Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Developing Entrepreneurship Curricula for Sustainable Development
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Developing Entrepreneurship Curricula for Sustainable Development

395

Published on

Interest in technology entrepreneurship aimed at solving the most intractable of global problems in the developing world is at an all-time high. A vast number of education programs, especially in …

Interest in technology entrepreneurship aimed at solving the most intractable of global problems in the developing world is at an all-time high. A vast number of education programs, especially in engineering- and design-related degree programs, focus on developing appropriate technology solutions to Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP) challenges in sectors such as food, water, energy, health, education and global connectivity. For many years, funding organizations have underwritten such efforts, only to see successful technologies that ultimately failed in the adoption cycle. The global community has largely come to the conclusion that technologies often fail because of they were never turned into sustainable enterprises. The authors have significant experience creating ventures in a developing world context (Africa, Mexico, American Indian, etc.) and in developing for-credit and non-credit technology entrepreneurship curricula for sustainable development. This session will discuss their experiences and offer suggestions for implementing successful ventures and curricula.

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
395
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Building Entrepreneurial Curricula for Sustainable Development by Dan O’Neill NCIIA Conference 2010 Thursday, March 25, 2010 © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr 1
  • 2. The Global Brand of Sustainability? © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr 2
  • 3. Props to Some Centers of Excellence Humanitarian Engineering and Social Entrepreneurship © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 3
  • 4. ASU Integrated Innovation Model Research & Technology Dev Challenges/Opportunities Market Pull Licensing Pathway Innovation Pipeline Venture Pathway Technology Push Innovation Stack Education and Mentoring (Capstone Courses) Industry Collaboration Technology Roadmapping Venture Acceleration Intellectual Property Management © Copyright 2010 Arizona State University
  • 5. © Copyright 2010 Arizona State University 5
  • 6. GlobalResolve: The ASU Center for Global Innovation ASU “In Country” ASU Global SkySong Resolve University Accelerator Other Research Education Venture Products 20:1 Accelera- tion •Conferences •BOP •ENG Cap •Journals Specific •GIE •Mentors •Exec Ed •Village •Edson Energy •CIC Value Net •Etc. (Ventures) © Copyright 2010 Arizona State University 6
  • 7. Global Impact Entrepreneurship Course • 3 Courses, Capstone • Six Faculty • 2 Campuses • 4+ Majors • Six Teams • 2 Collaborators KNUST (Ghana) TERI (India) • Next Year ITESM (Mexico) Others © Copyright 2010 Arizona State University 7
  • 8. © Copyright 2009 Acara Institute 8
  • 9. When Doing BOP Entrepreneurship • Consider – The Differences – Purpose – Focus – Objectives – Transdisciplinarity – Global Collaboration – Methodology & Method – Curricula Implications – World View © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr 9
  • 10. The Differences Two Worlds Sustainability Sustainable Development North White Rich South Population Slowing Non-white Hi-Tech Poor Hi-Potential SU Population Growing Venture Capital Appropriate Technology “Green” & QOL SME/SGB Micro Lending & Impact Investing Millennium Development Goals “Top of the Pyramid” “Bottom of the Pyramid” • 90% of design resources • 2B < $2 / day • 1B lack water • 500MM 1-acre farmers © Copyright 2007-2009, Arizona State University 10
  • 11. Millennium Development Goals http://www.unmillenniumproject.org/goals/index.htm Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme Hunger & Poverty Goal 2: Achieve Universal Primary Education Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality & Empower Women Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other Diseases Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/ © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 11
  • 12. Social Entrepreneurship Source: Kramer, Mark (2005) Measuring Innovation: Evaluation in the Field of Social Entrepreneurship, Prepared for the Skoll Foundation by the Foundation Strategy, April 2005. © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 12
  • 13. BOP I+E A social-justice movement that links the rich world and the poor, Oxford to a village in Rwanda, the movement that links concern for the earth with respectful solidarity towards its poorest inhabitants, is our last great hope for a world marked by less suffering and violence and premature death. It’s our last great hope for the generations to come, and for our own children, privileged though they may be. Source: Farmer, Paul (2009) Three Stories, Three Paradigms, and a Critique of Social Entrepreneurship, Innovations: Special Edition for the Skoll World Forum, 19-28. © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 13
  • 14. The Innovator’s Dilemma Source: Hart, Stuart L., Christensen, Clayton, M. (2002) The Great Leap: Driving Innovation From the Base of the Pyramid, MIT Sloan Management Review, Vol. 44, No. 1, pp. 51-56, Fall 2002. © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 14
  • 15. Foundational Thinkers/Practitioners 2005 2007 2008 © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 15
  • 16. Plethora of Reports, Guides & Other Works © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 16
  • 17. Purpose, Objectives, Focus • Purpose: – Research, Education, Service, Innovation, AOTA? • Objectives – Aware Students, Innovations, Ventures? • Focus – Application, Geography, Collaborators? • Transdisciplinarity & Global Collaboration – Which Disciplines, Which Partners? – ***THE STATE OF THE ART*** © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. 17
  • 18. © Copyright 2009 Bradley Rogers 18
  • 19. Curricula Implications Business Model Entrepreneurship Practice Business Model Entrepreneurship Practice Topic Topic Context Sustainability and Sustainable Development Competition and Dimensional “Blue Ocean” Thinking at the BOP Socio-ecological context Competitive Best Available Charitable Option Cultural context Advantage Impact definition, triple bottom line thinking Holistic value proposition Operations, Global manufacturing vs. appropriate technology Sustainability indicators Alliances and Detailed discussion of business type Monitoring and evaluation Management Micro-franchising First visit preparation Micro-financing plan Rapid village appraisal and other analysis tools The role of Governments and NGO’s Strategy Common challenges and mistakes Financials and Non-profit and hybrid financial statements Introduction to social business, social Investment More detailed review of impact investing entrepreneurship Packaging Ying-Yang investment deals Business type overview: profit, non-profit, hybrid How to pitch to an Impact Investor Introduction to successful business models Introduction to Impact Investing Monitoring and Appropriate M&E Evaluation Logic model Research and IP rules in the Sustainable Development context Development Extreme affordability and other major drivers Product/service co-evolution The Design Revolution IT in the Sustainable Development context Marketing and Detailed discussion of emerging business models It’s the same. Sales Value Network assembly Local champions But different. Micro-franchising Socio-cultural effective marketing © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 19
  • 20. World View: The Ethno-Metaphysics of Sustainability Entrepreneurship • AKA: Embrace your inner philosopher and anthropologist!!! 2005 2007 2008 © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. 20
  • 21. Prahalad’s 12 Keys to BOP Innovation “…Why can’t we mobilize the investment capacity of large firms with the knowledge and commitment of NGOs and the communities that need help?...” C.K. Prahald Source: Prahalad, C.K. (2005). The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid: Eradicating Poverty through Profits. Philadelphia: Wharton School Publishing. 1. Price Performance 2. Hybrids 3. Scale of Operations 4. Sustainable Development: Eco-Friendly 5. Identifying Functionality: Different? 6. Process Innovation 7. Deskilling of Work 8. Education of Customers 9. Designing for Hostile Infrastructure 10. Interfaces 11. Distribution: Accessing the Customer 12. Challenge Conventional Wisdom in Delivery © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 21
  • 22. Polak on Value Proposition • “The experience of IDE and other organizations, such as KickStart, indicates that there are many products capable of earning a net return of 300% per year or more on the investment made to buy them by extremely poor customers.” Source: Polak, Paul (2008) Out of Poverty: What Works When Traditional Approaches Fail. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler Publishers. © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 22
  • 23. Yunus “To make the structure of capitalism complete, we need to introduce another kind of business-one that recognizes the multidimensional nature of human beings. If we describe our existing companies as profit-maximizing businesses (PMBs), the new kind of business might be called social business. Entrepreneurs will set up social businesses not to achieve limited personal gain but to pursue specific social goals.” Source: Yunus, Muhammad (2007) Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism. New York: Public Affairs. © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 23
  • 24. Ethno-Metaphysical Positioning Impact First Individualist Collectivist Return First © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr. and the National Inventors and Investors Alliance 24
  • 25. Case Study: Light for Africa SociaLite © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr 25
  • 26. The Global Brand of Sustainability? © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr 26
  • 27. The Global Brand of Sustainability? OR? © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr 27
  • 28. Thank You!! Dan O’Neill Director Entrepreneurship & Research Initiatives ASU SkySong dan.oneill@asu.edu © Copyright 2009 Gerald D. O’Neill, Jr 28

×