="replayAnimation" android:hapticFeedbackEnabled="false"/> ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 58
  59. 59. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the custom haptic effect you exported earlier Copy the AirplaneEffects.java file from your hard drive to the src directory in your Eclipse project Add the package declaration to the top of the Java file; package com.immersion.haptic; Open AirplaneCrashActivity.java class in the IDE for editing Declare the Device class variable in your Activity: Device device; ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 59
  60. 60. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash applicationAdd the custom haptic effect you exported earlier Create an IVTBufferobject with the exported effect definitions in your Activity; IVTBufferivtBuffer = new IVTBuffer(Airplane.ivt); ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 60
  61. 61. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the onCreate() method of your Activity class, create a Device object; // Instantiate a device object try { device = Device.newDevice(getApplicationContext()); } catch(Exception ex) { Log.i("AirplaneCrashActivity.class", "Error in instantiating device object for haptics!"+ex.getMessage()); } ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 61
  62. 62. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the Running() method within the Activity, add code to play the running_hehaptic effect after the mediaPlayer.start() statement // Play the running haptic effect try { device.playIVTEffect(ivtBuffer, Airplane.running_he); } catch(Exceptione) { Log.i("AirplaneCrashActivity.class","Catch all exceptions!"+e.getMessage()); } ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 62
  63. 63. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the listener for the media player, when the running_snd.wav audio file is playing, add code to stop the running_hehaptic effect when the audio stops: mediaPlayer.setOnCompletionListener(newOnCompletionListe ner() { @Override public void onCompletion(MediaPlayer mp) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub device.stopAllPlayingEffects(); mediaPlayer.stop(); mediaPlayer.release(); Dying(); } }); ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 63
  64. 64. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the Dying() method within the Activity, add code to play the dying_hehaptic effect after the mediaPlayer.start() statement: // Play the dying haptic effect try { device.playIVTEffect(ivtBuffer, Airplane.dying_he); } catch(Exceptione) { Log.i("AirplaneCrashActivity.class","Catch all exceptions!"+e.getMessage()); } ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 64
  65. 65. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the listener for the media player, when the dying_snd.wav audio file is playing, add code to stop the dying_hehaptic effect once the audio stops: mediaPlayer.setOnCompletionListener(newOnCompletionListe ner() { @Override public void onCompletion(MediaPlayer mp) { // TODO Auto-generated method stub device.stopAllPlayingEffects(); mediaPlayer.stop(); mediaPlayer.release(); } }); ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 65
  66. 66. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the override function onAnimationEnd() of the planeAnimation3.setAnimationListener() method, add code to play the impact_tleffect after the mediaPlayer.start() statement: // Play the impact haptic effect try { device.playIVTEffect(ivtBuffer, Airplane.impact_tl); } catch(Exceptione) { Log.i("AirplaneCrashActivity.class","Catch all exceptions!"+e.getMessage()); } ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 66
  67. 67. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application In the listener for the media player, when the impact_snd.wav audio file is playing, add code to stop the impact_tlhaptic effect when the audio stops: mediaPlayer.setOnCompletionListener(newOnCompletionListe ner() { @Override public void onCompletion(MediaPlayer mp) { device.stopAllPlayingEffects(); mediaPlayer.stop(); mediaPlayer.release(); } }); ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 67
  68. 68. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application Add import statements for the Device and IVTBufferobjects (if they weren’t added automatically): import com.immersion.uhl.Device; import com.immersion.uhl.IVTBuffer; In the onDestroy() method of the Activity, add code to close the device: /* When the device is not needed anymore, it must be closed to avoid resource leak */ device.close(); ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 68
  69. 69. Exercise 5: Adding your custom hapticeffects to the Airplane Crash application Add code to close the device again in the onKeyDown() method in the Activity: public booleanonKeyDown(intkeyCode, KeyEvent event) { if ((keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_BACK) || (keyCode == KeyEvent.KEYCODE_MENU)) { // Finish the activity finish(); // close the device device.close(); return true; } return super.onKeyDown(keyCode, event); } ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 69
  70. 70. Appendix A: Development environmentsetupInstalling Android SDK on your PC If you haven’t already download and install the latest Android SDK, do so now:http://developer.android.com/sdk/1.5_r1/index.html Within the Android SDK, navigate to the file adb.exe Add the path of the folder containing the executable adb.exe to your PATH environment variable – This step is critical in enabling Haptic Studio to connect to your device Install the ADB driver for your device ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 70
  71. 71. Appendix A: Development environmentsetupInstalling Haptic Studio on your PC Log on to your computer using an account with Administrator privileges (Haptic Studio requires Administrator privileges to install certain required components) Download Haptic Studio from the SDK area Run the Haptic Studio installer (.exe file) to install the application ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 71
  72. 72. Appendix A: Development environmentsetupLinking your Android device to Haptic Studio On the handset, enable USB Debugging in the Settings/Applications/Development menu. Connect the handset to the PC using the USB cable that came with your device. Open a command prompt and type: adb devices ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 72
  73. 73. Appendix A: Development environmentsetupInstalling and configuring Haptic Bridge on your Android device Go to http://market.android.com/details?id=com.immersion.designer bridge on your device and download the Haptic Bridge application, or search for Haptic Bridge in the Android Market Install the Haptic Bridge application to your Android device Reboot your device (this ensures that the Haptic Bridge service has started) Locate the Haptic Bridge application in the application drawer by looking for the Haptic Bridge icon ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 73
  74. 74. Appendix A: Development environmentsetup Launch the application Launch Haptic Studio – If Studio is able to communicate with the handset, the connection status displayed in the Haptic Bridge application will change to connected Click on Reset Connection button in the application if the Haptic Bridge doesn’t connect to Haptic Studio Haptic Studio will also display the device name in the toolbar – If you are using a TouchSense-enabled handset, the string that appears in the toolbar will be the version of the TouchSense Player in the handset – If the handset uses the TouchSense Emulator functionality of the UHL, TS Emulator 3000 will be displayed ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 74
  75. 75. Appendix B: Haptic Studio user interfaceHaptic Studio menu items File menu—open, save and close files, create new files, convert audio files Edit menu—cut, copy and paste View menu – Icon—shows only effect icons – List—this is essentially the Icon view reduced in size – Detail—lists effects and provides detailed information Help menu—launches help documentation in a new window. New, Open and Save icons—shortcuts to File menu operations Cut, Copy and Paste icons—shortcuts to Edit menu operations ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 75
  76. 76. Appendix B: Haptic Studio user interface Viewicon—shortcut to View menu operations Basis Effects icons—inserts new Periodic, MagSweep and WaveForm effects Timeline icon—creates a timeline into which basis effects can be placed and manipulated Multimedia icon—imports an audio file for reference purposes Play and Stop icons—shortcuts to Playback menu Device List—allows you to select your connected device Refresh icon—refreshes device list Help icon —shortcut to Help menu functionality ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 76
  77. 77. Appendix C: Haptic Studio deviceconnection trouble shooting1. Save your work2. Close the Studio3. Unplug your device4. Open the Haptic Bridge application on your device and restart the service5. Re-plug in your device6. Open your Windows Programs menu and go to your ―Administrative Tools‖ folder7. Open your ―Services‖ control application that is found in the ―Administrative Tools‖ folder8. Scroll down the list of services until you find the ―Immersion TouchSense Service‖9. Select the ―Immersion TouchSense Service‖ and stop that service, then restart the service from this same window ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 77
  78. 78. Appendix C: Haptic Studio deviceconnection trouble shooting10. Next, keep the ―Services‖ control window open (in case you need to restart the services again) and re-launch Haptic Studio11. Check your device drop-down list to find your device connected12. If your device does not show connected, press the device refresh icon13. Wait a few seconds and check your device list again14. If you still do not see your device, keep your device connected but open your Haptic Bridge application on your device and restart Haptic Bridge software15. Now try steps 11-12 again ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 78
  79. 79. Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksShifting All Timeline Elements – To shift all Timeline elements one way or the other, use ―Ctrl+A‖ to select all elements within the Timeline and then you use your cursor to drag all the elements left or right in the Timeline as you please.Sorting Effects within Timelines – While working within the Timeline view, you may find you want to sort the listed order of multiple objects to for instance, better align vibe events to a referenced waveform profile. Simply select the object name (not the Timeline events) and press your Delete key. Then use the Undo edit option. This will return your deleted Timeline object to the bottom of the Object list. In this way you can reorder the Object list in the Timeline anyway you like.Sorting Effects within the List View – Since Haptic Studio lists effects in the order they were created, you may find you want to reorder the Object in the List View. You can do this by opening a new project and dragging Objects over to the new project in any order that you might want. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 79
  80. 80. Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksTimelines vs. Non-Timeline Basis effects - It is good practice place each of your new Basis effects, whether they are Periodic or MagSweeps, into Timelines and to rename the Timelines describing their purpose, like ―Menu Click‖ or ―Engine.‖ Once your effect is in a Timeline you have more design options, like: – The ability to browse to a sound file and use that sound file as a reference during your design – The ability to use the repeat looping function – The ability to use the pre-roll function – The ability to use the Basis effect Override function and reuse those Basis effects for multiple Timelines without changing the parameters of the original Basis effect You can reference the ―Haptic_Studio_Reference_Library.ivs‖ effect file to see a good example of this. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 80
  81. 81. Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksSingle Effect Files vs. Multi-Effect Files - It is not necessary to create a new effect file for each effect. You can group any number of effects within one Studio file. The only exception is for ringtone specific effects. The TouchSense API mechanism for playing back an effect Timeline with a ringtone on a handset requires that the effect file have only one Timeline. If there is more than one Timeline in the referenced file, only the first Timeline will be played.Periodic vs MagSweep effects – While MagSweep effects are easier to work with (since they lack the added parameter that allows pulsing), they can limit your creativity. You may want to stick with using only Periodic Basis effects unless you are certain the effect you are creating will remain very smooth (without the need for pulsing or changing frequency parameters). ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 81
  82. 82. Appendix D: Haptic Studio tips and tricksSharp vs Strong Effect Styles – Although Haptic Studio offers three Style modes within the Basis effect editing windows, (Strong, Smooth and Sharp), you will likely find yourself only using the Sharp and Strong modes because they are so different from each other. The Smooth mode is a subtle difference from Strong mode that most users will not be able to differentiate.Periodic Wave Types – Within the Periodic editing window, you have the option of choosing the type of vibration waveform the TouchSense player will simulate. This function is for very high fidelity (like piezo) actuators. Do not choose a Wave Type if you are not designing for piezo actuators, just leave it as it is. But if you are designing for piezo actuators, it is best to use the Sine Wave Type. Sine waves produce strong, yet quiet effects.Actuator Index – If you are not designing for multi-actuator devices, you will never have to change this. This option would allow you to trigger effects on two (or more) actuators at the same time from a single Timeline. ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 82
  83. 83. Additional Resources Android Developer website: http://developer.android.com/index.html http://www.immersion.com/developers/index.php?op tion=com_content&view=article&id=505&Itemid=831 http://www.immersion.com/developers/index.php?op tion=com_content&view=article&id=503&Itemid=827 ©2011 Immersion Corporation–Confidential 83

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