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Mbchb mobile uni of leeds june2012

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Transcript

  • 1. School of MedicineMobile Learning Programme Nancy Davies June 2012
  • 2. Why Mobile Learning?• Background in mobile learning and considerable skills having worked with the ALPS CETL (www.alps-cetl.ac.uk)• Retaining ‘near patient’ learning• Timely access to medical information• Feedback opportunities from practice professionals• Opportunities for recording evidence and feedback• Encouraging good lifelong learning practices• Many different placement environments with varied access to IT
  • 3. Martini LearningOpportunities for learning - • Anytime • Anyplace • Anywhere
  • 4. SolutioniPhones provided to Year 4 and 5 to use as their device (260 in each year)O2 3G Network with unlimited dataStudents can pay to use for calls and texts
  • 5. Why Apple?• Desirability of iPhone-acceptance by Students• Richness of app store• Usability of device• Infection Control
  • 6. Key aspects of• Part of new curriculum delivered in 2010• Mobile embedded as part of blendedlearning strategy not just an add-on• Students at the heart ofdevelopments
  • 7. Apps forassessment and
  • 8. Apps• Progress File ‘Blog’ app - Recordingevidence or can just use as a diary forreflective learning• MiniCEX app – assessment for learning,gathers feedback on skills from clinicians• Learning Suite app – for quick quizzeswith automatic feedback, reflective andevaluation exercises• All free from the Apple App Store
  • 9. Medical Resources• Dr Companion app • BNF • Oxford Handbook of Clinical Medicine • Oxford Handbook of Clinical Specialities• Other apps, supported by app review site (http://www.medicine.leeds.ac.uk/mbchb/medicalApps.aspx)• Developing own apps with students – OSCEsupport, orientation, MCQ banks
  • 10. eBook Extras• Search across multiple books• Browse history• Bookmarks• Constantly updated• Zoom in to images• Portability
  • 11. The e-portfolio (Progress File)• Space for reflecting on progress• Space for recording evidence• Space for publishing assessment outcomes• Preparing for Life LongLearning• Developing skills for CPD• Key tool for Mobile learning
  • 12. Evaluati
  • 13. Benefits of mobile learning near patients – students “I think it’s a great advantage though because if you think you are going to looksomething up at home and you don’t have a piece of paper …you’ll forget it. I find I have a lot of free time, so if I’m going into the back room….I can look it up, oh yeah I know what that is now.” “…like I have sat in clinic…and the doctor has said to me “in a minute I’m going to ask you about nephrotic syndrome” and then he sort of turned round to go on his computer and I was like ok, nephrotic syndrome, um, so I’ve used it for literally just looking something up a lot.” “Disability friendly.You can’t carry books on a ward”
  • 14. Benefits of mobile learning near patients – teachers“Access to clinical information at the time they think of the question - more likely to look something up there and then than if have to remember to do so at a later date.” (Clinician) “Usually better/faster than hospital IT” (Clinician)“They were used in appropriate places in clinical settings… e.g. doctorsoffice or behind desk and they were used for appropriate activities so I was not concerned. Had they been playing games on them in less appropriate settings my answer would be different.” (Clinician)
  • 15. Issues with mobile learning near patients• “I don’t usually use it in front of patients. I think it’s quite unprofessional actually to use it in front of patients.” (Student)• “Doesn’t look good. Even if being used legitimately it just looks like they are texting their friends.” (Clinician)• “I am happy with this at appropriate moments but not if I or the patient are talking. I don’t want patients to take routine phone calls or play on their phones and I wouldn’t [do] so during a consultation. I would hope students will show similar etiquette.” (Clinician)
  • 16. Accessing information With only one option available how would you access medical reference? Book in Purchase PC eBook Mobile Library Own book eBookLong ref 24 27 12 43clinicShort ref 9 8 9 76clinicLong ref 50 34 17 10campusShort ref 28 15 12 55CampusOverall 111 84 50 184results n=121
  • 17. Benefits to Students• Lifelong learning, good CPD practice• Being prepared• Students can get support andassessment in work-based practice• Extra skills• Awareness of good quality, up to dateresources
  • 18. Benefits to Leeds• The new MBChB is underpinned by innovativetechnology enhanced learning• Acceptance of the device - wide impact• Real innovation in teaching medicine• Students can get support and assessment inwork-based practice• First steps to expanding mobile learning
  • 19. Questiotelteam@leeds.ac .uk