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UT San Antonio - Building Inter-Collegiate - Open 2011

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    • 1. (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 1
      The University of Texas at San Antonio
      http://entrepreneur.utsa.edu
    • 2. Building Inter-Collegiate Technology Entrepreneurship into the Undergraduate Curriculum at the University of Texas at San Antonio:
      An Historical Perspective in Effective Educational Transformation through the Center for Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship (CITE)
      Anita Leffel and Cory R. A. Hallam
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 2
    • 3. Overview
      Start with the end in mind
      Understand where we were
      Define the process
      Sell success, not promises
      Entrepreneurship as the CONTEXT
      Elements of the Ecosystem
      See what they can do
      What we have learned
      Good science is good questions
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 3
    • 4. Start with the end in mind
      30,000 students and exponential
      growth in science and technology research expenditures we saw a future for:
      Student entrepreneurs
      Launching Technology-based companies
      On-campus incubation
      Stemming from their academic experience
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 4
    • 5. Start with the end in mind
      30,000 students and exponential
      growth in science and technology research expenditures we saw:
      No visible student entrepreneurs
      No Technology-based companies
      No on-campus incubation
      No translation of academic experience into entrepreneurial ventures
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 5
    • 6. Define the Process
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 6
      Education
      Experience
      Resources
      Support
      At the heart of American enterprise is the desire to create. Technological innovation is the foundation for creating new enterprises, and the spirit of entrepreneurship is the catalyst for turning these innovations into reality.
      Through a process of education, experiences, resources, and support, the Center for Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship (CITE) at the University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) is focused on fostering the growth of new technology-based ventures as a catalyst for the regional entrepreneurial ecosystem. The CITE is a joint venture of the colleges of Business and Engineering that combines academic rigor in the fundamentals with contextual applications in entrepreneurship.
      New Ventures
      Students
      Faculty
      Industry
    • 7. Define the Process
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 7
      Historical Education, Cases, and Speakers
      Skills Education and Experiences
      Incubation and Mentoring
      Contextual Factors
      Perceived Support
      Perceived Barriers
      KEY
      Shapero’s SEE
      Luthje and Franke
      Collegiate Pedagogy
      Perceived Desirability
      Expected Outcomes
      Propensity to Act
      Personality Traits
      Entrepreneurial Intentions
      Perceived Feasibility
      Perceived Self-Efficacy
      UTSA Accelerating Collegiate Entrepreneurship (ACE) Model: Understanding where we influence entrepreneurial intent from a collegiate perspective.
      Market Factors & Conditions
    • 8. Sell success, not promises
      As a new venture in itself, the CITE had to create examples for the rest of the university to see what could be done
      Provide baby-steps towards the end goal we had in mind through individual experiments
      Teaming classes
      with companies
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 8
    • 9. Sell success, not promises
      As a new venture in itself, the CITE had to create examples for the rest of the university to see what could be done
      Provide baby-steps towards the end goal we had in mind through individual experiments
      1 day boot camp for
      new technology
      entrepreneurs
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 9
    • 10. Sell success, not promises
      As a new venture in itself, the CITE had to create examples for the rest of the university to see what could be done
      Provide baby-steps towards the end goal we had in mind through individual experiments
      Regional guest speakers
      as examples for
      students
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 10
    • 11. Sell success, not promises
      As a new venture in itself, the CITE had to create examples for the rest of the university to see what could be done
      Provide baby-steps towards the end goal we had in mind through individual experiments
      An intercollegiate tech start-up
      competition to translate technologies
      into ventures
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 11
    • 12. Entrepreneurship as the CONTEXT
      Fundamentally we did not set out to create a new academic program in the traditional sense of a degree, we set out to infuse technology entrepreneurship as a context for applying existing disciplinary training
      We teamed the BBA in small business and entrepreneurship with engineering.
      BBA does business plan
      Engineering builds prototype
      NCIIA initially funded prototype budget (thank you!)
      Team pitches to investors (extracurricular)
      Hopefully all hell does not break loose!
      Maybe a company or two starts
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 12
    • 13. Elements of the Ecosystem
      Since inception in 2006 we have grown the ecosystem to include
      Boot Camp (600+ trained)
      $100K Competition (350 participants, 48 companies)
      Mentor Network (Harvard Business club, 30 mentors)
      Prototype Fund (over $50K)
      Roadrunner Incubator (50+ companies)
      CEO student organization ( new members a year)
      Annual CEO fair (15+ student owned companies a year)
      Advisory board to help build CITE
      Restructured curriculum for BBA and Engineering (200+ in BBA)
      Launch of Graduate certificate in Technology Entrepreneurship and Management
      University policy to protect student IP under same terms as faculty
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 13
    • 14. See what they can do
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 14
    • 15. IceGuard Didn’t Win…but
      GCEC 2009
      Slide 15
      Through the UTSA Center for Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship (CITE), seniors in the Colleges of Business and Engineering teamed their skills to solve a major roof and gutter problem for a national builder – ice build up. Combining the technology development and prototyping skills of the engineers with the business acumen of the entrepreneurship students, the final product (IceGuard © 2009) was presented at the UTSA New Technology Venture Start Up Competition in 2009. Beldon Roofing, a $50M+/year Texas-based company with national sales is licensing the technology and sponsoring research to further develop the product at UTSA with the 12 month goal of commercial launch as a $5M-$10M per year product line. This is the first student invention to be licensed from UTSA.
      “I haven’t seen my dad this excited about a product in 10 years” –Brad Beldon, CEO
    • 16. What we have learned
      Administrative support is essential
      This process costs $, and it is hard to find
      Exceptionally dedicated faculty
      Traditionalists just don’t get it, they aren’t entrepreneurs
      Willingness to help students learn outside of their comfort zone
      Do not underestimate the capability of the students, but they do need to be pushed
      Unlock their inner entrepreneur
      This is our job, help them see their potential to self select early in life
      Bootstrap experiments, fund successes
      It is easy to define the ecosystem from the ground up
      It is hard to fund the ecosystem from the ground up
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
      Slide 16
    • 17. 1st Place
      Invictus
      Invictus offers a product that significantly reduces the problem of having a premature child's head deform under its own weight, due to the underdeveloped cranial plates. The solution we have provided, which meets the guidelines for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) prevention, is a bonnet which distributes the pressure around the head eliminating points of high pressure, thus reducing the tendency for the child's head to deform under its own weight.
      Israel Gonzalez, Daniel Mendez
      (not present, Nicholas Louis Flores)
      Contact: ikh966@my.utsa.edu (832-257-3440
      Slide 17
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 18. 2nd Place
      2P3 Designs
      The 2P3 system is a device that is placed within the forearm of prosthetic arms. This device houses a pulley system that will allow the user to work with a third of the required force necessary for routine work.
      William Bonner, Arturo Corrales, Gregory Flint, Joshua D. Hanna, Celina V. Lozano, Alisha Patel (Not present Ismael Seanez)
      Contact: Celina Lozano: celinalozano26@yahoo.com
      Slide 18
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 19. Impulse Cycles
      2nd Place
      Impulse Cycles fabricates easy to install lithium ion battery power kits to replace gas engine components in most models of motorcycles 10 years and older. This allows our customers to convert their older, gas powered motorcycle into a safer, cleaner, more economical, and more reliable means of transportation or recreation.
      Brady, Chad Kremmer, Cameron Mehlenbacher, Lindsay Shelton, Mark Pesek(Not Present Braden Joseph Montalvo, Eric Allan Hulse)
      Contact: Chad Kremmer: ckremmer@me.com
      Slide 19
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 20. 3rd Place
      PREE, LLC. is an early start up venture offering a protective iPhone case that is equipped with the technology to harness and convert energy from wireless local area networks (WLAN), as well as solar energy to create a sustainable charge for the iPhone.
      Joshua Sellers, Amanda Dekay , Nicholas Trujillo, Matthew Ellison, Jason Mero, Matthew N. Jackson
      Contact: Amanda Dekay: fvy094@my.utsa.edu
      Slide 20
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 21. United Sources of Brilliance
      United Sources of Brilliance’s Auto-Remind flash drive reminds you that it has been left behind by beeping after the cap has been displaced from the flash drive body by more than five feet. By helping you remember where it is, the Auto Remind Flash Drive ensures you will no longer have to replace it or worry about losing personal information anymore.
      Ernest J. Tolliver, Hector I. Silva, Mikah Wilhite, Christopher Abowd, Matthew Ford , Gustavo Diaz, Gabriel Maldonado
      Contact: Mikahsw@yahoo.com
      Slide 21
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 22. JERYCHO PRODUCTS
      Are you tired of hearing ‘Are we there yet?’ Our product is a backseat tray that customers can use for a multitude of reasons including writing, eating, using a portable electronic device, or any other need for a flat surface.
      Rachel M Joes, Cody T Odell, Luis Tienda, Anish Prasla, Fred Gonzales
      Slide 22
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 23. Drinks Unlimited offers customers the ability to have an exact amount of their favorite beverages dispensed into their personal container. Our automatic dispensing device enables the user to place almost any size container into the machine and pay for only the amount of liquid that they want.
      Carlisha R. Clark, Brendan Baker, Towne Besel, Sean Tovar, Frederick Weissbach, Evan J. Wilkerson
      Contact: Towne Besel: towne.besel@hotmail.com
      Slide 23
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 24. Top Infrared Sensors
      Rails will have metal top for touch sensor
      Bottom Pressure Mats
      B.E.E.P.S
      B.E.E.P.S. will be able to detect the presence of a child in a crib, and once the child is detected it will employ two methods of escape prevention. The first will be through a touch sensor, the touch sensor will trigger an alert when the child is standing up. The second is a pressure sensor, if any weight is displaced from the crib it will immediately respond with an alarm.
      Paul E Carroll, Aaryn Cathey, Joseph Cooper, Zaida Mauricio, Desmond W. Miles, Elizabeth Serpas, Christopher Zavala.
      Contact: aaryn.cathey@gmail.com
      Slide 24
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 25. RTAD- Real Time Auto Data
      Real Time Auto Data offers a wireless engine management system engineered for auto racing enthusiasts in the United States. While there are currently multiple businesses in the Engine Control Units available, no available ECU offers an engine management system that can send auto data wirelessly or make changes while the vehicle is in motion.
      Joshua J. Junqueria, Rachel Anderson, Wesley Moncivais, Armando Noyola, Daniel J. Seiler, (Not Present Eric Andrew Gonzales)
      Contact: RealTimeAutoData@gmail.com
      Slide 25
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 26. DC INNOVATIONS
      “Saving You Green...By Going Green”
      Currently, electrical systems waste 6-10% of useful energy in the conversion of direct current (DC) to alternate current (AC). Our product eliminates that conversion by using the DC power produced from solar panels directly, making the use of energy efficient and less expensive.
      Elise Crespo, Jeremy J. Halbardier, Crystal Harden, Hector A. Ramirez, Olakunle Sosanya, Gerardo Trevino (not present Javier Enrique Guerrero)
      contact: GERARDO TREVINO: gtrevino80@gmail.com
      Slide 26
      (c) Copyright 2011 A. Leffel, C. Hallam
    • 27. Questions and Comments
      Dr. Anita Leffel
      (210) 458-2505
      Anita.leffel@utsa.edu
      http://entrepreneur.utsa.edu
      CITE Update April 2009
      Slide 27

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