Digital Curation: Northern Grid Conference; June 2012
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Digital Curation: Northern Grid Conference; June 2012

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Most teachers recognise there is a great deal of valuable educational content available on the Internet. But finding content using ad-hoc searches or checking lists of web links is unlikely to be a ...

Most teachers recognise there is a great deal of valuable educational content available on the Internet. But finding content using ad-hoc searches or checking lists of web links is unlikely to be a productive use of a teachers available time. Recently social bookmarking tools including Delicious and social networks such as Twitter have made it easier for teachers to find and share resources, now online curation tools take this a step further.

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  • Most teachers recognise there is valuable educational content available on the Internet. But finding content using ad-hoc searches or checking lists of web links is unlikely to be a productive use of a teachers available time. Recently social bookmarking tools including Delicious and social networks such as Twitter have made it easier for teachers to find and share resources, now online curation tools take this a step further.\n\nwe are likely to be looking for expert advice, guidance, opinion or recommendation we can trust on what we are searching for, even if we have no intention to use it right away. And there are plenty of those in cyberspace. Only problem is Google's search juggernaut can't deliver such 'condensed' knowledge. You need to wade through web page after web page, Google's powerful search machine will flash in front of your eyes even before you type in exactly what you are looking for. Who needs such boring and arduous labor anymore?\n\nKeyword Community : http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sreedhar-pillai/how-long-will-you-give-go_b_1595921.html\n
  • \n\n\nThere are benefits for both teachers and students; teachers are rewarded by recognition of their expertise and knowledge when their resources are used, students develop research and critical thinking skills. Digital curation is ideal for teachers who are not naturally drawn to blogging. The key quailty of a curator is a deep interest in a subject and the ability to inspire; natural attributes of good teachers.\n
  • \n\n\nThere are benefits for both teachers and students; teachers are rewarded by recognition of their expertise and knowledge when their resources are used, students develop research and critical thinking skills. Digital curation is ideal for teachers who are not naturally drawn to blogging. The key quailty of a curator is a deep interest in a subject and the ability to inspire; natural attributes of good teachers.\n
  • \n\n\nThere are benefits for both teachers and students; teachers are rewarded by recognition of their expertise and knowledge when their resources are used, students develop research and critical thinking skills. Digital curation is ideal for teachers who are not naturally drawn to blogging. The key quailty of a curator is a deep interest in a subject and the ability to inspire; natural attributes of good teachers.\n
  • \n\n\nThere are benefits for both teachers and students; teachers are rewarded by recognition of their expertise and knowledge when their resources are used, students develop research and critical thinking skills. Digital curation is ideal for teachers who are not naturally drawn to blogging. The key quailty of a curator is a deep interest in a subject and the ability to inspire; natural attributes of good teachers.\n
  • Talk about developing a scoopity site\n
  • Talk about developing a scoopity site\n
  • Talk about developing a scoopity site\n
  • Talk about developing a scoopity site\n
  • Talk about developing a scoopity site\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • \nEngaging Students\nThe possibilities here are intriguing. Teachers can have students set up collaborative boards for specific projects, portfolios, or to add an exciting dimension to a digital newspaper.\nTo display images which are related to the topic of a book or research article you have published. The weblink for the relevant board can be given in the article or book so that interested readers can view the images which you have collected on that topic. The commentary box allows you to provide some analysis or contextualising material under each image.\nTo display infographics: data represented as graphs, tables, social maps, flow-charts and figures relevant to the board topic.\nAs a repository for images you have collected that can be used and analysed as part of a current or planned research project.\nTo display images of book covers written by others on topics related to your boards that you have found especially useful or interesting.\nBoards can be used to publicise and promote your own academic writing. This only really works with books and blog posts or website pages, given that Pinterest is overwhelmingly a visual medium and has limited space for text. However if you wanted to promote your research article, you could include an image of the journal’s cover and give the title of your article in the commentary box below, along with a link to its online version.\nUniversities or individual academic departments or research groups can set up their own Pinterest sites and use boards to promote research and teaching initiatives.\n\nSome ideas for university teaching include:\nGiving your students access to a set of images that are related to the unit subject are teaching. The images can be displayed on your computer during class-time, or the link can be provided to students for them to view the boards out of class time. You can use your own boards or others’ boards. (If there is a good board already existing on a particular topic there is probably no point replicating yourself unless you curate a substantially different set of images or one specifically tailored to the content of the subjects you are teaching.)\nEngaging students and promoting their understanding of the visual and cultural dimensions of a topic by asking them to make their own boards and curate images relevant to a topic, or together contribute to one big shared board. Part of this activity could be asking students to provide analytical commentary for images, or to write an accompanying essay that analyses the images or contextualises them in relation to academic scholarship on the topic.\n\n
  • There’s tons of research and proof that we learn best when we are actively involved. We actually learned in school by studying and doing, not listening to lectures. It’s time to teach speakers new ways of helping audiences learn.\n\n
  • Playlist are and excellent way to combine videos that follow a subject topic or context. Individual videos only have a transoient value - playlists offer a visual curriculum\n
  • Playlist are and excellent way to combine videos that follow a subject topic or context. Individual videos only have a transoient value - playlists offer a visual curriculum\n
  • Playlist are and excellent way to combine videos that follow a subject topic or context. Individual videos only have a transoient value - playlists offer a visual curriculum\n
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  • One of the things that is still not common on link sharing and curation sites (compare with blogs) are comments - perhaps \n
  • One of the things that is still not common on link sharing and curation sites (compare with blogs) are comments - perhaps \n
  • One of the things that is still not common on link sharing and curation sites (compare with blogs) are comments - perhaps \n
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Digital Curation: Northern Grid Conference; June 2012 Digital Curation: Northern Grid Conference; June 2012 Presentation Transcript

  • DIGITAL CURATION Theo Kuechel
  • DIGITAL CURATION Theo Kuechel
  • 1. identify quality content2. collect & curate the content3. annotate and add value through tags, descriptions and links4. publish & Share using any of the readily available online curation platforms5. promote through social media and networks discover new educational resources and practice discover resources created by other teachers and students share resources discovered by teachers and students form new relationships with colleagues and peers build communities on subject or topic expertise curation becomes a strand of digital literacy and competence  
  • Scoop.it
  • Scoop.it Video for Learning
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • PINTEREST http://pinterest.com/theok2/https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AiKmE2TeR4oLdHFqcGRCaTZUamNxWGpVSG01SGtUZVE#gid=0
  • YouTube VIDEO MANAGER Subscriptions Playlists/Fav’s Video Editor Video Manager History
  • VIDQUE Vidque
  • EDMEDIASHARE
  • Other Tools
  • Other Tools
  • Other Tools
  • Other Tools
  • Other Tools
  • Other Tools
  • Other Tools
  • Other Tools
  • Schools Digital CurationProject Wiki
  • John Sayers Spencer Ayers
  • Ant Heald Ant Heald
  • Gideon Williams Gideon Williams
  • The Missing Essential Part Conversation
  • The Missing Essential Part Conversation
  • John Sayers
  • John Sayers
  • THE FUTURE http://blog.fueledbycoffee.com/tagged/sxswcurate Craighton Berman
  • THE FUTURE http://blog.fueledbycoffee.com/tagged/sxswcurate Craighton Berman
  • InfoThank You Theo Kuechel
  • Infom. theo.kuechel@gmail.comt. @theokkG+ theo kuechelSkype. theokkScoop.it Video for LearningBlog. DigitalSignPostsProject. http://sdcp.wikispaces.com/Thank YouImage Credits:Slide #1 Endless forms most Beautiful CC-BY-NC http://www.flickr.com/photos/13964815@N00Slide #2 JeanineAnderson BY-NC-ND http://www.flickr.com/photos/jeanineanderson/Slide #16 Leo Reynolds BY-NC-SA http://www.flickr.com/photos/lwr/1934268258/ Theo Kuechel