UofP HUM 150 Complete Study Materials. Download Now!
 

UofP HUM 150 Complete Study Materials. Download Now!

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Since 2010 I've helped thousands of students do A+ work. I want you to have the best grades, but more importantly I want to help you.

Since 2010 I've helped thousands of students do A+ work. I want you to have the best grades, but more importantly I want to help you.

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    UofP HUM 150 Complete Study Materials. Download Now! UofP HUM 150 Complete Study Materials. Download Now! Presentation Transcript

    •  Since 2010 I've helped thousands of students do A+ work. I want you to have the best grades, but more importantly I want to help you.
    •  HUM150 / HUM 150 / ENTIRE CLASS/COURSE TUTORIAL INCLUDES EVERYTHING LISTED
    •  Who contributes most to a film’s success? Why? What do you focus on most when watching a film? Why? When deciding to go to a movie, what influences your decision (genre, director, star, and so forth) regarding which movie to choose?
    •  Think of a film in which the main character shows development. Describe the character’s personality and circumstances at the beginning, middle, and end of the film. How did elements such as conflict, dialogue, or appearance demonstrate the development? How did your feelings about the character evolve in relation to these changes? Think of a film in which a character changes little or not at all. How does this lack of development affect your feelings toward the character and plot?
    •  Identify your favorite movie genre, movie, film actor, film actress, movie soundtrack, TV show on movies, movie website, where you find the movie times and why you like them.
    •  What impacts your decision of which movie to see – genre, director, star, etc.? Where do you get your information about a movie to make the decision to see it? How and where do you prefer to watch a film?
    •  HUM 150 Week 1 Summary
    •  Write a 500- to 700-word paper in which you address the following questions. How do you decide which films to watch? In your opinion, what makes a film enjoyable? In your opinion, what makes a film unenjoyable? Format your paper consistent with APA guidelines. Since this is a personal response paper, you may use first person language. Make sure that you are using supporting examples from the film for your thoughts. Do note the point value of this paper.
    •  Lighting can be crucial to film – sometimes to such an extent that lighting can help define the particular film genre. Film Noir, for instance, and if you are not familiar with Film Noir, look it into it and you'll see what I'm getting at. So what similarities and differences would you take into consideration when shooting horror, romantic comedy, detective, and musical comedy genres. How would your lighting choices support film storytelling, including setting tone and mood? Provide examples of specific scenes.
    •  Describe the most memorable costumes and makeup you have seen in film. What effect did this have on characterization and the film as a whole? Is there ever not an effect, intended or otherwise? To what extent is authenticity important? Always? Or are there exceptions, and if so, why so? Explain and provide examples.
    •  Discuss with examples the fundamental elements of setting (including but not limited to location, time, era, weather, and buildings). Sometimes setting is essential to a story, such as in The Perfect Storm, in which the setting is so integral that it could be considered a character unto itself. Are there other instances when setting is not so essential? What other elements of film might offset the impact of when/if setting becomes secondary? How may changing the setting to a different time and place affect a film?
    •  List the various types of sounds you hear during a movie. What purpose does each serve? (TIP... the book describes the Types of Sounds) Provide at least 2 or more examples of effective uses from films you remember. From these, discuss how sound manipulates audience reaction.
    •  Imagine your house or apartment is a set for a movie in which you are starring. What would the set tell the audience about you and your life? Why? What elements would be most revealing? How do moviemakers use sets to reveal character information, and create tone and mood for the story? Recall a scene from a film you have seen recently to illustrate your point.
    •  HUM 150 Week 2 Summary
    •  Watch the movie you selected in Week One. Complete the University of Phoenix Material: Editing, Sound, and Music Worksheet, based on the film. The word count requirement for each section should read 250 words, not 50 words. Make sure that you list the title of the film, the name of its director and the names of its principal actors at the top of your Worksheet before beginning
    •  How would you film your story into a 20-minute segment your friends would sit through? And keep in mind that in addition to entertainment, most dramas are produced to convey a film-maker's point-of-view or messages/lessons considered important. So first, consider the mechanics. What types of lighting, sound, and other technical techniques convey your drama's theme? What framing and camera angles would you use for each scene? Why? How will they convey emotions? How will they contribute to your drama's success? Similarly, what editing techniques would you use, such as transitions in and between scenes, ways to compress time, means to establish locations, and so forth? Why?
    •  Coordinating your responses here with DQ 1, consider the story you wish to tell. Stories require conflict, or at least a lot of tension, in order to generate interest. So, first, what's the conflict in your story and how are you plotting it out? Also, movies, like plays and TV but unlike books, must use what's called the “objective point-of-view” because they cannot show directly what characters are thinking and feeling. They are limited to showing the exterior of characters in ways that reflect what's going on internally. And they do so in compact units called “scenes” made up of action, mannerisms, and dialogue. So who would be your characters? Why? How would you have them act in what sort of scenes? Why? What is your dialogue trying to accomplish? Why? And what would you suggest to others about their plots and story-telling elements?
    •  DQ 3 covers settings. DQ 1 covers mechanics and DQ 2 covers characters and plotting. So it's only natural that to tell your story, you need to provide the fundamental elements of setting (including but not limited to location, time, era, weather, and buildings). Sometimes setting is essential to a story, such as in The Perfect Storm, in which the setting is so integral that it could be considered a character unto itself. And there other instances when setting is not so essential. Once you'd determined the influence setting will have on your story and characters, you can turn to figuring where and why you'd place doors, windows, tables, stolen jewels, corpses, and other props. How would you employ the setting, props, etc. to reveal character information, tone, and mood? Keep in mind the drama dictum that “if you have a rifle hanging over the fireplace in act one, you'd better well have it used by the end of act three.” In other words, everything has a purpose and you need to know what it is and how and why you'll implement it in your film.
    •  Imagine you are a character in a teenage slasher horror movie. What sounds do you hear? What sounds do you not hear, but the audience does? From these, discuss how sound manipulates audience reactions in horror films. Name some other characteristics one finds in all horror movies. How do they contribute to horror?
    •  Imagine you are a character in a comedy. What sounds do you hear? What sounds do you not hear, but the audience does? From these, discuss how sound manipulates audience reaction in comedic films. Name some other characteristics one finds in all comedies. How do they contribute to comedy?
    •  HUM 150 Week 3 Summary
    •  Resources: University of Phoenix Material: Film Matrix; University of Phoenix Material: Comedy and Horror Films List; Week Three Electronic Reserve Readings; and Microsoft® PowerPoint® Tutorial · Select one comedy and one horror movie from the list to watch as a team. · Watch, as a team, the selected comedy and horror films. · Discuss, as a team, both movies. · Complete two matrixes, as a team, one for the comedy and one for the horror film. · Create a 10- to 12-slide Microsoft® PowerPoint® presentation, explaining the team’s findings. Include detailed speaker notes. Address the following: How did the film’s components match with the horror genre? How did the film’s components match with the comedy genre? Was the film you watched typical or atypical for the genre? Why or why not? · Format your presentation consistent with APA guidelines. Review my comments on PowerPoint in the Class Materials Room. · Present your Film Matrix: Comedy and Horror presentation.
    •  Name some characteristics one will find in all documentary films. How do they contribute to the documentary? Can documentaries and their components be measured the same as other film genres, such as Westerns or comedies?
    •  One way of judging films (as well as literature, poetry, other forms of drama, etc.) is through time – specifically, by responding to the four following questions: 1. When was the particular film created and/or produced? It is of an era, after all, and will reflect the era's social morays, cultural quandaries, economic conditions, and so forth. 2. When does the film take place? Very often serious films reflect their era in a more honest and forthright manner by “disguising” their contemporary issues in prior or future times. It can help make the hard stuff easier to swallow. 3. When did you watch it? This, of course, brings up the whole topic of eras again – now vs then. And does when the film is set work better or worse now than when it was originally released? 4. Is the film “timeless”? This is the benchmark by which the great majority of viewers and critics find common ground about the worthiness of a film. Okay, choose one or more movies and respond accordingly.
    •  What about the acting in animated or halfanimated movies? Would you say that some of these movies are harder for (and on) actors – such as Avatar, in which the actors wore suits with electronic gizmos that recorded their movements for the computers to recreate with the Avatar people?
    •  If you created a film from the year you were born or a year of your choice, what tools would you use to place it in the proper context? Refer to the Film in Context chart in the text for guidance. Select a movie you are familiar with from the chart and identify the context.
    •  How has this class changed the way you will watch films? Describe your new approach to movie appreciation.
    •  hum 150 Week 4 Summary
    •  Resources: University of Phoenix Material: Film Matrix; University of Phoenix Material: Romance, Western, and Documentary Film List; Week Four Electronic Reserve Readings; and Microsoft® PowerPoint® Tutorial · Select, as a team, one Western, one romance, and one documentary film from the list to watch. · Watch, as a team, the selected Western, romance, and documentary films. · Discuss the three films. · Complete three matrixes as a team: one for the romance film, one for the Western, and one for the documentary. Review my earlier comments on this assignment in Weeks One and Two.
    •  Imagine you are a character in a comedy. And also a romance. And yet again in a comedyromance. What sounds do you hear? What sounds do you not hear, but the audience does? From these, discuss how sound manipulates audience reaction in comedic, romantic, and comedy-romantic films. Name some other characteristics one finds; how do they contribute?
    •  Now imagine you are a character in a horror movie. Again, what sounds do you hear? And what sounds do you not hear, but the audience does? Similar to Q 1, discuss how sound manipulates audience reactions in horror films. Name some other characteristics one finds in all horror movies. How do they contribute to horror? BUT ADD THIS CONSIDERATION: In some instances, genres overlap each other, as in DQ1's comedy-romances and in horrific movies like Zombieland or Shaun of the Dead. In your opinion, do you think these movies fall into an existing genre, such as horror or comedy? If so, which one do they fall into? Why did you select this genre? If not, how would you define the genre? What would you call it?
    •  Now let's consider (again?) the importance of a film’s context to its overall effect. What is meant by “context”? If a film was watched out of context (however you define it), do you think its meaning would be lost? So, first, select a movie you are familiar with and identify its context. For example, think of a children's or adult movie you saw as a child (something perhaps like The Wizard of Oz) or some inane teenage flick you saw as an adolescent (e.g., Bevis and Butthead or Scary Movie IV or that one about highschool girls making another girl's dating life miserable). What if anything did that movie have to say then, and what if anything does it say now? And what if anything did you and your contemporaries “hear” then, versus what if anything would viewers of that age group hear now? And what tools would you use to (re)place it in the proper context?
    •  When deciding what movie to watch, a typical thing to do is to check the newspaper or Internet for movie reviews. In this assignment, be a movie critic and report your findings to the public. Do not use material you have gleaned from professional or newspaper reviewers. This paper is to be based solely on your own observations and concepts/language that you have absorbed from our text. If you use material from our text, make sure that you quote and cite it correctly.