• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
SV-11 Industry Partnershps Cascade Design
 

SV-11 Industry Partnershps Cascade Design

on

  • 904 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
904
Views on SlideShare
771
Embed Views
133

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0

5 Embeds 133

http://nciia.org 126
http://www.nciia.com 3
http://dev.nciia.org 2
url_unknown 1
http://beta.gigablast.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • at
  • at
  • Water is delivered in very different ways
  • Based on cost data from Kenya/Ghana (4 sample points of salt, 1 sample point of battery charge)
  • What makes a good MFI product? Would this be high risk or low risk? During phase 2 we need to validate and refine these assumptions (# of customers and demand).assumptions: Cost of salt per kg$0.27; Salt used per batch (500mL) of BRINE solution =(kg)0.075;Cost of salt per batch (500mL) of BRINE solution=$0.00027;1 batch (500mL) of BRINE treats 1999.2 Litres of water;Cost per battery recharge$1.33; Battery recharge allows treatment of 32,000 Litres; Exchange Rate (KES/USD)75; Average daily demand for water (in litres)= 2,000; Operating days per month=26.1; # Runs of chlorinator per month= 217.3
  • Based on cost data from Kenya/Ghana (4 sample points of salt, 1 sample point of battery charge)
  • What makes a good MFI product? Would this be high risk or low risk? During phase 2 we need to validate and refine these assumptions (# of customers and demand).assumptions: Cost of salt per kg$0.27; Salt used per batch (500mL) of BRINE solution =(kg)0.075;Cost of salt per batch (500mL) of BRINE solution=$0.00027;1 batch (500mL) of BRINE treats 1999.2 Litres of water;Cost per battery recharge$1.33; Battery recharge allows treatment of 32,000 Litres; Exchange Rate (KES/USD)75; Average daily demand for water (in litres)= 2,000; Operating days per month=26.1; # Runs of chlorinator per month= 217.3

SV-11 Industry Partnershps Cascade Design SV-11 Industry Partnershps Cascade Design Presentation Transcript

  • Industry Partnerships
    Cascade Designs Inc.
    Day One Response, Inc.
    Sustainable Vision Workshop
    3/22/2011
    • Background: Cascade Designs Inc. (CDI)
    • Background: Day One Response
    • Case Study: SE200 Electrochlorinator
    • Partnering Strategies
    • Case Study: Day One Waterbag
    • Partner Selection Criteria and Pitfalls
    • Conclusions
    Agenda
  • Under the brand names Mountain Safety Research (MSR), Platypus, and Therm-A-Rest we are recognized as the technical and market leader in hydration systems, hand-held water purifiers, lightweight camp stoves, cookware, sleep pads, and snowshoes.
    MSR & SweetWaterPurifiers
    MSR Tents
    MSR Stoves
    Denali Snowshoes
    Therm-A-Rest Sleep Pads
    Platypus Hydration Systems
  • Cascade Designs Inc. (CDI)
    Core Strengths
    Over 40 years of experience in developing innovative commercial and military products.
    • Manufacturing expertise in a wide range of disciplines and technologies – metal forming and fabrication, sewing, RF welding, thermoforming, and final assembly. In-house microbiology lab.
    • Cascade Designs has over 5,000 Outdoor retail accounts in the U.S. and sales agents in over 40 countries around the world.
    • Existing supplier of the Army and Marine Corps’ standard-issue sleep pad, water purifier, camp stove, snowshoes, and dry bags.
  • Background
    • Cascade Designs’ core strength is bringing innovative new technologies to market. [i.e. – “Crossing the Valley of Death”].
    • On the commercial side of our business, market pressures require us to have something new at the trade show every year.
    • Government funded development efforts enable us to “swing for the fences”, and partner with universities and technology firms to research cutting-edge technologies.
    $
    $
    Valley of Death
    Product Revenue
    DoD Funding
  • Day One Response
    Background
    “Providing clean drinking water is our #1 challenge in disaster zones.” -Steve Rieve, American Red Cross
    Cal Poly State University & DayOne Response, Inc.
  • The DayOneWaterbag™
    All essential functions in one unit:
    Easy Collection
    Under difficult conditions
    Transport
    Backpack straps are comfortable
    Treatment
    Dirt, Cysts, viruses, bacteria removed
    Storage and Dispensing
    closure prevents re-contamination
  • Strategic Partnerships
    • Cal Poly State University R&D (2007-present)
    • DayOne Response, Inc. founded April 2010 with guidance from Innovation Quest and NCIIA
    • Partnership with Cascade Designs, Inc. and US Naval Facilities Engineering Command
    • Working with P&G’s Children’s Safe Drinking Water program to expand the use of PUR in disasters and other development settings.
    • Continued partnership with California Polytechnic University on R&D for current and future projects
  • Case Study: Electrochlorinators
  • CDI Water Purification Technologies Map
    Access to cutting-edge technologies has given CDI the opportunity to evaluate the full spectrum of water purification technologies for use in the Base of the Pyramid markets.
    Applied Energy
    Physical Separation
    Chemical Treatment
    MIOX
    PATH
    Particle Filtration (Sieves)
    Oxidant Dosing
    Sefar
    MIOX
    Sweetwater
    Electro-Chlorination
    Lemelson
    Quartek
    Laird- Norton
    Metal Ion Treatment
    Hollow Fiber
    MSR
    One Drop
    Gates
    Apaclara
    PATH
    Ceramic Candle Filters
    Forward Osmosis
    Capacitive De-ionization
    TDA
    Research
    Oasys
    MSR
    HTI
    MM Media
    Resintech
    Solar Radiation
    Ion Exchange
    Adsorption
    Puralytics
    Purolite
    Calgon
    ORICA
    Biomin
    Cal Poly University
    Halogenated Resin
    Precipitant Dosing
    Halosource
    Light Year
  • Background
    Water Purification Markets
    Outdoor
    • CDI has over a 35% share of the outdoor water purification market.
    Military
    • CDI is the supplier of the Marine Corps’ standard-issue Individual Water Purifier System.
    • CDI has funded R&D efforts to develop next generation on-the-move water purification systems for the Army, Marine Corps, and Special Forces.
    Developing World
    • CDI is providing lab and technical support on PATH’s Safe Water effort.
    • Funded development projects include the SE200 Electrochlorinator (Africa) and Household Water Treatment System (India).
  • Background
    CDI History in Emerging Markets
    2004 Tsunami: Lessons Learned
    • Philanthropy wasn’t enough.
    • Products need to be designed for the end user.
    • Logistics are critical.
    • Decision to apply CDI’s resources toward developing innovative technical solutions to provide access to safe water.
  • Background
    CDI Developing World Efforts
    • Waterborne diseases are a major global health problem.
    • Seattle is a center for global health initiatives (Gates Foundation, PATH, World Vision, etc.).
    • DoD-funded efforts have given CDI access to cutting-edge water purification technologies.
    • CDI is trying to determine if we can contribute in developing world markets. [Can we leverage the strengths that made us a leader in Outdoor and Military water purification?].
  • Technology
    Electrochlorinator uses electricity to convert salt into a powerful disinfectant.
    • Early development work funded by DARPA.
    • MSR MIOX Purifier launched to the outdoor market in November 2003. Became the #1 selling Purifier in its first year on the market.
    • Support from PATH and the Lemelson Foundation enabled CDI to adapt the electrochlorinator technology for developing world applications.
  • SE200 Electrochlorinator
    Advantages
    • Supply chain, storage, and transportation benefits.
    • The capital and operating costs are much lower than other small community water purification options.
    • Disinfectant is created fresh for each use. [No shelf life issues].
    • “Smart circuit” technology minimizes the potential for operator error.
  • Connections
    Cal Poly Electrochlorinator Project
    • The team at the Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center (NFESC) has helped CDI establish relationships with a wide range of government and industry partners.
    • Bill Varnava, the project officer on several of CDI’s military funded R&D efforts, is a Cal Poly alumni, and recommended that CDI consider working with the University on a Senior Project.
    Naval Base Ventura County (Port Hueneme, CA)
    The Seawater Desalination Test Facility (SDTF) provides research, development, test and evaluation, and training support for water purification equipment.
  • Senior Design Project
    Cal Poly Electrochlorinator
  • Benefits
    Students
    • Gained experience in designing an innovative water purification product.
    Cal Poly
    • Developed relationships with industry and government contacts.
    Cascade Designs
    • Interaction with students forced the CDI design team to reflect on the use modes and design parameters.
    • Students explored alternative design concepts and technical approaches.
    • Student team investigated innovative manufacturing processes.
    • Success on the Waterbag and Electrochlorinator projects have enabled CDI to expand our involvement with Universities.
  • Success Factors
    Cal Poly Electrochlorinator Project
    • Project was relevant within Cascade Designs. [Our design effort with PATH was done concurrently].
    • Strong project manager at Cascade Designs. [Design lead worked with the student team]. Willingness to invest time and resources to support the student effort.
    • Cal Poly students were smart and motivated to succeed.
    • Professor McFarland provided solid coaching. [Emphasis on functionality and manufacturability].
  • Seed Money
    Lemelson SE200 Grant
    What did the Lemelson Foundation grant enable the PATH/CDI team to accomplish?
    • Adapt the MIOX electrochlorinator technology for humanitarian and disaster relief applications.
    • Study the requirements for rural small-community water purification systems. Gather field data.
    • Evaluate sustainability (micro-finance water kiosk entrepreneur economic model).
    • Leverage existing government funding. [Evaluate new materials, power supply options, etc.].
    • Position the CDI/PATH/Day One team to participate in new humanitarian and disaster relief efforts. [Operation Crimson Viper].
    • Help CDI explore partnership opportunities with Universities. [Cal Poly, UC Berkeley, UW, etc.]
  • Partnering
  • 5% Technology - 95% All the other stuff
    Business models
    Cultural factors
    User experience
    Financing
    Ease-of-use
    Distribution
    Supply chain
    Maintenance
    Cost
  • Technology Transition
    Engineering
    Marketing
    Sales
    Admin.
    Operations
    Quality
  • Technology Scale-Up
    Cascade Designs Inc.
  • Case Study: DayOne Waterbag, Scaling and Partnerships
    Iterations
    (2007-2010)
    Product
    (2011)
    Concept
    (2007)
  • Waterbag 2007-2009
    Nicaragua 2009
  • Waterbag 2010-2011
    Crimson Viper, Thailand, July 2010
  • Waterbag 2010-2011
    Haiti, March 2011
  • Waterbag Next Steps…
  • Partnering
    Selection Criteria
    What factors does Cascade Designs consider when evaluating potential industry or University partners?
    Technical Advantage – Does the product concept have a competitive advantage over the existing COTS products.
    Passion – Does this team have the vision, talent and commitment to get the job done?
    Business Compatibility – Are the business interests aligned?
    Synergy – Does this opportunity fit in with other existing development projects or strategic objectives?
    Distribution Fit – Can we sell the products resulting from this effort into one of our existing markets?
    Manufacturing Fit – Can we produce the future products with our existing manufacturing capabilities?
    I.P. Protection – Is defensible I.P. protection available?
    Risk – What are the potential risks vs. rewards?
    Operation Crimson Viper Field Testing
  • Pitfalls
    Inventors & Start-ups
    What are some of the factors that often cause inventors and start-up companies to struggle?
    • Fail to partner with other organizations. [Try to do it all themselves].
    • Lack a clear understanding of the target markets and competitive landscape.
    • Unrealistic expectations regarding the value of their idea. [Std. royalty Outdoor market: 2-5% net profits].
    • Unable to identify a “Champion” within their key distribution channels. [Believe that a better mousetrap just sells.].
    • Funding. [Dilution of ownership, cash flow].
  • Thanks
  • Next Steps
    • Need to gain a better understanding of the HADR user needs and product requirements.
    • Need to identify which DoD/government agencies are relevant to our cause. [“Map the foodchain”].
    • Set up meetings with contacts in key HADR agencies. Brief them on our active and planned development projects. [“Connect the dots”].
    • Find the best ways to channel our strong corporate and political support.
    • Find new ways to get our “80% solution” product concepts out in the field for market testing.
  • ?
    Background
    What all the Lemeslon Funding allowed us to do
  • Economics of the SE200
    • Resupply items:
    • 30 kg salt per 40,000 liters of water ($4)
    • charge 12V car battery each 40,000 liters ($1.30 at a charging station1)
    • Raw water
    • Capital costs:
    • SE200 ($100 wholesale cost target)
    • 12V 80 Amp-hour battery ($100)
    • Total Capital Costs: $200
    • Operational cost per 1000 liters: $0.13
    1 Electricity battery charging cost is based on charging station price. It would be less if the operator has access to electricity and does not need to go to a charging station.
  • Development Business Model (Aquaya)
  • Comparison of oxidants (operational costs)
  • Field Trials
    December, 2008: Kenya
    Kenya, installation of a 20 L electrochlorinator.
    Collect initial operator/training feedback
    June, 2009:Kenya
    Kenya, revisit 20L installation
    Hold focus groups on 200L alpha prototype
    Collect qualitative feedback
    Spring/Summer, 2010: Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe
    Set up first SE200 water kiosks
    Carry out quantitative microbial studies in households
    Collect operator and customer feedback
    Develop preliminary financial model
    July, 2010: Disaster Response Exercise in Thailand
    Simulated disaster scenario
    Train Thai Marines to operate the SE200
    Compare to 5 other disaster relief water technologies
  • Partnership Opportunities
    • Strategic alliances are favored by DoD R&D funding patrons (ONR, DARPA, etc.). [CDI hunts most effectively in packs].
    • CDI and PARC have complimentary core strengths.
    • CDI’s in-house manufacturing engineering, prototyping and LRIP production capability can compliment PARC technology transition efforts.
    • CDI can serve as a Prime contractor on collaborative development efforts (SBIRs, etc.).
    • CDI has the brand recognition, marketing expertise, and distribution network to bring PARC technologies to the Outdoor and military markets.
  • Economics of the SE200
    • Resupply items:
    • 30 kg salt per 40,000 liters of water ($4)
    • charge 12V car battery each 40,000 liters ($1.30 at a charging station1)
    • Raw water
    • Capital costs:
    • SE200 ($100 wholesale cost target)
    • 12V 80 Amp-hour battery ($100)
    • Total Capital Costs: $200
    • Operational cost per 1000 liters: $0.13
    1 Electricity battery charging cost is based on charging station price. It would be less if the operator has access to electricity and does not need to go to a charging station.
  • Development Business Model (Aquaya)
  • Comparison of oxidants (operational costs)
  • Field Trials
    December, 2008: Kenya
    Kenya, installation of a 20 L electrochlorinator.
    Collect initial operator/training feedback
    June, 2009:Kenya
    Kenya, revisit 20L installation
    Hold focus groups on 200L alpha prototype
    Collect qualitative feedback
    Spring/Summer, 2010: Ghana, Kenya, Zimbabwe
    Set up first SE200 water kiosks
    Carry out quantitative microbial studies in households
    Collect operator and customer feedback
    Develop preliminary financial model
    July, 2010: Disaster Response Exercise in Thailand
    Simulated disaster scenario
    Train Thai Marines to operate the SE200
    Compare to 5 other disaster relief water technologies