Open 2013: Innovation Commercialization and Licensing

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Open 2013: Innovation Commercialization and Licensing

  1. 1. Innovation Commercializationand Licensing in Entrepreneurial Business Education March 23, 2013 NCIIA 17th Annual Conference Darian Unger Associate Professor Howard University School of Business dwunger@howard.edu 202- 806-1656
  2. 2. But after presentations like “Can You Milk a Rhino?”“Spreading the Fire,” and “Purple Dragon”….let’s try:
  3. 3. But after presentations like “Can You Milk a Rhino?”“Spreading the Fire,” and “Purple Dragon”….let’s try: Innovation Commercialization: Unicorns in flames!
  4. 4. Innovation Commercializationand Licensing in Entrepreneurial Business Education March 23, 2013 NCIIA 17th Annual Conference Darian Unger Associate Professor Howard University School of Business dwunger@howard.edu 202- 806-1656
  5. 5. Research Topic• Purpose • To test the utility of incorporating university innovation commercialization projects into graduate coursework• Methodology • Application of innovation lessons to university-owned intellectual property • Tracking commercialization results • Feedback from inventors, professors, and innovation-oriented MBA students
  6. 6. Research Topic• Literature Review • Tech transfer efforts enhanced by key variables (Friedman and Silberman, 2003) • Location, compensation, tech transfer experience • Cultural barriers between universities and firms (Siegel, et. al., 2003) • Industrial responsiveness to university innovations (Breznitz, 2011)
  7. 7. Research Drivers• Wealth of university inventions and intellectual property• Lack of a Technology Licensing Office (TLO) or Technology Transfer Office (TTO)
  8. 8. Research Drivers• Meanwhile, we’ve got classes of students studying innovation and entrepreneurship • Seeking actual examples and case studies
  9. 9. Key Course Skills:Commercializing Innovation• Creating value through innovation• Technology and market S-curves• Delivering value through new product design and development• Appropriating value through • Patents • Standards and dominant design • Time to market • Licensing
  10. 10. Application• Work applied with graduate students from a mid-size (5,000-10,000 students) university• Students were in-person students rather than EMBA students• Students self-selected from a menu of university-owned intellectual property • Patents already applied for or granted
  11. 11. Results and discussion• Each class resulted in multiple commercialization plans • Classes were not identical in size • Groups of two students per invention
  12. 12. Results and discussion• Each class resulted in multiple commercialization plans • Classes were not identical in size • Groups of two students per invention
  13. 13. Results and discussionConsider both • Academic (student and pedagogical) outcomes • Institutional (commercialization) outcomesof student teamwork dedicatedperforming tasks normally performed byTTOs/TLOs
  14. 14. Results and discussion• Student and pedagogical results included assessments of • Business planning • Market surveys • Prototyping • Patent value assessments• Practical project grade variance was significantly greater than conceptual exam variance, and served to better distinguish
  15. 15. Results and discussion• Innovation commercialization results • Student work had created value • Reduced administrative workload • Improved expected time to market in 40% of cases, as evaluated by technology transfer contract staff • Some groups recommended patent exploitation while others advocate time to market as more important
  16. 16. Guarded Observations• Future research will measure the efficacy of the revised teaching methods • Requires additional years and greater sample sizes • Still useful as a baseline• Common metrics also occur on time scales much longer than the courses themselves • Number of patents • Level of licensing revenue
  17. 17. Final thoughts• Demonstrates that introduction of these projects can spur a dual benefit: • Educating students with practical examples • Aiding the commercialization of commercialization of university-associated IP• Prospect of symbiosis between innovation-oriented educational programs and university technology transfer and licensing efforts
  18. 18. Questions?

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